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Oct 28, 2013 (3 years and 8 months ago)

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Syllabus for Principles of Macroeconomics (
1109ECON201A852
)

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-
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Faculty Contact Information:



Name: Dr. Charles T. Brumfield



E
-
mail address: cbrumfield@asia.umuc.edu



Address:

c/oUMUC, Unit 15556, APO AP 96205
-
5556



Contacts: I check email daily.

Course Description

An introduction to the study of the macroeconomy. The objective is to apply select

macroeconomic theories to real world situations. Discussion covers economic growt
h,

unemployment, inflation, and the roles of monetary policy and fiscal policy in
determining macroeconomic performance. Students may receive credit for only one of
the following courses: ECON 201 or ECON 205.


Course Introduction

This class is concerned
with economic method and the fruits of that method. We will start
with a description of the tools of economics, such as basic definitions, science, logic, and
some math. The tools will be discussed in sufficient detail for students to acquire a good
backgr
ound to continue with the class.

Your study of economics will then move into a brief excursion into the basic schools of
economic thought. Economists make different assumptions about the "way things are"
and they use different tools to analyze the economy
. Not surprisingly, they come to
different conclusions. This section will provide you with some ways to think critically
about economics and the economy. We will learn about classical, Keynesian, monetarist,
and supply
-
side schools of thought.

Applying th
e tools, we will learn how income and employment in the economy are
determined. This is a large question, and there are many parts to the answer. We need to
know what the various definitions of income are, and examine the role of financial and
political in
stitutions. Lastly, we will study international economics. This section will put
the question of income determination into a larger context. The course will cover a great
deal of information, but the other important thing to be obtained from the course is
an
understanding of the way economists think about problems. The facts and theories
change over time, but the way economists reason has remained fairly stable, and has
resulted in all the facts and theories.

Course Outcomes

1. identify key macroeconomic i
ndicators and trends, and explain how they influence

professional and personal economic decision making

2. discuss the roles of government and institutions in the macroeconomy

2. discuss the roles of government and institutions in the macroeconomy

3. use k
nowledge of the factors that drive the global economy to make informed
decisions


Position of Course in Curriculum


Role in Program and Degree Requirements

ECON 201 is the first of two economics courses that most business majors must take.
Students

may als
o earn a minor in economics.

Relation to Hallmark Competencies

H1. Historical and Cultural Perspectives

H2. Written Communications

H3. Information Literacy

H5. Critical Thinking

H6. Technology Fluency

H7. Scientific Literacy

H8. Quantitative Literacy

Cours
e Materials

Baumol, William and Alan Blinder.
Economics: Principles and Policy
. 11th Edition

Update
,

Southwestern College/West, 2011
.

Grading Information

Grades will be based on participation in conference areas, quizzes, an individual term
paper, and a p
roctored final exam.

There will be
8

conferences throughout the semester. Please participate in the
conferences by contributing thoughtful posts to the discussion areas, commenting on each
issue directly and also responding to other students' comments. Thi
nk of this as the
substitute for in
-
class discussion. Some of the conferences will also require that you
submit answers to problems. Your grade for the conferences will be determined by the
percent of conferences in which you participated in a meaningful w
ay (i.e., you don't just
say, "I agree with Joe's comments"). A good rule of thumb is that each answer should be
at least 50 words.


I post assignments
in Conference
on Sunday to be completed

during the following
week.


The due date on the assignments is t
he following Sunday at midnight (EST).


I
give a one
-
day "grace period" for any extreme

emergencies that may come up to cause a
student to miss a due date.


On Monday at midnight (EST) the previous week's
assignments are automatically

locked out to any fur
ther submissions.

Once assignments
are locked and solutions posted, no late submissions will be accepted regardless of
reason.

A short
written assignment
is required. These
assignments

are to be written by each
individual student. You can find a descripti
on of the
writing project

in the Project

Descriptions section of this syllabus. It is expected that you will use your text, the Web,
and other

suggested

sources (such as journals, other textbooks, newspapers, and so on) as
sources of information. Because
effective communication is an important component of
success in the business world, papers with poor grammar and spelling errors will lose
credit.
Papers will not be accepted late except with good excuse in writing from good
authority.

Please refer to UMUC
's
Guide to Writing and Research
(1998), pp. 100
-
102,
for
some
grading criteria.

Note: A description of the
writing assignment will be presented in Conference Two.

There will be 15 quizzes which you will take online. There will also be a proctored fina
l
examination that will consist of multiple
-
choice questions.

Your final grade will be determined as follows:

Participation in
conference areas



4
0
%

Quizzes




30
%

Writing Assignment




1
0%

Proctored examination


20
%

Total

100%

The grading scale, ba
sed on 100 points, is:

A =

90
-
100

B =

80
-
89.9

C =

70
-
79.9

D =

60
-
69.9


F =


0
-
59.9

MAKE
-
UP POLICY:

Assignments will be locked out two days after they are due, and
you will not be able to submit them once they are locked out, unless I receive
a
writte
n
excuse

from excellent authority as to why you were unable to submit the assignment
within 10 days
.

