A Manual for the Preparation of Graduate Theses

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A Manual for the Preparation of Graduate Theses

by Susan L. Smith and John M. Robson

Rose
-
Hulman Institute of Technology

2nd Edition

1994


This manual was endorsed by the
Graduate Studies Committee of Rose
-
Hulman Institute of Technology. We would like to thank Purdue University for
allowing us to use portions of Purdue's

A Manual for the Preparation of
Graduate Theses
, Third Revised Edition, 1982.




2




3


Table of Contents



INTRODUCTION



PROCEDURE FOR THESIS APPROVAL AND DEPOSIT

o

Thesis Format Approval

o

Duplication of Thesis



Deposit Co
py



Major Professor's Copy



Stack Copy



Deposit of Thesis



GENERAL INFORMATION

o

Library Use of Institute Theses

o

Use of Copyrighted Material in Theses

o

Copyrighting of Theses

o

Confidential Status of Thesis

o

Assistance in Preparation of Theses

o

Manuscript Preparation

o

Formatting

o

Duplication Processes



ARRANGEMENT OF CONTENTS

o

Opening Component



Title Page



Abstract Page



Dedication



Acknowledgements



Table of Contents



List of Tables and Figures



Lists of Symbols, Abbreviations, Nomenclature; Glossary

o

Text



Introduction



Body of the Thesis



Summary and
Conclusion



Recommendations

o

Reference Material

o

Styles of Citation

o

Appendices

o

Multi
-
Volume Thesis



PREPARATION OF MANUSCRIPT

o

Paper



Oversized Pages



High
-
speed Printer Output

4


o

Type

o

Appearance

o

Corrections

o

Page Numbering



TABLES AND FIGURES

o

General Instructions

o

Numbering



Tables



Figures

o

Captions of Tables and Figures

o

Photographs



Mounting



Printing



Marking

o

Unusual Material



APPENDICES: Samples

o

A.
Division Headings

o

B.
Example of Title Page

o

C.
Varieties of Tables of Contents

o

D.
Varieties of Lists of Tables

o

E.
Varieties of Lists of Figures

o

F.
Examples of Reference Page

o

G.
Reference Style and Composition Manuals




5


Introduction

The work
you have done up to this point in preparing to write your thesis is
outside the province of this manual. It assumes that your research is complete,
that your final thesis draft has been examined and approved by your major
professor and committee members, a
nd that you are now ready to prepare the
thesis in final form.

This manual sets out the requirements for thesis format established by the
Graduate Studies Committee of Rose
-
Hulman Institute of Technology. These
requirements must be met as a minimum in orde
r to procure the approval of the
Director of the Library. Individual departments of the Institute may have
various additional requirements or may specify in greater detail those that
follow. We urge you to learn first from your own graduate committee what,

if
any, special departmental requirements apply to you and then, taking these into
consideration, to prepare your thesis in accordance with the instructions of this
manual.

The format approval review of the deposit copy of your thesis is intended to
assis
t you in meeting the requirements of this manual. You are urged to consult
the Director of the Library if you have questions. Because there may be
problems, do not wait until the deadline periods.


Procedure for Thesis Approval and Deposit

This chapter pr
esents the required procedure for thesis approval and deposit. A
candidate who fails to meet these requirements will not graduate and must
register for the following quarter. For regulations governing this registration,
you are referred to the Director of
Graduate Studies.

Thesis Format Approval

The deadline for thesis format approval is two weeks before commencement.
Following the defense, take the unbound corrected copy of your completed
thesis to the Director of the Library. The paper for the format appr
oval copy
must be 8 1/2 by 11 inch but does not have to meet quality requirements. The
Director of the Library will provide an approval statement that the student gives
to the Director of Graduate Studies.



6


Duplication of Thesis

After thesis format approval, have the thesis duplicated. Three copies
(double
-
sided)
are required by the Graduate Studies Committee. Additional copies may
be required by the department or may be produced at the student's option for
his or her own use. Dup
lication costs are the responsibility of the student.

Deposit Copy

One copy of your thesis, called the deposit copy, is deposited with the Director
of Graduate Studies for addition to the Institute Library theses collection and
must meet the specifications

for quality paper, typing, format, duplication, and
the other requirements set forth in this manual. You must pay for binding the
deposit copy.

Major Professor's Copy

You must give one copy of your thesis to your major professor and it becomes
his or her
property. You must pay for binding the major professor's copy.

Stack Copy

One copy of your thesis serves as the circulating document. This copy is called
the "stack copy." The library will pay for binding the stack copy.

Deposit of Thesis

No later than one

week prior to commencement, deliver all copies to the
Director of Graduate Studies accompanied by a receipt from the Director of the
Library stating that you have paid for all binding.


GENERAL INFORMATION

Library Use of Institute Theses

The deposit copy

of each thesis becomes a part of the thesis collection of the
Institute Library and is available for review. Although you may wish to
examine model theses already in the collection as examples, the guidelines in
this manual must be followed. Ask the Direc
tor of the Library for model
suggestions.



