Teacher's Guide - Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum

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Dec 7, 2013 (3 years and 10 months ago)

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Teacher’s Guide
222 Fi FTh aVeNue sOuTh
NashViLLe, TeNNessee 37203
615.416.2001
cOuNTrYMusichaLLOFFaMe.cOM
The education programs at the Country Music Hall of Fame
®
and Museum are made possible, in part,

by grants from the Metropolitan Nashville Arts Commission and by an agreement between the Tennessee Arts Commission and National Endowment for the Arts.
This Teacher’s Guide was funded in part by a Tennessee Arts Commission Teacher Training Grant.
Accredited by the American Association of Museums, the Country Music Hall of Fame
®
and Museum is operated by the Country Music Foundation
®
, Inc., a 501(c)(3) non-profit educational organization chartered by the state of Tennessee in 1964.
This guide contains materials designed to help teachers prepare students for an
in-depth tour of the exhibit
I Can’t Stop Loving You: Ray Charles and Country
Music, Sponsored by SunTrust
.
It also addresses specific curriculum objectives in
language arts, music, and social studies for students in grades 3-12. All curricular
connections are based on the Tennessee state curriculum standards, and the
activities can be used as interdisciplinary teaching tools. Teacher’s Notes are
included in some of the lessons that provide special instructions and suggestions
for ways teachers can adapt lessons to their particular classes.
Ray ChaRles and CountRy MusiC
Teacher’s Guide
I Can’t Stop Loving You: Ray Charles and Country Music,

Sponsored by SunTrust,
presented at the invitation of

Ray Charles Enterprises, provides an overview of
Charles’s remarkable career with a central focus on
his country music influences and his contributions
to its growth and popularity. From the earliest

known photograph of Charles through his final
televised performance, the media-rich exhibit

honors Charles as “one of the most revered and
recognized musicians in the world.”
This exhibit includes artifacts, instruments, song
manuscripts, costumes, photographs, computer
interactives, recorded sound, and moving images
to tell a story about an impoverished blind child
who grew up listening to the Grand Ole Opry

and became known as the “genius of soul.”

He redefined the cultural value of country music
by performing dozens of country standards and
regularly appearing alongside country music stars

in the recording studio and on national television.
AbouT The exhIbIT
To learn more about this exhibit and the life and career of Ray Charles,

visit www.countrymusichalloffame.com and www.raycharles.com.

Photograph by Ron Keith

I Can’t Stop Loving You: Ray Charles and Country Music Sponsored by Suntrust
PRe-Visit lessons

Teacher’s Guide
PRe-Visit lessons
What do you Know
about Ray Charles?
Tennessee sTaTe CurriCulum sTandards:
Language Arts
.0

The student will develop the structural and creative
skills of the writing process necessary to produce written
language that can be read, presented to, and interpreted
by various audiences. Learning expectations: 2.02 (3-
5), 2.09 (3-5), 2.12 (6-8); High School Writing (I, II, III, IV)
.0

The student will use Standard English conventions
and proper spelling as appropriate to speaking and
writing. Learning expectations: 3.01 (3-8), 3.02 (3-8),
3.03 (3-8), 3.04 (3-8)
high School Speaking and Listening
The student will express ideas clearly and effectively
in a variety of oral contexts and apply active listening
skills in the analysis and evaluation of spoken ideas.
(I, II, III, IV)
Social Studies
Culture .0
Culture encompasses similarities and
differences among people, including their beliefs,
knowledge, changes, values, and traditions. Students
will explore these elements of society to develop an
appreciation and respect for the variety of human
cultures. Learning expectations: 1.01 (6-8), 1.02 (K-5),
1.03 (K-5), 1.04 (6,7)
objective:
Students will create a set of statements
they believe about Ray Charles as well as a set of
statements determining what they would like
to learn about Charles and then evaluate these
statements by reflecting on their museum visit.
Prep Time:
None
Materials:
Paper, Pencil
. The following activity creates
materials that will be needed for the
post-visit activity
What Did You Learn
About Ray Charles?
found on page 6.
Before visiting the Ray Charles exhibit, create
a KWL chart with your class. This is a chart with
three sections or columns, one for each letter K,
W, and L. The K section is what we already KNOW
about Ray Charles. The list might include items
such as: he was a good singer or he played piano or
he was blind. The W section is what we WANT to
learn about Ray Charles. Answers might include:
where he grew up, how old he was when he went
blind, etc.
The L represents what we LEARNED about Ray.

This section will be completed after the museum
visit. Once this chart is created, save it for review
and use in the post-visit activity at the end of this
teacher’s kit.
TeACheR’S NoTe:
You may choose to make this an individual activity by
asking students to create their own KWL charts. They
could also take these charts and fill them in during their
visit to the exhibit.
Raised in the Country:
Georgia on My Mind
Tennessee sTaTe CurriCulum sTandards:
Language Arts
.0

The student will develop the structural and creative
skills of the writing process necessary to produce written
language that can be read, presented to, and interpreted
by various audiences. Learning expectations: 2.02 (3-5),
2.09 (3-5), 2.12 (6-8); High School Writing (I, II, III, IV)
.0

The student will use Standard English conventions
and proper spelling as appropriate to speaking and
writing. Learning expectations: 3.01 (3-8), 3.02 (3-8),
3.03 (3-8), 3.04 (3-8)

high School Speaking and Listening
The student will express ideas clearly and effectively
in a variety of oral contexts and apply active listening
skills in the analysis and evaluation of spoken ideas.

(I, II, III, IV)
Social Studies
Culture .0

Culture encompasses similarities and
differences among people, including their beliefs,
knowledge, changes, values, and traditions. Students
will explore these elements of society to develop an
appreciation and respect for the variety of human
cultures. Learning expectations: 1.01 (6-8), 1.02 (K-5),
1.03 (K-5), 1.04 (6,7)
Geography .0

Geography enables the students

to see, understand, and appreciate the web
of relationships between people, places, and
environments. Students will use the knowledge, skills,
and understanding of concepts within the six essential
elements of geography: world in spatial terms, places
and regions, physical systems, human systems,
environment and society, and the uses of geography.
Learning expectations: 3.01 (K-5, 6, 7, 8)
high School Post WWII era
Culture .

Identify examples of how language,
literature, the arts, architecture, traditions, beliefs,
values, or behaviors contribute to the development and
transmission of culture.
Music
6.0

Students will listen to, analyze, and describe music.
Learning expectations: 6.2 (3, 6-8, 9-12), 6.3 (4, 5)
7.0

Students will evaluate music and music
performances. Learning expectations: 7.1 (4,5, 6-8,

9-12)
9.0

Students will understand music in relation to history
and culture. Learning expectations: 9.1 (4), 9.2 (3,5)
objective:
Students will examine the connection
of geography to culture by discussing how Ray
Charles was exposed to various types of music
where he grew up. Students will apply this idea to
their own lives by considering the music they are
exposed to within their own culture.
Prep Time:
15 minutes to copy activity sheet and
set up CD player and CD
Materials:
Activity sheet for
Raised in the Country,

CD player, lesson kit CD, pencils
Key Vocabulary:
Culture
. use the following questions

for class discussion:
• What is culture?

