Internetworking with TCP/IP - Karpagam University

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Oct 26, 2013 (4 years and 13 days ago)

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Master of Science, Computer Science, 20
11
, Karpagam University
,

Coimbatore
-
641021, India

#
1


Semester
-
I


11CSP101





J2EE






5H
-
5C

Instruction Hours / week:

L: 5 T: 0 P: 0 Marks:

Internal:
40

External:
60

Total
:
100



End Semester Exam:
3

Hours


Prerequis
ite:

Prerequisite course work is required; students are expected to have a
fundamental understanding of basic Programming and Java Programming skills


Course Objective:
This is designed



To rapidly learn Java web programming with J2EE.




understand object
-
o
riented programming with J2EE and learn how to write
increasingly sophisticated J2EE programs



To get started fast in J2EE programming
.



Learning Outcomes:
A student who successfully completes this course should, at a
minimum, be able to:



Understand J2EE a
s an architecture and platform for building and deploying web
-
based, n
-
tier, transactional, component
-
based enterprise applications



Understand the fundamental concepts of XML and related technologies



Acquire knowledge on how XML is currently being used i
n various application
areas



Know how to parse and transform XML documents via tools and through
programming APIs



Understand the EJB architecture and have a good grasp on when to use and how
to use various EJB bean types and acquire relevant Java programm
ing experience


UNIT
-
I

J2EE Overview:

Beginning of Java


Java Byte code


Advantages of Java

J2EE and
J2SE. J2EE Multi Tier Architecture


Distributive Systems


The Tier


Multi Tier
Architecture


Client Tier, Web Tier, Enterprise Java Beans Tier, Ent
erprise Information
Systems Tier Implementation.


UNIT
-
II

J2EE Database Concepts
: Data


Database


Database Schema.
JDBC Objects
: Driver
Types


Packages


JDBC Process


Database Connection


Statement Objects


Result
Set


Meta Data.


UNIT
-
III

Java Ser
vlets
: Benefits


Anatomy


Reading Data from Client

Reading HTTP Request

Headers


Sending Data to client


Working with Cookies.


UNIT
-
IV

Enterprise Java Beans:

Deployment Descriptors


Session Java Bean

Entity Java Bean
Message Driven Bean.

Master of Science, Computer Science, 20
11
, Karpagam University
,

Coimbatore
-
641021, India

#
2



UNIT
-
V

JSP
: What is Java Server Pages?

-

Evolution of Dynamic Content Technologies


JSP &
Java 2 Enterprise Edition;
JSP Fundamentals
: Writing your first JSP
-

Tag conversions
-

Running JSP.

Programming JSP Scripts
: Scripting Languages


JSP tags
-

JSP
directives


Scripting elements


Flow of Control


comments;


Java Remote Method Invocation.


TEXT

BOOK
S

1.

Jim Keogh. 2002. The Complete Reference J2EE, 1st Edition, Tata McGraw Hill,
New Delhi
.


(P
AGE
N
OS
.

:

3

-

61

,23

-

35,

98



116,124



151,

157



159,

350



369,

406



443,

380



395,

486
-

490)

2.

Duane K.

Fields

&

Mark A.Kolb
. 2000

Web Development with Java Server Pages
,

1st Edition
,

Manning Publications, Pune.

(P
AGE
N
OS
.

:

2



15,

46

-

64,

65



99

)


REFERENCES

1.

Joseph J. Bambara et al. 2001. J2EE Unleashed, 1st Ed
ition, Tech Media, New Delhi.

2.

Paul J. Perrone, Venkata S. R. Chaganti, Venkata S. R. Krishna and Tom Schwenk.
2003. J2EE Developer's Handbook, Sams Publications, New Delhi.

3.

Rod Johnson. 2004. J2EE Development without EJB, 1st Edition, Wiley Dream Tech,
New

Delhi.

4.

Rod Johnson and P.H. Rod Johnson. 2004. Expert One
-
On
-
One J2ee Design and
Development, John Wiley & Sons, New Delhi.


WEB SITES

1.

java.sun.com/javaee/

2.

java.sun.com/j2ee/1.4/docs/tutorial/doc/

3.

www.j2eebrain.com/

















Master of Science, Computer Science, 20
11
, Karpagam University
,

Coimbatore
-
641021, India

#
3


Semester
-
I


1
1
CSP102

CRYPTOGRAPHY AND NETWORK SECURITY


5H
-
5C

Instruction Hours / week:

L: 5 T: 0 P: 0 Marks:

Internal:
40

External:
60

Total
:
100




End Semester Exam:
3

Hours


Prerequisite:

Students must be
familiar with computer network basics and be able to
code in a high level computer programming language


Course Objective:




This course will introduce cryptography theories, algorithms, and systems. It will
also consider necessary approaches and technique
s to build protection
mechanisms in order to secure computer networks.



Understanding the goals, issues, technologies, algorithms, protocols, systems, and
design criteria used in cryptography and data security. Developing basic system
analysis and solution

synthesis skills.



The course covers fundamental aspects of security in a modern networked
environment

with the focus on system design aspects and cryptography in the
specific context of

network / internetwork security



It also dwells into basics of cryptog
raphic techniques,

algorithms and protocols
required to achieve these properties; computational issues in

implementing
cryptographic protocols and algorithms; and system/application design

issues in
building secure networked systems.


Learning Outcomes:

A
student who successfully completes this course should, at a minimum, be able to:



Understand theory of fundamental cryptography, encryption and decryption
algorithms,



To show the ability to encrypt “Plain Text” into “Cipher Text” and vice versa,
using diff
erent encryption algorithms.



The ability to choose a suitable ciphering algorithm according to the required
security level.



The ability to understand a given ciphering algorithm and to analyze it.



Learn to program and apply the encryption algorithms,



Buil
d cryptosystems by applying encryption algorithms,



Apply the cryptosystems so far learned to building of information and network
security mechanisms,



Techniques for identity authentication message authentication develop identity
management,



Build secure

authentication systems by use of message authentication techniques.


UNIT

-
I

Introduction


Security Trends
-

The OSI Security Architecture


Security Attacks


Security Services


Security Mechanisms


A Model for Network Security. Classical
Encryption T
echniques


Symmetric Cipher Model


Substitution Techniques
-

Transposition Techniques


Rotor Machines
-

Steganography.

Master of Science, Computer Science, 20
11
, Karpagam University
,

Coimbatore
-
641021, India

#
4



UNIT

-
I
I

Block Ciphers and Data Encryption Standard

Block Cipher Principles


The Data
Encryption Standard
-

The Strength of DES

Ad
vanced Encryption Standard (AES)


Evaluation Criteria for AES


The AES Cipher


Multiple Encryption and Triple DES


Block Cipher Modes of Operation


Stream Ciphers and RC4.


UNIT
-
I
II

Confidentiality using Symmetric Encryption


Placement of Encryption
Function


Traffic Confidentiality


Key Distribution


Public key Cryptography and RSA


Principles of Public Key Cryptosystems


The RSA Algorithm
-

Key Management


Diffie Hellman Key Exchange.


UNIT
-
I
V

Message Authentication and hash functions


Authen
tication Functions


Message
Authentication Codes (MAC’s) Functions


Security of Hash Functions and MAC’s
Digital Signatures and Authentication Protocols


Digital Signatures


Digital Signature
Standard


UNIT
-
V

Network Security Applications
-

Authentica
tion Applications


KERBEROS


X.509
Authentication Service


Public Key Infrastructure


Electronic Mail Security


Pretty
Good Privacy


S/MIME


IP Security.


TEXT BOOKS

1.

Atul Kahate, 2003. Cryptography and Network Security, 2nd Edition, Tata McGraw
Hill
, New Delhi.

2.

William Stallings. 2006. Cryptography and Network Security Principles and
Practices, 4th Edition, Pearson Education, New Delhi.

(Page Nos. :
6
-
35
,
62
-
75
,
80
-
135
,
199
-
220
,
289
-
298
,
317
-
340
,
377
-
390
,
400
-
436
,
436
-
457
,
483
-
506
)


REFERENCE
S

1.

Ankit

Fadia. 1998. Network Security, 1st Edition, McMillan Publications, New Delhi.

2.

Bruce Schneir. 1998. Applied Cryptography, 1st Edition, CRC Press, New Delhi.

3.

Charlie Kaufman, Radia Perlman and Mike Speciner. 2003. Network Security Private
Communication in a

Public World, 2nd Edition, Prentice
-
Hall of India, New Delhi.

4.

*Menezes .A, Van Oorschot and S. Vanstone. 1997. Hand Book of Applied
Cryptography, 1st Edition, CRC Press, New Delhi. (Free Downloadable)


WEB SITES

1.

williamstallings.com/
Crypto
3e.html

2.

u.cs.biu
.ac.il/~herzbea/book.html

3.

www.flipkart.com/search
-
books/
cryptography
+and+
network
+
security
+William+
stallings+ebook


Master of Science, Computer Science, 20
11
, Karpagam University
,

Coimbatore
-
641021, India

#
5


Semester
-
I


11CSP
103 WIRELESS AND MOBILE COMPUTING



4H
-
4C

Instruction Hours / week:

L: 4 T: 0 P: 0 Mark
s:

Internal:
40

External:
60

Total
:
100




End Semester Exam:
3 Hours



Prerequisite:

No explicit prerequisite course work is required, but students are expected
to have some knowledge of networking and mobile computers.


Cou
rse Objective:

Ubiquitous access to information, anywhere, anyplace, and anytime,
will characterize whole new kinds of information systems in the 21st Century.



It is an emerging field, and builds on data communications, computer networks,
distributed sys
tems, information management, and applications.



This course will follow an emerging field of mobile computing applications,
architecture, Mobility support in cellular telephone networks, Personal
Communications Systems/Personal Communications Networks, Wi
reless local
area networks,Direct Broadcast Satellite; Low Earth Orbiting Satellites.


Learning Outcomes:
A student who successfully completes this course
must

be able to



Identify the use of mobile wireless technologies



Know the types of mobile wireless te
chnologies that are currently being used



Knows how does mobile wireless technologies access to network resources?