Project Descriptions

Instead of writing a research paper, I want you to writ
e three minimum two
-
page
essays
/critiques of the three
-
part PBS documentary
Co
mmanding Heights
. That is, I want
three two
-
page
essay
/critiques, six pages minimum. (Of course, you may write more than
six pages if you wish.) Summarize each of the three "episodes" and tell me what you
think of each of them. Be a movie critic. This

documentary is very unbiased and is an
excellent

coverage of world economic history since World War I. You can find it by
accessing the website which is the first entry under
Webliography

in the menu on your
left. You also may find it in your local libr
ary. Or, you may purchase it online and add it
to your personal collection.

You must bring out key economic points made by each of the three two
-
hour episodes in
the series. Bear in mind that I have access to the summaries and critiques available at
that

website and other websites. Write your critique yourself and enjoy this excellent
series.

Since effective communication is an important component of success in the business
world, papers with poor grammar and spelling errors will lose credit. Also, late

papers
without written excuse from good authority will be reduced by two letter grades.

Please

refer to Guide to Research and Writing (University of Maryland University
College, 1998), pp. 100
-
102 for grading criteria.

This paper is an individual effort
. Everyone has to do their own. I do not mind at all if
you share ideas, but ultimately, one product per person.

Course Schedule

Week

Session Dates

Readings, Assignments, and Due Dates

1

OCT

24

-

OCT

30

Introductions. Submit Biography.

Familiarize yours
elf with the classroom format and textbook.

Read Chapters 1, 2, and 3 from text (introductory and
background material).

Complete all assignments in Conference One.

Complete Quiz Ch 1, Quiz Ch 2, and Quiz Ch 3.

Contact your instructor about any question
s or problems you
had in completing the assignments.

2

OCT 31



NOV
6

Read Chapters 4 and 22 (introductions to supply and demand
and aggregate supply and demand).

Complete all assignments in Conference Two.

Complete Quiz Ch 4 and Quiz Ch 22

3

NOV

7



NOV

1
3

Read Chapters 23 (including appendix), and 24

Complete all assignments in Conference
Three
.

Complete Quiz Ch 23 and Quiz Ch 24.

4

NOV

14



NOV

20

Read Chapters 25 (including appendices) and 26 (including
appendices).

Complete all assignments i
n Conference
Four
.

Complete Quiz Ch 25 and Quiz Ch 26.

5

NOV 21



NOV
27

Read Chapter
s

27 (including appendix)

and Chapter 28
(including appendix).
.

Complete all assignments in Conference
Five
.

Complete Quiz Ch 27

and Quiz Ch 28
.

6

NOV 28



DEC
4

Read Chapter 29 and Chapter 30.

Complete all assignments in Conference Six.

Complete Quiz Ch 29 and Quiz Ch 30.

REMINDER: Next week is Proctored Exam Appointment

Week. Be sure to get your appointments made next week.

7

DEC 5



DEC
11

Read Chapters 31 an
d 32.

Complete all assignments in Conference Seven.

Complete Quiz Ch 31 and Quiz Ch 32.

REMINDER: This is Proctored Exam Appointment Week.

You must make your appointment for a proctored exam this
week!

8

DEC 12



DEC
18

PROCTORED EXAM


Please see the
Administrative
Policies, Procedures and Practices below for information
about the proctored exam.


Online Etiquette and Conduct:

1.

Be polite

2.

Do not write anything you would be embarrassed to have printed in the
newspaper. Computer massages are not private
. NO CHAIN LETTERS.

3.

Keep in mind that any message you write can and may be forwarded to others.
Again, be careful what you write and NO CHAIN LETTERS.

4.

Do not forward personal notes or messages to others or a group unless you are
certain the content is ap
propriate and you have asked the author. Do NOT forward
chain letters to anyone who is enrolled in a UMUC course.

5.

Be aware of how your words may affect others. Since you have no body language
cues, you must be more careful.

6.

When using quoted material or
someone else's idea, include the citation just as
you would in a hard
-
copy version.

7.

Reread your message before sending it; edit if necessary.

Faculty Bio:

TO BE POSTED IN ONLINE CLASSROOM

Academic Policies

Academic Policies are not course specific and a
re therefore created and housed separately
from this syllabus. You may access and print Academic Policies from the Syllabus sub
-
menu in your classroom.


The following is not written by your professor but accompanies your
academic syllabus for this course


UMUC Asia DE Administrative Policies,
Procedures and Practices


Ordering Course Materials:


Textbooks can be ordered online at the Asia DE Web site,
http://webtext.asia.umuc.edu/
. Books
ordered from any other s
ource will be at the student's own risk. UMUC Asia cannot be
responsible for problems encountered when textbooks are ordered from sources outside of the
Asia DE Web site.


Proctored Exams:


Asia DE 8 week courses require all students to take a proctored ex
am at the end of the term.
Students that do not take the proctored exam will receive a failing grade for the course.

