Advancing Nigeria by Strengthening Business Management Education

gazeagraffeManagement

Nov 20, 2013 (3 years and 8 months ago)

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Title: “Advancing Economic Development in Nigeria Through Strengthening
Business Management Education and Technology Competence”


Project Goal


We request funding from the Higher Education for Development (HED), an affiliate of the
United States A
gency fo
r International Development

(USAID) for an institutional partnership
between the University of
Lagos
, Nigeria and Kansas State University and its affiliates to develop
a
program that would
strengthen the graduate business education in Nigeria with particul
ar reference
to the Master

of Business Administration (MBA) at the University of Lagos in Nigeria. The pro
ject
proposes to

develop a
state
-
of
-
the
-
art
graduate
business
management program that would produce
adequately
trained business

managers for the Niger
ian business environment. The pro
ject supports

the USAID/Nigeria strategic objectives to 1) increase demand for quality education and training
,

2)
strengthen the administrative and institutional capacity, and 3) build the next generation of Nigerian
busin
ess leaders.

The
specific
goal
is to strengthen the
UNILAG
MBA program
and create a model for
transformation that can be transferred to other MBA programs in Africa

as shown in Figure 1
.
The
implication of this goal is that the
MBA program must begin a pr
ocess of both short and long
-
term
change
that will move it from where it is currently to a new level of functioning that is informed by
world
-
class standards

and employer expectations. T
his goal

means
there must be a
commitment to
work
continuously
over t
he next three years
to make the UNILAG MBA degree

significantly more
competitive and comparable to that of any one else’s in the world. It means the pursuit of
excellence in modern management education where the skills taught are the skills needed.




2

Pr
oject Objective


Six objectives are associated with the project goal. These objectives are: (1) to engage a
senior leadership team in sustainable change management for continuous program improvement; (2)
to assess, redesign, and implement a revised UNILAG

MBA curriculum consistent with

international standards and the needs of the private sector; (3) to introduce updated pedagogy,
including the use of technology in instruction to increase teaching effectiveness; (4) to provide
opportunities for faculty dev
elopment and collaborative applied research; (5) to engage the private
sector in the UNILAG MBA program; and (6) to better prepare students for and link them with
career opportunities.
















Change Management


Private Sector Engagement



Business Advisory Council



Employer Relations



Alumni Seminars



Executive Lectur
e Series



Distinguished Alumni Award

Faculty Enhancement


▪ AACSB Seminar & Conference

▪ Faculty Incentive Grants

▪ Faculty Development Grants

▪ Workshop Presentations

▪ Hampton University Executive


Leadership Summit

Business

Curriculum



Re
-
design of Courses



Innovative Pedagogies



Continuous Improvement

Career Services

▪ Skills
-
building workshops



Internship Coordination



Career Fair



Placement Tracking

Assurance of Learning



Assessment Plan



Employer Surveys/Focus


Groups



Established Process


Strategic Vi
sioning

Accountability

Sustainability


3

Program Components


The

s
ix objectives
translate into
the following
program components: (1) Change
Management; (2) Curriculum Development and the Assurance of Student Learning; (3) Innovative
Pedagogies; (4) Faculty
E
nhancement; (5) Private Sector
Engagement
; and (6) Career
Servic
es
. For
convenience, each program component is described below in ter
m
s of the

transformational issues to be addressed

and component activities, outcomes, and performance
indicators and metrics.

Chan
ge

Management


C
hange is difficult for any organizati
on and for African organizations, the challenge
may
be
even more difficult. Long traditions of doing things a certain way, faculty w
ith long tenures,
autocratic leadership styles, and layers of bureaucracy can all combine to make the process of
change ver
y difficult to manage. Even when people acknowledge the need for change, buying into
and actually facilitating change is easier said than done. On the other hand, without widespread
understanding and support for change, the normal human dynamics of resis
tance, fear, and inertia
will surface to
vigorously
reinforce the status quo.


A Change Management Team
,

composed of
senior leadership and major stakeholders of the
UNILAG MBA program
, will be created

to address:



Institutional change dynamics and the for
ces that will propel the program forward and those
that will impede the change process.



