Reversing the order of the Engineering Curriculum: Last Out, First In

fingersfieldMechanics

Feb 22, 2014 (3 years and 6 months ago)

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Reversing the o
rder of the Engineering Curriculum: Last Out
,

First In


Erol İnelmen


inelmen@boun.edu.tr


Abstract
:
There is an

i
ncreasing reduction in the number of university candidates
applying for engineering

education
in some institutions
. This fact

shows the
dissatisfaction for the content of the program and the prospects perceived for the
profession. We propose a radical change in the curriculum that will attract candidates to
this career that requires
more

and more
creative as its

basic ingredient.



Introduction


Our
aim
is to share our experiences while in engineering education with the hope that in
the coming years
,

reform on the curriculum will take place. We start

with the
premise

that engineering educ
ation
-
as per today
-

does not satisfy the expectations of neither the
students nor the instructors. Consequently we
claim

that to enhance the quality of
engineering education the order of the curriculum must be reversed so that what we now
teach at the end

must be covered in the early stages.

During the last decade we have
gathered

during our teaching experience

enough
evidence

to support our claim as it will
be argued in the following sections.

We share in this paper lessons learned while
implementing new
ideas evolving from the literature available
.


One of the most important realization
s

while teaching engineering
courses was to
understand the need for a system approach to education. As can be seen for Exhibit 1.,
engineers are required to bridge the gap
between needs and means considering the
environment as a limited resource. Engineering practice require close cooperation with
other studies: economy, law and sociology are as important as technology. Respect for
the environment

flora and fauna
-

is clear
in the need to recycle what we produce and
then dispose.

There is no end to the
needs


shelter, nutrition etc
-

but we are constrained
by the available
means
. We must develop curricula that keep “appropriate technologies”
courses at the top of the agenda

to
gether with extra
-
curriculum activities (See Exhibit 2.)
.


Reflection


We present here the chronological summary of our previous published work that will
help to support our claim: the order of the engineering curriculum must be changed so
that early on in

the program students will have hand
-
on experience on the profession they
have selected and be willing to engage in training programs outside the classroom. We do
not what to suggest that this is the only literature available, we want only to share our
own

experiences which were reflected in these publications. We started with defending
our practice of project based learning, but as we when along the years the idea of active
or engaged learning seemed more attractive. At the current
juncture

we are for what

is
known as “situated learning” as will be obvious for latter publications.


Exhibit 1.

I
ntegrated model to be implemented in
engineering
design process



Engineering

Curriculum

Social

Aviation

fluid dynamics

Policy Think
Tank

Diving

biotechnology

Ballet

Computer Engineering

software engineering

Cinema

Construction

bridge construction

Dancing Society

Electro
-
Technology

circuit design

Bridge

Engineering Society

project management

Chess

Environmental Society

w
aste management

Drama

Mechanics & Technology

material science

Fine Arts

Mountaineering

soil mechanics

Folklore

Operations Research

linear programming

Management

Photography

inorganic chemistry

Music

Radio

electromagnetic waves

Social Scienc
es

Science

laser technology

Sports Committee

Scuba Diving

hydraulics

Classical Music

Speleology

geology

Village & Cooperatives

Exhibit 2
.

Model to integrate

extra curriculum activities


in the mainstream program





ENVIRONMENT

NEEDS

MEANS

nutrition

shelte
r

care

information

recreation

security

tran

sportation

cloth
wear

mining

cultivating

constructing

servicing

manufacturing

recycling

land

flora

fauna

soil

water

air

animal

human

ecology

economy

technology

sociology

law

K
NOWLEDGE

As can w
e seen from Exhibi
t 3
, publications by the author


listed in the bibliography
-

in
the last decade have been classified to show the variety of topics that were taken abroad
in the quest for excellence in engineering education.
Starting with topics directly related
with the c
lassroom the author moved to the

new

educational

from teacher
centered

to
student
centered
-

approaches
. The
awareness

of the dissatisfaction of students and
instructors showed the way to education refo
r
m the curriculum. Life long education has
consequentl
y become a major concern for the author. Only with a global vision of
education we can reach at the desired quality.


