Using Visuals in the Middle School Classroom - UNCA - UNC ...

gayheadtibburInternet and Web Development

Feb 5, 2013 (4 years and 2 months ago)

116 views

Using Visuals to Enhance Student
Communication and Representation
in a Middle School Classroom

A presentation at the Florida Council of
Teachers of Mathematics

by

Nancy Ruppert

UNC Asheville, NC


Theoretical Frameworks

Adolescent Characteristics

Elements of Literacy

Essential/Core Standards

21
st

Century Skills

Facets of Understanding

Six Facets of Understanding


Explain


Interpret


Apply


Have perspective


Empathize


Have self
-
knowledge


Middle School Students are described
as “becoming”
(Powell 2010, TWB, 2010)


Social

peers/pairs/groups


Emotional


egocentric/self/emerging


Intellectual

making connections/to other
content/to literacy skills/to real life


Physical

active/construct/do


Elements Associated with Literacy


Use Images to Enhance
Comprehension


Ask Questions


Activate Background Knowledge


Draw Inferences


Determine Importance


Retell or Synthesize


Monitor Comprehension


Employ Fix
-
Up Strategies


21
st

Century Learning Skills


Communicate


Create


Critical thinking


Collaboration

Theoretical Framework

Adolescents

Literacy

Core Standards

21
st

Century Skills

The Current Goal of Middle Schools


To prepare young people for high school
graduation
and
college.

Middle School Students


Who are failing math or science in 6
th

grade


Who are attending < 80% of the time


Who are behavior problems




Any one of these gives them 1 in 4 chances of
graduating

This is what I hear…


I don’t have time


The pacing guide does not build in anything
other than content and assessment


I don’t have the money to buy the tools



For today, let’s suspend what we have not
control over, and let’s consider ways to
integrate visual literacy into the math
classroom.

Goals


1
)

present four ways to use images in the
middle school math classroom


2
)

engage
in actual experiences related to
middle school mathematics standards
and for
each of these

ways


3
) provide

a
challenge and tools for
implementing the use of visual
images


http://
www.corestandards.org
/


Statement
By: State Board of Education Chairman T. Willard Fair Regarding adoption of the Common
Core State Standards for English/Language Arts and
Mathematics



Today, the Florida State Board of Education,
in a unanimous and unified vote, approved
the adoption of the Common Core State
Standards for English/Language Arts and
Mathematics
.”
Press Release Tuesday, July 27, 2010


Visuals in a Quadrant


Communication and
Collaboration



II


Building Background
Information




I


III


Inquiry/Pondering/Questionin
g

and Real Life Application



IV


Creative

Interpretation

Independent Work





Ruppert, 2011

Level 1:


building background knowledge


Can be used to motivate learners


Can be a tool for finding out what students
already know and/or have misconceptions about


Often used as a warm
-
up


Examples and non
-
examples

Level II


providing tools for communication and
collaboration



This is during class, independent and/or group
work

Level III


developing inquiry and questioning
techniques,



Once students have worked on activities, it is
time to get them to sink their teeth into a
problem.

Level IV


and sharing creative opportunities for
expressing and experiences mathematics.



Allowing students to elaborate on their
learning providing them with choices

Example 1
-

Statistics


6.SP.4. Display numerical data in plots on a number line, including
dot plots, histograms, and box plots.


6.SP.5. Summarize numerical data sets in relation to their context,
such as by:


Reporting the number of observations.


Describing the nature of the attribute under investigation, including
how it was measured and its units of measurement.


Giving quantitative measures of center (median and/or mean) and
variability (inter
-
quartile range and/or mean absolute deviation), as
well as describing any overall pattern and any striking deviations from
the overall pattern with reference to the context in which the data
were gathered.


Relating the choice of measures of center and variability to the shape
of the data distribution and the context in which the data were
gathered.