7


Use of Copyrighted Material in Theses

If you quote extensively from copyrighted material, you should obtain
permission from the author or publisher, whichever holds the copyright. Such
permission is usually
granted on condition that acknowledgment is made. If
payment is required, this is your responsibility. Be very sure that you obtain
permission to use all such material before you submit your thesis for approval.

Copyrighting of Theses

If you want to have y
our thesis copyrighted, you must have a letter from your
major professor and the head of your department addressed to the Director of
Graduate Studies requesting that the thesis be copyrighted. In this letter they
should state the reasons they consider it
desirable or necessary.

Confidential Status of Thesis

If your thesis is to be placed in confidential status, consult the Director of
Graduate Studies for information.

Assistance in Preparation of Thesis

This manual assumes that you have adequate command of

the English language
and its constructions, spelling, and usage. Assistance, if needed, should be
sought in standard dictionaries and handbooks of composition. See Appendix
G. You may submit your manuscript for review at the Learning Center.

Manuscript Pr
eparation

We suggest that you become thoroughly familiar with the requirements of this
manual and with the special publication requirements of your department. It is
imperative that the final manuscript adhere to these rules as set down. You bear
the respo
nsibility for the appearance, the form, and content of your thesis. All
copies must be identical.

Formatting

Your thesis must be printed double
-
sided.


All four margins must be set to 1
inch.


Gutter margin must be set to 0.5 inch with the gutter position
set to
“left.”

If you are using Microsoft Office, the following information should be
helpful:

8




To properly format page numbers, the header must be set to “different
odd and even pages.”




In the Page Setup dialogue box where you can set the margins,
gutter,
and gutter position, there is a Multiple Pages drop down box.


Select
“Mirror Margins.”

Duplication Processes

Both xerographic copies and copies printed on a letter quality or laser printer
are acceptable. In either case, you must use paper which m
eets the
specifications set forth in this manual. The only exception is the listing of a
computer program in which case a letter
-
quality printer need not be used.
Typed copies are also acceptable, but not recommended. Any other methods of
reproduction must

be discussed with the Director of the Library and your
duplication service before you begin to prepare your final copy.

Note: Preparation and duplication of theses can be expensive. It is suggested
that you have a clear understanding in advance of the
cost of photographic
work, drawings, and duplication before final typing is started. You should
consult the Institute Printing and Duplication Center for information about
special materials required for the reproducing of the graphics used in
illustrating
your thesis.


ARRANGEMENT OF CONTENTS

Opening Component

Title Page

A title page is required. This page is the primary way by which the thesis will
be identified. This page is not numbered, but it is counted as the first page (i) of
the opening component.
The contents of the title page are as follows:



Title.

This must be the full official title of the thesis. The title should be
a meaningful description of the content of the thesis. Information
retrieval systems use the words in the title to locate theses.



Candidate's name.

Your full name is preferable to the use of initials.
Whatever form you select, use it consistently throughout the thesis.

9




Degree.

Write out the full name of the degree for which you are a
candidate. Candidates must be very sure that they
use the precise degree
name, for example, Master of Science in Chemical Engineering.



Date.

This is determined by the month and year in which you qualify for
graduation.

A

blank page following the title page

is required
.

Abstract Page

An abstract page must

accompany all theses for approval. Along with text of
the abstract itself, the abstract page must contain a heading, the candidate's
names as it appears on the title page with the last name first, the abbreviation of
the degree, the name of the institutio
n granting the degree, the month and year
the degree is obtained, the title of the thesis (wording and punctuation to agree
exactly with the Title Page) and the name of the major professor.

Place the heading ABSTRACT, in capital letters, centered, without
punctuation, two inches from the top of the page. The rest of the text begins
four spaces below the heading, is double
-
spaced, and is flush with the left
-
hand
margin. The text of the abstract should include a statement of the thesis
problem, a brief exposi
tion of the research, and a condensed summary of
findings. Remember, the abstract may be used separate from the main text of
the thesis for reference purposes. Therefore, the abstract should not make
reference to any tables or figures nor to other works. A
lso, all nonstandard
symbols or abbreviations should be defined and the use of equations should be
avoided. The maximum length of the abstract is 350 words not including the
first paragraph as described above. The abstract is neither counted nor
numbered.

Dedication

A dedication is optional. If used, it should be brief and centered on its own
page. No heading is necessary.

Acknowledgments

Acknowledgments are also optional, but most theses do include a brief
statement of appreciation or recognition of specia
l assistance. If you intend to
include them, place them on their own page with the heading,
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS, in capital letters, centered, without punctuation,
two inches from the top of the page. The text begins four spaces below.