Clarifica
tion and reformation of mission, vision, and core values.



International standards for business management education and the n
eed for curriculum
assessment, re
-
design, and development.




What private sector employers want in UNILAG MBA graduates.



Incorporation of the project plan into an internally
-
driven strategic

and operational
plan for
transformation.



4



The creation
and coordination
of
work groups that correspo
nd
to
project components.



A
dmissions standards and proce
dures
.




F
aculty hiring
projections and
procedures to
increase
the possibility
of
more diverse hires.




Sustaining the effort

in order to achieve both
short
-
term and long
-
term benefits.

U
NILAG
faculty

and administrators will be helped to t
ake ownership of and
lead the
process of
change
.
Needed transformation
is not something that can be done for them or to them, only by
them and with them.

The efficient functioning of th
e Change Management Team
will
contribute to
long
-
term and sustainable continuous
quality
improvement.


Component methods will include: (1) a

retreat
for the MBA faculty
at the beginning of each
program year; (2) monthly meetings of the
C
hange
M
anagement
T
eam; (3) visits to UNILAG by
re
levant American project personnel; (4) mission clarification and strategic planning; (
5
) work
group formation and
coordination
(
6
) attendance at the
Association to Advance Collegiate Schools
of Business
-

AACSB International seminar on Strategic Management

and the conference on
Continuous Improvement;
(7) attendance at the Hampton University Executive Leadership Summit,
and (8) systematic reviews.


Component outcomes will be: (1) an understanding of
and
commitment to sustained change
management
and continu
o
us

improvement
by a team of academic leaders and stakeholders; (2)
clarification and reformulation of MBA program vision, values, mission, and goals; (3) a
n updated
strategic management plan;
and
(4) reformulat
ed plans for the technology infrastructure and

access;
admission standards and procedures;
and
faculty hiring
procedures
consistent with a commitment
t
o
diversity.


Component metrics and performance indicators will include: (1) retreat schedule
s
and
learning outcomes;
(2)
retreat
participant list
s
; (3
) participant evaluation of the retreat
s
; (4)
the

5

Change Management Team membership rosters; (5
) monthly meeting minutes and the attendance
roster
s

for the
C
hange
M
anagement
T
eam; (
6
) the membership roster for component work group
s
;
(
7
)
the revised
strateg
ic
management and operational
plan
s
; (
8
) revised
planning documents and
policy statements on
technology, admissions procedures, and
faculty hiring; (
9
) annual component
report
s; and (10) year
-
end reports
documenting
the
accomplishments, challenges, and pla
ns
of each
work group
for the subsequent year.

Curriculum Development and
t
he Assurance of Student Learning


Th
e work group created here will
focus on the
disciplinary
structure of the curriculum, the
courses in each
disciplinary
area, the content of these

courses, the learning outcomes associate
d

with each cou
r
se, and how student learning
is

assessed.


T
he UNILAG
MBA
faculty
have an average tenure of 28 years and
have been teaching the
same classes
the same way
for a very long time. In addition, this fa
culty
share a certain perspective.
Most of them are economists who think of business
management
as applied economics.
What is
needed, h
owever, is not only or largely an understanding of economics, but advanced modern
methods for the management of decisio
n
-
making

in complex organizations existing in fast
-
paced
and ambiguous environments. Moreover,
the
entire
curriculum needs to be evaluated against
international standards
and private sector expectations
to identify strengths and areas in need of
improveme
nt
. This
baseline assessment
will
provide
a
starting point for curriculum transformation.
Activities will include:



A review of the disciplinary structure of the curriculum measured against international
standards.




A review of core courses in each disci
plinary are
a

to determine the extent to which these
course
s

reflect
recommended
course offerings in each area.




A review of the topics covered in each course in each disciplinary area to determine the
extent to which these topics reflect
recommended conten
t
and
workplace
relevance.


6




A review of core courses to determine the degree to which they have issues of business
ethics, social responsibility, the values of community involvement and volunteerism,
honesty, diversity of ethnicity and gender, and globaliz
ation woven in
to

them.