Allow students to share their ideas about this word before

giving them the following definition or asking them to look

it up in the dictionary.
Culture:
The totality of socially transmitted behavior patterns, arts,
beliefs, institutions, and all other products of human work
and thought typical of a population or community at a given
time
(Webster’s II).
• What are the things that define a culture?

Possible answers: food, language, dialect, religion, beliefs
• Do you think the neighborhood or community
where you live has a distinct culture? Explain.
• Does the music to which a person listens
reflect his or her culture?
(Yes)
How?
Music, as other art forms, reflects the lives of people within

a particular community, population, or group.
• Is the music a person hears growing

up affected by where that person lives?

(Yes)
Why or why not?
Possible answer: A person growing up in New Orleans,
might hear more jazz than a person growing up in

a small community in Kentucky where bluegrass is more
prevalent. Or a person in Texas might hear more Spanish

language songs on the radio than someone growing up

in Wisconsin.

|

|
Ray’s Fender Rhodes Suitcase 88 Electric Piano

I Can’t Stop Loving You: Ray Charles and Country Music Sponsored by Suntrust
PRe-Visit lessons

Teacher’s Guide
PRe-Visit lessons
• What do you think it might be like to grow up

as Ray Charles did in the rural South in the
1930s and 1940s? What kind of music would

he have heard?
Be sure to remind them that Ray Charles would not

have had a television, computer, or even a record player

in his home. Most of the music he heard would have been
live music or music from a radio or jukebox.
. Share the following with students:
You may wish to reference a map of the United
States to point out where Charles was born and
grew up.
Ray Charles was born Ray Charles Robinson in
Albany, Georgia, on September 23, 1930.
His
mother, Retha Robinson, raised him in the small
rural town of Greenville, Florida. Ray had access
to a piano and a jukebox, which he considered
the two most important items affecting his young
life. These were made available to him by Wylie
Pitman, who owned a general store and rooming
house in Greenville. “Mr. Pit,” as Charles called
him, allowed Ray to play his piano anytime, and he
taught Ray how to play in the boogie-woogie style.
Ray cited Mr. Pit as his greatest musical influence.
At age five, Ray Charles witnessed the accidental
drowning death of his younger brother, and by

age six he was completely blind due to what

would later be diagnosed as juvenile glaucoma.
Charles attended the Florida School for the
Deaf and Blind in St. Augustine before leaving
at age fifteen after the death of his mother. It was
then that he began pursuing music as a career in
Jacksonville, Florida.
Growing up in the South, Ray Charles absorbed
many musical influences. He heard gospel singing
at church, down-home blues on the jukebox,
and classical music at school. On the radio, he
encountered jazz, big-band, and hillbilly tunes.
He especially enjoyed the cool piano blues of Nat
“King” Cole. All of these different styles would
later find their way into Ray’s own music. Ray
commented on his musical influences saying, “My
music had roots which I’d dug up from my own
childhood, musical roots buried in the darkest
soil.” As for the culture in which Ray grew up,
he said this: “I’m a country boy. And, man, I
mean the real backwoods! All I ever saw—and I’m
talking literally—was the country.” Charles grew
up hearing the Grand Ole Opry broadcast on
radio from Nashville, Tennessee, and developed
an appreciation for country music at an early age.
In fact, one of Ray’s most well-known albums,
Modern Sounds in Country and Western Music,
helped bring
country songs and songwriters to new audiences.
Charles said, “I just wanted to try my hand at
hillbilly music. After all, the Grand Ole Opry had
been performing inside my head since I was a kid
in the country.”
.
Distribute the activity sheet for

Raised in the Country,
which can be
copied from this booklet. Then, share
the following with students:
TeACheR’S NoTe:
An adaptation can be made to this activity by using a
Venn Diagram to compare and contrast the two songs
and answer these questions.
Compare Ray Charles’s 1964 cover version of
“Move It on Over” to the original 1947 recording
by Grand Ole Opry star and Country Music Hall
of Fame
®
member Hank Williams. Hank wrote the
song, but how did Ray make it his own?
. Play “Move It on over” by hank

Williams (CD track #) and “Move It

on over” by Ray Charles (CD track #).
Use the following as discussion questions:
1. What instruments do you hear in each version?
2. How would you describe the voices or style

of singing in each song?
3. How would you describe the style of music

of each song?
4. Do you like this song? Why or why not?
5. Do you like one version of the song better

than the other? If yes, which one? Explain.
6. What do you think Ray might have liked about
the original version of this song that would
make him want to record his own version?
7. How do you think the culture in which

Ray grew up might have influenced his

version of this song?
.
Share the following with students:
Just as Ray Charles was shaped by the music,
food, and dialect of his surroundings, we too are
influenced by the culture in which we live. Think
about your own exposure to music, especially
music you might not choose yourself, and write a
paragraph addressing the following questions:
• What kind of music do I hear that

I don’t choose for myself?
• Where do I hear this music?
• Who is choosing to play or perform

this music? My parents, my grandparents,

my friends, my music teacher?
• Would the music I hear around me be
different if I lived in another part of the
country or another part of the world? How?
TeACheR’S NoTe:
You may wish to take this activity further by asking
students the following question: Have the Internet and
cable television made music less regional?
6. encourage students to share their
writings with the class.
TeACheR’S NoTe:
You can learn more about Hank Williams by visiting

http://countrymusichalloffame.com/site/explore-
inductees-list.aspx and selecting his name from the
drop-down menu.
Charles’s first band, the McSon Trio (Ray Charles, piano; Gossie McKee, guitar; and Milt Garrett, bass) at a Seattle radio station, 1948.
7
Teacher’s Guide
PRe-Visit lessons
RAISeD IN The CouNTRY: GeoRGIA oN MY MIND
acTiviTy sheeT
Name _______________________________________________ Class _______________________________
For questions 1-3, circle the choices you think best answer the question as you listen to the recordings played by

your teacher. You may circle more than one answer.
Question

Hank Williams Version


Ray Charles Version
1. What instruments do Banjo Fiddle Saxophone Banjo Violin Saxophone
you hear in each version? Bass Guitar Steel Guitar Bass Guitar Steel Guitar
Drums Piano Trombone Drums Piano Trombone
Other: Other:
2. How would you Easy Loud Smooth Easy Loud Smooth
describe the vocals Flowing Pounding Soft Flowing Pounding Soft
in each song? Hard Rough Twangy Hard Rough Twangy
Other: Other:
3. How would you Swing Pop R&B Swing Pop R&B
describe the style of Blues Rock Jazz Blues Rock Jazz
music of each song? Country Country
Other: Other:
For questions 4-7, write your answer using complete sentences.
4. Do you like this song? Why or why not?
5. Do you like one version of the song better than the other? If yes, which one? Explain.
6. What do you think Ray Charles might have liked about the original version of this song that would

make him want to record his own version?
7. How do you think the culture in which Charles grew up might have influenced his version of this song?
independence:

learning Braille
Tennessee sTaTe CurriCulum sTandards:
Language Arts
high School Speaking and Listening
The student will express ideas clearly and effectively
in a variety of oral contexts and apply active listening
skills in the analysis and evaluation of spoken ideas.