UNIT
-
I

Mobile computing applications and Platforms

-

Introduction


Strengths and
Weakness of Wireless


Applications


Platforms to support
Mobile Computing
Applications

Wireless Networks


Wireless Architecture, Security and Management


Wireless Business



UNIT
-
II

Mobile Computing Applications

-

Key Characteristics of Mobile Applications


Messaging for users


Mobile Portals


Special Appl
ications


Mobile agent applications


UNIT
-
III

Wireless Internet, Mobile IP and Wireless Web

-

Internet and Web


How it works


Mobile IP


WWW for wireless


Mobile Web Services
-

Mobile Computing Platforms

-

Introduction


Wireless Middleware


Wireles
s Gateways and Mobile Application
Servers


WAP


I
-
MODE, Wireless JAVA, MMIT, and BREW


Voice communication


UNIT
-
IV

Wireless LANs

-

IEEE 802.11


MANET


HiperLAN2
-

Wireless Personal Area

Networks

-

IEEE 802.15


Home Networks


Blue tooth LANs


Senso
r Networks
-

Cellular Networks

-

Principles


First Generation(1G) Cellular


Paging networks


Second Generation(2G) Cellular


Data over Cellular Networks


Third Generation
Cellular (3G) Networks


Beyond 3G


Master of Science, Computer Science, 20
11
, Karpagam University
,

Coimbatore
-
641021, India

#
6


UNIT
-
V

WML:

Formatting Output


Variables


Input Operations


WML Script


WML
Libraries.


TEXT BOOKS

1.

Amjad Umar. 2004.
Mobile Computing and Wireless Communication


Applications,
Networks, Platforms Architecture and Security,

NGE Solutions INC., New York.

(Page Nos: 1.1
-

1.52, 2.3


2.51, 3.2


3
.37, 4.3
-
4.51, 6.16
-
6.36, 7.3
-
7.33, 8.4
-
8.39
)

2.

Kris Jamsa. 2001.
WML & WML Script,

Tata McGraw Hill Publishing, New Delhi

(Page Nos: 61
-
198, 225
-
336)


REFERENCE
S

1.

Ashok K.Talukder and Roopa R. Yavagal. 2008. Mobile Computing, Tata Mc
-
Graw
Hill Publishing Co
mpany Pvt Ltd,
New Delhi.

2.

*Jack M. Holtzman and David J. Goodman. 1994.
Wireless and Mobile
Communications,

Kluwer Academic Publishers.

3.

*Mischa Schwartz. 2005.
Mobile Wireless Communications
, Cambridge University
Press.


WEB SITES

1.

http://www.networkcomput
ing.com/netdesign/wireless1.html

2.

http://www.homeandlearn.co.uk/bc/beginnerscomputing.html

3.

http://compnetworking.about.com/

4.

http://www.compinfo.co.uk/computer_books.htm#tele
























Master of Science, Computer Science, 20
11
, Karpagam University
,

Coimbatore
-
641021, India

#
7


Semester
-
I


11CSP
104

INTERNETWORKING WIT
H TCP/IP




4H
-
4C

Instruction Hours / week:

L: 4 T: 0 P: 0 Marks:

Internal:
40

External:
60

Total
:
100




End Semester Exam:
3 Hours



Prerequisite
: No explicit prerequisite course work is required, but
students are expected
to have some knowledge of network fundamentals.


Course Objective:

To identify and learn the functions/ services of



TCP/IP component and layer



TCP/IP addressing



k
ey protocols in the TCP/IP suite including IP and TCP



unicast and mult
icast routing protocols



DHCP and DNS in Internet



TCP/IP applications such as FTP, TELNET, SMTP etc.



WAN Networks


Learning Outcomes:

At the end of this course the student should be able to understand



architectural Overview of the TCP/IP Protocol Suite



I
P Addressing Fundamentals



IPv4 forwarding and routing.



learn about host name resolution and the Domain Name System (DNS).



services and operations of DHCP Servers and Domain Name Servers



major applications using the key TCP/IP protocols


UNIT
-
I

Intro
duc
tion: WAN, WAN technologies
-

Protocols and Standards
-

TCP/IP protocol
suite
-

Internetworking Devices
-

Classful IP Addressing


Subnetting


Supernetting


Classless Addressing


UNIT
-
II

ARP & RARP


Proxy ARP


ARP over ATM


ARP and RARP Protocol Forma
t. IP
Datagram


Fragmentation


Options


IP Datagram Format


Routing IP Datagrams


Checksum. ICMP


Types of Messages
-

Message Format


Error Reportin
g


Query


Checksum.


UNIT
-
III

Unicast Routing Protocol: Intra Domain and Inter Domain Routing


Dis
tance Vector
Routing


RIP


Link State Routing


OSPF


Path Vector Routing


BGP


Multicast
Routing


Multicast Routing Protocols. Group Management


IGMP Message


IGMP
Operation


Process to Process Communication


UDP Operation


TCP Services
-

Flow

Control.



Master of Science, Computer Science, 20
11
, Karpagam University
,

Coimbatore
-
641021, India

#
8


UNIT
-
IV

BOOTP
-

DHCP


Address Discovery and Binding. DNS


Name Space


DNS in
Internet


Resolution


Resource Records


UNIT
-
V

Remote Login
-

FTP


SMTP


SNMP. IP over ATM Wan


Cells


Routing the Cells


ATMARP


Logical IP Subnets.

VPN


TEXT BOOK

1.

Behrouz A. Forouzan. 2003. TCP/IP Protocol Suite. 3
rd

Edition, Tata McGraw Hill
Publication, New Delhi.

(Page Nos:

2
-
5, 6
-
38, 69
-
74, 84
-
95, 102
-
121, 160
-
188, 191
-
1
-
201, 221
-
232, 238
-
241,
256
-
279, 299
-
304, 386
-
430, 441
-
444, 457
-
464, 471
-
488,
519
-
542,

561
-
566,

575
-
576,

621
-
632,

637
-
644,

680
-
682)


REFERENCE
S

1.

Andrews S. Tanenbaum. 2003.

Computer Networks, 4
th

Edition, Prentice Hall of
India Private Ltd., New Delhi.

2.

Buck Graham. 2007. TCP/IP Addressing, 2
nd

Edition, Harcount India Private
Limited, Ne
w Delhi.

3.

Douglas E. Comer. 2000. Computer Networks and Internets, 4
th

Edition. Pearson
Education, New Delhi.

4.

William Stallings. 2007. Data and Communication Network, 8
th

Edition, Tata
McGraw Hill, New Delhi.


WEB SITES

1.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Internet_prot
ocol_suite

2.

http://docwiki.cisco.com/wiki/Introduction_to_WAN_Technologies

3.

www.yale.edu/pclt/COMM/
TCPIP
.HTM

4.

www.w3schools.com/
tcpip
/default.asp

















Master of Science, Computer Science, 20
11
, Karpagam University
,

Coimbatore
-
641021, India

#
9


Semester
-
I


11CSP
111



ROUTER CONFIGURATION
LAB



5
H
-
2
C

Instruction H
ours / week:

L: 0 T: 0 P: 5 Marks:

Internal:
40

External:
60

Total
:
100




End Semester Exam:
3 Hours




1.

Access and utilize the router to set basic parameters.

2.

Connect, configure, and verify operation statu
s of a device interface.

3.

Implement static and dynamic addressing services for hosts in a LAN environment.

4.

Identify and correct common problems associated with IP addressing and host
configurations.

5.

Configure, verify, and troubleshoot RIPv2.

6.

Perform and

verify routing configuration tasks for a static or default route given.

7.

Configure, verify and troubleshoot
NAT

operation on a router.

8.

Configure and verify a PPP connection between routers.

9.

Configure, verify, and troubleshoot Access Control List




Master of Science, Computer Science, 20
11
, Karpagam University
,

Coimbatore
-
641021, India

#
10


Seme
ster
-
I

11CSP
112



J2EE
LAB




5
H
-
2
C

Instruction Hours / week:

L: 0 T: 0 P: 5 Marks:

Internal:
40

External:
60

Total
:
100




End Semester Exam:
3 Hours




1.

Create a sign in form

in servlets.

2.

Write a servlet Program to lock a server.

3.

Write a servlet program that returns list of information in table format.

4.

Design a counter that counts number of times user has visited the site in current
browsing session.

5.

Write a program to retriev
e cookies information

6.

Build a JAVA Bean for opening an applet from JAR file.

7.

Write a program to add controls in BEAN.

8.

Design a counter in JAVA BEAN.

9.

Write a program to stream contents of a file using JSP.

10.

Write a program to insert a menu applet into JSP pa
ge.
























Master of Science, Computer Science, 20
11
, Karpagam University
,

Coimbatore
-
641021, India

#
11


Semester I


1
1
NMP101 FUNDAMENTALS OF PROGRAMMING LANGUAGES 2H
-
2C

Instruction Hours / week:

L: 2 T: 0 P: 0 Marks:

Internal:
40

External:
60

Total
:
100




End Semester Ex
am:
3 Hours



UNIT
-
I

The Evolution & Challenges of Programming Languages: History


Fortran and
ALGOL60


The stormy 60’s


Advances in early 70’s
-
Criteria for Language Design
-
Some possible solutions

Syntax: The character set
-
BNF
-
Syntax Graphs
-
Syntax and
Reliability


UNIT
-
II

Variables, Expressions and Statements: Variables and assignment


Binding time and
Storage allocation
-

Constants and Initialization


Expressions


Conditional statements


Iterative statements


GOTO statement and Labels

Types: Data t
ypes and typing


Enumerated data types


Elementary data types


Pointer
Data Type


Structured data types


Type coercion


Type Equivalence


UNIT
-
III

Scope and Extent: The basics


Run
-
time implementation


An extended example


Binding, scope, and exte
nt revisited

Procedures: General features


Parameter Evaluation and Passing


Call
-
by
-
name


Specification of objects in a procedure


Aliasing


Overloading


Generic Functions
-

Co routines


UNIT
-
IV

Concurrency: Basic concepts


Semaphores


Monitors


Message passing

Data Flow programming languages: The data flow model


Language design goals


VAL


A Data Flow Programming Language


UNIT V

Object Oriented Programming Languages: History


Division of Smalltalk into
Programming Language and user interf
ace


Smalltalk: Object Oriented Programming
Language


Objects


Messages


Methods


Classes


Control structures


Classes
Compared to Abstract Data Types


Inheritance and Subclassing


Smalltalk: Object
Oriented User Interface


Design principles


REF
ERENCES


1.