10


Table of Contents

A tab
le of contents is required. The function of a table of contents is to allow
the thesis to be used efficiently. It provides an overview of the thesis' structure
and an index for selective reading of the thesis. All materials following the
Table of Contents
are listed in it. No preceding material is listed. The titles of
parts, sections, or chapters, and their principal subdivisions should be listed in
the Table of Contents and must be worded exactly as they appear in the body of
the thesis. The heading TABLE

OF CONTENTS, in capital letters, is centered,
without punctuation, two inches from the top of the page. The listing begins at
the left
-
hand margin four spaces below the heading.

List of Tables and Figures

You should list any tables or figures used in the
thesis on a separate page. The
listing begins at the left
-
hand margin four spaces below the heading. The List
of Tables or List of Figures uses exactly the same numbers and captions as
appear with the tables and figures in the text or in the appendices. Th
e heading
LIST OF TABLES or LIST OF FIGURES, in capital letters, is centered,
without punctuation two inches from the top of the page.

Lists of Symbols, Abbreviations, Nomenclature; Glossary

If needed in your thesis, place these lists after the Lists of Ta
bles and Figures in
the Preliminaries. Follow a form acceptable to your field of study.

Text

There are no specific requirements of the Graduate Studies Committee for the
internal organization of your text. The requirements are only that you use some
standard scheme of organization and that you use one system consistently
throughout the thesis. The recommendations presented here are not intended to
be restrictive. You can chose your own system, if your major professor agrees.

Introduction

The Introduct
ion may constitute either the entire first chapter or only the
opening statement of the first chapter. If the introduction is to be included as a
separate chapter, the heading, INTRODUCTION, is the title of the first chapter
(or major division) and its pla
cement is consistent with that of other chapter
titles. If the introduction is included only as an opening statement, it requires no
special treatment.

11


Body of the Thesis

This is the substance of the thesis, the detailed written statement of your
research.

The internal organization of this material into chapters, sections, and
subsections is up to you and your major professor. Divisions and subdivisions
should be introduced by brief descriptive headings which, by variations of
format, indicate the relative
importance of the text divisions.

Summary and Conclusions

These are usually treated as the last major division of the Text.

Recommendations

The Recommendations section follows the Conclusions only if the subject

matter permits and if you wish

to include it.


Reference Material

There is a wide diversity of content and location of notes in the publications of
the sciences, the humanities, and the social sciences. You are strongly
encouraged to use the in
-
text or parenthetical system of documenta
tion which
cites the work by its designated number in the List of References and relevant
paging. Your reference might look like the following:



. . . The evidence for the theory has been widely



explained [4: 382
-
383].



Every thesis makes use of
other writings, either in direct quotation or by
reference. Your thesis must contain a List of References. Pertinent works that
have been consulted but not specifically cited should be listed under the
subheading General References, and references specific
ally cited should be
listed under the subheading Cited References.. Place the List of References
immediately after the text. See Appendix F.

The references begin with a cover sheet bearing the heading LIST OF
REFERENCES, in capital letters, centered, and w
ithout punctuation. This page
is neither counted nor numbered. The heading is repeated on the first page of
the LIST OF REFERENCES itself, two inches from the top, centered, and
without punctuation. The list of references begins four spaces below the
headi
ng.

12


In general, each item consulted in the preparation of the thesis, whether cited
specifically or mentioned in general, should be numbered and listed in an
alphabetical order. The elements are the following: Author(s), Title, Publisher,
and Year. The ele
ments should be given in full form to facilitate easy retrieval
by others. Do not abbreviate any useful data, for example an author's first name
if given or the journal title in full. The List of References is double
-
spaced. For
additional guidance consult

your advisor. See Appendix G for style authorities.

Style of Citation

Books

Single Author

Ulrich, Henri.
Introduction to Industrial Polymers
. Munchen:


Hanser, 1972.



Multiple Authors

Edwin, G., and Thomas Roddam.
Principles of Feedback Design
. New


York: Hayden Book Co., 1964.


Colcaser, Roy A., Donald A. Neamen, and Charles F. Hawkins.


Electronic Circuit Analysis: Basic Principles
. New York: John


Wiley, 1984.



No personal author, list by sponsoring agency

National Semic
onductor.
Series 32000 Microprocessor Databook
. Santa


Clara, Calif.: National Semiconductor, 1988.



Periodical Articles

Single author

Grounds, Preston W. "Numerical Analysis of Finite Frequency


Selective Surfaces with Rectangular Patches

of Various Aspect


Ratios."
IEEE Transactions on Antennas and Propagation

39



(1991): 569
-
575.



Multiple authors

Kohl, M., and J.P. Harrison. "SQUID Magnetometer Designed for High


Temperature Superconductors."
Cryogenics

31

(1991): 369
-
372.


Rao, P. Srinivasa, P.K. Aravindan and K. Ramanjaneyulu. "Buckling


Safety of Cooling tower Shells: Evaluation of Some Important


Code Provisions."
ACI Structural Journal

88

(1991): 325
-
329.