(I, II, III, IV)
Mathematics
Algebra .0

The student will understand and
generalize patterns as they represent and analyze
quantitative relationships and change in a variety of
contexts and problems using graphs, tables, and
equations. Learning expectations: 2.1 (K-3)
Social Studies
Culture .0

Culture encompasses similarities and
differences among people, including their beliefs,
knowledge, changes, values, and traditions. Students
will explore these elements of society to develop an
appreciation and respect for the variety of human
cultures. Learning expectations: 1.03 (K-5)
high School Post WWII era
Culture .

Identify examples of how language,
literature, the arts, architecture, traditions, beliefs,
values, or behaviors contribute to the development
and transmission of culture.
high School Contemporary World
Culture .

Identify instances in which language, art,
music, belief systems, and other cultural elements
facilitate understanding or create misunderstanding.
Two separate Braille activities are listed below.
This introductory information is appropriate
whether you choose to do one or both activities.
Please share this information with students.
Ray Charles went blind when he was six years
old. When he was seven, he began learning to
read and write in Braille at the Florida School
for the Deaf and Blind, which he attended for
eight years. This allowed him to become an avid
reader, to write music, and to communicate in
general throughout his life. Ray Charles said, “If
you want to do something, you can make yourself
about as independent as you want to be, but you
must have the will. It doesn’t make a difference if
you’re blind or not.”
He did not allow his blindness to stop him from

traveling and living his life to the fullest. Ray
Charles did not use a cane with a white tip or a
guide dog as many people who are blind do.
He preferred to have guided assistance. This
means that he would have a sighted person
guide him around by walking in front of him
and allowing him to hold their arm near

the elbow.
Ray also used some specialized devices and
materials to assist in his daily life as well as

to help him enjoy hobbies and interests. When
you visit the museum, you will look at objects

such as magazines printed in Braille and a talking
chess set.

|
Ray’s talking chess set.

I Can’t Stop Loving You: Ray Charles and Country Music Sponsored by Suntrust
PRe-Visit lessons
9
Teacher’s Guide
PRe-Visit lessons
lesson one
objective:
Students will sort and find particular
objects that they cannot see to understand the
importance of hands and touch to people who are
blind.
Prep Time:
20 minutes to select objects and place
them in bags or boxes
Materials:
Cloth bags or cardboard boxes (with

a lid and a hole large enough for students to

reach in and feel objects), collection of ordinary
objects inside of each bag/box, Braille alphabet
card (provided with this kit)
. Share the following with students.
An acute sense of touch is integral to a person
who is blind. Because they cannot see, they must
be able to discriminate between objects by feeling

their characteristics rather than seeing them.
Children who are blind are taught at a very young

age to sort objects by feeling them.This becomes

even more important when learning Braille, as the
dots or bumps are tiny and close together.
.
Divide students into pairs,and give
each pair a bag/box of objects.
You may need to have student pairs take turns if
you do not have enough bags/boxes for each pair.
One student will arrange the objects in the bag or
box and ask the other student to find a particular
object or to find all the objects of a particular
shape, such as square or circular, in the bag or box.
The partners should then switch roles.
. encourage students to share with

the class their experiences in doing
this activity.
You may use the following questions to encourage a
class discussion:
• Was it difficult to find the specific object?
Why?
• Was it more or less difficult to identify all the
objects of a particular shape without being able
to see them? Why? What other activities do you
do that would be difficult to do without being
able to see?
.
Give each student the braille
alphabet card.
Instruct them to examine it with their eyes closed,
using their sense of touch. Then ask students to
discuss the following questions:
• Can you identify the patterns of the bumps

without looking?
• Is it difficult to do this? Why or why not?
lesson two
objective:
Students will examine the Braille
alphabet and numbers to write their names and
birthdays in Braille and to gain an understanding

of the adaptations Ray Charles learned in order to
live his life fully and independently.
Prep Time:
15 minutes to copy worksheets
Materials:
The Braille Trail: An Activity Book
(AFB Press,
provided with this kit), copies of worksheets on

pages 3, 5, 18, and 19 of
The Braille Trail
for each

student, pencils
Key Vocabulary:
Braille
.
Ask students to discuss what they
know about braille before sharing the
following definition and information
with them.
braille:
According to
Webster’s Dictionary,
Braille is a system
of writing and printing for the blind, in which varied
arrangements of raised dots representing letters and
numerals are identified by touch.
This system was developed by Louis Braille.
TeACheR’S NoTe:
You may wish to share Louis Braille’s biography,

found on page 26 of
The Braille Trail.
Braille is not a language, it is another way to

read and write English or any other language.
Every character in the Braille code is based on

an arrangement of one to six raised dots.

Each dot has a numbered position in the Braille
cell. These characters make up the letters of

the alphabet, punctuation marks, numbers,
and everything else you can do in print (page 2,

The Braille Trail: An Activity Book).
Page 5
includes the Braille alphabet.
.
Distribute handout of
The braille Trail,
pages  and .
Guide students in examining the “cell” system of
Braille that includes six dots. Look at the pattern on
the ladybug. Using the cells provided on handouts
of pages 18 and 19, ask students to “bubble in” the
letters of their names as well as writing a short note
to a friend.
.
You may choose to take this lesson
further by doing the following activities
with your students:
1. Use any other activities from
The Braille Trail:

An Activity Book
that you think would be useful for
your class.
2. Purchase or rent a Braille writer for your
classroom so that students can actually write

in Braille.
3. Contact the organizations below for more
information and resources. Some may be able
to send a representative to your classroom to
talk about how to interact appropriately with a
person who is blind or to explain different types
of visual impairments and what causes them.
4. Encourage your students to visit the Web sites
provided below.
5. Encourage your students to learn more about
the lives and contributions of Helen Keller and
Louis Braille. There are many good books for
children about them, and each has a biography
in
The Braille Trail: An Activity Book
on pages 26
through 28.
6. Research other famous blind people.
7. Take a field trip to the
American Printing House

for the Blind, Inc.
and
Marie and Eugene Callahan

Museum of the American Printing House for the Blind
in
Louisville, Kentucky.
0
I Can’t Stop Loving You: Ray Charles and Country Music Sponsored by Suntrust
PRe-Visit lessons

Teacher’s Guide
PRe-Visit lessons
Ray’s Musical style
Tennessee sTaTe CurriCulum sTandards:
Language Arts
.0
The student will develop the structural and creative
skills of the writing process necessary to produce written
language that can be read, presented to, and interpreted
by various audiences. Learning expectations: 2.02 (3-5),
2.09 (3-5), 2.12 (6-8); High School Writing (I, II, III, IV)
.0
The student will use Standard English conventions
and proper spelling as appropriate to speaking and
writing. Learning expectations: 3.01 (3-8), 3.02 (3-8),
3.03 (3-8), 3.04 (3-8)
high School Speaking and Listening
The student will express ideas clearly and effectively
in a variety of oral contexts and apply active listening
skills in the analysis and evaluation of spoken ideas.