A review of core course
s

to determine
their r
elevan
ce
to “the Nigerian perspective and
business environment,”
and their use
of business

cases that have
“Nigerian”
relevancy and
implications
.




A review of all course
s

to determine how

clearly learning outcomes
and methods of
assessing student learning
are specified
.




A review of the
internship and
capstone experience
s
.



Offering Faculty Incentive Grants and o
pportunities to work with
consultants and

a Business
Advisory Council

to make

improvements in the
existing courses and develop

new courses
needed in the re
-
engineered MBA curriculum
.




Component methods will include: (1)
review and discussion of
international standards for
graduate business management education programs

and of
p
ri
vate sector needs; (
2
) extensive,
systematic curriculum reviews aided by project personnel and consultant
s
; (
3
) monthly progress
reports to the
Ch
ange
M
anagement
T
eam for their input; (
4
) attendance a
t

the AACSB International
seminars on
Graduate Managemen
t Programs,
Assessment and
Continuous Improvement
;
(
5
)
interfacing with
the Business Advisory Council for their input; (
6
)
using incentive grants to
motivate faculty to
strengthen existing courses which align

well
with international standards and
private s
ector needs
,
to
remov
e

and/or reform courses that meet standards and needs we
a
k
ly
,

and
develop new courses to fill gaps; and (
7
) implementation of
a wholly
revised
MBA
curriculum
.


Component outcomes will include: (1) greatly improved
faculty
understanding

o
f
international standards for business management education, of
Nigerian private sector
needs
,
and of
the

importance of having clear student learning outcomes and methods of assuring student learning;
(2) a
B
lueprint for
Curriculum T
ransformation based o
n a full assessment of the existing
curriculum;
and
(3) a fully revised
MBA
curriculum
.


7


Component metrics
and performance indicators
will
include: (1) work group meeting

minutes and attendance rosters
; (
2
) the monthly reports to the
C
hange
M
anagement
T
e
am; (
3)
the
quality of the
Blueprint for Curriculum T
ransformation as
assessed
by the
project
consultant
s

and
the Business Advisory
C
ouncil;
and
(
4
) the quality of the revised
MBA
curriculum as determined
by the consultants and the Business Advisory Counci
l
; and (5) annual reports to the Change
Management Team
.

Innovative Pedagogies


O
pportunities
must be provided
for UNILAG faculty to learn how to diversify their teaching
methods

for greater teaching effectiveness
.
The
lecture and the textbook
can no long
er be the
primary modes of delivery.
Rote memorization is not the most desirable level of learning. T
here is
much mounting research which indicates that students learn best when engaged in dynamic,
participatory, case
-
and real
-
world focused pedagogy.
Mo
reover, the use of technology to support
classroom instruction
has become
part of
the gold standard in
promoting student learning.


K
-
State has developed an outstanding web
-
based learning management system called AXIO.
This system features online assess
ment and grade book, classroom lectures, case material, chat
rooms, whiteboards, live collaborations, etc. This important piece of instructional technology is a
unique aspect of what K
-
State can contribute to this project and it can be easily adapted to f
i
t

the
needs of the UNILAG MBA program. In addition, AXIO is hosted at K
-
State which alleviate
s

the
need for system maintenance at UNILAG.

Component a
ctivities will include:



Learning about active teaching and methods to increase teaching effectiveness a
nd building
the capacity of faculty to teach this to other faculty.




Compiling, sharing, and selecting
business cases that have been developed by the Lagos
Business School and the International Finance Corporation’s Global Business School
Network.


8




L
earn
in
g
about the use of
AXIO

technology in classroom instruction and building the
capacity of faculty to teach this to other faculty.




Opportunities for UNILAG faculty to visit Kansas State University and learn about cutting
edge pedagogies through our Center f
or Teaching Excellence.




Opportunities to observe K
-
State College of Business c
lasses
and
discuss classroom
instruction with faculty.