Rabitti, Fausto, Elisa Bertino, Won Kim, and Darrell Woelk. "A Model


of Authorization for Next
-
generation Database Systems."
ACM


Transactions on Database Systems

16

(1991): 88
-
131.



No author, list by title

13


"Quality Programs Drive Heat Tra
nsfer Technology."
Chemical


Engineering

98

(June 1991): 125
-
126.



Parts of Books

Conference paper

Chang, J., W.F. Filter, G.J. Lockwood, and B.T. Neyer. "Photonic


Methods of High Speed Analog Data Recording." In
Proceedings of


the 16th International Congress on High Speed Photography and


Photonics
, edited by M. Andre and M. Hugenschmidt, 12
-
21.


Bellingham, Wash.: SPIE
-
The International Society for Optical


Engineering, 1985.



Article in Book

Locke, Doug. "The Ada Programming Support Environment." In
The Ada


Programming Language: A Tutorial
, edited by Sabina H. Saib and


Robert E. Fritz, 46
-
47. New York: IEEE Computer Society, 1983.



Chapter of Book

Brewster, James H. "Assignment of Stereochemical Configuration by


Chemical Methods." Chap. 17 in
Elucidation of Organic


Structures by Physical and Chemical Methods
, edited by K.W.


Bentley and G.W. Kirby, Part 3. 2nd ed. New York: Wile
y
-


Interscience, 1972.



Unpublished Materials

Conversation or interview

Smith, James A. Interview with author, 3 February 1991.



Letters

Hulbert, Samuel F. Letter to author, 21 June 1989.



telephone call

Lebaric, Jovan. Telephone call with

Donald Morin, 2 February 1991.



Thesis

Acharya, Mukund. "Veiling Glare in the F411 Image Intensifier."


Master's thesis, Rose
-
Hulman Institute of Technology, 1990.



Internet

(WWW, FTP, IRC, etc.)

Read this:

MLA
-
Style Citations of Electronic Sources
.

Appendices

Some students will not need to include an Appendix. An appendix contains
supplementary material, not immediately essential to an understanding of the
14


subject. This section is separated from the preceding material by a cover sheet
with the heading APPENDICE
S, in capital letters (or if there is only one,
APPENDIX), centered, and without punctuation. This sheet is neither counted
nor numbered.

The APPENDICES may be divided into Appendix A, Appendix B, etc.,
depending on the kinds and amounts of materials used.

These divisions should
be treated as first order subdivisions.

The letter and title for each Appendix should be shown at the top of the first
page of the individual Appendix. If separate sheets are used for the
identification of individual Appendices, the
se sheets are numbered and
counted. Each Appendix with its title, if it has one, should be listed separately
in the Table of Contents as a first order subdivision under the heading
APPENDICES. See Sample C. Tables and figures in the Appendices must be
numb
ered and captioned and also listed in the List of Figures and List of Tables
in the opening component. Appendices must meet the left
-
h
and margin
requirement of 1 inch

but not necessarily the requirements for top, bottom,
right
-
hand margins, and line spacin
g.

Multi
-
Volume Thesis

The length of the thesis may necessitate two or more volumes. When more than
one volume is used, the separations should come at the end of major divisions
of the thesis. The Title Page is repeated in each volume and all are identical

except for the word "Volume I," "Volume II," etc., just below the title. The
Title Pages of Volumes II, III, etc., are neither counted nor numbered. All other
preliminaries are in Volume I. In numbering the pages of the text and reference
material, number
ing is continuous from Volume I through the end of the last
volume.


PREPARATION OF MANUSCRIPT

Paper

Your thesis must be

typed or printed double
-
sided on

8 1/2 by 11 inch white
paper. The deposit copy must be 25%, or greater, rag content paper. All other
copies may be on regular 20
-
pound typing paper. Photographic paper may be
used only in special circumstances. See page 22 for information about its use in

theses.

15


Oversized Pages

Oversized pages up to 11 by 22 1/2 inch are acceptable without special
permission as long as the folded edge is at least 1 1/2 inches from the left edge
to permit unfolding, and the right edge lines up evenly with the standard 8
1/2
by 11 inch sheets. The page number appears in the upper right
-
hand corner or
in the middle of the sheet as usual. The use of any sheets larger that 11 by 22
1/2 inches require consultation with the Director of Graduate Studies.

High
-
speed Printer Outpu
t

High
-
speed printer output sheets may be included in the text or the appendices,
if they meet the requirements for paper and margins as stated in this manual.
Appendix sheets do not have to conform to the requirements for top, bottom,
and right
-
hand margi
ns; however, a 1
inch margin is still required at the left.
Each sheet, whether included in the text or in the appendices, must have a page
number appropriate to its placement in the thesis.