1

Active learning

2

Case based reasoning

3

Collaborative work

4

Computer aided design

5

Distance learning

6

Engineering curriculum

7

Extra
-
curriculum activities

8

Global education

9

Life long learning

10

Problem based learning

11

Quality of education

12

Social responsibility awareness

13

Use of internet

14

Visual thinking

15

Work based learning


E
xhibit 3
. List of subject
s

of

engineering education

in the publication by the author


Description


Currently engineering programs are very much tailored according to the classical idea
that

basic comes first

. If we just take any engineering program
-
and in our case
mechanical for th
e author convenience
-

we see that physics, chemistry and mathematics
are the only courses offered to the new candidate (See Exhibit 4, METU program
simplified) during the first two years. This is the “black hole” of the curriculum: the
candidate is expecti
ng to be involved in creative work but must be contended to solve
problems that have been solved years and years along and do experiments that have
definite solutions. It is only in the third year that the candidate starts to feel the goodies of
engineerin
g but still in a very abstract fashion


Based on the experien
ce of the author and ref
l
e
cted in the publications refer
r
ed in the
previous section we are about to propose a mechanical engineering program that is
reversed:

last in, first out

. Basic courses
are postponed until the candidate has a pretty
good idea about what engineering is about. In order to suggest a general pattern for all
engineering programs we submit at th
e

end of this section a framework applicable to all
programs which reflects the idea

behind the proposed program to be expanded in the next
section. As you can see from Exhibit
5, the candidate is first introduced to general design
using parameters back
-
uped with numeracy (computers tools).
Further on,

the candidate
is required

as needed
-

to grasp the

nuts and bolts


of basic science.

FIRST YEAR

Course Code

Course Name


PHYS105

GENERAL PHYSICS I

phy
sics

MATH119

CALCULUS WITH ANALYTIC GEOMETRY

math
ematics

ME113

COMPUTER
UTER AIDED ENGINEERING DRAWING I

computer

CENG230

INTRODUCTION TO C PROGRAMMING

computer

IS100

INTRODUCTION TO INFORMATION TECHNOLOGIES AND APPLICATIONS

computer



PHYS106

GENERAL PHYSICS II

phy
sics

CHEM107

GENERAL CHEMISTRY

mat
erials

MATH120

CALCULUS FOR FUNCTIONS OF SEVERAL VARIABLES

math
ematics

ME114

COMPUTER
UTER AIDED ENGINEERING DRAWING II

computer


SECOND YEAR

Course Code

Course Name


MATH219

INTRODUCTION TO DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS

math
ematics

EE209

FUNDAMENTALS OF ELECTRICAL&ELECTRO. EN

el
ectr
icity

ME200

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING ORIENTATION

design

ME203

THERMODYNAMICS I

heat

ME205

STATICS

mech
anics

METE227

BASIC CONCEPTS IN MATERIALS SCIENCE

mat
erials



ME202

MANUFACTURING TECHNOLOGIES

mat
erials

ME204

THERMODYNAMICS II

heat

ME2
06

STRENGTH OF MATERIALS

mat
erials

ME208

DYNAMICS

mech
anics

ME210

APPLIED MATH. FOR MECHANICAL ENGINEER
S

math
ematics

METE228

ENGINEERING MATERIALS

mat
erials


THIRD YEAR

Course Code

Course Name


ECON210

PRI
NCIPLES OF ECONOMICS

eco
nomy

ME301

THEORY OF MACHINES I

mech
anics

ME303

MANUFACTURING ENGINEERING

mat
he
matics

ME305

FLUID MECHANICS I

mech
anics

ME307

MACHINE ELEMENTS I

mech
anics

ME311

HEAT TRANSFER

heat


ME302

THEORY OF MACHINES II

mec
hanics

ME304

CONTROL SYSTEMS

elec
tricity

ME306

FLUID MECHANICS II

mec
hanics

ME308

MACHINE ELEMENTS II

m
ec
hanics

ME310

NUMERICAL METHODS

math
ematics

ME312

THERMAL ENGINEERING

heat


FORTH YEAR

Course Code

Cou
rse Name


ME407

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING DESIGN

design


ME410

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING SYSTEMS LAB.

design


Exhibit 4.