Component methods will
include: (1) a series of workshops on innovative pedagogies to
improve teaching effectiveness whi
ch cover topics such as collaborative learning; the pyramid
exam, “think
-
pair
-
share,” use of the business case study, inquiry
-
based learning, preparing students
to teach modules, in
-
class exercises on interpreting diagrams and performing calculations
,

etc.
; (
2
)
exposing this work group to
Classroom Assessment Techniques: A Handbook for College Teachers

by Thomas Angelo and Patricia Cross which covers 50 techniques that can be used

and
adapted

by
all college teachers; (
3
) a two
-
part workshop for this group o
n “Ten Things that Teachers
C
an
D
o to
Help all Students Learn More

; (
4
) attendance at the AACSB International
s
eminar
s

on Teaching
Effectiveness

and Continuous Improvement

(
5
) as courses are redesigned
, m
embers of this
work
group will meet with faculty to

help
infus
e

innovative pedagogies
; and (6) working and training on
the use of AXIO technology in classroom instructionAXIO technology will be implemented using a
provided wireless mobile computer classroom (cart) that will be used by multiple courses in t
he
revised MBA program
.



Component outcomes will be
:

(1) a significantly improved understanding of innovative
pedagogies by a critical mass of faculty; (
2
) the ability of faculty to teach other faculty about
innovative pedagogies; and (
3
)
the introductio
n of technology into classroom instruction; and (4)
re
-
designed courses that have been infused with innovative pedagogies.


9


Component metrics
and performance indicators
will include: (1)
workgroup meeting
minutes and attenda
nce rosters;

(2) the monthly r
eports to the Change Management Team; (3)
workshop learning outcomes and outlines of activities; (
4
)
workshop
participant evaluation
s

and
assessment
s

of learning; (
5
)
documentation
of courses that have undergone pedagogical reform
; and
(6) annual reports t
o the Change Management Team.

Faculty

Enhancement


T
he heart of any academic program is its faculty. Their quality
, vitality,
and diversity
largely determine the quality of the program
. H
ence, recruiting, developing, supporting and
rewarding faculty in t
he right way
s

have to be constant concerns. Certainly, as the
UNILAG
MBA
program is transformed through
continuous improvement
,
the enhancement

and
professional
develop
ment o
f
the
faculty must
occur simultaneously. This component provide
professional
de
velopment
opportunities to enhance the excellence of UNILAG MBA faculty.

Activities in this component will target
the entire

MBA
faculty and include:



A

constructive review of the last five years for
all faculty

to
includ
e

professional
development activit
ies, publications/presentations,
consultations,
research program
,
community service,
and self
-
reports of perceived strengths and areas
of desired
growth
.




Offering Faculty Development Grants to
support professional growth in ways
that conform
to
internatio
nal
curricul
um standards and private sector
expectations.




Opportunities for faculty to:

-

learn about the role of diversity in post
-
graduate education and the business case for
diversity and internationalization
.


-

engage in
collaborat
ive applied
research wi
th K
-
State College of Business faculty.

-

attend international business conferences to expand knowledge and to build and/or
expand the network of colleagues in the same discipline.



Component methods will include: (1) a systematic review of all faculty; (2
) development of
individual
self
-
report
s

on strengths and areas of desired growth; (3) generatin
g

and reviewing

10

individual
faculty professional development
plans; (4)
granting visiting UNILAG faculty access to
K
-
State library holdings; (5) symposia featuri
ng outstanding faculty development efforts; (6) using
Faculty Development Grants to support faculty professional development;
and

(7)
connecting
UNILAG faculty to collaborative research opportunities with K
-
State faculty.


Component outcomes will include:
(1) individual development plans for faculty; (2) greatly
expanded learning opportunities for faculty; (3) increased financial support for faculty development;
(4) increased research collaborations; (5) an expanded network of colleagues; and (6) enhanced
f
aculty competence and enthusiasm.