Allen Tucker. 2002. Programming Languages,
1st Edition
, Tata McGraw Hill, New
Delhi.

2.

Elliz Horowitz. 2000. Fundamentals of Programming Languages,
2nd Edition
,
Galgotia Publications (P) Ltd, New Delhi.

(Page Nos: 1
-
28, 33
-
44, 47
-
71, 77
-
107, 117
-
154, 165
-
194, 199
-
225, 287
-
319, 373
-
391, 395
-
417)

Master of Science, Computer Science, 20
11
, Karpagam University
,

Coimbatore
-
641021, India

#
12


3.

Sebesta. 2007. Programming Languages, 7th Edition, Pearson Education, New Delhi.
2001.


WEB SITES

1.

http://www.webopedia.com/TERM/p/programming_language.html

2.

http://www.langpop.com/

3.

http://www.scriptol.com/p
rogramming/list
-
programming
-
languages.php

4.

http://www.plre.org/languages.html







































Master of Science, Computer Science, 20
11
, Karpagam University
,

Coimbatore
-
641021, India

#
13


Semester
-
II

11CSP
201




DATA MINING AND WAREHOUSING


5H
-
5C

Instruction Hours / week:

L: 5 T: 0 P: 0 Ma
rks:

Internal:
40

External:
60

Total
:
100




End Semester Exam:
3 Hours



Prerequisite:

Students are expected to have a fundamental understanding of basic
computer principles


Course Objective:



To introduce students to the b
asic concepts and techniques of Data Mining.



To develop skills of using recent data mining software for solving practical
problems.



To gain experience of doing independent study and research.


Learning Outcomes:
A student who successfully completes this

course should, at a
minimum, be able to:



To introduce students to the basic concepts and techniques of Data Mining.



To develop skills of using recent data mining software for solving practical
problems.



To gain experience of doing independent study and
research.



Possess some knowledge of the concepts and terminology associated with
database systems, statistics, and machine learning


UNIT
-
I

Introduction:

Fundamentals of data mining
-

Data Mining Functionalities
-

Classification of Data Mining systems

-

Major issues in Data Mining.

Data Warehouse and OLAP Technology:

An Overview
-

Data Warehouse
-

Multidimensional Data Model
-

Data Warehouse Architecture
-

Data Warehouse
Implementation
-

From Data Warehousing to Data Mining.


UNIT
-
II

Data Preprocessing
:

Needs Preprocessing the Data
-

Data Cleaning
-

Data Integration
and Transformation
-

Data Reduction
-

Discretization and Concept Hierarchy Generation
-

Online Data Storage.


UNIT
-
III

Mining Frequent Patterns, Associations and Correlations:

Basic Concepts

-

Efficient
and Scalable Frequent item set Mining Methods
-

Mining Various kinds of Association
rules


From Association Mining to Correlation Analysis
-

Constraint
-
Based Association
Mining.


UNIT
-
IV

Classification and Prediction:

Issues Regarding Classif
ication and Prediction
-
Classification by Decision Tree Induction
-

Rule
-
based Classification


Prediction
-

Accuracy and Error Measures
-

Evaluating the Accuracy of a classifier or Predictor
-
Ensemble Methods
-

increases the Accuracy
-

Model Selection.

Master of Science, Computer Science, 20
11
, Karpagam University
,

Coimbatore
-
641021, India

#
14



U
NIT
-
V

Cluster Analysis Introduction :
Types of Data in Cluster Analysis
-

A Categorization of
Major Clustering Methods
-

Partitioning Methods
-

Hierarchical Methods


Density
-
Based Methods, Grid
-
Based Methods
-

Model
-
Based Clustering Methods
-

Clustering
Hi
gh
-
Dimensional Data


Constraint
-
Based Cluster Analysis
-

Outlier Analysis.

Applications and Trends in Data mining:

Text Mining
-

Web Mining
-

Multimedia
Mining
-
Spatial Mining
-

Visual data mining.


TEXT BOOK

1.

Jiawei Han and Micheline Kamber. 2006. Data Mi
ning


Concepts and Techniques,
1st Edition, Morgan Kaufmann Publishers, Mumbai.

(Page Nos: 1
-
36, 47
-
94, 105
-
148, 227
-
267, 289
-
306, 318
-

322, 354
-
372, 386
-
458, 600
-
640)


REFERENCES

1.

Michael J.A. Berry, Gordon S. and Linoff. 2006. Data mining Techniques,

2
nd

Edition, Wiley Publishing Inc, New Delhi.

2.

Arun K Pujari. 2001. Data Mining Techniques, 1
st

Edition, University Press, New
Delhi.

3.

Gupta G.K. 2000. Introduction to Data mining with case studies, 1
st

Edition, Prentice
Hall of India, New Delhi.

4.

Hillo
l Kargupta, Anupam Joshi, Krishnamoorthy Sivakumar and Yelena Yesha. 2005.
Data Mining Next Generation Challenges and Future Directions, 1
st

Edition, Prentice
Hall of India, New Delhi.

5.

Inmon W. H. Building the DataWarehouse, Wiley Dreamtech India, 1
st

Edi
tion, New
Delhi.

6.

Michael J.A. Berry, Gordon S. and Linoff. 2000. Mastering Data Mining, 1
st

Edition,
John Wiley & Sons Inc, New Delhi.

7.

Margaret H. Dunham. 2000. Data Mining Introductory and advanced topics, 1
st

Edition, Pearson Education, New Delhi.

8.

Paulraj Ponnaiah. 2002. Data Warehousing Fundamentals, 1
st

Edition, Wiley Student
Edition, New Delhi.

9.

Ralph Kimball. The Data Warehouse Life cycle Tool kit, 1
st

Edition, Wiley Student
Edition, New Delhi.

10.

Sam Anahory and Dennis Murray. Data Warehousing
in the Real World, 1
st

Edition,
Pearson Education, Asia.

11.

Soman K.P, Shyam Diwakar and V.Ajay. 2006.
Insight into Data Mining Theory and
Practice, 1
st

Edition, Prentice Hall of India, New Delhi.


WEB SITES

1.

Thedacs.Com

2.

Dwreview.Com

3.

Pcai.Com

4.

Eruditionhome.C
om




Master of Science, Computer Science, 20
11
, Karpagam University
,

Coimbatore
-
641021, India

#
15


Semester
-
II


11CSP
202





C# with .NET





5H
-
5C

Instruction Hours / week:

L: 5 T: 0 P: 0 Marks:

Internal:
40

External:
60

Total
:
100




End Semester Exam:
3 Hours



Prerequisite:

Pr
erequisite course work is required; students are expected to have a
fundamental understanding of basic Programming and
C
Programming skills
.


Course Objective:




To rapidly learn
C#

programming.




U
nderstand object
-
oriented programming with
C#

and learn how

to write
increasingly sophisticated
C#

programs


Learning Outcomes:
A student who successfully completes this course
will



be

able to

create simple programs in C# .NET
:



have sufficient understanding of the .NET framework to easily continue self
-
learning



b
e able to find required components



have greatly improved the programming productivity


UNIT
-
I

The C
LR

And The .Net Framework
:
Assemblies, Versioning, Attributes, Reflection,
Viewing MetaData, Type

Discovery, Reflecting on a Type, Marshaling, Remoting,
Un
derstanding Server

Object Types, Specifying a Server with an Interface, Building a
Server, Building

the Client, Using Single Call, Threads.


UNIT
-
II

Introduction To C#:

Understanding .NET, Overview of C#, Literals, Variables, Data

Types, Operators, Express
ions, Branching, Looping, Methods, Arrays, Strings,

Structures, Enumerations.


UNIT
-
III

Object Oriented Aspects Of C#:

Classes, Objects, Inheritance, Polymorphism, Interfaces,
Operator Overloading, Delegates, Events, Errors and Exceptions.



UNIT
-
IV

Appli
cation Development On .Net
:
Building Windows Applications, Accessing Data
with ADO.NET.


UNIT
-
V


Web Based Application Development On .Net:

Programming Web Applications with
Web Forms, Programming Web Services.



Master of Science, Computer Science, 20
11
, Karpagam University
,

Coimbatore
-
641021, India

#
16



TEXT BOOK

1.

Ba
lagurusamy .E.

2004.

Programmi
ng in C#, Tata McGraw
-
Hill,
New Delhi.


REFERENCES

1.

Herbert Schildt
. 2004.
The Complete Reference: C#, Tata McGraw
-
Hill,
New Delhi.

2.

Liberty

.
J. 2002.

Programming C#, 2nd ed., O'Reilly
.


3.

Robinson et al
.

2002.

Professional C#
, 2
nd

Edition
, Wrox Press
.


4.

Thamar
ai Selvi

.
S

and R
. Murugesan
. 2003.

A Textbook on C#, Pearson Education,

New Delhi.


WEB SITES

1.

www.intelligentedu.com

2.

www.exforsys.com/tutorials/csharp

































Master of Science, Computer Science, 20
11
, Karpagam University
,

Coimbatore
-
641021, India

#
17


Semester
-
II


11CSP
203



PROGRAMMING IN MATLAB



4H
-
4C

In
struction Hours / week:

L: 4 T: 0 P: 0 Marks:

Internal:
40

External:
60

Total
:
100




End Semester Exam:
3 Hours



Prerequisite:

No explicit prerequisite course work is required, but students are expected
to

have a fundamental understanding of basic computer principles


Course Objective:


This course will introduce
for engineering students and others who want a comprehensive
introduction to fundamental programming concepts using a block
-
structured language
(
MATLAB). General problem
-
solving techniques, including the concept of step
-
wise
refinement applied to the development of algorithms. Programming style, structure,
documentation, and testing.


Learning Outcomes:

A student who successfully completes this co
urse should, at a minimum, be able to:



Be able to learn how to use MATLAB



Be able to learn how to program in MATLAB



Be able to learn 2D and 3D programming in MATLAB



Ability to create a computer program to solve problems in science and engineering.



An ab
ility to apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering



An ability to design and conduct experiments, as well as to analyze and interpret data



An ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools necessary for
engineering prac
tice


UNIT
-
I

Introduction to MATLAB:

advantages & disadvantages
-
environment.
MATLAB
Basics:

variables and arrays


initializing variables in MATLAB
-

multidimensional
arrays


sub arrays
-

special values
-

displaying output data
-

data files
-

scalar and a
rray
operations
-

hierarchy of operations


built
-
in MATLAB functions
-

introduction to
plotting.


