Hard Work, Warm Hearts Australia's success mantra to shine with India

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Hard Work, Warm Hearts: Australia’s success mantra to shine with India




Hard Work, Warm Hearts

Australia’s success mantra to shine with India













White paper






Dated

1 March,
2012


Submitted by

Jayantee Mukherjee
^


Director and Principal
Consultant

Aei4eiA



Submitted to

The Australia in the Asian Century
Task Force

Hard Work, Warm Hearts: Australia’s success mantra to shine with India


2












Aei4eiA

Sydney, NSW, Australia

Phone
-

+61 2 9499 7856

E mail: info@aei4eia.com.au

Website
-

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© 2012
, Aei4eiA


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Hard Work, Warm Hearts: Australia’s success mantra to shine with India


3

Table of Contents


Introduction
…………………………………………………
…………………
….

3


Australia and India: Brief
and Broad
Strategic A
nalysis
………..

6


Hard Work, Warm Hearts

…………………………………………………
.
.

10


Conclusion
…………………………………………………
………………………
..

11


References

…………………………………………………
……………………
….

1
1


About the Author

…………………………………………………
…………….

12









Contents

Hard Work, Warm Hearts: Australia’s success mantra to shine with India



Introduction

The term “Asian Century” as a belief
first arose in the mid to late 1980s,
and is attributed to a 1988 meeting
with
Indian Prime Minister Rajiv
Gandhi
and
People's Republic of China
(PRC) leader Deng Xiaoping (United
States Congress Senate Committee on
For
eign Relations,

1985). It signified
that the 21st century would be
dominated by Asian countries and this
assessment was predominantly based
on some demographic and economic
factors materialization. Though the
term faded in the following years, it
was resur
rected in 2008 with the
public
ation of the book ‘
The New
Asian Hemisphere: The Irresistible
Shift of Power to the East


by
Singapore’s distinguished diplomat
Prof.
Kishore Mahbubani
(
Mahububani, 2008;
Kapila, 2008).


Scope of the paper

As with
m
any concept
s, debates
continue regarding the acceptance of
the very concept of ‘Asian Century’.
For example, in his paper Kapila
notes,
‘The Asian Century is
strategically a myth for nowhere is
there evidence today or evidence in
terms of future indications that the
Asian Region extending from Turkey in
the West to Japan in the East and
from Mongolia in the North to Sri
Lanka in the South is a ‘monolithic
whole’ strategically, politically,
economically or culturally”

(Kapila,
2008).


However, t
h
e

objective of this paper
is not to
debate on whether Asian
centur
y is a myth or reality; nor is
it
dissecting
facts to establish
which
Asian country will hold the
stewardship

in

a real Asian century
,
t
he objective of this paper is

but

to
illustrate
-



H
ow Australia can
nurture
links with

India

by seizing the
opportunities and meeting
the challenges?


This paper
consists of
three
more
sections and
broadly outlines

the
ways to achieve the objective
.


The next section
-

Australia and India:
Brief
and Broad

Strategic A
nalysis
,

compares and
sketches the
current
demographic, economic, social,
environmental
states of the two
countries while identifying the
opportunities

and challenges
;




Hard Work, Warm Hearts: Australia’s success mantra to shine with India


5

The suggested success mantra is
explained in the section
-

H
ard Work,
Warm Hearts
. This
section
cautions
that the road
to shining
with India will
require
hard work,
appreciation
for
the jobs well done
and tolerance for
differences

and
ambiguity.


Finally, this paper concludes by
reinforcing

what Lee (2009) noted,

Ignoring I
ndia is a serious mistake
and a significant oversight considering
that the United States and our other
allies and partners in Asia

also
looking to anticipate future regional
problems

are working hard to
cultivate a constructive and long
-
lasting diplomatic
and strategic
relationship with India

.


Assumptions

This paper is
thus
based on
the
following
fundamental assumptions
-

a) Any progressive relationship is
based on trust and
mutual
respect

b
) Creating a sustainable future need
not always have to have a fla
vour of
competition but accentuate
s with the
sense of co
-
creation,
where there is a

win
-
win proposition

and

c
) Mutual appreciation for the jobs
well done
and tolerance for
differences
and ambiguity
.
































