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forestevanescentElectronics - Devices

Nov 2, 2013 (3 years and 7 months ago)

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Presented by:

Robert Meyer


Josue

Orellana



Joseph Sleasman






Sponsored by:

Esterline

Technologies


Korry

Electronics

John Green


Andy Leslie


Tim Robinson







With Faculty Mentor:

Dr. Thomas R. Fischer


EECS Senior Design


EE416

Spring 2012

Haptics

refers

to

the

science

of

sensing

and

manipulation

through

touch
.

Haptic

response

therefore

refers

to

the

sensation

one

experiences

from

touching
.

For

many

devices,

human

interfacing

requires

tactility,

thus

generating

a

haptic

perception
.

A

standardized

method

of

which

a

haptic

response

is

measured

and

quantified

has

yet

to

be

established
.

This

is

the

primary

challenge

for

manufacturers

when

attempting

to

design

and

deliver

products

where

haptics

is

desirable
.

One

reason

haptics

are

not

more

prevalent

in

products

is

an

inability

for

technology

to

keep

up

with

specifications
.

Consumers

prefer

not

to

invest

in

products

featuring

haptics

if

the

functionality

does

match

those

without
.

An

example

involves

touch
-
screen

cell

phones

-

initially

buyers

seemed

hesitant

to

replace

physical

buttons

with

flat

surfaces
.

Early

touch
-
screen

cell

phones

did

not

contain

the

features

of

those

today

and

were

often

turned

down

for

the

technology

buyers

had

more

faith

in
.

As

integration

of

haptics

improved

the

touch
-
screen

technology

it

soon

became

the

norm

for

most

smart

phones
.

This

is

the

primary

problem

for

those

interested

in

the

advancement

of

haptic

technology
:

the

idea

may

be

there,

but

developers

must

deliver

the

goods
.


The

intent

of

the

system

is

to

quantitatively

measure

the

perceived

physical

response

of

avionic

push

button

switches,

specifically,

those

produced

by

Korry

as

show

below,

in

an

attempt

to

autonomously

replicate

the

results

yielded

by

human

actuation
.

Measured

data

will

then

be

analyzed

and

used

to

characterize

a

haptic

profile

and

procedure
.

A

sensor

array

measuring

force,

displacement,

acceleration,

acoustic

signature

and

electrical

switch

transfer

capture

the

essential

aspects

of

the

characterization
.

A

microcontroller

is

utilized

for

communicating

with

sensors

as

well

transmission

of

data

to

a

computer

via

custom

data

acquisition

software
.

The

final

product

will

also

feature

dedicated

software

for

data

representation

and

analysis
.

The

strategies

used

by

the

team

can

be

referenced

by

any

party

whose

goal

is

to

generate

a

haptic

profile

of

a

device
.



Market for Haptic
Technology Continues
to Grow

Haptic Technology
Meets or Exceeds the
Demands of Buyers

Market for Haptic
Technology Stops
Growing

Haptic Technology
Fails to Meet the
Demands of Buyers

Scenario 1:

T
he

current

state

of

much

of

the

market

for

haptic

devices,

shows

a

high

demand

for

haptic

technology

while

remaining

acceptable

to

buyers
.


Scenario 2:

T
he

current

demand

is

high,

yet

the

technology

is

remains

in

its

infancy
;

development

cannot

yet

respond

to

the

call

of

the

market
.


Scenario 3:

This

scenari o

appears

outdated,

where

haptic

technology

was

not

yet

impressive

enough

to

take

hold

of

the

attention

of

buyers
.


Scenario 4:

Possible,

but

an

unlikely

scenario

due

to

recent

buzz

in

the

world

of

haptics,

but

it

is

possible

that

stakeholders

in

the

field

will

no

longer

be

interested

in

haptic

technologies

even

if

they

have

been

developed

fully

and

can

be

integrated

into

many

devices
.

Uncertainty Axis:

Unknown

variables

deciding

the

future

of

haptic

technology

include

public

interest

in

haptic

features,

the

reliability

and

effectiveness

of

the

technology

and

the

presence

of

competing

technology

among

others
.

While

addressing

the

issues

brought

forth

in

the

impact

analysis,

a

few

parameters

have

been

considered

for

this

design
.

The

system

features

have

been

presented

to

the

team

per

request

from

the

sponsoring

company,

while

the

metrics

and

corresponding

requirements

are

physical

limitations

of

the

test

switches

and

measurements
.