UNIT
-
II

Branching Statements and Program Design

:

introduction to top
-
down techniques
-
use
of Pseudo code
-

the logical data type


branches
-

additional plo
tting features.
Loops

:

the while loop
-

the for loop
-

logical arrays and vectorization.


UNIT
-
III

User Defined Functions

:

introduction to MATLAB functions
-
variable passing in
MATLAB
-

optional arguments
-

sharing data using global memory
-

preserving d
ata
between calls to a function
-

function functions
-

subfunctions, private functions, and
nested functions.
Additional Data types and Plot types

:

complex data
-

string functions
-

multidimensional arrays
-

additional data types
-

additional two
-
dimensio
nal plots
-
three
-
dimensional plots.

Master of Science, Computer Science, 20
11
, Karpagam University
,

Coimbatore
-
641021, India

#
18



UNIT
-
IV

Advanced Features

:

sparse arrays
-

cell arrays
-

structure arrays
-

function handles
-
Input/output Functions
: the textread function
-

load and save commands
-

MATLAB
file processing
-

file opening and closing
-

binary I/O functions
-

formatted I/O functions
-
comparing formatted and binary I/O functions
-

file positioning and status functions.


UNIT
-
V

Handle Graphics

:

the MATLAB graphics system
-

object handles
-

examining and
changing object properties
-

using s
et to list possible property values


user
-
defined data
-

finding objects
-

selecting objects with the mouse
-

position and units
-

default and
factory properties
-

graphics object properties.


Graphical User Interfaces

:

creating and displaying a graphic
al user interface
-

object
properties
-

graphical user interface components
-

A
dditional containers
: panels and
button groups
-
dialog boxes
-

menus.


TEXT BOOK

1.

Stephen J. Chapman. 2005. MATLAB Programming for Engineers, 3rd Edition,
Thomson learning, New De
lhi

(Page Nos.: 1
-
10, 21
-
58, 85
-
121, 147
-
170, 199
-
243, 261
-
305, 315
-
350, 359
-
401, 409
-
434, 439
-
487)


REFERENCES

1.

Delores M. Etter, David C. Kuncicky and Holly Moore. 2005. Introduction to
MATLAB 7, 1
st

Edition , Pearson Education,
New Delhi.

2.

RajKumar Bansal
, Ashok kumr Goel and Manoj Kumar Sharma. 2009. Matlab and
its Applications in Engineering, 1
st

Edition, Pearson Education,
New Delhi.

3.

Rudra Pratap. 2007. Getting Started with MATLAB 7
-

A Quick Introduction for
Scientists and Engineers, 1
st

Edition, Oxfo
rd University press.

4.

Stanley. 2008. Technical Analysis & Applications with Matlab, 1
st

Edition, Thomson
Education, New Delhi.


WEB SITES

1.

http://www.mathworks.com/products/MATLAB

2.

http://www.mathtools.net/MATLAB

3.

http://www.math.ufl.edu/help/matlab
-
tutorial










Master of Science, Computer Science, 20
11
, Karpagam University
,

Coimbatore
-
641021, India

#
19


Semester
-
II


11CSP
204
A





SOFTWARE TESTING



4H
-
4C

Instruction Hours / week:

L: 4 T: 0 P: 0 Marks:

Internal:
40

External:
60

Total
:
100




End Semester Exam:
3 Hours



Prerequisite:

No explicit pr
erequisite course work is required, but students are expected
to have a fundamental understanding of basic software engineering principles


Course Objective:




To discuss the distinctions between validation testing and defect testing



To describe the princi
ples and need for various types of testing



To describe strategies for generating system test cases



To understand the essential characteristics of tool used for test automation



To understand the significance of metrics


Learning Outcomes:

A student who succ
essfully completes this course should, at a
minimum, be able to:



Reliable:

Tests perform precisely the same operations each time they are run,
thereby eliminating human error.



Repeatable:

You can test how the software reacts under repeated execution of th
e
same operations.



Programmable
: How can program sophisticated tests that bring out hidden
information from the application.



Comprehensive:

How can build a suite of tests that covers every feature in your
application.



Reusable:

How can reuse tests on dif
ferent versions of an application, even if the
users interface

changes.



Better Quality Software:

Because you can run more tests in less time with fewer
resources



Fast:

Automated Tools run tests significantly faster than human users.



Cost Reduction:

As t
he number of resources for regression test are reduced.


UNIT
-
I

Introduction about testing, Definition about software testing
-
Principles of testing
-
Phases
of software project
-
Difference between QC and QA
-
Testing, Verification and Validation.

Life cycle mo
dels for Waterfall, Spiral and V model.


UNIT
-
II

Types of testing
-
White box testing
-

black box testing
-
Performance testing
-

Regression
testing
-
Adhoc testing.


UNIT
-
III

Test planning
-
Test process
-
Test reporting
-
Best practices
-
Test planning check list
-
T
est
plan templates
-
Test case writing
-
Techniques for SRS document.

Master of Science, Computer Science, 20
11
, Karpagam University
,

Coimbatore
-
641021, India

#
20



UNIT
-
IV

Software test automation
-
Skills needed for automation
-
What to automate
-
Scope of
automation
-
Design and architecture for automation. Process model for automation
-
Selecting test too
l.


UNIT
-
V

Test metrics


Types of metrics


Project metrics
-
progress metrics
-
productivity metrics.
What is win runner
-
Methods of testing in win runner.


TEXT BOOK

1.

Srinivasan Desikan, GopalaSwamy and Ramesh. 2008. Software testing

Principles
and Practice
s, 1
st

Edition, Pearson Education, New Delhi.

(Page Nos:
3
-
22, 25
-
43, 47
-
68, 73
-
104, 169
-
190, 193
-
207, 228
-
248, 351
-
385, 388
-
416, 420
-
456)


REFERENCES

1.

Boris Beizer. 2000.
Software Testing Techniques
, 2
nd

Edition, Wiley Dreamteach,
India, New Delhi.

2.

Elfri
de Dustin. 2007. Effective software testing, 1
st

Edition, Pearson Education, New
Delhi.

3.

Louise Tamres. 2002.
Introduction to Software Testing
, 1
st

Edition Pearson
Education, New Delhi.

4.

Ron Patton. 2004.

Software Testing
, 2
nd

Edition, Pearson Education
, New Delhi.

5.

William E. Perry. 2001. Effective methods for Software Testing, 2
nd

Edition, John
Wiley & Sons, New Delhi.


WEB SITES

1.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/
Software
_
testing

2.

www.onestop
testing
.com/
-

3.

www.ece.cmu.edu/~koopman/des_s99/sw_
testing
/

4.

http://stud
ents.depaul.edu/~slouie/wr_tut.pdf


(Unit V)















Master of Science, Computer Science, 20
11
, Karpagam University
,

Coimbatore
-
641021, India

#
21


Semester
-
II


11CSP204
B




DIGITAL IMAGE PROCESSING



4H
-
4C

Instruction Hours / week:

L: 4 T: 0 P: 0 Marks:

Internal:
40

External:
60

Total
:
100





End Semester Exam:
3 Hours



Prerequisite:

Students will be expected to have strong programming skill in either
C/C++ or MATLAB, and a working knowledge of basic statistics, probability, calculus,
and linear algebra.


Course Objective:

The objectives of
this course are to:



make the students learn the fundamental theories and techniques of digital image
processing



cover the fundamental concepts of visual perception and image acquisition, basic
techniques of image manipulation, segmentation and coding, and

a preliminary
understanding of Computer Vision.



Develop critical thinking about shortcomings of the state of the art in image
processing



Learning Outcomes:

With successful completion of the course, students will be able to
perform image manipulations an
d analysis in many different fields. Image

processing
topics such as enhancement, restoration, compression, and

reconstruction will provide
students with the ability to apply knowledge of

computing, mathematics, science and
engineering to solve problems in

multidisciplinary research
.


UNIT
-
I

Introduction: Digital image processing


Origins of digital image processing
-

Examples
of fields that use digital image processing
-
Fundamental steps in digital image processing
-

Components of an image processing system
-
Representing digital image.


UNIT
-
II

Some Basic relationships between Pixels
-
Basic gray level transformations
-

Histogram
processing
-

Basic spatial filtering
-

Smoothing special filtering
-

Image Degradation/
Restoration process
-

Noise Models.


UNIT
-
III

Imag
e Segmentation: Thresholding
-

Edge Based Segmentation


Region Based
Segmentation


Matching. Image Compression: Error Criterion
-

Lossy Compression
-

Lossless Compression.


UNIT
-
IV

Shape Representation And Description: Region Identification
-

Contour Bas
ed
Representation And Description


Region Based Shape Representation And Description

Master of Science, Computer Science, 20
11
, Karpagam University
,

Coimbatore
-
641021, India

#
22



UNIT
-
V

Image Recognition: Introduction


Statistical Pattern Recognition
-

Neural Net
-

Syntactic
Pattern Recognition
-

Graph Matching
-

Clustering


TEXT BOOK

1. Rafael
C. Gonzalez, Richard E. Woods. 2004. Digital Image Processing, 2
nd

Edition,


Pearson Education, New Delhi.



REFERENCES

1.

Chanda. B and Dutta Majumder .D. 2000. Digital Image Processing and Analysis, 1st
Edition, Prentice Hall of India, New Del
hi.

2.

Milan Sonka and Vaclav Hlavac and Roger Boyle. 2004. Image Processing, Analysis
and Machine Vision, 2
nd

Edition, Vikas Publishing House, New Delhi.

3.

Nick Efford. 2000. Digital Image Processing


A Practical introduction using JAVA,
1
st

Edition ,
Pearson Education Limited, New Delhi.


WEB SITES

http://www.cs.dartmouth.edu/farid/tutorials/fip.pdf

http://www.imageprocessingbasics.com/

http://www.astropix.com/HTML/J_DIGIT/TOC_DIG.HTM


























Master of Science, Computer Science, 20
11
, Karpagam University
,

Coimbatore
-
641021, India

#
23


Semester
-
II


11CSP204
C


OBJECT ORIENTED AN
ALYSIS AND DESIGN WITH UML


4H
-
4C

Instruction Hours / week:

L: 4 T: 0 P: 0 Marks:

Internal:
40

External:
60

Total
:
100




End Semester Exam:
3 Hours



Prerequisite:

Students will be expected to have
working

knowledge
in either
C/
C++ or
java.