Type

All text must be rendered using black ribbon or toner which
produces sharp,
clear type. Only standard type sizes such as pica, elite, and executive are
acceptable, and only one type face may be used throughout the thesis This type
face must have all characters needed to complete the thesis. This includes upper
and
lower case as well as all needed punctuation marks. Italics may be used
only when appropriate, for example when rendering book and journal titles, or
foreign terms. For the generation of symbols or special characters select
appropriate software. Handwritte
n equations and formulas are not acceptable.
Use of any nonstandard type styles must be approved by the Director of the
Library.

Appearance

The text should be double
-
spaced throughout with the exception of appendices
as noted above using margins of 1 inch
for the top, b
ottom, and right sides and
1

inch for the left side. Printing should not extend more than a single line below
the bottom margin

line, and then, only to complete the last line of a chapter,
paragraph, subdivision, or figure caption. A new para
graph at the bottom of a
page must have at least two full lines of print, or it should begin the next page.
The page may be shortened to allow this. The last word on the page should not
16


be hyphenated. The line should be short of the margin and the whole wo
rd
placed on the following page.

Corrections

No interlineations or crossing out of letters or words are acceptable. The use of
correcting fluid is not acceptable on the deposit copy.

Page Numbering

Page numbers are placed without punctuation 1/2 inch from
the top edge of the
sheet, either centered over the text or in the upper right
-
hand margin.
Consistency of treatment of page numbers is more important than choice of
position. The opening components of the thesis are numbered in consecutive
lower case Roma
n numerals. The Title Page is considered to be page i, but the
number does not appear on the page. Roman numeral ii appears on the first
page following the Title Page and Abstract. Every page on which any typing or
drawing appears has a number except: The
Title Page is counted but not
numbered. The abstract page is neither numbered nor counted. Cover sheets
preceding the Bibliography and the Appendices are neither numbered nor
counted. The Text and all Reference pages, including the Appendices are
numbered
consecutively in arabic numerals, beginning with 2 on the second
page of the text.

TABLES AND FIGURES

General Instructions

In preparing both tables and figures, use a computer wherever possible. Tables
or figures should conform to the same regulations
governing the text. If the
computer printout is columnar output to be used in the Appendices, it may be
listed with Appendix letters and headings rather than as tables and figures with
numbers and captions. Regardless of the process used to duplicate the t
hesis, all
tables and figures, except the photographs, used in the text must be on paper
meeting the requirements.

Place the whole table or figure, including the caption, on the page within the
prescribed margins. A table or figure too large to fit within
margins may be
divided and continued on the following page or pages. Tables or figures which
are slightly oversized may be reduced to fit within the margins. The bottom of a
table or figure usually faces the lower edge of the page on which it appears;
howe
ver, if its size and format require horizontal placement, the bottom of the
17


table or figure faces the outer edge of the page. Tables and figures of a half
-
page or less in length should appear on the same page with the text, separated
from the text above an
d below by triple
-
spacing. Tables and figures larger than
half
-
page are better placed on separate sheets. Two or more small tables or
figures should be grouped on a single page. In all cases, tables and figures
should follow the first reference as soon as
practical to aid the reader.

Numbering

Tables and figures are numbered in separate series. Each table and figure,
including any in the Appendices, must have a unique number in its own series.
The numbers in each series must appear in consecutive order in t
he thesis.
Arabic numerals, with capital and lower case letters for the captions, are used
for tables and figures. To show unique numbering in a thesis in parts, the
numbers of Tables and Figures may be expressed as 1.1, 1.1, 1.3, etc. Tables
and Figures i
n the Appendices may use numbering such as A1, A2, A3, etc. for
each series.

Note : Special systems of numbering may be required by some departments.
These should be reviewed with the Director of Graduate Studies before the
thesis is prepared in final form
.

Tables

The word "Table" (with T capitalized), the table's number and its caption are
placed above the table so that one blank line is left between the bottom line of
the caption and the top line of the table. If any table continues to the following
or
subsequent pages, the top line of the page reads, for example, "Table 16,
continued." The caption is not repeated. Leave one blank line before continuing
the body of the table.

Figures

The word "Figure" (with F capitalized), the figure's number, and its ca
ption are
placed below the figure. Leave one blank line between the bottom edge of the
figure and the word "Figure," its number, and its caption. If any figure
continues to the following or subsequent pages, on the second line below the
bottom edge of the
figure, type, for example, "Figure 16, continued." The
caption is not repeated.


18


Captions of Tables and Figures

Every table and figure must have a caption. Together with the number, the
caption may be either centered or may start at the left
-
hand margin, p
laced at
the top or bottom of the item. There are two ways of centering: you may center
the word Table (or Figure), the table number, and its caption on one or more
lines, or you may center the word Table or Figure and its number on one line
and center the

caption on the following line or lines. Horizontal or vertical
position of captions and numbers of tables and figures is always the same as the
positioning of the tables or figures themselves.