Typical Mechanical Engineering Undergraduate Program

(METU simplified)

year

basic

design

area

core

1

materials

general

devices

numeracy

2

process

machine

drivers

electricity

3

control

heat

coolers

economy

4

mathematics

system

plants

physica
l
-
chemistry


Exhibit 5.
Proposal for a reversed program in engineering

(for mechanical engineering)


Proposition


Based on the experiences gained in the last decade we are entitled to suggest a radical
change in the curriculum. Since engineering is basica
lly about the design of means
needed to satisfy the needs of our society, we ought to start by hands
-
on activities aimed
at exploring the use of the tools we have to engineer new products or services. Once the
students become acquainted with the design pro
cedures, it is the right time to introduce
the basic theory behind the creative stages. Concurrently the

student

should be learning
how to use the theory in ever more complicated systems as will be shown in the example
in this paper. The student will devel
op confidence on his own abilities and understand
that the basic sciences are necessary to develop

optimum solutions

.


As an example
-
drawn from the fluid engineering area
-

we present in Exhibit
6

a top
down approach to the curriculum. We start with a sy
stem in a holistic approach followed
by the design of the mechanical equipment.

Once the equipment is decided upon based
on the catalogue characteristics the detailed design of the fluid conduits can be a
d
dressed.
It is then that basic physics enters in th
e picture with all the details of the science backed
up by mathematics. The de
s
ign of a complete system can only be possible when the
electrical
-

electronic devices are put on plac
e. As can be seen form Exhibit
7
., the basic
mechanical components are match
ed with the el
e
ctrical
-

electronic counterpart to assure a
smooth operation of the whole system
.


Implementation


Since the background of the author is mechanical engineering, in this section a model
will be suggested based on a traditional curriculum. We
argue here, that none of the
traditional courses

be it practical or theoretical
-

will be left aside. The only difference in
the model is that the topics we cover at the end will be moved to the early stages of the
program. Since design is the main occupat
ion of the engineer, students should be able at
the end of the first year to submit working simple models of mechanical devices based on
parametric principles (See Exhibit 8). As the years go on, the student

as she is engaged
in more complex projects
-

w
ill realize the importance of the theory which is behind of the
parameters that he has accepted as given

(see Appendix A)
.


A

SYTEMICS

SENSING

Velocity

Temperature

Position



PROCESSING

Database

Rule
-
based

Infer
-
based



ACTUATING

Pneumatic

Hydraulic

Ele
ctronic







B

MECHANICS

DEVICES

Turbines

Pumps

Compressors



PARAMETERS

Flow

Power

Efficiency







C

FLUIDICS

ENVIRONMENT

Open

Closed

Immersed



FLOW

Laminar

Turbulent

Compressible







D

PHYSICS

STATICS

MATTER

GEOMETRY

ACTION




Density

Lengt
h

Force




Viscosity

Area

Torque




Compressibility

Volume

Pressure









KINEMATICS

LINEAR

CIRCULAR

OSCILATING




Displacement

Displacement

Displacement




Velocity

Velocity

Velocity




Acceleration

Acceleration

Acceleration









DYNAMICS

MA
TTER

ENERGY

IMPULSE




Mass

Work

Momentum




Inertia

Power

Kinetic




Temperature

Heat

Potential








Exhibit
6
.

Knowledge hierarchy for fluid dynamics (a top to bottom approach)



Electrical

gate


memory





amplifier


generator





wave


antenna


transport


Component


Divise


System

power


Mechanical

spring



piston



industry



heater



clutch





gear



brake




Exhibit
7
.

Integration

of Electrical and Mechanical E
ngineering disciplines





Exhibit 8
. Machine element symbol
s used in the freshmen course



Recommendation


Basic sciences department
s

have always imposed their

preferences in the design of
engineering curriculum assuming this profession to be only a science. Engineering is also
a skill that has to mature with expe
rience. We have not denied the importance of basic
sciences: we simply want to seem them

and even to a more depth
-

presented when

it

is
relevant. To give and example the chemical characteristics of a fuels should be given
exactly when the students are dea
ling with the design of an “internal combustion engine”.
With this approach the deep knowledge about organic chemistry will be relevant in
understanding the combustion process. Furthermore nanotechnology now requires that
the student of materials goes deep
er into the molecular structure of matter.


After half a century (1958
-
2008) of experiences in the field of engineering

as trainee,
student, practitioner, instructor and researcher
-

we feel entitle
d

to make suggestion on the
organization of the curriculu
m. We do not attempt to reduce or add and course to the
program, our concern is that the student should feel that what she is learning is relevant to
what she is doing: learning will then take place. The use of portfolios will assure that the
student has a

feeling of her accomplishments and is ready to present herself in the work
market as a full fletched engineer. The graduate should feel she is ready to take on board
any real assignment and will contribute with innovative ideas. We are not including here
other questions about engineering
that require answers
as shown in
Appendix B
.