Course Objective

Introducing students to the concepts and terms used in the object
-
oriented approach to systems analysis and design



Highlighting the importance of Object Oriented Analysis and Design concepts
and apply

them to solve

problems



Showing how we apply the process of Object Oriented Analysis and Design
documents for a given problem

using Unified Modelling Language



Pointing out the importance and function of each UML model throughout the
process of obje
ct
-
orien
ted analysis and design.


Learning Outcomes:

After completing this course the student must demonstrate the
knowledge and ability

to:



Use object
-
oriented technologies



Use Unified Modeling Language 2.2



Perform object
-
oriented analysis and design



Explain h
ow the Unified Modeling Language

(UML) represents an object
-
oriented system using a number of modeling views.



Construct various UML models (including use case diagrams, class diagrams,

interaction diagrams, statechart diagrams, activity diagrams, and imple
mentation

diagrams) using the appropriate notation.


UNIT
-
I

The Object Model:

The evolution of the object model


Elements of the object model


Applying object model.
Classes and Objects:

The nature of an object


Relationships
among objects.


UNIT
-
II

Cla
sses and Objects
: The nature of the class


Relationship among classes


The
Interplay of Classes and Objects


On building quality classes and objects.
Classification:

The Importance of proper classification


Identifying proper classes and
objects


Key
abstraction mechanism.


UNIT
-
III

The notation: Elements of the notation


class diagrams

state transition diagrams


object diagrams.

Master of Science, Computer Science, 20
11
, Karpagam University
,

Coimbatore
-
641021, India

#
24



UNIT
-
IV

The Process: First principles


The micro development process


The macro development
process.


UNIT
-
V

UML Overv
iew: UML History


Goals of UML


UML concept areas


Syntax of
Expressions and Diagrams.

Nature and purpose of Models: A Model


Levels of Models


Meaning of Model. UML
Walkthrough: UML views


Static views


use case view


interaction views


state
ma
chine view


activity view


physical view


model management view
-

extensibility
constructs.


TEXT BOOK

1.

Grady Booch. 2001. Object Oriented Analysis and Design, 2
nd

Edition, Addison
Wesley, New Delhi.


REFERENCES

1.

James Rumbaugh, Ivar Jcobson and Grady Boo
ch. 2003. The Unified Modeling
Language Reference Manual, 1
st

Edition, Addison Wesley, New Delhi.

2.

Martin Fowler, Kendall Scott. 2004. UML Distilled, 2
nd

Edition, Pearson Education,
New Delhi.


WEB SITES

1.

uml
-
tutorials.trireme.com/

2.

http://www.devshed.com/c/a
/Practices/Introducing
-
UMLObjectOriented
-
Analysis
-
and
-
Design/

3.

http://community.sparxsystems.com/tutorials/object
-
oriented
-
analysis
-
and
-
design


















Master of Science, Computer Science, 20
11
, Karpagam University
,

Coimbatore
-
641021, India

#
25


Semester
-
I
I


11CSP
211




DATA MINING LAB USING MATLAB




5
H
-
2
C

Instruction Hours / week:

L: 0 T: 0 P: 5 Marks:

Internal:
40

External:
60

Total
:
100



End Semester Exam:
3 Hours



1. Assume that an input file n
amed transactions.txt consists of text that looks as follows:


1 3 4

1 2 3 5

2 3 5

2 5

1 2 3 6


In the file, blanks separate items (identified by integers) and new lines separate
transactions. For example, the above file contains information about a total
of 5
transactions and its second transaction consists of 4 items. Write a MATLAB program,
that takes as parameters the minimum support, minimum confidence (given as floating
point numbers in the range [0::1]), and the name of file of transactions (whose fo
rmat is
as that of the file transactions.txt above) and produces all association rules which can be
mined from the transaction file which satisfy the minimum support and confidence
requirements. The rules should be output sorted first by the number of item
s that they
contain (in decreasing order), then by the confidence, and finally by their support (also in
decreasing order).


2. Write a MATLAB code to compares and contrasts some similarity and distance
measures for the following .

(a) For binary data, the

L1 distance corresponds to the Hamming distance; that is, the
number of bits that are different between two binary vectors. The Jaccard similarity is a
measure of the similarity between two binary vectors. Compute the Hamming distance
and the Jaccard simi
larity between the following two binary vectors.

x = 0101010001

y = 0100011000


3. Consider the
N
x
P

dataset
X
= {

x
1
T
,
x
2
T
, … ,

x
N
T
}. We model
X

as a

normal
distribution with mean

1

and variance

2
2
.

a.


Give the expression for the log
-
likelihood function

l
(
D
) = log
L
(
D
).

b
.

Determine from the expression for
l
(
D
) the MLE (= Maximum Likelihood
Estimator) for the first parameter,
.

c
.
From the results in
a

and
b

determine the MLE for the second parameter,
.

d.

Compare your results for

and

with the regular expressions for
mean


and standard
-
deviation


of the normal distribution.


Master of Science, Computer Science, 20
11
, Karpagam University
,

Coimbatore
-
641021, India

#
26


4.
For the following vectors, x and y, calculate the indicated similarity or

distan
ce measures.

(a) x = (1, 1, 1, 1), y = (2, 2, 2, 2) cosine, correlation, Euclidean

(b) x = (0, 1, 0, 1), y = (1, 0, 1, 0) cosine, correlation, Euclidean, Jaccard


5. For a given data set X of three
-
dimensional samples,

X=[{1,2,0},{3,1,4},{2,1,5},{0,1,6},{
2,4,3},{4,4,2},{5,2,1},{7,7,7,},{0,0,0},{3,3,
3}]


a)

find the outliers using the distance
-
based technique if


i)

the threshold distance is 4, and threshold fraction p for non
-
neighbor
samples is 3.


ii)

the threshold distance is 6, and threshold fr
action p for non
-
neighbor
samples is 2.


6. Given the data set X with three input features and one output feature representing the
classification of samples




________________________________________

X:


I
1


I
2


I
3


O



___________________________
_____________



2.5


1.6


5.9


0



7.2


4.3


2.1


1



3.4


5.8


1.6


1



5.6


3.6


6.8


0



4.8


7.2


3.1


1



8.1


4.9


8.3


0



6.3


4.8


2.4


1



_______________________________________


Rank the features using a comparison of means and variances


7. A
data set for analysis includes only one attribute X:


X={7,12,5,18,5,9,13,12,19,7,12,12,13,3,4,5,13,8,7,6}

a) What is the mean of the data set X?

b) What is the median?

c) What is the mode, and what is the modality of the data set X?

d) Find the standard
deviation for X.

e) Give a graphical summarization of the data set X using a boxplot
representation.

f) Find outliers in the data set X.






Master of Science, Computer Science, 20
11
, Karpagam University
,

Coimbatore
-
641021, India

#
27


8. Given a data set with two dimensions X and Y.



_______________________



X



Y



_______________________



1



5



4



2.75



3



3



5



2.5


a) Use a linear
-
regression method to calculate the parameters α and β where y= α
+ βx.

b) Estimate the quality of the model obtained in a) Using the correlation
coefficient r.


9.Given 5
-
dimensional numeric samples A=(1,0,2,5,3) and B=(2,1,0,3,
-
1) find

a)
the Eucledian distance between points.

b)

the city
-
block distance

c)

the Minkowski distance for p=3.

d)

the cosine
-
correlation distance.


10. Given a transactional database Y:



Y:


TID



Items



____________________________________






T01



A1,B1,C2





T02



A2,C1,D1





T03



B2,C2,E2





T04



B1,C1,E1





T05



A3,C3,E2





T06



C1,D2,E2



_______________________________________

Using the threshold values for support s=30% and confidence c=60%, find:

a)

All large itemsets in database Y.

b)

If items
ets are organized in a hierarchy so that A={
A1,A2,A3},B={B1,B2},C={C1,C2,C3},D={D1,D2}, and E={E1,E2}, find large
itemsets that are defined on conceptual level including a hierarchy of items.

c)

Find Strong association rules for large itemsets in b)


11.
Consider a classification problem defined with the set of three

dimensional samples
X, where two diemensions are inputs and the thirdone is the output.

Master of Science, Computer Science, 20
11
, Karpagam University
,

Coimbatore
-
641021, India

#
28




X:



I
1


I
2


O



____________________________________________________





_1


1


1




0


0


1





1


-
1


1




1


0


0




0


1


0


a) Draw a graph of the data points X labeled according to their classes.

b) Draw a diagram of the perception you would use to solve the problem. Define
the initial values for all network parameters.



12. The test scores for

the three students are given in the following table:

________________________________________________________________________


RDBMS


OracleDBA


WebDesigning


AI

_____________________________________________________________________
___


Smith


66



91



95



83

Sam


91



88



80



73

John


80



88



80



78

_________________________________________
_______________________________


Find the best student using multifactorial evaluation, if the weight factors for the subjects
are given a
s the vector W= [0.3, 0.2, 0.1, 0.4]



13. The following is the data set X:



_____________________________

X:


Year


A


B

____________________________

1996


7


100

1997


5


150

1998


7


120

1999


9


150

2000


5


130

2001


7


150


Create 2D Presentations:

a)

Show a bar chart for the variable A

b)

Show a histogram for the variable B.

c)

Show a line chart for the variable B

d)

Show a pie chart for the variable A



Master of Science, Computer Science, 20
11
, Karpagam University
,

Coimbatore
-
641021, India

#
29


Semester
-
I
I


11CSP
212






C#

with .NET

LAB




5
H
-
2
C

Instruction Hours / week:

L: 0 T: 0 P:
5 Marks:

Internal:
40

External:
60

Total
:
100




End Semester Exam:
3 Hours




1.

Write a program to implement Calculator.

2.

Write a program to implement Notepad

3.

Write a program to draw several shapes and fill w
ith color.

4.

Write a program to calculate the days elapsed between the given two dates.

5.

Write a program to animate the picture using animation control.

6.

Write a program to check whether given string is a Palindrome or not.

7.

Write a program to calculate the tot
al marks of the student and print the grade

8.