(I, II, III, IV)
Social Studies
Culture .0
Culture encompasses similarities and
differences among people, including their beliefs,
knowledge, changes, values, and traditions. Students
will explore these elements of society to develop an
appreciation and respect for the variety of human
cultures. Learning expectations: 1.01 (6-8), 1.02 (K-5),
1.03 (K-5), 1.04 (6,7)
high School Post WWII era
Culture .
Identify examples of how language,
literature, the arts, architecture, traditions, beliefs,
values, or behaviors contribute to the development and
transmission of culture.
high School Contemporary World
Culture
.
Identify instances in which language, art, music,
belief systems, and other cultural elements facilitate
understanding or create misunderstanding.
Music
.0
Students will sing, alone and with others, a varied
repertoire of music. Learning expectations: 1.1 (4,5) 1.2
(9-12)
.0
Students will improvise melodies, variations, and
accompaniments. Learning expectations: 3.1 (5), 3.2

(3, 5, 6-8, 9-12)
.0
Students will compose and arrange music within
specified guidelines. Learning expectations: 4.2 (4)

6.0
Students will listen to, analyze, and describe music.
Learning expectations: 6.2 (3, 6-8, 9-12), 6.3 (4, 5)
7.0
Students will evaluate music and music
performances. Learning expectations: 7.1 (4, 5, 6-8,

9-12)
9.0
Students will understand music in relation to history
and culture. Learning expectations: 9.1 (4), 9.2 (3,5)
Visual Art
.0
Students will understand and apply media,
techniques, and processes. Learning expectations: 1.1
(K, 1, 2, 3-4, 5, 6-8, 9-12), 1.2 (K, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6-8, 9-12),
1.3 (1-2, 3-5, 6-8, 9-12) 1.4 (4-5)
.0
Students will choose and evaluate a range of subject
matter, symbols, and ideas. Learning expectations: 3.1
(1, 2, 3, 4, 5) 3.2 (1, 2, 3, 4, 5) 3.3 (1)
6.0
Students will make connections between visual
arts and other disciplines. Learning expectations: 6.1
(1, 2, 3, 4, 5) 6.2 (3, 4, 5)
objective:
Students will compare and contrast
a Ray Charles version of a country song with its
original version in order to examine Charles as

an interpreter of music.
Prep Time:
15 minutes to copy activity sheet

and set up CD player and CD
Materials:
Activity sheet for
Ray’s Country,

CD player, lesson kit CD, pencils
Key Vocabulary:
Interpretation
. Share the following with students:
In 1962, Ray Charles released the album
Modern
Sounds in Country and Western Music,
which contained
his interpretations of some popular country music
songs. While Charles had recorded a country song
in the past and had played briefly with a country
band as a teenager, this was the first time he created
an album of country songs. Although executives at
his record label did not think the album would be
successful, it quickly sold over a million copies.
Its biggest hit song, “I Can’t Stop Loving You,”
originally written and performed by Don Gibson,
reached the #1 position on both the R&B and the
pop music charts. It also won the Grammy for Best
Rhythm & Blues Recording and was nominated for
Record of the Year.
American Council of the blind
1155 15th Street, NW, Suite 1004,
Washington, DC 20005
(202) 467-5081, (800) 424-8666
FAX: (202) 467-5085
www.acb.org
American Foundation for the blind
11 Penn Plaza, Suite 300
New York, NY 10001
(212) 502-7600
www.afb.org
American Printing house for the
blind, Inc. & Marie and eugene
Callahan Museum of the American
Printing house for the blind
1839 Frankfort Avenue
Louisville, KY 40206
(800) 223-1839
www.aph.org
Metro Nashville Public Schools
Vision Program
(615) 884-4375
National Federation of the blind
Tennessee Affiliate:
Mr. Michael Seay, President
1226 Goodman Circle West
Memphis, TN 38111-6524
Phone: (901) 452-6596
Email: michael.seay@ssa.gov
www.nfb.org
Tennessee School for the blind
115 Stewarts Ferry Pike
Nashville, TN 37214
Phone: (615) 231-7300
www.tsb.k12tn.net


|
Contact the following organizations

for resources and to learn more:
Florida School for the Deaf and Blind in St. Augustine, Florida, as it might have looked when Ray Charles was a student there.

I Can’t Stop Loving You: Ray Charles and Country Music Sponsored by Suntrust
PRe-Visit lessons

Teacher’s Guide
PRe-Visit lessons
6.
Distribute the activity sheet for

Ray’s Country,
which can be copied
from this booklet. Then share the
following with students:
Compare Ray Charles’s version of “I Can’t Stop
Loving You” with the original by Country Music
Hall of Fame
®
member Don Gibson. Charles’s
version was recorded in 1962; the original was made
in 1957.
TeACheR’S NoTe:
You can learn more about Don Gibson by visiting

www.countrymusichalloffame.com/site/explore-

inductees- list.aspx and selecting his name from the
drop-down menu.
Use your activity sheet to record your responses

to the questions we will discuss while you listen to
the songs.
7.
Play “I Can’t Stop Loving You”

by Don Gibson (CD track # )

and “I Can’t Stop Loving You”

by Ray Charles (CD track # ).
Use the following questions for class discussion.
TeACheR’S NoTe:
An adaptation can be made to this activity by using

a Venn Diagram to compare and contrast the two songs

and answer these questions:
1. What instruments do you hear in each version?
2. How would you describe the vocals

in each song?
3. How would you describe the style of music

of each song?
4. How is the background singing different?
5. What do you notice about the number of
instruments and singers on each recording?
6. Do you like this song? Why or why not?
7. Do you like one version of the song better than
the other? If yes, which one?
8. What does Ray Charles do with the song that
makes it his own distinctive style?
9. Do you think Ray Charles’s version of the song
is still country? Why or why not?
TeACheR’S NoTe:
An adaptation can be made to use this as an art activity
by asking students to draw how they feel when they hear
each version of these songs.
.
Ask students the following questions:

Do you think Ray Charles was a
successful interpreter of music?