Acknowledgement


We remain grateful to our first engineering Prof. Turgut Noyan (former Provost) who
tried in vane to convince us of the importance of engineering history he del
ivered. In later
years he became instrumental in guiding us
in taking

the first steps in the profession

with
courage
.


Appendix A .
“Concurrent design model” for a car manufacturing enterprise







Appendix B
. Design framework

for an engineering curriculum (to be used as

compass

)









consensus


why


how


exploration








just
-
in
-
time


when

engineering

what


relevant








out
-
of
-
class


where


who


innovator










CAR DESIGN

Machine design

Thermal design

Human design

Physics

Chemistry

Mathematics

Geography

History

Materials

Processes

Ergonometric

SOCIAL

BASIC

APPLIED

Steel

Plastic

Rubber

Casting

Forming

(drawn by s
tudent using ACAD)

Bibliography
: Selected publication
s

by the aut
hor

1

Inelmen, E., “The Role of the Third Sector in Enhancing University,
Industry and Gover
n
ment Collaboration: A Case Study”, UnIG’96,
International Conference on Technology Management
:
University/Industry/Gover
n
ment Collaboration, UNESCO Chair on
Mechat
ronics, Boğaziçi University, Istanbul, pp. 554
-
558, 1996.

Collaboration between
stake
-

holders




2

Inelmen, E., “Reconciling Engineering Research and Educational
Activities: A Case Study”,
V. Yerlici
-

Engineering and Education

(Ed. G. A. Altay), pp. 32
5
-
334, Istanbul, 1997.(indexed)

Education and research
hand in hand




3

Inelmen, E. "Introducing Freshmen Students to Hands
-
on
Experience in Engineering Design",
UNESCO Global Congress on
Engineering Education,

6
-
11 September 1998, Cracow, (Poland), pp.

273
-
276.

Engineering design start
-
up




5

Inelmen, E. "Enhancing the Engineering Orientation Course to Meet
the Requirements of the Next Century,
100
th

Anniversary Jubilee
Conference on Engineering Education
, 17
-
19 September 1998,
Fachhochshule Mannheim
, (Germany), pp. 300
-
303.

Engineering orientation
freshmen




6

Inelmen, E. "Encouraging Freshmen Engineering Students to
Prepare Oral and Written Reports: A Case Study",
IGIP
International Symposium on Engineering Education
, 14
-
18
September 1998, MADI T
echnical University, Moscow, (Russia),
pp. 270
-
273.

Writtin
g

oral and written
reports




7

Egi, S.M. and Inelmen, E., “The Role of Extra
-
Curriculum Activities
in the Life Long Education of Engineers”,
Global Journal of
Engineering Education
, UNESCO Inter
national Centre for
Engineering Education, Vol 3, No 3, (1999), pp.199
-
202.

Extra
-
curriculum activities




8

Inelmen, E., "Stimulating Social Responsibility as a Prerequisite for
“Project Based Learning”,
2
nd

UICEE Annual Conference on
Engineerig Educat
ion,

12
-
14 February 1999, Auckland, (New
Zealand),
session chair,

pp. 151
-
154.

Social responsibility
awareness




9

Inelmen. E., “Proposal for Full Integration of Electrical Engineering
Undergraduate Programs”,
Annual Conference of the American
Society f
or Engineering Education
, 20
-
23 June 1999, (poster, on
CD)

Integration of engineering
curriculum




10

Inelmen, E., “Project Cent
e
red Learning as a Model for the Life
-
long
Education of Engineers”,
4
th

European Form for Continuing
Engineering Education
, T
rondheim (Norway), 9
-
11 June 1999, pp
117
-
120.

Project centered learning




11

Inelmen, E., “Experience Gained While Implementing ‘Project
Based Learning’ in Engineering Graphics”,
SEFI Annual
Conference
, Zurich, (Switzerland), 1
-
3 July 1999, pp.135
-
140.

Project centered learning




12

Inelmen, E. “A Holistic Approach to Work Based Learning in
Engineering Education”,
3
rd

Baltic Region Seminar on Engineering
Education,
Göteburg, (Sweden), 3
-
5 September 1999, pp. 72
-
74.