All
students are expected to make their reservations during Weeks 6 and 7 of the session.




Asia based students should make their proctored
exam reservation through the
Asia DE online "Proctored Exam Reservation" system
(
http://de.asia.umuc.edu/proctor/index.cfm
), or through their local UMUC Asia Field
Reps.



Europe based students must
make their reservations through their local UMUC
Europe Field Rep Office or computer lab.



Students unable to test at either UMUC Asia or Europe facilities need to arrange
for an alternate proctor. For details go to
http://de.asia.umuc.edu/proctor/index1.cfm
,
and submit the Alternate Proctor Request Form.



Students who need to test outside of Proctored Exam week should review the
information about early/late testing at
http://de.asia.umuc.edu/proctor/early_procedures.cfm
, and follow the procedures
outlined there.


Computer
-
Based Proctored Exams are a popular option for students testing at designated
UMUC Computer Labs (only availabl
e during the scheduled Proctored Exam Week). Ask your
local UMUC Asia/Europe Field Reps or Computer Lab Staff if their location is participating.
Students at other locations or using an alternate proctor must take paper exams.


Important reminder:

Keep you
r professor informed of your testing status.

Occasionally exams
(particularly paper exams) take time to reach the professor or there are problems with exams
being delivered. Therefore, when Proctored Exam week arrives many professors will create a
special
"Proctored Exam Reporting" conference in the WebTycho classroom where you can
report "when", "where" and "how" you took the exam (by paper or computer). If you do not
report that you have taken your exam and it has not arrived by the end of the term, the
i
nstructor will give you a failing grade for the course.



Fall 2011 Session 2 (8 Week Course Calendar)



Registration Dates:
27 Jun 2011 ~ 24 Oct 2011

Session Dates:
24 Oct 2011 ~ 18 Dec 2011


WEEK

DATES

ACTIVITY

1

OCT 24 ~ OCT 30

Normal Course Instructio
n Begins

Oct 30 Last Withdrawal Date for 75% Tuition Refund

2

OCT 31 ~ NOV 6

Nov 6 Last Withdrawal Date for 50% Tuition Refund

3

NOV 7 ~ NOV 13

Normal Course Instruction

4

NOV 14 ~ NOV 20

Normal Course Instruction

5

NOV 21 ~ NOV 27

Normal Course Instru
ction

6

NOV 28 ~ DEC 4

Make Reservation for Proctored Exam

7

DEC 5 ~ DEC 11

Make Reservation for Proctored Exam

Dec 9 Last Date to Officially Withdraw

8

DEC 12 ~ DEC 18

Proctored Exam Week


Contact Information:




For administrative assistance contact:

de@asia.umuc.edu




For GoArmyEd issues contact:
GoArmyEd@asia.umuc.edu




For WebTycho assistance on workdays contact:
tycho@asia.
umuc.edu



For WebTycho assistance on Saturdays and Sundays:
http://support.umuc.edu/




For proctored exam information, please visit the Asia DE Website at
http://de.asia.umuc.ed
u

and click on 'Proctored Exams'



For proctored exam assistance contact:
exams@asia.umuc.edu




For textbook assistance: contact
detextbooks@asia.umuc.edu




For MyUMU
C help visit UMUC 360 Helpdesk
-

http://support.umuc.edu/



Support for UMUC Asia students is also available by phone at 225
-
3696 (DSN) or 81
-
42
-
552
-
2510
Ext. 5
-
3696 (international comm.), Monday
-

Friday 7:30 a.m.
-

4:30 p.m. (JST).


Plagiarism:


Ask your professor about his/her plagiarism policies. Here is some further guidance on how to
avoid plagiarism:




UMUC's Effective Writing Program

"Helping Student
s Avoid Plagiarism"



UMUC's Online Writing Center

"How to Avoid Plagiarism


The University has a license agreement with Turnitin, a service that helps prevent plag
iarism
from Internet resources. The professor may be using this service in this class by either requiring
students to submit their papers electronically to Turnitin or by submitting questionable text on
behalf of a student. If you or the professor submit p
art or all of your paper, it will be stored by
Turnitin in its database throughout the term of the University's contract with Turnitin. If you
object to this temporary storage of your paper, you must let the professor know no later than
two weeks after the

start of this class. Please Note: If you object to the storage of your paper on
Turnitin, the professor may utilize other services to check your work for plagiarism.


Students With Disabilities:


Reasonable accommodations are available for students who ha
ve disabilities and are enrolled in
any program offered at UMUC. For more information, students should contact the Director,
Student Affairs or e
-
mail
SADirector@asia.umuc.edu
.


Academic Policies:

Academic Po
licies are not course specific and are therefore created and housed separately from
this document. You may access and print Academic Policies from the Syllabus sub
-
menu in your
WebTycho classroom or by going to these links
http://de.asia.umuc.edu/policies/

or
http://www.umuc.edu/policy/category.shtml
.


Caveat:


UMUC Asia DE syllabi are tentative and subject to change, if necessary. Changes will be
ann
ounced with as much notice as possible.