Why or why not?”
.
Although he composed many of his
early hits, Charles is considered to be
an interpreter of music.
Ask students what they think “interpretation of
music” means. Allow them to share their thoughts
before asking them to look it up in the dictionary
or share the following.
The primary definition in most dictionaries
will reference the meaning of an artistic work.
Encourage students to think about / look up
alternate definitions.
Interpretation
A performer’s distinctive personal version of a song, dance,
piece of music, or role; a rendering (www.dictionary.com)
or representation in performance, delivery, or criticism
of the thought and mood in a work of art or its producer
esp. as penetrated by the personality of the performer
(Webster’s III).
.
Divide students into groups of five
and share the following:
Now each of you will have the opportunity to
“interpret” a song. In your group, decide in
what style you would like to sing the song “Happy
Birthday.” You may choose any style you wish,

such as rock & roll, rap, country, jazz, etc. Practice
the song a few times in the style you’ve chosen to
perform for your classmates.
.
Allow students time to practice their
song and then take turns having each
group present their “interpretation” of
“happy birthday.”
TeACheR’S NoTe:
In a music classroom, the teacher might choose to play
the song in different styles and have the entire class sing
together various interpretations.
Use the following questions for class discussion:
• Was it fun to create your interpretation

of the song?
• Was it difficult?
• Does interpreting the song differently make it

a different song?
• Why would a person want to interpret
something in their own way?
• How would you describe the style

of your song? How would you describe

another classmate’s song?
. Share the following with students:
Ray Charles wrote many of his early hits, including
“I’ve Got a Woman” and “What’d I Say,” but
beginning in the 1960s, he primarily added his
own style to songs written and performed by others.
Ray said this about choosing and performing
songs: “See, I always pick my own songs. I may
run through a hundred cassettes, and out of that
hundred I may be lucky if I find five or six. I mean
that’s the truth, man. It’s not that the songs are
not good, but they’re not good for me. I’ll tell any
writer, if I turn down a song, don’t think the song
is bad. It’s just I can’t find no way to handle it for
me. Like for instance, I love the song ‘Stardust,’
but I’ll never sing it. I love the song, but I can’t do
nothing with it.”
Ask your students: “What do you think Ray Charles
meant in his words?”
Let’s examine Ray Charles’s interpretation of one
of his biggest hits, which was first a country hit,
written and performed by Don Gibson.
Don Gibson

Teacher’s Guide
PRe-Visit lessons
the Musical Genius
Tennessee sTaTe CurriCulum sTandards:
Language Arts
high School Speaking and Listening
The student will express ideas clearly and effectively
in a variety of oral contexts and apply active listening
skills in the analysis and evaluation of spoken ideas. (I,
II, III, IV)
Music
6.0
Students will listen to, analyze, and describe music.
Learning expectations: 6.2 (3, 6-8, 9-12), 6.3 (4, 5)
7.0
Students will evaluate music and music
performances. Learning expectations: 7.1 (4, 5, 6-8,
9-12)
Social Studies
Culture .0
Culture encompasses similarities and
differences among people, including their beliefs,
knowledge, changes, values, and traditions. Students
will explore these elements of society to develop an
appreciation and respect for the variety of human
cultures. Learning expectations: 1.03 (K-5)
objectives:
Students will discuss the meaning of
the term genius and identify ways in which Ray
Charles fits this category by examining four of his
songs. Students will identify the variety of styles of
American music incorporated in his music as well
as his own personal style.
Prep Time:
10 minutes to set up

CD player and CD
Materials:
CD player, lesson kit CD,

paper, pencils
Key Vocabulary:
Genius

.
Ask students what they think the
word genius means before they look
it up in a dictionary. Then share the
following with them and consider the
discussion question.
Genius
According to
Webster’s Dictionary,
genius is

exceptional intellectual or creative power; a

natural inclinatioin or talent.
Discussion Question:
• Name some individuals who you think might be
considered geniuses and explain why you think
this.
(Some answers might include Mom, Dad, Albert Einstein,
Bill Gates, Leonardo Da Vinci, Thomas Edison, Oprah Winfrey,
J.K. Rowling, Michael Jordan etc.)
TeACheR’S NoTe:
This may be adapted to a writing activity by having
students write their thoughts.
.
Share the following and discuss

with students:
Ray Charles was raised in poverty in the Deep
South during a time of harsh racism. By the end of
his life, he was known by most as an American icon
and a musical genius. He said, “I was born with
music in me. Like my ribs, my liver, my kidneys,
my heart. Like my blood.” He was blinded at six
and orphaned at fifteen but refused to let these
circumstances prevent him from being the best

he could be.
At the Florida School for the Deaf and Blind he
learned to read text and music in Braille. He would
sit at the piano and read the music in Braille with
his left hand while playing with his right hand. He
then would switch hands and learn the music for
the opposite hand, memorizing what both hands
were doing. Those closest to him said that he heard
all parts of the music in his head. His colleagues
would often write out the music for him as he told
it to them. He worked very hard on each song and
would not stop until it was perfect.
Charles was a talented singer, pianist, saxophonist,
and musical arranger. He was able to play and
blend different streams of American music: jazz,
blues, R&B, country, rock & roll, pop, and gospel.
He not only blended these different styles but he
added his own style to the music. Through his work
as a musician, he traveled all over the nation and
world. He didn’t “see” the places he visited, but he
heard them.
RAY’S MuSICAL STYLe
acTiviTy sheeT
Name _______________________________________________ Class __________________________________
For questions 1-3, circle the choices you think best answer the question as you listen to the recordings played by your
teacher. You may circle more than one answer.
Question

Don Gibson Version


Ray Charles Version
1. What instruments do Banjo Fiddle Saxophone Banjo Violin Saxophone
you hear in each version? Bass Guitar Steel Guitar Bass Guitar Steel Guitar
Drums Piano Trombone Drums Piano Trombone
Other: Other:
2. How would you Easy Loud Smooth Easy Loud Smooth
describe the vocals Flowing Pounding Soft Flowing Pounding Soft
in each song? Hard Rough Twangy Hard Rough Twangy
Other: Other:
3. How would you Swing Pop R&B Swing Pop R&B
describe the style of Blues Rock Jazz Blues Rock Jazz
music of each song? Country Country
Other: Other:
For questions 4-9, write your answer using complete sentences.
4. How is the background singing different?
5. What do you notice about the number of instruments and singers on each recording?
6. Do you like this song? Why or why not?
7. Do you like one version of the song better than the other? If yes, which one?
8. What does Ray do with the song that makes it his own version?
9. Do you think Ray Charles’s version of the song is still country? Why or why not?

|
6
I Can’t Stop Loving You: Ray Charles and Country Music Sponsored by Suntrust
PRe-Visit lessons
7
Teacher’s Guide
PRe-Visit lessons
6. one of the reasons Ray might be
considered a musical genius is his
interest in and ability to play several
styles of music.
Ray respected the work of artists from several
musical styles, just like they admired his work. In
addition to creating his own versions of country
songs on
Modern Sounds in Country and Western Music

and
Modern Sounds in Country and Western Music Volume
Two,
Ray also recorded the duet albums
Friendship

and
Genius Loves Company
with artists such as Norah

Jones, Willie Nelson, Bonnie Raitt, and Ricky
Skaggs. The
Friendship
album became a #1 selling
album in 1984, and Ray’s duet with Willie Nelson,
“Seven Spanish Angels,” became a #1 country hit.
Let’s examine Ray’s duet with Willie Nelson.
TeACheR’S NoTe:
You can learn more about Willie Nelson by

visiting countrymusichalloffame.com/site/explore-
inductees-list.aspx and selecting his name from

the drop-down menu.
7.
Play “Seven Spanish Angels”

(CD track #) and discuss the following:
• How would you describe the style?
• What different styles of music do you hear?
Explain.
• Does it remind you of music you have heard
before? If so, describe it.
• Do you like it? Why or why not?
• Do you like the way Ray Charles’s and

Willie Nelson’s voices sound together?
TeACheR’S NoTe:
You can easily adapt this to a writing activity by

asking students to write a paragraph addressing the
questions above.
.
Why do you think that Ray Charles is
considered a musical genius? What is
it that you are talented at doing?
TeACheR’S NoTe:
In addition to the above selections, Ray Charles’s

versions of “America the Beautiful” and “Georgia on My
Mind” are good examples of Charle’smusical genius.