Captions should be as short as possible. Caption wording ident
ical to that used
above each table below each figure must be repeated in the List of Tables and
the List of Figures. Capital and lower case letters are preferred for captions. If a
lengthy caption is essential, a brief descriptive statement may be used in
the
List of Tables or List of Figures. Use the same statement above table or below
figure and end it with a period. Continue with the needed additional statement.
If the caption is longer than one line, double space between lines. Consistent
treatment is r
equired.

Photographs

Mounting

Smaller than page
-
size photographs should be firmly mounted with either
adhesive specially prepared for photographic work or self
-
adhesive tissue or
dry
-

mounting tissue. If you are uncertain about the correct material or
procedures, consult the duplicating printing center.

The photographs should be mounted on the same kind of paper used in the
thesis in which they are to appear. [Note : Do not permanently mount
photographs before you obtain thesis approval.] Photographs sh
ould not be
mounted to obtain thesis approval. Mount photographs permanently only after
the thesis is duplicated. The Deposit Copy must contain the original
photographs. Other copies may also have photographs or Xerox reproductions
as your committee may de
sire.

Printing

Photographs may either be printed photographically on page
-
size photographic
paper or affixed on page
-
size paper used in the balance of the thesis for the
Deposit Copy.

19


Marking

If photographs must be marked, it is important and necessary to
use India ink.
Typing on the face of glossy prints will not reproduce on microfilm.

Unusual Material

We urge you to obtain the advice of the Director of Graduate Studies regarding
the preparation and presentation of all unusual material and to consult your

duplicating service to determine if the duplication of the material is possible
and practical. This is especially true with colored materials.


Appendices

A.

Division Headings

(page requires graphics)

B.

Example of Title Page

C.

Varieties of Tables of Contents

D.

Varieties of Lists of Tables

E.

Varieties of Lists of Figures

F.

Example of Reference Page

G.

Reference Style and Composition
Manuals



20


Appendix A: Division Headings


21






22


Appendix B: Example of Title Page


THE EFFECT OF NUCLEATION KINETICS

ON CRYSTAL SIZE DISTRIBUTION



A Thesis

Submitted to the Faculty


of


Rose
-
Hulman Institute of Technology


by


John Paul Jones


In Partial
Fulfillment of the

Requirements for the Degree


of


Master of Science in Chemical Engineering


May 1984




23


Appendix C: Varieties of Tables of Contents


Variety 1:




iv


TABLE OF CONTENTS



Page

LIST OF TABLES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . v


LIST OF FIGURES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . vi


BACKGROUND AND LITERATURE SURVEY

. . . . . . . . . . . 1



General. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1


Forced
-
Convection Vaporization . . . . . . . . . . . 2


Two
-
Phase Pressure Drop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8


Heat Transfer. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . 13


Forced Convection Surface Bonding . . . . . . . . 17


Incomplete Evaporation . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22


APPARATUS AND TEST PROCEDURE . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32



General Flow System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32



Test Section . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36


Instrumentation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40


Temperature Measurement . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40


Pressure Measurement. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45


Electric Po
wer Measurement. . . . . . . . . . . . 46


Test Procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47


DATA. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56


RESULTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62



Heat Transfer Coefficients . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62


Correlations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75


CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS . . . . . . . . . . . . 89



Conclusions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89


Recommendat
ions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91


BIBLIOGRAPHY. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93


APPENDICES



Appendix A Measurement Errors . . . . . . . . . . . 102


Appendix B Calculated Results . . . . . . . . . . . 104


VITA. . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106



24



Variety 2:


iv


TABLE OF CONTENTS



Page

LIST OF FIGURES . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . v


LIST OF ABBREVIATIONS AND NOMENCLATURE. . . . . . . . . vi


INTRODUCTION. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1


CHAPTER I
-

THE HISTORY OF THE OLYMPIC GAMES. . . . . . 3



Ancient Greece through Roman Empire. . . .

. . . . . 3


Interval of the Dark Ages. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9


Revival in France 1896 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10


Twentieth Century. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12


CHAPTER II
-

CONTINUING INFLUENCE OF


ANCIENT TRADITIONS
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14



Spirit, National Pride, Sportsmanship. . . . . . . . 14


Changes in Performance of Some Games . . . . . . . . 22


Addition of Winter Olympics. . . . . . . . . . . . . 25


Tribute Paid to Greece in 1896 . . . . . . . . . . . 27


CHAPTER III
-

MODERN SCHEDULE OF EVENTS AND CONTESTS. . 29



Categories and Events. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29


Participating Countries. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32


Significanc
e of Amateur Requirement. . . . . . . . . 34


Recent Records Made and Broken . . . . . . . . . . . 36


CHAPTER IV
-

1972 OLYMPICS IN MUNICH. . . . . . . . . . 38




Anticipated Attendance, Weather Conditions, etc. . . 38


Factors Which May Caus
e Difficult Conditions . . . . 40


Relations with Eastern European Countries


(ef. Sydney 1956). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40


Racial Boycott Threatened by Some Countries . . . 43


Possibility of On
-
the
-
Spot Rioting


an
d Demonstrations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46


Records Which May Be Broken. . . . . . . . . . . . . 48


Effect on German Tourist Economy . . . . . . . . . . 53


CONCLUSION. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55


NOTES . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56


BIBLIOGRAPHY. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61




25


Variety 3:


iv




TABLE OF CONTENTS




Page


LIST OF TABLES. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . v


CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1



Statement of the Problem . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1


Objective
s of the Investigation. . . . . . . . . . . 3


Definitions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8


Organization of the Thesis . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11