Component metrics and performance indicators will include: (1) faculty data, self
-
assessments, and individual professional development plans for a minimum of 85% of the faculty;
(2) 30 faculty development grants awarded;
(3) the number of collaborative research projects
involving K
-
State and UNILAG faculty; (4) documentation collected each year on colleagues added
to faculty networks and the value of these; (5) annual reviews of the faculty professional
development plans n
oting what has been accomplished and what needs to be accomplished in the
subsequent year; and (8) annual workgroup reports submitted to the Change Management Team.

Private Sector Engagement


The private sector is both the beneficiary of MBA education and
the crucible in which talent
and skills can be honed. Hence, the private sector should be a critical player in business
management education. In Nigeria, international businesses and spin
-
offs comprise a very rich and
specialized resource because they ex
pect sophisticated management, decision
-
making,
technological, and ethical practices. Because of this, they can be potent program advisors,
exceptional trainers, and leadership developers. At present, the private sector is not engaged with
the UNILAG MB
A program. UNILAG, on the other hand, does not know the degree of satisfaction

11

employers have with their graduates or what these businesses really expect of them. What is very
clear is that better relationships between the private sector and the UNILAG Sc
hool of Business
would be very mutually beneficial.

Two private sector partners have now been established with
many more in the pipeline. They are Honeywell Flour Mills of Nigeria and Albarka Airlines, Plc.
Both companies have pledged their full support t
oward the project.


The goal of this component is to engage the private sector in the UNILAG MBA program.

Activities in this component will target businesses in Nigeria, and will include:



The creation of a business advisory council consisting of senior to
top
-
level managers to
meet on a regular basis to discuss the curriculum, technology needs, and other issues.




Developing more internship and final
-
year practica sites so students can gain more
p
ractical
experience.




Developing more business case studies.



The creation of a distinguished executive lecture series to expose MBA students to
prominent CEO’s and real
-
world business problems.




The identification of alumni and creation of an alumni database, distinguished alumni
award, and an alumni seminar to rec
onnect them to the MBA program, the faculty, and the
students.



Component methods will include: (1) work group discussions of the value, creation, and
functioning of business advisory councils led by the Partnership Co
-
Directors; (2) writing the first
pla
n for the UNILAG School of Business Advisory Council with vision, mission, and goal
statements; term limits; fees for participation; etc.; (3) soliciting representation on the Business
Advisory Council from medium to large businesses in Nigeria; (4) profes
sional orientation and
training of the BAC members; (5) semi
-
annual meetings of the BAC; (6) monthly work group
reports to the Change Management Team; (6) working with the Business Advisory Council to
develop more internship sites, case studies, final
-
year

practica sites and to create special programs
for bringing alumni and executives into contact with students and faculty.


12


Component outcomes will include: (1) increased knowledge about and understanding of the
value and functioning of a business advisory
council among a critical mass of faculty; (2) a
functioning Business Advisory Council; (3) an increased number of internship and practica sites;
and (4) an alumni seminar, and executive lecture series, and a distinguished alumni award.


Component metrics a
nd performance indicators will include: (1) workshop learning
outcomes, schedule of activities, and participant evaluations including an assessment of learning;
(2) the list of businesses solicited for participation on the council, the solicitation letter,

and the
response letters; (3) the Business Advisory Council membership roster with at least 10 major
businesses represented; (4) BAC and workgroup meeting minutes and attendance rosters; (5)
monthly work group reports to the Change Management Team; (6) an
nual comparisons of the
number of internships and practica sites at the beginning of the year and at the end; (7)
documentation of executive lectures, alumni seminars, and distinguished alumni awards; and (8)
annual component reports submitted to the Chang
e Management Team.

Career
Services


The MBA degree is supposed to be one’s ticket to enter meaningful management
employment. In fact, one indicator of program effectiveness commonly used in the United States is
the percentage of graduates employed in thei
r fields six months after graduation. One way to
enhance performance on this indicator is to intentionally engage students in career development
activities and then link them with employment opportunities.


In America, separate Student Affairs units off
er extensive, professional, and technology
-
assisted career services. Kansas State University has an exceptional operation of this type with a
full complement of professional staff, newly
-
renovated facilities, and a very visionary and engaged
director.