If you would like to examine these songs with your class,
Nashville Public Library has the following CDs available
for loan. Call numbers and ISBN numbers are provided for
your convenience.

America the Beautiful” & “Georgia on My Mind”
Ultimate Hits Collection, Ray Charles
Rhino, 1999
CALL # CD Soul C4751u
ISBN: 081227564421
“America the Beautiful”
More Music from Ray
Atlantic/Rhino/WMG Soundtracks, 2005
CALL # CD Soundtrack M836m
ISBN: 081227870324
“Georgia on My Mind”
Georgia on My Mind
LaserLight, 2001
CALL # CD Blues C476g
ISBN: 018111178426
Ray: Original Motion Picture Soundtrack
Atlantic/Rhino/WMG Soundtracks, 2004
CALL # CD Soundtrack R2631o
ISBN: 6308685097
20 Golden Classics
, Ray Charles
Goldenlane Records, 2000
CALL # CD Jazz C476t
ISBN: 741157088229
The Very Best of Ray Charles
Rhino, 2000
CALL # CD Soul C4751v
ISBN: 081227982225
TeACheR’S NoTe:
If you would like to explore with your class the issues
of racism and poverty in the Deep South that are
mentioned in this activity, free resources are available
at www.tolerance.org/teach/resources
Let’s listen to some examples of Ray’s

performances, to explore his musical genius
by examining how he combined and added to

different types of American music.
.
Play Ray Charles’s version of the
Scottish folk song “My bonnie”

(CD track # ), a song that may

be familiar to your students.
Direct them to listen for different styles of music,
and use the following questions for discussion or
a writing activity. Let students know Ray is singing
and playing piano on this song. It might also be
helpful to play another version of “My Bonnie”
and sing it with your students before listening to
Ray Charles’s version.
• What do you think about Ray’s singing and piano
playing abilities?
• Describe the styles of American music you hear

(jazz, R&B, pop, rock & roll, country, etc).
• Describe the instruments you hear.

Answers might include descriptions of piano, drums, guitar,
bass, saxophone, and trombone.
• How would you describe Ray’s personal style in
the music?
• What “feeling” do you think Ray is trying to
convey in his version of the song?
• Do you like this song? Why or why not?
• How does listening to the song make you feel?
.
Play “What’d I Say” (CD track # 6),

one of Charles’s most popular songs.
In this song, Ray incorporated the “call-and-
response” technique, often associated with gospel
music, which involved the audience or singers in his
band. This song demonstrates his gift of combining
gospel and blues. The fusion of these two sounds is
called soul music, and Ray is considered to be one
of the primary inventors. Listen to this song and
consider the following:
• Describe the call-and-response singing

you hear.
• Have you ever heard this sound in other types

of music?

Answers might include gospel, Christian, rap, rock & roll,
children’s rhymes.
• If so, what and where did you hear this music?
Answers might include church, sporting events, or on the radio.
• Do you like this song? Why or why not?
• How does listening to the song make you feel?
. Listen to Ray’s solo from this
instrumental called “x-Ray blues”

(CD track # 7).
Ray always sang and played piano during his
concerts. Throughout most of his career, he
also played some songs on saxophone during
performances. When we visit the museum, we will
see Ray Charles’s alto saxophone. Consider the
following questions:
• What do you think about his saxophone

playing abilities?
• Describe the styles of American music you hear

(jazz, R&B, pop, rock & roll, country, etc).
• Do you like this piece of music?

Why or why not?

I Can’t Stop Loving You: Ray Charles and Country Music Sponsored by Suntrust
PRe-Visit lessons
9
Teacher’s Guide
PRe-Visit lessons
6. Share the following with students:
During the latter part of his career, Ray Charles
emerged as an icon. Even as his records failed to
make the charts after the success of 1984’s
Friendship

album, Charles was being showered with awards and
honors, and courted by presidents and politicians
as a symbol of American opportunity and equality.
His appearances in popular TV ads kept him in the
public eye in the 1990s and helped secure his status
as a well-known figure of popular music.
7. use the following questions

for discussion:
• When you think of Ray Charles, what comes to
mind? You may wish to reference the poster
from this kit as a visual aid.
• We have learned that Ray Charles appeared
in several TV ads. Can you remember any
advertisements in which you have seen Ray
Charles? Describe them. Many students will not
have seen or heard these ads.
• One popular advertisement he did in the
United States was for Diet Pepsi cola (“You Got
the Right One, Baby”). Why would a company
want someone considered an icon to advertise

their product?
• We’ve also learned that Ray Charles was given
numerous awards and recognitions in the
United States and around the world. Among
them, he received the Kennedy Center Honors,
presented to him by President Reagan. This is
one of the most prestigious awards a performer
can receive. Charles also was given the Order of
Arts and Letters from the French government,
one of France’s highest artistic honors. What do
these honors tell us about Ray Charles?
• Would you want to be an icon? Why or why not?
. explore with your students more
about the Kennedy Center honors at
www.kennedy-center.org/programs/
specialevents/honors/about/home.
html and learn more about the
order of Arts and Letters at www.
ambafrance-us.org/culture/people/
texts/order-art.html.
• What is the John F. Kennedy Center for the
Performing Arts? Where is it located? What is
special about it?
9.
Ask students to write a paragraph
about their favorite icon, addressing
why the person or thing is an icon
and what they represent.
0. encourage students to share their
work with the class.
What’s an icon?
Tennessee sTaTe CurriCulum sTandards:
Language Arts
.0
The student will develop the structural and creative
skills of the writing process necessary to produce written
language that can be read, presented to, and interpreted
by various audiences. Learning expectations: 2.02 (3-5),
2.09 (3-5), 2.12 (6-8); High School Writing (I, II, III, IV)
.0
The student will use Standard English conventions
and proper spelling as appropriate to speaking and
writing. Learning expectations: 3.01 (3-8), 3.02 (3-8),
3.03 (3-8), 3.04 (3-8)
high School Speaking and Listening
The student will express ideas clearly and effectively
in a variety of oral contexts and apply active listening
skills in the analysis and evaluation of spoken ideas.