Write a program to maintain details of students. Use Crystal Report to generate
report.

9.

Write a Program to implement Employee Payroll.

10.

Write a program to create and manipulate a File.






















Master of Science, Computer Science, 20
11
, Karpagam University
,

Coimbatore
-
641021, India

#
30


Se
mester
-
II


1
1
NMP201





MULTIMEDIA TOOLS




2
H
-

2C



Instruction Hours / week:

L: 2 T: 0 P: 0 Marks:

Internal:
40

External:
60

Total
:
100



End Semester Exam:
3 Hours



Prerequisite:

No explicit prerequisite course work is required, but students are expected
to have a Basic computer skills and Basic Web/Internet skills.


Course Objective:

Understand basic multimedia concepts, devices and the current
trends in multimedi
a. Has the ability to build a multimedia project.


Learning Outcomes:

A student who successfully completes this course should, at a minimum, be able to:



Understand basic multimedia concepts.



Acquire basic knowledge on Multimedia devices.



Understand curren
t trends in multimedia by experiencing a variety of applications
and development packages.



Be able to design different application in M.M and use different tools like adobe
Photoshop and macromedia flash.


UNIT
-
I

Definition of multimedia


Introduction

to making multimedia: the stages of a project

Basic software tools
-
Using Text in multimedia
-

font editing and design tools


hypermedia and hypertext.


UNIT
-
II

Introduction to Photoshop 6: Interfaces and Navigation
-
Tools
-
Text
-
Working in
Photoshop
-
Creati
ng new documents
-
Saving Files.


UNIT
-
III

Displaying the Images
-

Using Rulers, Guides and Grids


Making Selections
-

Layers and
Types
-
Choosing Colors
-
Creating Brushes
-

painting & editing Tools
-

Making and
Applying Gradients.


UNIT
-
IV

Introduction to Flash:
Variables & data types
-

Data types in Action Script
-
Creating and
placing variables


Buttons with text fields.


UNIT
-
V

Basic Actions: Play, stop, Back & forth
-

Between frames and scenes


Timelines


External scripts
-
Loops.


TEXT BOOK

1.

Bill Sanders. 2001.
F
lash5 Action Script,

1
st

Edition, DreamTech Press, New Delhi.

(Page Nos :
1
-
19, 20
-
36, 51
-
69)

Master of Science, Computer Science, 20
11
, Karpagam University
,

Coimbatore
-
641021, India

#
31


2.

Steve Romaniello. 2001. Mastering Photoshop 6, 1
st

Edition, BPB Publications, New
Delhi.

(Page Nos :
1
-
16, 21
-
24, 39
-
50,
70
-
79, 107
-

122, 195
-
213, 256
-
289)

3.

Tay V
aughan. 2008. Multimedia making it work, 7
th

Edition, Tata McGraw
-
Hill,
New Delhi.

(Page Nos :
1
-
11, 18
-
23, 50
-
56, 262
-
276)


REFERENCES

1.

Dinesh Maidasani. 2006. Flash 8, 1
st

Edition, Firewall Media Publications, New
Delhi.

2.

Robert Shufflebotham. 2004. Photos
hop CS in Easy Steps, 1
st

Edition, DreamTech
Pess, New Delhi.

3.

Ze
-
Nian Li and Mark S. Drew. 2004. Fundamentals of Multimedia, Pearson Eduction,
New Delhi.


WEB SITES


1.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/
Multimedia

2.

www.arena
-
multimedia
.com/
-

3.

www.nextwave
multimedia
.com/




























Master of Science, Computer Science, 20
11
, Karpagam University
,

Coimbatore
-
641021, India

#
32


Semester
-
I
II


11CSP
301




WEB TECHNOLOGY



5
H
-
5
C

Instruction Hours / week:

L: 5 T: 0 P: 0 Marks:

Internal:
40

External:
60

Total
:
100




End Semester Exam:
3 Hours



Pre
requisite:

No explicit prerequisite course work is required, but students are expected
to have a fundamental understanding of basic computer principles and some creativity to
design the webpage.


Course Objective




W
eb technologies relates to the interface
between web servers and their clients.



This information includes markup languages, programming interfaces and
languages, and standards for document identification and display.



The use of Web technology makes to enhance active student learning and
improves

their creativity in making web pages.


Learning Outcomes:

A student who successfully completes this course should, at a
minimum, be able to:



Create a new webpage



Will be able to identity which technologies can be used.



Understand the fundamental feature
s of web applications.



Understand the objects and components needed for a web designing.


UNIT
-
I

Creating an HTML Document



creating list


creating links between documents


linking to resources on the internet


working with hypertext attributes


worki
ng with
fonts and text styles


tables


creating frameset


working with forms


working with
cascading style sheets.


UNIT
-
II

JavaScript
: Introduction to javascript


Programming fundamentals


Functions and
objects


Navigator object model


UNIT
-
III

Jav
aScript
: Form and form elements


Scripting frames and multiple windows


Event
object


Functions and custom objects.


UNIT
-
IV

ASP
: Introduction to Active Server Pages


Active Server pages and http


Applications and
sessions


form processing with ASP


ActiveXComponents.


UNIT
-
V

ASP
: Database interaction with ASP


the recordset object


command object


active
server pages


email
-

ASP and security.


Master of Science, Computer Science, 20
11
, Karpagam University
,

Coimbatore
-
641021, India

#
33


TEXT BOOKS

1.

Danny Goodman, 2000, “Javascript Bible”, 3
rd

Edition, IDG Books India Pvt Ltd.

(Page Nos.:
9
-
16, 24
-
33, 68
-
89, 116
-
130, 151
-
157, 174
-
198, 248
-
252, 323
-
329, 348
-
356)

2.

Jude D’Souza and Monica D’Souza. 2002.
Discover ASP,

1
st

Edition, TATA
McGraw Hill Publishing, New Delhi.

(Page Nos.:
1
-
12, 17
-
32, 41
-
62, 81
-
113)

3.

Patrick Carey 2005, “New Perspective
s on HTML and XHTML”, 1st Edition,
Thomson Course Technology Publishing.

(Page Nos.:
99
-
110, 123
-
131, 685
-
692, 699
-
725)

4.

Rohit Khurana’s , 2002, “Javascript Professional edition”, 2
nd

Edition, A.P.H.
Publishing company, NewDelhi
.

(Page Nos.: 1
-
93,
98
-
170)


REFERENCE
S

1.

Chuck Musciano and Bill Kennedy. 2006. HTML & XHTML: The Definitive
*Guide, O'Reilly.

2.

David Flanagan. 2006. JavaScript: The Definitive Guide, O'Reilly,

3.

Nicholas C. Zakas, Inc Ebrary and Ebrary. 2005. Professional JavaScript for Web
Develope
rs, John Wiley & Sons Inc, New Delhi.

4.

Russell Jones A.. 2000.
Mastering ActiveServerPages 3
,
1
st

Edition, BPB
Publishing, New Delhi.

5.

Thau. 2007. The Book of JavaScript: A Practical Guide to Interactive WebPages,

6.

Wendy Willard. 2007. HTML: A Beginner's G
uide, Tata McGraw
-
Hill Professional,
New Delhi.



WEB SITES

1.

www.w3schools.com/

2.

www.
html
code
tutorial
.com

3.

www.2createa
website
.com

4.

www.your
html
source.com

5.

www.
javascript
kit.com

6.

www.learn
-
javascript
-
tutorial
.com

7.

www.webteacher.com/
javascript

8.

www.
asptutorial
.inf
o

9.

www.
asp
free.com

10.

www.
asp
net
tutorial
s.com










Master of Science, Computer Science, 20
11
, Karpagam University
,

Coimbatore
-
641021, India

#
34


Semester
-
I
II


11CSP
302





WEB SERVICES




5
H
-
5
C

Instruction Hours / week:

L: 5 T: 0 P: 0 Marks:

Internal:
40

External:
60

Total
:
100




En
d Semester Exam:
3 Hours



Prerequisite:

Familiarity with XML and Web Designing.


Course Objective:

Web services enable computer programs to communicate with each
other across application, operating system, hardware and organizational boundaries via
XML do
cuments and open standard Internet protocols. This course covers the basic
standards that enable web services: SOAP, WSDL, and UDDI. It describes proper design
of web services and applications to use them within a service
-
oriented architecture.


Learning O
utcomes:
Students will learn:



the role of web services in commercial applications



the principles of web service provision



use of Java for implementing web services



use of BPEL (Business Process Execution Logic) and WSDL (Web Service
Description Languag
e) for implementing web services



To develop a web service using Apache Axis Soap Server and Tomcat application
Server.


UNIT
-
I

Introduction: What are Web Services


Importance of web services


Web services and
enterprises. XML Fundamentals: XML Documents

-

Namespaces


Schema


Processing
XML.


UNIT
-
II

SOAP: SOAP Model


messages


Encoding


RPC


Alternative SOAP encodings


Document, RPC, Literal, Encoded


SOAP, Web Services and the REST Architecture.

WSDL: Structure


Using SOAP and WSDL. UDDI: UDDI

Business Registry


Specification


Data Structures


Life cycle Management


Dynamic Access Point
Management.


UNIT
-
III

Advanced Web Services Technologies and Standards: Conversation


Overview


Web
Services Conversation Language


WSCL Interface Compon
ents. Workflow
-
Business
Process Management


Workflow and Workflow Management systems


BPEL.
Transaction

ACID transaction


Distributed Transaction


OASIS Business
-

Transaction Protocol.


UNIT
-
IV

Security


Security Basics


Security Issues


Types of
Security Attacks


WS

Security.

Master of Science, Computer Science, 20
11
, Karpagam University
,

Coimbatore
-
641021, India

#
35


Mobile and Wireless


Mobile Web Services


Challenges with mobile


Proxy Based
Mobile Systems
-
Direct Mobile Web service access
-

J2ME Web Services.


UNIT
-
V

Building Real World Enterprise Web Service and Applications : Rea
l World Web Service
Application Development


Development of Web services and Applications onto Tomcat
application Server and Axis Soap Server.


TEXT BOOK

1.

Sandeep Chatterjee, James Webber. 2004. Developing Enterprise Web Services: An
Architect’s Guide, 1
st

Edition, Pearson Education, New Delhi.

