M L W M U

friendshomeopathInternet and Web Development

Dec 4, 2013 (3 years and 11 months ago)

103 views

M
AKING

L
IBRARY

W
EBSITES

M
ORE

U
SABLE

Fatih

Oguz

Margaret Swanson

Mike
Kastellec


Valdosta
State University

MLIS Program

1

M
LIS

7370: I
NFORMATION

A
RCHITECTURE


Theory and techniques of designing Web sites for
effective information delivery. Study of organization,
labeling, navigation, and indexing systems is included.



Main Components:


Basic website design


Create a simple website using an HTML editor.


Website Evaluation


A series of websites including public and academic library
websites are assessed based on IA principles.


Content Management Systems


design an academic or public library website using content
management software.


document the design process

2

P
RESENTERS


Margaret Swanson
currently lives in Athens,
Georgia, and works for the University of Georgia
Press. She earned a Bachelor of Arts with honors in
History from
Millsaps

College in Jackson, Mississippi.
She completed a Master of Arts in History at the
University of Georgia in 2007. This is her final
semester in the MLIS program at VSU where she has
pursued the technology track.


Mike Kastellec

also lives in Athens. He is the
Computer Specialist for the Oconee County and
Bogart Libraries of the Athens Regional Library
System (ARLS) for past five years. He is a member of
ARLS web redesign team. He has a B.S. from Georgia
Tech and is in his second year of VSU MLIS program.


http://www.valdosta.edu/~makastellec/portfolio/


3

I
NFORMATION

A
RCHITECTURE

AND

U
SABILITY

Margaret Swanson


Valdosta State University

MLIS Program

4

D
EFINITIONS


Information Architecture: “the structural
design of an information space to facilitate
task completion and intuitive access to
content” (Rosenfeld & Morville, 2002).



Usability: “refers to the measure of success a
user achieves when utilizing a product or
system, such as a website” (King & Jannik,
2005, p. 236)

5

C
OMMON

W
EBSITE

E
RRORS


Edgy visual and dynamic effects


Too much information


Ignoring structure, navigation, and content
integrity


Forgetting the users in testing and design


Poor site maintenance



















(
Shelstad
, 2005)

6

I
MPORTANT

IA P
RINCIPLES


Organization Systems and Structures


Labeling


Navigation Systems


Search Systems


Metadata

7

O
RGANIZATION

S
YSTEMS


Exact or objective



alphabetical, chronological, geographical




Ambiguous or subjective



topical, task, audience, metaphor, hybrids

8

O
RGANIZATION

S
TRUCTURES


Hierarchy
--
a top down approach


easy to understand


polyhierarchical
--
allows cross listing



Database mode
--
a bottom up approach


see also links


good for product catalogs



Hypertext
--
non
-
linear


complex and confusing



Social classification
--
user
-
created, bottom up


folksonomy
--
social navigation

9

L
ABELING



Labels are a form of representation


communicate information efficiently


convey meaning without using too much
space or thought




Labels are most obvious way to show users
your organization and navigation systems

10

H
EADINGS
, T
ITLES
,
AND

L
ABELS



Textual and iconic



Contextual links



Headings



Labels within navigational systems



Index terms

11

D
ESIGNING

LABELS

o
Clarity/Simplicity

o
Consistency

o
Placement/Location

o
Font, Size, and Color

o
Differentiation between types of labels

12

N
AVIGATION


Embedded Navigation Systems



Global or Site
-
wide



Local



Contextual

13

L
IBRARY

W
EBSITES
:

T
HE

G
OOD
, T
HE

B
AD
,

&
T
HE

U
GLY

14

16

U
SABILITY

T
ESTING


Iterative Design Approach


Solicit Test Participants’ Comments


“Before and After” Study


Heuristic Evaluation

21

L
IBRARIES

AND

U
SABILITY

T
ESTING


Usability testing can be a struggle for libraries


Time and money constraints


Exceedingly varied community demographics


User needs will invariably be different as will
user skills


Lack of willing participants or lackluster response
to surveys

22

C
ONTENT

M
ANAGEMENT

S
YSTEMS


A
content management system

(CMS) is a
software, usually implemented as a Web
application, for creating and managing HTML
content.


It is used to manage and control a large,
dynamic collection of Web material (HTML
documents and their associated images).