(I, II, III, IV)
Social Studies
Culture .0
Culture encompasses similarities and
differences among people, including their beliefs,
knowledge, changes, values, and traditions. Students
will explore these elements of society to develop an
appreciation and respect for the variety of human
cultures. Learning expectations: 1.03 (K-5)
high School Post WWII era
Culture .
Identify examples of how language,
literature, the arts, architecture, traditions, beliefs,
values, or behaviors contribute to the development and
transmission of culture.
high School Contemporary World
Culture .
Identify instances in which language,
art, music, belief systems, and other cultural elements
facilitate understanding or create misunderstanding.
objective:
Students will explore the term icon by
examining Ray Charles’s work and achievements
that demonstrate his iconic status.
Prep Time:
None
Materials:
Paper, pencils
Key Vocabulary:
Icon, cultural icon
. Ask students what the word

“icon” means.
You may choose to have them share what they
know about the word before looking it up in a
dictionary. Many students will associate icon with
a computer screen. Use this to discuss how the
icons on a computer screen are really symbols for
other things such as various computer programs

or functions.
. Share the following with students:
While there are multiple definitions for the

word icon, here are two that are relevant to our
discussion today:
Icon
1) An important and enduring symbol.

2) One who is the object of great attention and devotion;

an idol.
. Ask students to list ten icons

(that are not people), such as the
Statue of Liberty, Mickey Mouse,

or the Washington Monument.
Discuss each icon on the list and what

it represents.
. Share the following with students:
When people are considered icons, it is different
from just being famous. An icon is an enduring
symbol, meaning that it has stood the test of
time. Just like items we consider icons that are
not people—such as monuments, characters, and
buildings—these people represent something
else, such as an achievement or way of life.

Their accomplishments, reputations, and legacies
become a part of American life. Hence, they
become icons.
. As a class, list twenty famous

people, and decide whether each
name is someone who is an icon

or just famous.
Ask your class if Ray Charles fits the definition of
an icon, and ask them to explain their answer.
6
|
Ray Charles shakes hands with President Ronald Regan and Vice President George Bush after singing “America the Beautiful”
at the 1984 Republican Convention.
Photograph courtesy of Bill Greensmith
0
I Can’t Stop Loving You: Ray Charles and Country Music Sponsored by Suntrust
Post-Visit lessons

Teacher’s Guide
Post-Visit lessons
Ray’s stage style
TeACheR’S NoTe:
In preparation for this activity, students will be given an
observation worksheet to collect information during their
exhibit tour. The worksheet is included on page 15 for
reference and will be distributed to students during their
museum visit.
Tennessee sTaTe CurriCulum sTandards:
Language Arts
.0
The student will develop the structural and creative
skills of the writing process necessary to produce written
language that can be read, presented to, and interpreted
by various audiences. Learning expectations: 2.02 (3-
5), 2.09 (3-5), 2.12 (6-8); High School Writing (I, II, III, IV)
.0
The student will use Standard English conventions
and proper spelling as appropriate to speaking and
writing. Learning expectations: 3.01 (3-8), 3.02 (3-8),
3.03 (3-8), 3.04 (3-8)
high School Speaking and Listening
The student will express ideas clearly and effectively
in a variety of oral contexts and apply active listening
skills in the analysis and evaluation of spoken ideas.

(I, II, III, IV)
Visual Art
.0
Students will understand and apply media,
techniques, and processes. Learning expectations: 1.1
(K, 1, 2, 3-4, 5, 6-8, 9-12), 1.2 (K, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6-8, 9-12),
1.3 (1-2, 3-5, 6-8, 9-12) 1.4 (4-5)
.0
Students will choose and evaluate a range of subject
matter, symbols, and ideas. Learning expectations: 3.1
(1, 2, 3, 4, 5) 3.2 (1, 2, 3, 4, 5) 3.3 (1)
6.0
Students will make connections between visual
arts and other disciplines. Learning expectations: 6.1
(1, 2, 3, 4, 5) 6.2 (3, 4, 5)
objective:
Students will reflect on their museum
visit by discussing how Ray showed his personal style
in what he wore as well as draw a representation of
or write about their own personal style.
Prep Time:
None
Materials:
Paper, pencils (Art supplies such as
crayons and scissors if you choose to do the art
extension.)
. Share the following with students:
You may also wish to refer them to the poster
that came with the lesson kit to examine different
images of Ray.
Now that we have seen the Ray Charles exhibit,
let’s discuss his style based on the costumes and
sunglasses we saw.
. use the following questions for
discussion or ask students to write

a paragraph addressing one or

more of them:
• What do you remember about Ray’s costumes?

(Answers might include: glamorous, flashy, beautiful, etc.)
• Did you have a favorite costume?

What made it special?
• What did all the different costumes

have in common?

If students don’t mention it on their own, point out

that they attract attention in one way or another.
• Why do you think Ray often chose

to wear tuxedos?
• What would be the advantage of having

“flashy” or “sparkly” stage wear?
• How would these kinds of costumes

be even more helpful to someone who

could not move around the stage?
• Ray wore sunglasses when in public.

Why do you think he did that?
• How would you describe

Ray Charles’s sunglasses?
• What might Ray’s sunglasses say about

his personal style?
. Share the following with students.
Ray Charles often wore nicely tailored and
fashionable suits on stage. Many performers wear
“flashy” or “sparkly” costumes because they stand
out under the stage lights, which reflect off sequins
or other shiny materials. For Ray, this was especially
important, as he was often performing with a large
band and could not move around the stage because
of his blindness. He typically remained seated at the
piano, but his costumes helped to make sure that he
was the focus. He also began wearing sunglasses as a
young man to improve his appearance. Sunglasses
were one of the very few luxuries he purchased
once he began making a small amount of money as
a musician. Ray described it this way: “I was feeling
full-grown, making a small amount of change,
and working in halfway decent clubs. Even bought
myself a pair of dark glasses–my first. They were
just regular sunglasses. My friends had been telling
me that my eyes didn’t look good. Lots of times
they were tearing and caked with matter. So for

the sake of appearance, I got some dark glasses,
and I’ve been wearing them ever since.”
.
Ask students to write in their

journals describing the Ray Charles
costumes and sunglasses they

saw in the exhibit.
.
Ask students to write a paragraph
about or draw a picture of a costume
that they would wear on stage. Ask
them to consider what they would
like the audience to think about when
they are on stage.
You might choose to have students create a
visual representation of Ray Charles and one
of themselves, as well as a descriptive paragraph
explaining the style of each.
6. encourage students to share their
work with the class.

|
Ray Charles at Carnegie Hall, 1962
Photograph by Joe Adams. Courtesy of Joe Adams.

Teacher’s Guide
Post-Visit lessons
RAY’S STAGe STYLe
exhibiT Tour WorksheeT
1. Find the display case that contains some of Ray’s tuxedos.
It is located near the big television screen at the back of
the exhibit. Look carefully at each of the costumes.
a. What words would you use to describe Ray’s costumes?

d. Which of these costumes do you like the best? Why?
You can use this space to describe
that costume or to draw a picture of it.