Hard Work, Warm Hearts: Australia’s success mantra to shine with India


6

Exhibit 1
: Australia and India
-

At
-
a
-
glance

* Sources: CIA, 2012; # WEF, 2011

Australia and
India: Brief
and
Broad
S
trategic
A
nalysis

Australia
is a

highly developed
country

(Wikipedia, 2012) and
India is
an Asian giant growing in confidence,
ambition, power, wealth, and
influence

(Lee, 2009).


Recent years have seen the
strengthening of bilateral
relationships between India and
Australia. It involves series of actions
that attempt to coordinate policies or
join efforts to achieve common
objectives. Considering the current
trends of economic chu
rning and
fragility, properly
-
planned and well
-
executed bilateral relationships
between two countries could be a
balancing act, to stabilize economies
and co
-
create a sustainable and a
better society to live in.


In this section,
brief
and broad
strategic
analysis is conducted as to
how Australia and India can mutually
benefit from each other and

progress

further
.


Exhibit
1
not
es some of the key
demographic,
economic
,
environmental and

social factors
and
compares the curr
ent state of both
the countries.


As compared to $917.7 billion for
Australia, India's Gross Domestic
Hard Work, Warm Hearts: Australia’s success mantra to shine with India


7

Exhibit 1
: Australia and India
-

At
-
a
-
glance (contd.)

Sources: CIA, 2012; WEF, 2011

Product
-

Purchasing Power Parity
(GDP
-
PPP) is $4.463 trillion making it
the world's third largest economies
next to the US and China (WEF, 2011).
A nation's GDP
at
PPP exchange rates
is the sum value of all goods and
services produced in the country
valued

at prices prevailing in the
United States.


As may be noted

from E
xhibit 1
,
Australia

is 'innovation
-

driven


economy

whereas India, with its hu
ge
population base is a 'factor
-
driven


economy (WEF, 2011).



‘Innovation
-
driven economies’ are
those where there is widespread
deployment of technology and high
-
level skills but which have high labour
Hard Work, Warm Hearts: Australia’s success mantra to shine with India


8

costs. They benefit most from
investment in innovation, investment
in the highest
-
level skills and in
business sophi
stication. ‘Factor
-
driven
economies’
on the other hand
,

are
those which have limited or minimal
infrastructure but very low labour
costs. They benefit most from
investment in basic infrastructure,
legal frameworks and primary
education
.

However, economies

are
not monolithic and there will be parts
of an ‘innovation
-
driven economy’
which will still have insufficient
deployment of technology and so on
(Universities Scotland, 2009, p7).


Though innovation driven,
Australia
still lags behind the top performe
rs of
the Global Competitiveness Index
(GCI) when it comes to innovation
(22nd) and business sophistication
(29th), two critical drivers of
competitiveness for advanced
economies (WEF, 2011). On the other
hand, the WEF's Global
Competitiveness Report recog
nises
India's innovation capabilities. India's
world
-
class engineering and business
schools offer opportunities to export
higher knowledge in specialised fields.
Large pool of skilled workforce in
science and technology makes the
country attractive to new
ventures in
product engineering, pharmaceutical
research, and healthcare
(Parthasarthy, 2010). In praise of India
Albert Einstein once quoted, "
We owe
a lot to the Indians, who taught us
how to count, without which no
worthwhile scientific discovery could
have been made
" (Das, 2012).



C
on
sidering the above
, i
t may be
noted that Australia may
benefit
from the innovation capabilities that
India has

in its store
.


In simple terms, bilateral trade
relationships takes place between two
countries when there is a

demand (of
goods, capital, technology, labour
etc.) in one country and the other has
the capacity to supply and cater to
such demands.


India’s economic growth is only
sustainable with the equivalent
infrastructure

and necessary skills

to
support it. Presently, the growing
demand is not been adequately met
for example in areas like green skills
,
renewable energy etc.

where
,

as on
date
Australia has a leading edge

(
Evan
s,
2011)
.

India is significantly
lower in the
Sustainable
Competitive
ness Index (
SCI
)

rankings

than
it

i
s showing in the GCI

m
ainly
Hard Work, Warm Hearts: Australia’s success mantra to shine with India


9

because environmental concerns.
India’s sustainable competitiveness
would be well served by stronger
environmental policies, a more
efficient use of resources, and better
protection of the envi
ronment

(WEF,
2011
, p65
)
.