13


Ou
r African counterparts are not as fortunate and yet, they need to become involved in
activities similar to those provided by first
-
class operations or else risk developing a class of under
-
employed, underpaid graduates. Such persons do not speak well of o
ne’s educational programs.


For this component, a Career Specialist will be hired to help the UNILAG MBA program
develop the capacity to provide some of the career and employment services that will benefit their
graduates and link them to private sector em
ployment.

Activities in this component will include:



Building relationships with employers to promote the value of the UNILAG MBA graduate.




Creating more internships and coordinating internship placements.



Providing basic career development skills build
ing workshops to include: (1) writing
professional
résumés

and cover letters that attract attention; (2) interviewing techniques; (3)
appropriate business attire; (4) business etiquette; and (5) how to network.




Networking and leveraging connections and op
portunities with existing alumni.




Sponsoring a career fair either alone or in conjunction with a consortia of schools of
business.




Tracking placement of graduates and administering employer satisfaction surveys.


Component methods will include: (1) a wor
kshop with faculty on career services led by the
Career Specialist and the LBS consultant; (2) training/capacity
-
building to offer a core group of
career services; (3) an annual career fair; (4) tracking placement data for graduates; (5) employer
satisfact
ion surveys; and (6) monthly reports to the Change Management Team for their input.


Component outcomes will include: (1) an understanding among a critical mass of faculty of
career services and the value they add to one’s program and students; (2) the cap
acity to offer career
services, including; (3) a career fair; (4) a tracking system for graduate placements; (5) a system for
evaluating employer satisfaction with UNILAG MBA graduates; and (6) utilization of this
employer feedback to improve the UNILAG MB
A program.


14


Metrics and performance indicators will include: (1) the faculty workshop learning
objectives, schedule of activities, and participant evaluations including assessments of learning; (2)
offering at least five skills
-
building workshops in projec
t years 2 and 3; (3) documentation of a
career fair with at least 20 employers present in project years 2 and 3; (4) a report of graduate
placement; (5) a report on employer satisfaction and how satisfaction data can be used to improve
the MBA program; (6)

monthly work group meeting minutes and attendance rosters; (7) monthly
reports to the Change Management Team; and (11) annual reports of workgroup activities submitted
to the Change Management Team.

Sustainability


How this project will be sustained afte
r the three years of grant support is a very important
consideration. There are several ways in which the project activities become self
-
sustaining and
this can be explained as follows:

First, by the end of the project, the Change Management Team will h
ave become a highly
cohesive and efficient driver of change. They will have been well
-
trained in many areas and they
will have grown in commitment to continuous quality improvement. They will have achieved
functional autonomy for maintaining momentum bey
ond the grant period.


Second, the revised curriculum will be a major achievement that will not need to be repeated
in such full measure for a number of years. Fine tuning can occur continuously and without major
effort. The revised curriculum will bring

new recognition and esteem to the UNILAG MBA
program and there will be no need to turn back to the old curriculum. The program would have
endangered a new culture of continuous improvement.


15

Third, the Business Advisory Council will also continue after t
he grant period. It will be a
strong external driver of change and it will press for continual alignment between private sector
needs and the skills taught.


Fourth, use of the AXIO learning platform will continue. Faculty will have the ability to
teach

its use to each other. AXIO will be hosted by Kansas State University and accessed remotely
by UNILAG faculty and students through the Internet. By hosting the technology remotely, this
will resolve the problem of maintaining and updating the technology

which can be very resource
intensive. The award
-
winning customer support of AXIO will be available to UNILAG MBA
faculty and staff to immediately respond to any questions that may arise.


Fifth, as a result of attendance at AACSB International programs, t
he UNILAG MBA
faculty will have become part of a robust network of world
-
class business management programs.
UNILAG faculty will be motivated to want to continue in this new status.

Sixth, the K
-
State/UNILAG Institutional Partnership that results from t
his grant will be very
strong by the end of the project. We will seek new grant opportunities and continue to work
together on collaborative research, student and faculty exchanges, and study abroad programs.