(Page Nos: 1
-
11, 17
-
67, 69
-
94, 98
-
117, 119
-
138, 145
-
163, 175
-
221, 249
-
262, 271
-
283, 305
-
335, 377
-

415)


REFERENCES

1.

Eric A Marks and Mark J Werrell. 2003. Executive Guide to Web Services, 1st
Edition, John Wiley and
Sons, New Delhi.

2.

Keith Ballinger. 2003. NET Web Services: Architecture and Implementation with
.Net.1st Edition, Pearson Education, New Delhi


WEB SITES

1.

www.w3schools.com/
webservices
/default.asp

2.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/
Web
_
service

3.

www.
webservices
.org/























Master of Science, Computer Science, 20
11
, Karpagam University
,

Coimbatore
-
641021, India

#
36


Semester
-
I
II


11CSP
303



XML
AND JSP
PROGRAMMING


4H
-
4C

Instruction Hours / week:

L:
4

T: 0 P: 0 Marks:

Internal:
40

External:
60

Total
:
100




End Semester Exam:
3 Hours



Prerequisite:

P
rogramming experience in an object
-
oriented language such as Java,
JavaScript (JScript, ECMAScript) or C# is strongly recommended. Java Server Pages are
written as a mix of HTML and Java and so if you need to be able to build a web
application using Java S
erver Pages then these prerequisites are essential


Course Objective:


1.

One fundamental characteristic of XML is the separation of the structure, content and
presentation of data. While the structure and content aspects are described in the
Introduction to

XML course, the presentation is the focus of this course.

2.

This course covers creating output presentations using XSL (eXtensible Stylesheet
Language). With XSL style

sheets, it is possible to transform an XML document into
an HTML presentation, a text pr
esentation, or even another XML document with a
different structure.

3.

For situations where a non
-
text
-
based presentation is required (for example, PDF),
XSL Formatting Objects (FO) are introduced

4.

How to deploy and configure an Application Server,

5.

Learn the

software required for Java Server Pages, and be able to build a JSP based
web application.


Learning Outcomes:

A student who successfully completes this course should, at a minimum, be able to:



Describe the context for and use of XSL in a business.



Crea
te XSL/T template rules
,
functions
,

commands and advanced features
.



Filter XML nodes.



Use the advanced XSL/T features.



Generate XML, HTML and text presentations from an XML document.



Explain the JSP technology, its features and advantages



Explain Web d
evelopment process and various server
-
side technologies



Develop JSP applications using JSP Tags, JSP Scriptlets and JavaBeans



Explain JSP Application Models



Develop JSP applications implementing Session Management and Database
Connectivity


UNIT
-
I

Creating

Mark up with XML
:

Introduction


Parsers and well formed XML
Documents


Parsing an XML Document
-

Characters


Mark up


CDATA Sections


XML Namespaces.
Document Type Definition



Parsers, Well formed and valid XML
documents


Element type declarations


Attribute declarations
-

Attributes Types.
Schemas


Schemas VS DTD’s


W3C XML Schema

Master of Science, Computer Science, 20
11
, Karpagam University
,

Coimbatore
-
641021, India

#
37



UNIT
-
II

Document Object Model
:
DOM implementations


DOM with JavaScript


Components
-

Creating nodes


Traversing the DOM.
Simple API for XML
: DOM vs
SAX


SAX based

Parsers.

XLink, XPointer, XInclude and XBase


UNIT
-
III

XML Path Language
:

Nodes


Location Paths
;

XSLT
:

Templates
-

Creating Elements
and attributes


Iteration and Sorting


Conditional Processing


Copying Nodes


Combining style sheets


variables..
XM
L Technologies and Applications
:

XML Query
Language
-

XML topic Maps


UNIT
-
IV

The JSP Component Model
: Component architectures
-

Benefits
-

Component Design
for Web Projects
-

Building applications from Components


JavaBean Fundamentals
-

JavaBean Tags;
Develop
ing JSP Components
: Bean conventions
-

The Bean
constructor
-

Bean properties
-

JSP type conversion
-

Configuring beans


Examples


Bean Interfaces
-

Mixing scriplets and Bean tags


UNIT
-
V

Working With Databases
: JSP & JDBC


Database driven;
JSPs
: Creating J
SP
components from table data
-

JSPs and JDBc data types
-

Maintaining persistent
connections


Handling large sets of results
-

Transaction processing;
Architecting JSP
applications
: web applications


Page centric design


Servlet Centric design


TEXT BOOK
S

1.

Deitel & Deitel. 2001. XML How to Program, 1
st

Edition, Pearson Education, New
Delhi.

(Page Nos:
110
-
127,

134
-
159,

165
-
186,

192
-
227,

232
-
258,

372
-
391,

297
-
314,

319
-
347,

603
-
608
)

2.

Duane K. Fields & Mark A.Kolb. 2000 Web Development with Java Server Pages,
1st Edition, Manning Publications, Pune.

(Page Nos:
198


216, 229


262, 385


416, 418


452, 467
-

468
)


REFERENCES

1.

Ann Novarro, Chuck White and Linda Burman. 2000. Mastering XML, 1
st

Edition,
BPB Publications, New Delhi.

2.

Charles Ashbacher. 2000. XM
L in 24 hours, 1
st

Edition, Techmedia Publication,
New
Delhi.

3.

Manish Jain. 2001. XML Complete, 1
st

Edition, BPB Publications, New Delhi
.

4.

Steve Holzner. 2000. Inside XML , 1
st

Edition, TechMedia, New Delhi.


WEB SITES

1.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/
XML

2.

www.w3.org
/
XML
/

3.

www.w3schools.com/
xml
/default.asp

Master of Science, Computer Science, 20
11
, Karpagam University
,

Coimbatore
-
641021, India

#
38


S
emester
-
III


11CSU304A




SOFTWARE PROJECT MANAGEMENT

4H
-

4C

Instruction Hours / week:

L
: 4 T: 0 P: 0


Marks:

Internal:
40

External:
60

Total
:
100





End Semester Exam:
3 Hours



Prerequisite:

Students are expected to have a fundamental understanding of basic
understanding of software engineering.


Course Objective:

The graduates shall be able to:



Apply proper theoretical, technical,

and practical knowledge of software
requirements, analysis, design, implementation, verification and validation, and
documentation.



Resolve conflicting project objectives considering viable tradeoffs within
limitations of cost, time, knowledge, existing s
ystems, and organizations.



Develop appropriate design solutions to a given problem using software
engineering approaches that integrate ethical, social, legal, and economic
concerns.



Work as an individual with minimum guidance and as a leader/member of a t
eam
to develop and deliver quality software artifacts with effective communication
skills.


Learning Outcomes:
A student who successfully completes this course should, at a
minimum, be able to:



Analyze, specify and document software requirements for a sof
tware system.



Implement a given software design using sound development practices.



Design, select and apply the most appropriate software engineering process for a
given project, plan for a software project, identify its scope and risks, and estimate
its c
ost and time.



Express and understand the importance of negotiation, effective work habits,
leadership, and good communication with stakeholders, in written and oral forms,
in a typical software development environment.


UNIT
-
I

Introduction to Software Proj
ect Management


Stepwise: an overview of project
planning


Project Evaluation.


UNIT
-
II

Selection of an appropriate project approach


Software effort estimation


Activity
planning


Risk Management.


UNIT
-
III

Resource Allocation


Monitoring and Cont
rol


Managing Contracts.

Master of Science, Computer Science, 20
11
, Karpagam University
,

Coimbatore
-
641021, India

#
39



UNIT
-
IV

Managing People and Organizing Teams


Software Quality


Small Projects.


UNIT
-
V

Prince 2 An Overview


BS 6079:1996 An Overview


Programme Management


ISO12207: An Overview.


TEXT BOOK

1.

Bob Hughes and Mike Cotterell.

2
004. Software Project Management
,

2
nd

Edition,
Tata McGraw Hill, New Delhi:


REFERENCES

1. Royce.2000. Software Project Management, 1
st

Edition, Addisions Wesley, New
Delhi.


WEB SITES

1.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Software_project_management

2.

http://www.o
nesmartclick.com/engineering/software
-
engineering.html

3.

http://www.cc.gatech.edu/classes/AY2000/cs3802_fall/



























Master of Science, Computer Science, 20
11
, Karpagam University
,

Coimbatore
-
641021, India

#
40


Semester
-
III


11CSP304B




DISTRIBUTED OPERATING SYSTEM



4H
-
4C

Instruction Hours / week:

L: 4 T: 0 P: 0

Marks:

Internal:
40

External:
60

Total
:
100


Prerequisite
:

Students are expected to have good understanding of a systems
programming language

preferably C.


Course Objective:
This course focuses on software issues in the design and

implement
ation of modern computer systems, particularly the

operating systems and
distributed algorithms
.

The objectives is to learn the fundamentals of



Distributed processes (synchronization, communication and

scheduling)



Concurrent processes and programming



Proce
ss interaction

and
Process scheduling



Distributed file systems

and
Distributed shared memory



Security issues in network and distributed environments


Learning Outcomes:
After completing this course the students will be able to:



Explain what a distributed
system is, why you would design a system as a
distributed system, and what the desired properties of such systems are;



List the principles underlying the functioning of distributed systems.



Design a distributed system that fulfills requirements with regar
ds to key
distributed systems properties (such as scalability, transparency, etc)



Build distributed system software using basic OS mechanisms as well as higher
-
level middleware and languages.


UNIT
-
I

Fundamentals


message passing


Remote procedure calls

: Introduction


the RPC
model


transparency of RPC


Implementing RPC mechanism

stub generation


RPC
messages


marshaling arguments and results


server management


parameter passing
semantics


call semantics.


UNIT
-

II

Distributed shared memory :
Introduction


general architecture of DSM systems


design and implementation of DSM


granularity


structure of shared memory space


replacement strategy


heterogeneous DSM


advantages of DSM.


UNIT
-

III

Synchronization: Introduction


clock synchron
ization


event ordering


mutual
exclusion. Resource management: Introduction


desirable features of a good global
scheduling algorithm


task management approach


load balancing approach


load
sharing approach.


UNIT
-

IV

Distributed file system: Intro
duction


desirable features of a good distributed file system


file models


file accessing models.

Master of Science, Computer Science, 20
11
, Karpagam University
,

Coimbatore
-
641021, India

#
41


Naming: Introduction


desirable features of a good naming system


fundamental
terminologies and concepts.