System Features

Metric

Requirements

-
Transportable bench
-
top unit

-
Practical graphical

user interface

-
Communication through USB or RS232

-
Quantifiable haptic numeric and graphic
output

-
Adaptable

to multiple switch geometries

Acceleration

Maximum
-

±

8g

Acoustic

Signature

Minimum


30dB @

96kHz

Displacement

Maximum


6.35mm (0.25in)

Force

Maximum


22.24
N (5
lb
)

Resolution

Maximum
-

1%

Velocity

Maximum


25 mm/s

Pros:

-
Accommodate any
size/shape switch

-
Easily switch from
human to mechanical
actuation

-
Self contained, stand
alone unit


Cons:

-
Gravitational
Acceleration cannot be
neglected

Pros:

-
Gravitational
Acceleration a non
-
factor


Cons:

-
Difficulty integrating
various sensors

Pros:

-
Visually explicit

-
Easily switch from
human to mechanical
actuation


Cons:

-
Poor versatility with
various switches

-
Gravitational
Acceleration cannot be
neglected

Acceleration

ADXL345
: Triple
Axis

10 bit
resolution

Operating Voltage: 3.3
V

SPI
connection

Bandwidth: 0.05
-
1600
Hz

Range: +/
-

2g,4g,8g,
16g

3
mm x 5mm x 1mm

Actuation

ZHO
-
1364S
-
36A13

Operating Voltage:


5V
to 36
V

Current consumption:

2.7
A at
36V

Maximum Disp.: 10 mm

Force

LLB130
-

FSH02941

Sensing
diameter: 10 mm

Sensing
Range: 5
lb

Accuracy
0.5%

Light Weight

Low Deflection

17
-
4 Stainless Steel Construction

Subminiature Size

Compression

Displacement

356
-
1014
-
ND

MHR 500

Linear Range:
±

12.7 mm

Dimensions: 83.8 mm

Linearity:
±

0.25%

Sensitivity: 77 mV/V/mm

Acoustic Signature

PCM1803A

Sampling Rate: 16 kHz to 96
kHz

Single
-
Ended
Voltage Input
: 3
Vp
-
p

Dynamic Range: 103
dB

SNR: 103
dB

THD+N:

95 dB

Microcontroller

ATmega328

8MHz external resonator

DC Input: 3.3V up to 12V

3.3V Regulator

Digital I/O Pins: 14 (of which
6
provide
PWM output
)

Analog Input Pins: 6 DC
Current per
I
/O Pin


Implement final design as shown


Adjustable mounting table


Integrate system (on board power supplies)


Test other switches


Compare to current information


Generate switch specific haptic profiles

With

a

standardized

way

to

quantitatively

measure

the

haptic

profile

of

a

switch,

the

goal

is

to

apply

this

knowledge

in

order

to

develop

a

two

dimensional

touch

screen

giving

a

similar

tactile

feel

and

response,

ultimately

replacing

the

switches

with

a

single,

compact

unit
.

In

addition

to

the

guidance

and

experience

from

our

sponsors

at

Korry

and

our

mentor,

Dr
.

Thomas

R
.

Fischer,

Team

Nollet

would

like

to

thank

Kirk

Reinkens
,

Dr
.

Patrick

D
.

Pedrow
,

John

Yates

and

the

WSU

Machine

Shop

for

their

assistance

in

making

this

project

possible
.


Left to Right:

Joseph Sleasman

Robert Meyer

Josue

Orellana

Electrical Transfer


Distinct on/off stages


No shudder (electrical “bounce”)


Overall:
Excellent

Displacement


Few outliers


The displacement itself, consistent


Overall
:

Good

(Shaking

and

bouncing

with

the

LVDT

and

extension

plate

may

have

explained

some

of

the

“noise”

associated

Force


Within specified limits


Fairly consistent and repeatable


Smooth

slope

signifies

a

smooth

actuation

(no

weird

discrepancies

or

plateaus)


Overall:
Excellent

Errors

Looking

at

Figure

2
,

we

see

some

odd

results
.

It

would

appear

as

if

the

switch

transfers

at

different

positions

in

each

test
.

This

has

to

do

with

stability

of

the

LVDT

sensor

setup,

as

there

is

a

slight

bounce

that

cannot

always

be

compensated

for
.


The

team

has

elected

to

investigate

a

few

key

measurements

for

the

sake

of

readability
.

In

Figure

4

we

see

multiple

trials

of

measured

displacement

of

switch

actuation
.

Figures

1

and

3

show

the

measured

electrical

transfer

and

force

of

this

actuation

respectively

Figures

2

and

5

relate

the

transfer

and

force

to

the

linear

displacement
.

This

concept

plays

a

key

role

in

haptics,

“how

hard

do

I

have

to

push”

and

“when

does

the

switch

turn

on
.


Based

on

the

data

collected,

we

can

conclude

that

the

switch

analyzed,

the

Korry

433
,

is

one

which

we

can

base

a

solid

profile

on
.

External

sources

and

surveyors

have

supported

this

by

selecting

the

433

over

the

other

switches

shown
.