Similarly, there are multiple areas in
which such demands and supply
matters may be established
, explored
and nurtured
.
Potential for Indo
-
Australian cooperation exists in
infrastructure development including
roads, ports, airp
orts and railways;
power sector; mining; oil and natural
gas including LNG; biotechnology;
drugs and pharmaceuticals;
information technology; water
management, soil conservation and
waste disposal; food processing and
agribusiness; film and television;
pro
cessing of gems and jewellery;
tourism; and education

(
Cons
ulate
General of India, Sydney,
2012).


It may be
thus
a matter of catering to
the existing demand or creating a
new
demand
for it

to be
subsequently catered.


However,
the road ahead is
challenging yet stimulating and calls
for
Hard Work, Warm Hearts
.








































Hard Work, Warm Hearts: Australia’s success mantra to shine with India


10

Source: WEF, 2011

Exhibit
2: T
op five most problematic factors of doing business

Hard Work,
Warm Hearts

As noted in the previous section,
exploring, establishing and nurturing
links with India will require persistent
hard work and an approach where
there is
appreciation for jobs well
done and toleranc
e for differences
and ambiguity. That is
,

a ‘W
arm
H
earts


approach
.


With respect to the

‘H
ard W
ork


context, let us acknowledge the fact
that there are multiple
problematic
factors of doing business

as enlisted in
Exhibit 2.



























Therefore, l
ooking beyond the
differences would require conscious
effort to portray to the mass
,
the
images of
both the countries

in a
more positive realm.

Strained
relationship
(McClintock, 2010)

will
only damage the prospect of
co
-
creating a
better
futur
e.


The key question is h
ow

to progress
from here?

Indians in general
,

are
sentimental in nature and
more
receptive to
‘Warm H
earts


approach.


I
t is vital to understand
ing

their
sentiments and
touching the
ir

emotions
.














Hard Work, Warm Hearts: Australia’s success mantra to shine with India


11

Conclusion

"
India is
the cradle of the human race, the
birthplace of human speech, the mother of
history, the grandmother of legend, and the
great grand
-
mother of tradition. Our most
valuable and most instructive materials in the
history of man are treasured up in India only"
-

Mark Twain

As of 2009, it is estimated that there are over
405,000 Australians of Indian origin of which
308,542 are born in India (Colebatch, 2010)
and th
is is no doubt
-

beneficial for the
Australian economy
.



For example,
d
uring the twelve month period

ending 31 December, 2010
,

a total of 138,700
Indians visited Australia, an increase of 11 per
cent compared to the

same period the
previous year (many of whom visited their
local relatives).
Tourism Australia Managing
Director Andrew McEvoy notes, "
India
is the
world’s tenth largest economy and has the
second largest population in the world. It’s
also the largest English speaking country in
the world, all of which make it a very
important market for us
…”
(Tourism Australia,
n.d)
.


Now that Australia is keen to explore more
opportunities of association with India and
India is on
its way to

a magnificent growth
phase, this is perhaps a perfect juncture in the
history of bilateral relations between the
countrie
s

to reap mutual benefits
.

The prudent approach may be in starting
small, regularly measuring the impact
s

and
then taking the next steps

forward
.



To summarise
, Australia’s succe
ss mantra to
shine with India lies in

Hard Work, Warm
Hearts

!


References

Central Intelligence
Agency (CIA) (2012), The
World Fact Book
-
India, Washington, USA viewed
on 29 Feb 2012, Available at
<https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the
-
world
-
factbook/geos/in.html>

Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) (2012a), The
World Fact Book
-

Australia, Washin
gton, USA
viewed on 29 Feb 2012, Available at
<https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the
-
world
-
factbook/geos/as.html>

Colebatch, T. (2010), 'Asia
-
born population
matching local born', The Age (Melbourne),
viewed on 29 Feb 2012, Available at
<http://ww
w.theage.com.au/national/asiaborn
-
population
-
matching
-
local
-
born
-
20100729
-
10y2h.html>

Consulate General of India, Sydney (2012),
India
-
Australia Relations, Consulate General of
India, Sydney Viewed on 27 February 2012,
Available at
<http://www.indianconsu
latesydney.org/india_
ausrelations2.htm>