Let’s play with a few


It is fall…. Consider the topic of Fitness


Possible projects:


Exercise


Eating right


Taking care of one’s self


Taking care of others


Setting goals

Activity 1


Circle graphs of your day


In school


Exercise


Media


Family


Activities you do alone


Activities you do with others

Activity Level II


Fitness and Graphing


Jump rope


Pedometers


Jumping jacks


Activity Level III


Graphing ways to become fit


Using surveys


Allowing students to



analyze data

Activity Level IV


Fitness Plan:

Over break, keep a



record of the number



of minutes you


1) exercise,


2) read, and


3) do a service for someone.


Record your activities. Compute the total number of minutes
for each activity. Write a summary of what you learned
from this activity.


Activity Level IV


Create a Brochure or Podcast




to illustrate how Math and Fitness are related.
Include an encouraging word, information
about What Moves You, and relate
mathematically how fitness looks over time.



(Example: If I jump rope 30 minutes a day for 5 days, I have
jumped rope for 2 1/2 hours.)


Sample II


Ratios and Proportional
Relationships


7.RP.3. Use proportional relationships to solve
multistep ratio and percent problems.
Examples: simple interest, tax, markups and
markdowns, gratuities and commissions, fees,
percent increase and decrease, percent error.


Level I
Ruby Tuesday’s Lunch Menu is displayed
here. Which items would you be most inclined to
order?

Level II


Using an actual menu, choose a
healthy meal. Determine the bill.

Level II


Using Catalogues or Menus allow students
to choose items and calculate tax or discounts…

Level III


It just got better. Or did it?

What is a discount? What does it mean? And Why do business
give discounts?

Level IV


Using catalogues, menus, or the internet,
choose 5 items


Calculate the cost


Determine a 25% discount


Add a 7% sales tax


Describe your findings.

Example 3: Geometry


8.G.1. Verify experimentally the properties of
rotations, reflections, and translations:


a. Lines are taken to lines, and line segments to
line segments of the same length.


b. Angles are taken to angles of the same
measure.


c. Parallel lines are taken to parallel lines.


Level 1 Describe lines, angle
relationships

Level II


have students make a kite

Fold in half, crease towards
bellybutton.

Notice the angle of the fold. This will
be the bottom of the kite.

Flip it over and open the flap you bent.

Tape the spine and tape the stick
perpendicular to the spine.

Tape a long tail to the end of the kite.

Flip the kite over and fold the spine
back and forth.

Punch a hole in the spine and attach
your string.

Level III


Using the following information ,
consider what will make your kite fly
best.


What problems might you encounter?


Would the size of your kite matter?


Wind Strength

#

Description

MPH

Example

What

to fly

0

Calm

0
-
1

Smoke rises vertically

Paper airplanes

1

Light Air

1
-
3

Smoke drifts

Too light for kites

2

Light Breeze

4
-
6

Leaves tremble, flag
waves

gently

Very light kites will
fly

3

Gentle Breeze

7
-
10

Small twigs vibrate, flag

flaps

Ideal for beginners

4

Moderate
Breeze

11
-
16

Dust, papers rise,
branches sway,

Perfect

for stunt
flying

5

Fresh Breeze

17
-
21

Small trees sway,

surface water ripples

Flying takes work

6

Strong Breeze

22
-
27

Large branches move

Highly experienced

7

Moderate Gale

28
-
33

Entire trees will sway

Stay home

Level IV


Make a larger kite out of newspaper or tissue
paper.


Measure the angles, and use your vocabulary
to describe the kite.


Test your kite against the Wind Strength on
two different days.


Describe what happens.

Visuals in a Quadrant


Communication and
Collaboration



II


Building Background
Information




I


III


Inquiry/Pondering/Questionin
g

and Real Life Application



IV


Creative

Interpretation

Independent Work





Ruppert, 2011

21
st

Century Learning Skills


Communicate



Create




Critical thinking




Collaboration


Build Background



Communication/Collabo
ration



Developing inquiry and
questioning



Creativity




The Rubric for a Level IV


___ You followed the directions.



___ The content is accurate.



___ You illustrated the project.



___ You reflected on your learning.



___ Your project was on time.