Three areas will need fiscal resources for p
roject sustainability. These areas are: (1) the
Career Specialist position ($7,200), (2) the greatly reduced annual license fee for AXIO ($10,000),
and (3) faculty development funds ($20,000). The money needed here, approximately $37,200, will
be address
ed in part through the BAC. Initially, their fees for participating on the advisory council
can be used to offset these costs. As time goes on, corporate donations can be solicited. As the
quality of the MBA program improves, tuition can be increased and

the resulting revenue streams
committed to these needs. Moreover, entrepreneurial projects can be developed which produce
revenue for these needs.


16

Monitoring and Evaluation Plan

The monitoring of the project includes the collection of extensive baseline
data on the
existing courses in the UNILAG MBA program

on
;

faculty development and productivity in the
five years previous to project implementation; employer expectations of MBA graduates; employer
satisfaction with UNILAG graduates; on the assessment of
student learning, and internships.
Monitoring of the project is further aided by having the LBS consultant working closely with the
project in Nigeria and by having the Partnership Co
-
Directors travel to Lagos frequently to advance
the project objectives
and to inspect operations for compliance with timetables and deliverables.
All
-
faculty meetings at the beginning of each project year and frequent workgroup meetings are
strategies designed to keep people committed to the project and to resolve any proble
ms
that may
occur
. The Project Co
-
Directors recognize the importance of faculty approval of end
-
products and
seek it in accordance with faculty review p
rocess.

The outcomes for each component have been
clearly defined, as well as metrics and performance

indicators. Many tangible outcomes exist.
Either things have been done or they have not. Accountability has been structured into the very
fiber of the project through monthly meetings and reporting structures. Moreover, the project has
been organized
in three clear phases which build
on
one upon the other. In the first year, activities
are aimed at preparing for and embracing change. People are learning what they need to know,
breaking out of “their shells,” and engaging with new people with new idea
s. In the second year,
the same people make change happen. They are the ones revising courses, learning new
pedagogies, engaging in applied collaborative research, visiting K
-
State, interacting with the private
sector and alumni, and adding value to thei
r graduates.
According to Mescon
1
, people and structure
provide the makeup of organizations, at the end of the day, people drive success.




1

Mescon, T. S. 2006.
http://www.aacsb.edu/publications/enewsline/Vol
-
5/Issue
-
11/email/Deans.htm


17

In the third year, changes are institutionalized. The new curriculum with updated pedagogy
is implemented, strategic

and operational plans exist, the assessment process is ready, and more.
Each activity in each workgroup depends on the successful completion of preceding activities. All
of this has been thought out and planned in great detail.

For HED and USAID, ther
e will be
semi
-
annual
progress reports generated by the
Partnership Co
-
Directors and the year
-
end reports from the Change Management Team.


For final project evaluation, an external consultant of considerable expertise has been added
to the team. Project
objectives are clear. Results are tangible. Metrics and performance indicators
are there. He will travel to Lagos and assess the impact of the project and see for himself whether
what we say has occurred, in fact, has occurred. In addition, he will ass
ess the satisfaction of all
major stakeholders in the project with the project: namely, faculty, administrators, students, alumni,
executives, and employers. His final report will go straight to HED and USAID. He will give the
Partnership Co
-
Directors a
verbal debriefing, along with any recommendations for improving
similar projects in the future.

Pr
oject

Personnel


The project personnel of this grant form a very strong team of diverse people with
interlocking and complementary skills and experiences.

Ike

Ehie

will serve as
p
artnership Co
-
Director
. Ehie is a professor of management and the
Associate Dean in the College of Business at Kansas State University. He holds a Ph.D. degree in
Engineering Management from the University of Missouri, Rolla. Ehie cha
irs the Assessment
Committee in the College of Business and has been integrally involved in the AACSB re
-
accreditation process of the College coming up in 2008/2009. He served as a
consultant of
U
nited

18

N
ations
D
evelopment
P
rogram

(UNDP)
to develop supply c
hain curriculum at the Lagos Business
School in Nigeria.