CHAPTER II REVIEW OF THE LITERATURE. . . . . . . . . 12



Theoretical Base . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12


Experimental Use . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15


Control Study. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21


CHAPTER III METHODOLOGY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24



Subjects .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24


Group Description. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28


Questionnaire. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31


Interviews . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35


Criterion Measurement. . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . 38


Statistical Analysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42


CHAPTER IV RESULTS AND DISCUSSION. . . . . . . . . . 45



Results. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45


Examination of Data . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . 45


Experimental Results. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49


Validity Measurement. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54


Discussion. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58


CHAPTER V SUMMARY CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS . 62



Summary. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62


Conclusions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64


Recommendations. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65


LIST OF REFERENCES. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69


APPENDIX. .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71




Variety 4:

26



iv


TABLE OF CONTENTS



Page

LIST OF TABLES. . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . v


LIST OF FIGURES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . vi


INTRODUCTION. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1


CHAPTER


1 INTERSECTIONS OF PRIME AND PRIMARY IDEALS OF C . . . 5



Background and Preliminary Results . . . . . . . . . 5


Main Results . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12


2 THE PRIMARY IDEALS OF G. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36



Background . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36


Analysis .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39


3 INTERSECTIONS OF PRIME AND PRIMARY IDEALS OF G . . . 53


References. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76


APPENDICES



Appendix A . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81


Appendix B .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86


Appendix C . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93


VITA. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99






27


Appendix D: Varieties of Lists of Tables


Variety 1:




vi




LIST OF TABLES


Table Page


1. Weight gain comparison in children fed


test diets. . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . 12



2. Basic Recipe for noodles with variations. . . . . . . 21



3. Relation between increased fish protein


concentrate (FPC) or soy flour and increased


protein content in noodles (flour replications) . . .
24


4. Percentage of protein per 100 grams of


sample on a dry basis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26



5. Relation between increased fish protein


concentrate and increase of protein content


in biscuits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26



6. Mean taste panel scores for noodles


containing varying percentages of fish


protein concentrate and/or soy flour . . . . . . . . 28


Appendix

Table


7. Score sheet u
sed for organoleptic


evaluation of noodles with FPC and soy flour. . . . . 42



8. Nitrogen content of noodles with various


amounts of FPC and soy flour by macro
-
Kjeldahl


method . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43



9. Moisture loss of noodles with FPC and soy


flour during drying in the vacuum oven for


15 hours. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46





Variety 2:


vi

28





LIST OF TABLES


Table Page


1. Correlation Analysis for DD


ij


Directional Scores . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24


2. Correlation Analysis for D
E


ij


Directional Scores . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25


3. Estimated and Actual Correlations Between



Nondirectional Difference Scores . . . . . . . . 27


4. Inter Correlations of the Potential



Moderator Variables. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29


Appendix

Tables


1A. Intercorrelations Among the Nineteen Scores



for Each Subject . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40


2A. Intercorrelations Among the First Ten Scores



for Each Subject
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41


3A. Intercorrelations Among the Last Nine Scores



for Each Subject . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42






29


Appendix E: Varieties of Lists of Figures


Variety 1:


viii




LIST OF FIGURES


Figure Page


1. The Fractionation of RNA in Sodium


Acetate Solutions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
6


2. Initial Reaction Rate as a function of


LMW RNA Concentration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20



3. The Purification of LMA RNA with DEAE
-
Cellulose:


Its Effect on Aminoacylation. . . . . . . . . . . . 23



4. UV Scan of Pea Root LMW RNA .
. . . . . . . . . . . 27



5. The Hydrolysis of LMW RNA with


Snake Venom (Russell's Viper) . . . . . . . . . . . 39



6. The Presence of Cytokinin Activity in Pea


Root LMW RNA. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43



7. A Comparison of
Lysly
-
Synthetase Extracted


from Fresh and Frozen Tissue . . . . . . . . . . . 46



8. The Effect of LMW RNA and Amino Acid


Concentration on Total Amount of tRNA Acylated . . 51


Appendix

Figure


9. The Synthetase Activity of the Protein


Ab
sorbed on Various Amounts of Calcium


Phosphate Gel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88


10. The Fractionation of the Synthetase


Preparation by Gel Filtration . . . . . . . . . . . 89







30


Variety 2:


viii




LIST OF FIGURES


Figure Page


1. Siegel Modified Johnson Mechanism . . . . . . . . . 5



2. Mechanism of the Proposed
Reaction of


2
-
Methylenecyclohexylmethanol . . . . . . . . . . . 10



3. Synthesis of 2
-
Methylenecyclohexylmethanol. . . . . 14


Appendix

Figure


A1. IR Spectrum of 1, 2
-
Methylenecyclohexane. . . . . . 43


A2. NMR Spectrum of 1, 2
-
Methylenecyclohe
xane . . . . . 43


A3. IR Spectrum of 2
-
Methylenecyclohexylmethanol


Acetate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44


A4. NMR Spectrum of 2
-
Methylenecyclohexylmethanol


Acetate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45






31


Appendix F: Examples of Reference Page


Variety 1:


REFERENCES





General References




American Chemical Society. Committee on Analytical



Reagents.
Reagent Chemicals: American



Chemical Society Specifications.

6th ed.



Washington: The Society, 1981.


Anderson, James A., Michael T. Gately, P. Andrew



Penz and Dean R. Collins. "Radar Signal



Categorization Using a Neural Network,"



Proceedings of the IEEE

78

(1990): 1646
-



1657.


Elmor
e, William C. and Mark A. Heald.
Physics of



Waves.

New York: Dover Publications, 1969



(1985 Printing).


Stevenson, Williams D. Jr.
Elements of Power



System Analysis.

4th ed. New York: McGraw
-



Hill Book Company, 1982.


Wang,
Jing. "Text
-
to
-
Speech Conversion Using



Artificial Neural Systems," Master's thesis,



Rose
-
Hulman Institute of Technology, 1991.





32


Variety 2:

Cited References




1. Sanford, Paul A. Letter to Noel E. Moore, 25



November 1988.


2.
Hulbert, Samuel F. Telephone call with author,



13 March 1992.


3. Cybenko, George, Lyle Kipp, Lynn Pointer and



David Kuck. "Supercomputer Performance


[TM]


Evaluation and the Perfect Benchmark
s ."



In
Conference Proceedings 1990 International



Conference on Supercomputing, June 11
-
15,



1990, Amsterdam, The Netherlands,

254
-
266.



New York: Association for Computing Machinery,



1990?


4. Kine, Benjamin B. and R.W. Nov
ac. "Mehtacrylic



Polymers." Vol. 15 of
Encyclopedia of



Chemical Technology,

377
-
398. 3rd ed. New



York: John Wiley, 1981.


5. "RIM Auto Scrap Gets Recycled."
Machine Design



64

(6 February 1992): 17.


6.
BrainMaker Users Guide
and Reference Manual.

3rd



ed. Sierra Madre, Calif.: California



Scientific Software, 1989.






33


Appendix G: Reference Style and Composition Manuals


Reference Style Manuals

The choice of a suitable style for referencing sources of
information used in the
thesis is diverse. What is important is consistency and that the data cited in the
REFERENCE section of this manual be included. You have some latitude in
how to format the citation elements. Your major professor will have
preferenc
es based on the standards used in his or her discipline.

In addition to guidelines for authors in preparing periodical articles provided by
the various professional engineering societies that are on reserve, the following
titles are found in Logan Library:


Achert, Walter S. and Joseph Gibaldi.
The MLA Style Manual
. 3rd


ed. New York: Modern Language Association of America, 1985.



The Chicago Manual of Style for Authors, Editors, and Copywriters
.


14th ed. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1993
.




Dodd, Janet S., ed.; Marianne C. Brogan, advisory editor.
The ACS


Style Guide: A Manual for Authors and Editors
. Washington:


American Chemical Society, 1986.



Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association
.


4th ed. Washi
ngton: The Association, 1994.





Composition Manuals

Other useful titles for better understanding the rules of English composition and
spelling are:


Day, Robert A.
Scientific English: A Guide for Scientists and Other


Professionals
. Phoenix: Oryx
Press, 1992.



Flexner, Stuart Berg.
Random House Unabridged Dictionary
. 2nd


ed., rev. and updated. New York: Random House, 1993.


34


Millward, Celia.
Handbook for Writers
. 2nd ed. New York: Holt,


Rinehart and Winston, 1983.



The Oxford Dictionary
for Scientific Writers and Editors
. Oxford:


Clarendon Press, 1991.



Parker, Sybil P., editor in chief.
McGraw
-
Hill Dictionary of Scientific


and Technical Terms
. 5th ed. New York: McGraw
-
Hill, 1994.



Webster's Standard Style Manual
. Springfield,

Mass.: Meriam
-


Webster, 1985.



Webster's Third New International Dictionary of the English


Language, Unabridged
. Springfield, Mass.: G & C. Merriam Co.,


1971.