Work based learning

13

Inelmen, E.
,”Integrating Engineering Disciplines to Meet the
Requirements of the Next Century: The Case Study of
Biomechatronics”,
28
th

International Engineering Education
Symposium
, Istanbul (Turkey), 20
-
24 September 1999,
session chair,

pp. 394
-
399.

Integrating di
sciplines




14

Inelmen, E. “Experience Gained in Teaching Computer Aided
Design Using a Problem Centered Learning Approach”,
5
th

International Conference on

Computer Aided Design in Engineering
Education
, Sofia (Bulgaria), 22
-
24 September 1999, pp.181
-
1
87.

Computer aided design




15

Inelmen, E. “Professional Development of Engineer Educators:
From the Lecture to the Program”,
3
rd

UICEE Annual Conference on
Engineering Education
, Hobart, (Australia), 9
-
12 February 2000,
pp.388
-
391.

Professional develop
ment
of educators




16

Inelmen, E. “Engineering educators as models for the new
generations: a case study”,
2
nd

Global Congress on Engineering
Education
Wismar,

(Germany)
,
2
-
7 July, 2000, pp.210
-
213.

Education of engineering
educators




17

Inelmen, E
. “A new model for teaching computer machine language
to freshmen students”,
4
th

Baltic Region Seminar on Engineering
Education
,
Lyngby, Copenhagen, (Denmark), 1
-
3 September, 2000,
pp. 98
-
100.

Teaching computer
machine language




18

Inelmen, E., “In S
earch for Excellence in Engineering Education:
Years 1998
-
2001”

Global Journal of Engineering Education
,
UNESCO International Center for Engineering Education, Vol 5, No
1, (2001), pp.199
-
202.

Engineering education
excellence




19

Inelmen, E. “Implemen
ting ‘Visual thinking’ in the Engineering
Orientation Course”,
European Journal of Engineering Education,

SEFI, Vol.26, No.3, (2001), pp.291
-
299

Visual thinking




20

Inelmen, E. “Implementi
ng ‘Case Based Reasoning’ in Engineering
Management Education”,
4
th
UICEE Annual Conference on
Engineering Education,
Bangkok, (Thailand), 7
-
10 February 2001,
pp.110
-
112.

Case based reasoning




21

Inelmen, E. and Ibrahim, A.M. “A Proposal for a novel C
ontrol
Systems Undergraduate Program”,
Proceedings of the International
Association of Science and Technology for Development (IASTED)
Modelling, Identification and Control
, Innsbruck, (Austria), 19
-
22
February, 2001 (Ed. M.H.Hamza), pp. 494
-
499.

Control
systems curriculum




22

Inelmen, E. “Reflections on Enhancing the Quality of Engineering
Education”
International Conference on Engineering Education
,
Oslo/Bergen, (Norway), 6


10 August 2001
, CD ISBN
:
1
-
-
588740919

Quality of education




23

Inelmen
, E. “Encouraging freshmen students to do creative
collaborative project work”
5th Baltic Region Seminar on
Engineering Education
, Gdynia, (Poland), 17
-
19 September 2001,
pp.1
55
-
158.

Collaborative work




24

Inelmen, E. “A Roadmap for an Integrated Undergraduate Industrial
Electronics Design Program”
, IECON’01, 27
th

Annual Conference of
the IEEE Industrial Elect
ronics Society
, Denver, Colorado (USA),
29 November
-
2 December 2001, pp. 1746
-
1749.

Integration of curriculum




25

Inelmen, E. and Inelmen, K. “Suggestions to Further Encourage the
Use of In
ternet in Engineering Education”
, IECON’01, 27
th

Annual
Conference of the IEEE Industrial Electronics Society
, Denver,
Colorado (USA), 29 November
-
2 December 2001, pp.1750
-
1753.

Use of internet




26

Inelmen, E. “Re
-
inventing engineering education: a new challenge”,
World Transaction in Engineering Education
, UICEE, Vol.1 No.1,
(2002), pp.141
-
145.

E
ngine
erin
g

education
reform




27

Inelmen, E., “Planning the first day of class for an engine
ering
undergraduate course”, 5
th
UICEE Annual Conference on
Engineering Education,
Madras, (India), 6
-
9 February 2002, pp.119
-
122.