UNIT
-

V

Security: Introduction


potential
attacks to computer system


cryptography.


TEXT BOOK

1.

Pradeep K. Sinha.
1997.
Distributed Operating Systems Concepts and Design, 1
st

Edition, Prentice Hall of India, New Delhi
.


REFERENCES

1.

Paul J. Fortier.
1998.
Design of Distributed Operating System concep
ts and
Technology, 1
st

Edition, Tata McGraw Hill, New Delhi
.

2.

Andrew S. Tanenbaum. 1995. Distributed Operating System. Pearson Education,
New Delhi.


WEB SITES

1.

http://staff.um.edu.mt/csta1//courses/lectures/csm202/os17.html

2.

http://www.inf.uni
-
konstanz.de
/dbis/teaching/ss06/os/ch14
-
wrongNumber.pdf

3.

https://www.cs.columbia.edu/~smb/classes/s06
-
4118/l26.pdf



























Master of Science, Computer Science, 20
11
, Karpagam University
,

Coimbatore
-
641021, India

#
42


Semester
-
III


11CSP304C





GRID COMPUTING





4H
-
4C

Instruction Hours / week:

L: 4 T: 0 P: 0

Marks:

Internal:
40

External:
60

Total
:
100




End Semester Exam:
3 Hours



Prerequisite
:
Preferably programming skills in

C/C++ or
Java
is needed


Course Objective:
The main objective of the course is to portray th
e recent trends

in the
field of Grid computing and
creation and management of Internet
-
based utility computing
infrastructure
.

Learning Outcomes:

A student successfully completing this course unit should

be able




Provide a good understanding of the concept
s, standards and protocols in Grid
computing



To peroform analysis, design and implementation of ARC grid computing model.


UNIT
-

I

Introduction: Cluster to Grid Computing


Cluster Computing Models


Grid Models


Mobile Grid Models


Applications. Parse
t: System
-
independent Parallel Programming
on Distributed Systems

introduction


Semantics of the Parset Construct


Expressing
Parallelism through Parsets


Implementing Parsets on a Loosely Coupled Distributed
System


UNIT
-

II

Anonymous Remote Computi
ng Model: Issues in Parallel Computing on Interconnected
Workstations


Existing Distributed Programming Approaches


The ARC Model of
Computation


The Two
-
tired ARC Language Constructs


Implementation. Integrating
Task Parallelism with Data Parallelism
: A Model for Integrating Task Parallelism into
Data Parallel Programming Platforms


Integration of the Model into ARC


Design and
Implementation


Applications
-

Performance Analysis


UNIT
-

III

Anonymous Remote Computing and Communication Model: Locati
on


Independent
Inter
-
task Communication with DP


DP Model of Iterative Grid Computations


Design
and Implementation of Distributed Pipes. Parallel Programming Model on CORBA:
Notion of Concurrency


System Support

Implementation and Performance


UNI
T
-

IV

Sneha
-
Samuham Grid Computing Model: A Parallel Computing Model over Grids


Design and Implementation


Performance studies. Introducing Mobility into
Anonymous Remote Computing and Communication Model


Issues in Mobile clusters
and Parallel Comput
ing on Mobile Clusters


Moset Overview


Computation Model


Implementation and Performance


Master of Science, Computer Science, 20
11
, Karpagam University
,

Coimbatore
-
641021, India

#
43


UNIT
-

V

Distributed Simulated Annealing Algorithms for Job Shop Scheduling
-

Implementation.

Parallel Simulated Annealing Algorithms
-

Si
mulated Annealing (SA) Technique


Clustering Algorithm for Simulated Annealing (SA)


Combination of Genetic Algorithm
and Simulated Annealing (SA) Algorithm
-

Implementation. Epilogue : DOS Grid:
Vision of Mobile Grids
-

Mobile Grid Monitoring System


Healthcare Application
Scenario.


TEXT BOOK

1.

Janakiram
.
D. 200
5
. Grid Computing


A Research Monograph, TataMcGraw Hill
Publishing Company Limited, New Delhi
.



REFERENCES

1.

Joshy Joseph and Craig Fellenstein. 2003.
Grid Computing
,

Pearson Education,

New
D
elhi
.



2.

Prabhu .C.S.R. 2008. Grid and Cluster Computing, Prentice Hall of India,
New Delhi
.


WEB SITES

1.

http://cseweb.ucsd.edu/classes/sp00/cse225/notes/fran/introweb.html

2.

http://www.wisegeek.com/what
-
is
-
grid
-
computing.htm

3.

http://www.cs.kent.edu/~farrell/gr
id06/lectures/index.html


























Master of Science, Computer Science, 20
11
, Karpagam University
,

Coimbatore
-
641021, India

#
44


S
emester
-
I
II


11CSP
311




WEB TECHNOLOGY
LAB



5
H
-
2
C


Instruction Hours / week:

L: 0 T: 0 P: 5 Marks:

Internal:
40

External:
60

Total
:
100




End Semester Exam:
3 Hours




1.

Develop a website for Karpagam University using HTML.

2.

Write Online Quiz program (Include Style Sheets)

3.

Create a flick animation using CSS.

4.

Using javascript change the font color on reloading a webpage.

5.

Generate web page that r
epresents clock
-
every 60 see the page updated with server
current time Using JavaScript.

6.

Design a form and validate it using JavaScript.

7.

Show the demo of AD Rotator Component

8.

Write Database Access program using ASP.

9.

Program to retrieve Cookies information
using ASP

10.

Program to count web page hits using ASP

11.

Program to create Date & Time, String Manipulation using ASP

12.

Write a program to find the visitor’s Browser Type, IP Address and More
Information.



















Master of Science, Computer Science, 20
11
, Karpagam University
,

Coimbatore
-
641021, India

#
45


Semester
-
I
II


11CSP
312




XML
AND

JSP

LAB







5
H
-

2
C

Instruction Hours / week:

L: 0 T: 0 P: 5 Marks:

Internal:
40

External:
60

Total
:
100




End Semester Exam:
3 Hours




1.

Create a menu in XML
.

2.

Create a demo for XSLT.

3.

Display XML information in Tree structure format.

4.

Write a
XML
program to navigate the records in the file.

5.

Write a program to save data to an XML file.

6.

Write a program to show the function of CDATA.

7.

Write a program to generate XML

file on the server.

8.

Write a program to generate XML file from the Database

9.

Write a program to load a text file into a div element with XML HTTP.

10.

List data from an XML file with XML HTTP.

11.

Write a program to add menu applet in JSP page.

12.

Build
a simple appli
cation that calculates

value of compound interest using JAVA
BEAN.

13.

Write a program to stream the contents of the file using JSP.

14.

Write a database access with JSP.

15.

Create an XML output using JSP.

16.

Write JSP web application that stores data in XML format usin
g XML tags.














Master of Science, Computer Science, 20
11
, Karpagam University
,

Coimbatore
-
641021, India

#
46


Semester
-
III


1
1
NMP301





E
-
LEARNING






2
H
-

2C



Instruction Hours / week:

L:
2

T: 0 P: 0 Marks:

Internal:
40

External:
60

Total
:
100





End Semester Exam:
3 Hours



Prerequisite:

No explicit prerequisite course work is required, but students are expected
to have a Basic computer skills and Basic Web/Internet skills.


Course Objective:


This course will give the students a basic un
derstanding of e
-
learning, creation of
graphics, animation, audio and video materials, and software development using high
level authoring tools, such as Flash. Sound forge and Adobe Premiere.


Learning Outcomes:

A student who successfully completes this

course should, at a minimum, be able to:



understand the basic principles of E
-
learning



develop simple animations using Flash.



include audio files in animations and edit them in sound forge.



create and edit video files using Adobe Premiere


UNIT
-
I

E
-
Learn
ing Evolution
-

Advantages and Disadvantages of E
-
Learning
-

Instructional
design Models for E
-
Learning
-
Applying User
-
Centered Design to E
-
Learning
-

Methods
and Measures to Retain Students Enrolled in Online Education
-
Choosing an Effective
Communication

Tool.


UNIT
-
II

Flash : Geometric shape tools


Drawing tools
-

fill and stroke controls
-

Selection Tools.


UNIT
-
III

Creating Animation and Effects: Animation strategies


TimeLine Animation


Character
animation Techniques


fundamentals of Editing.


UNIT
-
IV

Sound: Import and Export formats


Importing sound to flash


adding sound to timeline


synchronizing audio to animations
-

stopping sounds


Working with sound forge.


UNIT
-
V

Video: Integrating and Importing Video


Editing video with Adobe Premiere


Organizing & Editing clips


Adding Transition between clips


Adding special effects
to video.




Master of Science, Computer Science, 20
11
, Karpagam University
,

Coimbatore
-
641021, India

#
47


TEXT BOOK
S

1.

Robert ReinHardt and Snow Dowd. 2006. MacroMedia flash 8 Bible, 1
st

Edition,
Wiley India (P) Ltd, New Delhi.

(Page Nos.:
111
-
146, 309
-
323, 325
-
3
49, 423
-
428, 461
-
476, 545
-
567)

2.

Pamela Berman, institute for Interactive Technologies
,

Bloomsburg University of
Pennsylvania, USA (e
-
book), 2006, E
-
Learning Concepts and Techniques.

(Page Nos.:
1
-
7, 13
-
17)


REFERENCES

1.

Dinesh Maidasani. 2006. Flash 8, 1
st

Ed
ition, Firewall Media Publications, New
Delhi.

2.

Fred T.Hofstetter. 2001. MultiMedia Literacy, Tata McGraw Hill, New Delhi.

3.

NIIT. 2004.

A guide to film Making with Software tools Adobe Premier and Sound
forge, Prentice Hall of India, New Delhi.

4.

Tay Vaughan.
2008. Multimedia making it work, 7
th

Edition, Tata McGraw
-
Hill,
New Delhi.


WEB SITES

1.

iit.bloomu.edu/spring2006_ebook_files/
ebook_spring2006
.pdf (
E
-
Learning Concepts
and Techniques)

2.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/
Multimedia

3.

www.arena
-
multimedia
.com/
-

4.

www.nextwave
multimedia
.com/

5.

http://www.bmf.hu/conferences/mtn2005/Bucko.pdf