A CMS facilitates content creation, content
control, editing, and many essential Web
maintenance functions.

23

C
ONTENT

M
ANAGEMENT

S
YSTEMS


Libraries are about content:


acquiring it,


storing it,


indexing it,


retrieving it, and


presenting it.



CMSs help libraries accomplish these tasks on
the Web by providing a back
-
end structure for
a Web site so that the authors can focus on
content.

24

U
SABILITY

AND

C
OLLECTIVE

K
NOWLEDGE


Content Management Systems such as Drupal,
Joomla, and WordPress have a fairly large and
active community of users and developers.


Harnessing collective knowledge in these
communities help libraries alleviate concerns
about usability, scalability, and support.

25

C
ONTENT

M
ANAGEMENT

S
YSTEMS

Mike Kastellec


Valdosta State University

MLIS Program

26

C
ONTENT

VS

F
ORMATTING


In a traditional Web site, HTML defines both the content and
the
formatting in a single document



<a
href
="http://www.valdosta.edu/">
</a>
<a
href
="http://www.valdosta.edu/gradschool/">
</a>



src
="images/accredited
-
seal
-
medium_000.jpg" alt="ALA Seal"
width="146" height="146" align="right" />




Legend:


27

28

C
ONTENT

VS

F
ORMATTING

IN

CMS


CMS use databases in the backend and newer Web
programming/scripting languages to store content
and define formatting separately.


<div style=“
”>
</div>

<div style=“
”>
</div>

<div
syle
=“
”>
</div>



The real power of a CMS is that when you separate
content from formatting, you can more easily
change either without having to recode your entire
Web site

29

CMS S
TRUCTURE

30

1.
Core Systems

2.
Extensions

3.
Templates


http://www.bathcomms.co.uk/joomla
-
website
-
design.html


CMS S
TRUCTURE
: C
ORE

S
YSTEMS


These are “core modules" which can be enabled by the
administrator to extend the functionality of the core
website. These core modules may vary from one CMS
to another


Content Management


Posts, Pages, Media Files, Links, Comments


User Management


Identify user roles


Update and Migration


Update


Import & Export


Settings

31

CMS E
XTENSIONS


Software that extends features and/or
functionality
1
.


Core Extensions


Contributed Extensions

32

1. Adapted from definition at http://drupal.org/node/19828, accessed 9/26/200

A
LSO

K
NOWN

A
S

Extension

33

Plugin

Module

Extension

Component

Widget

CMS S
TRUCTURE
: E
XTENSIONS


Aka Modules, Plugins


Extends the core functionality and provides
additional features


Third party developers create extensions for free or
for profit.



Scriblio

(formerly WPopac) is an award winning,
free, open source CMS and OPAC with faceted
searching and browsing features.


The
Islandora

module allows Drupal users to view
and manage digital objects stored in Fedora.

34

CMS S
TRUCTURE
: T
HEME


Customize the aesthetic look
-
and
-
feel of the site


Some themes may be more complex than others


Themes may be hot
-
swappable

35

S
ELECTED

CMS
S


Wordpress
http://www.wordpress.org



Drupal
http://www.drupal.org



Joomla!
http://www.joomla.org


36

W
EB

2.0 E
XTENSIONS


Comments


RSS feeds


Mobile/international
versions


Chat


Wiki


Quick linking


User Profiles


Web forms & Polls


Forums


Event Calendars


Event Registration


Photo Galleries


Embedded
Multimedia


Embedded external
applications


37

IA E
XTENSIONS


Navigation


Tag Clouds


Categories


Index/Site Map


Related Content


Advanced Search

38

L
IBRARY
-
S
PECIFIC

E
XTENSIONS


Link Resolver


Bibliography


OAI
-
PMH


Islandora


Books



Basic embedded ILS


ILS integration


MARC import


Z39.50 Search

39

E
XAMPLES



W
ORDPRESS

40

E
XAMPLES
:
S
CRIBLIO

41

E
XAMPLES
:
J
OOMLA

42

E
XAMPLES
:
D
RUPAL

43

C
ONCLUSIONS

Web 2.0

Fully
Integrated
Site

Wordpress

Joomla
!

Drupal

44


Presentation slides and WordPress installation
video are available online at


http://hdl.handle.net/10428/361


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