Das, S. (2012), In Praise of India, About.Com,
Viewed on 27 February 2012, Available at
<http://hinduism.about.com/od/history/a/india
quotes.htm>

Evans, C. (2011), Senator Evans doorstop, Perth
-

Green skills, carbo
n price, mining industry,
renewable energy, Commonwealth of Australia,
Viewed on 27 February 2012, Available at
<http://ministers.deewr.gov.au/evans/senator
-
evans
-
doorstop
-
perth
-
green
-
skills
-
carbon
-
price
-
mining
-
industry
-
renewable
-
energy>

Kapila, S. (2008
), 'Asian Century is strategically a
myth', South Asia Analysis Group, viewed 28 Feb
2012, Available at
<http://www.southasiaanalysis.org/%5Cpapers2
7%5Cpaper2677.html>

Lee, J. (2009), 'The importance of India:
Restoring Sight to Australia’s Strategic Blin
d
Hard Work, Warm Hearts: Australia’s success mantra to shine with India


12

Spot', The Centre for Independent Studies,
Australia viewed on 29 Feb, 2012 Available
online at <
http://www.cis.org.au/images/stories/foreign
-
policy
-
analysis/fpa
-
2.pdf

Mahbubani, K. (2008), The New Asian
Hemisphere: The Irresistible Shift of Power to
the East, Public Affairs, USA

McClintock, A. (2010), Facebook urged to switch
off hate sites, Sydney Morning Herald, January
24, 2010 Viewed on 27 February 2012, Available
at
<http://www.smh.com.au/technology/technolo
gy
-
news/facebook
-
urged
-
to
-
switch
-
off
-
h
ate
-
sites
-
20100123
-
mrow.html>

Parthasarthy, R., (2010), For an innovation
-
driven economy, The Hindu business line,
Viewed on 27 February 2012, Available at
<http://www.thehindubusinessline.in/2010/04/
10/stories/2010041050660800.htm>

Tourism Australia, (n
.d), Tourism Australia
Launches Advocacy Campaign in India, Tourism
Australia, Viewed on 27 February 2012,
Available at
<http://www.tourism.australia.com/en
-
au/news/media
-
releases_6143.aspx>

United States Congress Senate Committee on
Foreign Relations (19
85), Security and
development assistance : hearings before the
Committee on Foreign Relations, United States
Senate, Ninety
-
ninth Congress, first session, on
S. 559 ... S. 560 ... S. 660 ... S. 656 ... March 15,
20, 21, 22, and 26, 1985, Washington, U.S.

Universities Scotland (2009), What was/What
next?, Universities Scotland, Edinburgh, Viewed
on 28 Feb 2012 Available at
<http://www.universities
-
scotland.ac.uk/uploads/publications/What%20n
ext%20
-
%20black%20and%20white%20version%20for%
20website.pdf>

Wikip
edia (2012), Australia, Wikipedia, Viewed
on 27 Feb 2012, Available at
<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Australia>

World Economic Forum (WEF) (2011), Global
Competetiveness Report 2011
-

2012, WEF,
Geneva, Viewed on 27 February 2012, Available
at <http://www.
reports.weforum.org/global
-
competitiveness
-
2011
-
2012/>


About the Author

Jayantee Mukherjee
^

PhD (Mgt
-
Cont.), MPhil. (Mgt), MBA (HRM), BSc, Cert.
(Human Rights), Cert.

(How to tackle discrimination in
the world of work
-

ILO)


Jayantee is
the Director and Principal
Consultant of Aei4eiA

(
http://aei4eia.com.au/
)
,
a Sydney
-
based
management research and consultancy firm.
She has extensive experience in the field of
business research and
strategies,
manage
ment and human resources. She

has
been working closely with g
overnment, public
sector agencies, multinational corporations,
small and medium sized enterprises, global
bodies,
professional firms and
academia
in
the region and beyond
. Based on her
pioneering

works on business sustainability
,

her

book
,

titled
'Succeed or Sink: Business
Susta
inability under globalisation’

ha
s
recently been
published
from

Oxford, UK.


^
Alias
-

Jayantee Mukherjee Saha






…………………………….