Course planning in
engineering education




28

Inelmen E. ‘Frontier research’ as a novel approach in the
engineering curri
culum of tomorrow,
6
th

Baltic Region Seminar on
Engineering Education
, Wismar, (Germany), 22
-

25 September,
2002, pp. 107
-
111.

Engineering curriculum
reform




29


Inelmen, Emine,
Inelmen
, E. and Ibrahim, A. “A New Approach to
Teaching Fuzzy Logic Sys
tem Design”,
Fuzzy Sets and Systems
-

IFSA 2003
, (Bilgic, T., Bogazici University, Istanbul, Turkey; Baets,
B. D., University of Gent, Belgium; Kaynak, O., Bogazici
University, Istanbul, Turkey (Eds.)), Springer
-
Verlag, Heidelberg, 3
-
540
-
40383
-
3, pp. 79
-
88
.

Engineering curriculum
reform




30


Inelmen
E. “Appropriate technologies research (ATR): A new
approach to engineering education” In:
Information
-
Communication
-
Knowledge
Engineering Education Today

(32th International
Engineering Education Symposium
, 15
-
18 September 2003), ISBN
3
-
00 012081
-
5, Fachhochschule Karslruhe Press, Karlsruhe
(Germany) pp. 416
-
422.

Engineering curriculum
reform




31

Inelmen,
E.

“Challenging the Administration to Implement
Problem
-
Based Learning in the Undergraduate Curri
culum”
International Journal of Engineering Education
, Special Issue 19: 5,
(2003) Problem Based Learning,
Erik de Graaff, E, Kolmos A.,
Fruchter, R (guest eds.), pp. 725
-
729.

Problem based learning




32

Inelmen, E. and Ibrahim, A.M. “On the Aim, Conte
nt, and Method
of the Engineering Education of Tomorrow”

,

33
th

SEFI Annual
Conference
, Ankara, (
Turkey
), 7
-
10 September 2005, pp. 323
-
329

Engineering curriculum
reform

33

Inelmen, E., ‘Placing more Emphasis on “Active Learning” in the
Future of Engineer
ing Education’,
34
th

SEFI Annual Conference
,
Uppsala, (
Sweden
), 28 June
-

1 July 2006, in CD,

Active learning approach




34

I
nelmen, E. and Inelmen, EM, “Blending “Distance Education” into
an “Undergraduate Curriculum”: A Proposal”,

35
th

SEFI Annual
Co
nference
, Miskolc, (
Hungary
), 1
-
4 July 2007, pp.79
-
80.

Distance education




35

İnelmen, E., “Designing an Introductory Course for an
Undergraduate Program to Address Global Economic Development
Challenges”, 6
th

Annual ASEE Global Colloquium on Engineeri
ng
Education,
"Shaping the Future through Global Partnerships"
,
hosted by Boğaziçi University
,
Conrad Hilton, Istanbul, Turkey
,
October 1
-

4, 2007, in CD

Global education




36

İnelmen, E., “
Reverse
-
Engineering the Engineering Curriculum: A
Proposal
”,
6
th

Annual ASEE Global Colloquium on Engineering
Education,
"Shaping the Future through Global Partnerships"
,
hosted by Boğaziçi University
,
Conrad Hilton, Istanbul, Turkey
,
October 1
-

4, 2007

Engineering curriculum




37

İnelmen, E., “Guiding Engineer
s through a Self
-
Regulated Life Long
Learning Pathway”, 6
th

Annual ASEE Global Colloquium on
Engineering Education,
"Shaping the Future through Global
Partnerships"
,
hosted by Boğaziçi University
,
Conrad Hilton,
Istanbul, Turkey
,
October 1
-

4, 2007

Life
long education




39

İnelmen, E., “Finding a Role in the Education Process for Extra
-
Curriculum Activities”, 6
th

Annual ASEE Global Colloquium on
Engineering Education,
"Shaping the Future through Global
Partnerships"
,
hosted by Boğaziçi University
,
Conr
ad Hilton,
Istanbul, Turkey
,
October 1
-

4, 2007

Extra
-
curriculum activities




40

İnelmen, E., “Fulfilling the three Aims of a Global Engineering
Education Institution”, 6
th

Annual ASEE Global Colloquium on
Engineering Education,
"Shaping the Future th
rough Global
Partnerships"
,
hosted by Boğaziçi University
,
Conrad Hilton,
Istanbul, Turkey
,
October 1
-

4, 2007

Global education


OUR
FRESHMEN
STUDENTS IN A SITE
(from Doguş

University, Istanbul (Turkey)