What did you learn

about Ray Charles?
Tennessee sTaTe CurriCulum sTandards:
Language Arts
.0
The student will develop the structural and creative
skills of the writing process necessary to produce written
language that can be read, presented to, and interpreted
by various audiences. Learning expectations: 2.02 (3-
5), 2.09 (3-5), 2.12 (6-8); High School Writing (I, II, III, IV)
.0
The student will use Standard English conventions
and proper spelling as appropriate to speaking and
writing. Learning expectations: 3.01 (3-8), 3.02 (3-8),
3.03 (3-8), 3.04 (3-8)
high School Speaking and Listening
The student will express ideas clearly and effectively
in a variety of oral contexts and apply active listening
skills in the analysis and evaluation of spoken ideas.

(I, II, III, IV)
Social Studies
Culture .0
Culture encompasses similarities and
differences among people, including their beliefs,
knowledge, changes, values, and traditions. Students
will explore these elements of society to develop an
appreciation and respect for the variety of human
cultures. Learning expectations: 1.01 (6-8, 7), 1.02 (K-5),
1.03 (K-5), 1.04 (6,7)
objective:
Students will create a set of statements
they believe about Ray Charles as well as a set of
statements determining what they would like to
learn about Ray and then evaluate these statements
by reflecting on their museum visit.
Prep Time:
None
Materials:
KWL charts created before visiting the
exhibit, paper, and pencils
.
After visiting the Ray Charles

exhibit, review the KWL charts
created by your students before

their visit and use the following
questions for discussion:
• Are all the items on our “what we KNOW” list
correct?
• If not, what changes do we need to make to the
incorrect items?
• What did we LEARN about Ray Charles on our
visit that we can put in our “L” section?
• Did we learn everything that was on our “what
we WANT to learn” list?
• If not, how could we find the information we
still do not have?
• What was your favorite part of the Ray Charles
exhibit and why?
TeACheR’S NoTe:
If you chose to have each student create their own

KWL chart, you may wish to make this an individual

activity also by asking students to write their own
responses to the discussion questions before sharing
their thoughts with the class.
.
Ask students to write a letter to

Ray Charles telling him what they
learned about him that they did not
know before seeing the exhibit.
If Ray Charles were still alive today, what would
you like to tell him? These letters can be mailed to
the museum. Museum staff members will forward
these letters to the Ray Charles Marketing Group of
Ray Charles Enterprises. You may choose to send
samples of the other writing activities your students
completed during their work with this kit.
School Programs Coordinator
Country Music Hall of Fame
®
and Museum
222 Fifth Avenue South
Nashville, TN 37203

|
3. Find the big television screen located on the back wall of the exhibit. Have a seat on one of the round benches
and take some time to watch the footage of Ray Charles’s performances. As you watch, pay close attention to his
costumes. Then answer the following questions.
a. What do you notice about Ray’s costumes?
b. Do you like the way Ray’s costumes look when he is performing? Why or why not?
a. What words would you use to describe these sunglasses?
b. Which of these pairs of sunglasses do you like the best?
Why? You can use this space to describe that pair of
sunglasses or to draw a picture of them.
2. Examine the sunglasses in the glass case near the back wall of the exhibit.
b. What is similar about the costumes?
c. What is different?

I Can’t Stop Loving You: Ray Charles and Country Music Sponsored by Suntrust
Post-Visit lessons
1. Move It on Over — Hank Williams
(Hank Williams Sr.)
© 1947 Sony/ATV Acuff Rose Music (BMI). All rights on behalf

of Sony/ATV Acuff Rose Music administered by Sony/ATV Music
Publishing, 8 Music Square West, Nashville, TN 37203. A.ll rights
reserved. Used by permission. Courtesy of Estate of Hank Williams
2. Move It on Over — Ray Charles
(Hank Williams Sr.)
© 1947 Sony/ATV Acuff Rose Music (BMI). All rights on behalf

of Sony/ATV Acuff Rose Music administered by Sony/ATV Music
Publishing, 8 Music Square West, Nashville, TN 37203. All rights
reserved. Used by permission. Courtesy of Ray Charles Enterprises

by arrangement of the Ray Charles Marketing Group
3. I Can’t Stop Loving You — Don Gibson
(Don Gibson)
© 1958 Sony/ATV Acuff Rose Music (BMI). All rights on behalf

of Sony/ATV Acuff Rose Music administered by Sony/ATV Music
Publishing, 8 Music Square West, Nashville, TN 37203. All rights
reserved. Used by permission. Under License From The SONY BMG
Custom Marketing Group, SONY BMG MUSIC ENTERTAINMENT
4. I Can’t Stop Loving You — Ray Charles
(Don Gibson)
© 1958 Sony/ATV Acuff Rose Music (BMI). All rights on behalf

of Sony/ATV Acuff Rose Music administered by Sony/ATV Music
Publishing, 8 Music Square West, Nashville, TN 37203. All rights
reserved. Used by permission. Courtesy of Ray Charles Enterprises

by arrangement of the Ray Charles Marketing Group
5. My Bonnie — Ray Charles
(Traditional, Arranged by Ray Charles)
Unichappell Music, Inc. (BMI)

Produced Under License From Atlantic Recording Corp.
6. What’d I Say — Ray Charles
(Ray Charles)
Unichappell Music, Inc. (BMI)

Produced Under License From Atlantic Recording Corp.
7. X- Ray Blues — Ray Charles
(Ray Charles)
Unichappell Music, Inc. (BMI)
Produced Under License From Atlantic Recording Corp.
8. Seven Spanish Angels — Ray Charles & Willie Nelson
(Troy Seals / Edward F. Setser)
Warner-Tamerlane Publishing Co. (BMI) / WB Music Corp.

(ASCAP) Under License From The SONY BMG Custom

Marketing Group, SONY BMG MUSIC ENTERTAINMENT
Christina Amezquita
Glendale Elementary School
Leshia Bess
Julia Green Elementary School
Cassandral Cambric
Oliver Middle School
Mark Hayes
Maplewood High School
Trevor Holt
Brick Church Middle School
Melissa Javors
Paragon Mills Elementary
Amy Moore
Martha Vaught Middle School
Michael Stewart
St. Bernard Academy
Patrice Villines
East Literature Magnet School
Ray Charles and Country
Music teacher’s lesson Kit
Companion Cd
The staff of the Country Music hall
of Fame
®
and Museum thanks the
following local teachers who gave
their time and valuable input during

the development of this resource:
Photograph by Howard Morehead
Collection of the California African American Museum,
Gift of Fran Cooper and the Estate of Howard Morehead
Teacher’s Guide
222 Fi FTh aVeNue sOuTh
NashViLLe, TeNNessee 37203
615.416.2001
cOuNTrYMusichaLLOFFaMe.cOM
The education programs at the Country Music Hall of Fame
®
and Museum are made possible, in part,

by grants from the Metropolitan Nashville Arts Commission and by an agreement between the Tennessee Arts Commission and National Endowment for the Arts.
This Teacher’s Guide was funded in part by a Tennessee Arts Commission Teacher Training Grant.
Accredited by the American Association of Museums, the Country Music Hall of Fame
®
and Museum is operated by the Country Music Foundation
®
, Inc., a 501(c)(3) non-profit educational organization chartered by the state of Tennessee in 1964.