Myra Gordon

will serve as the
partnership
Co
-
Director. Gordon is
Professor of
Psychology

and
the Associate Provost at Kansas State University. Gordon brings 2
0
-

year track record in
working in high
er education in West Africa and in the empowerment of women in Africa. She has
senior level
curriculum

development experience and has had career services report to her.

Gordon
knows Nigeria and has first hand knowledge of the business education in Nigeri
a.

Yar Ebadi

is the
senior

personnel. Ebadi is the dean of the College of Business
Administration
at Kansas State University
and has served in that role since 1996. Ebadi was
successful in developing the most powerful business advisory council on campus wi
th over 50
company executives as member
s
.

Ebadi will be helpful in developing an effective business
advisory council for the UN
ILAG

MBA.

William Harvey
will serve as senior consultant. Harvey is the President of Hampton
University, an HBCU school and rece
ived his Ph.D. from Harvard in Educational Leadership.

His
commitment to expansion and innovation in academic programs has resulted in 76 new academic
programs being implemented under his watch among which is a graduate program in Business
Administration (
MBA).
Harvey has transformed Hampton University from a small black college to
a world
-
class leader in the field of higher education.

Harvey specializes in executive leadership and
development of entrepreneurial culture.

Enase Okonedo

will serve as senior c
onsultant. Okonedo is the
D
irector of the full
-
time
MBA, Executive MBA

and Careers and Admission at the Lagos Business School at Pan African
University. Her area
s

of specialization include financial management, financial strategy, and

19

corporate accounting
. Okonedo is a certified public accountant and received her MBA from the
International Graduate School of Management (IESE) in Barcelona. Okonedo will serve as the on
-
site consultant and will
address best practices for the Nigerian

context across all work
groups
.

David Martin

will serve as the
assessment consultant
. Martin is the Dean of the College of
Business at Bloomsburg University of Pennsylvania. Martin is one of the four presenters of the
AACSB Applied Assessment Seminar and has conducted assessment

workshops
many universities
n the US and around the world.

Martin is currently serving as a mentor to AACSB
-
candidate
schools and serves on the AACSB Maintenance of Accreditation Peer Review Team.

Roger McHaney
will serve as a
curriculum
.
McHaney

holds t
he Coffman Distinguished
Teaching Scholar Chair from Kansas State University and is a professor of information systems.
Mc
H
aney
has
served as
a

curriculum consultant
for many universities wishing to develop new
programs
in information systems. McHaney will

be responsible for reviewing the MBA courses and
curriculum at the UNILAG MBA

with a special emphasis on technology and information systems.


Amir Tavakkol

will serve as a
curriculum consultant.

Tavakkol is a professor of finance
and has a Ph.D. in Econom
ics from Kansas State University. Tavakkol is the chair of the
C
ourse
and
C
urriculum
C
ommittee of the College of Business at Kansas State University. He
will be
reviewing the UNILAG MBA curriculum with special focus on course revision and redesign
.

David

K. Smith
will serve as external evaluator. Smith is professor of marketing at
Southeast Missouri State University and a visiting professor of the Lagos Business School at Pan
African University, Lagos Nigeria. Smith served as a Fulbright Scholar in Nigeri
a and his
assignment involve
d

developing case studies with senior level business executives associated with
the Harvard Business School Club of Nigeria. He later taught the case studies to MBA students at

20

the University of Ibadan, the University of Lagos,

and the University of Nigeria. In 2002, Smith
was awarded the Honorary Fellow of the Nigerian Institute of marketing
after

complet
ing

a
textbook on Marketing Management in Nigeria. Smith has an excellent background to serve as the
external reviewer of th
e program.

David Darling

is senior consultant in strategic planning and visioning. Darling is specialist
in community development with an extensive experience in strategic visioning and planning. He
has held a number of strategic visioning and planning i
n academic institution and recently guarded
the College of Business at Kansas State University through its strategic planning process. Darling
has his Ph.D. from Ohio State University in Agricultural Economics. His combined experience on
economic developm
ent and strategic planning will be an asset to the project.