-- First Edition --

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ASSESSMENT HANDBOOK
:


Guidelines on Writing Course Assessments
















--

First Edition
--



Project Lead The Way®

Clifton Park, New York

©
2003



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Table of Contents


Preface


................................
................................
................................
..................

3


Writing Assessment Items

4

Content Information

................................
................................
.................


4

Age and Percep
tion

................................
................................
.................


4

Proven Test Strategies

................................
................................
............


5

Multiple
-
Choice Questions

................................
................................
......


5

Application of Components

................................
................................
....


5

Short Answer Questions

................................
................................
.........


9

Constructed Response

................................
................................
............

10

Rubric

................................
................................
................................
........

10

Performance Tasks

................................
................................
..................

11



Providing for Optimal Testing Environment

................................
.......................

16


Testing Course Specific Concepts

................................
................................
......

1
7


Using the PLTW Testing Template

................................
................................
......

18


Using

a Yearly Timeline

................................
................................
........................

18


Following PLTW Assessment Parameters

................................
.........................

20


Appendix
A: Key Concepts:
Introduction to Engineering Design

...........

22

B: Key Concepts:
Principles of Engineering

...........................

24

C: Key Concepts: Digital Ele
ctronics

................................
.......

27

D: Key Concepts: C
omputer Integrated Manufacturing

..........

32

E. Key Concepts: Civil Engineering and Architecture

............

35


Appendix

F
: Directions to the Teacher

................................
..............................

37

Rules and Grading Criteria

................................
.........................

37

Appendix G
: Testing Template

................................
................................
...........

40

Part A

................................
................................
...........................

40

Part B (High Scho
ol Credit
)

................................
........................

46

Part C (College Credit)

................................
................................

48


Appendix H
: Part B/C Performance Task Rubric

................................
..............

50




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Preface


Project Lead The Way
®

believes that the alignment of curriculum,
instruction, and assessment is essential to meeting its goal of
continuous improveme
nt through systematic evaluation
.


Yearly assessment provides teachers, National Affiliates, and PLTW
with information on how well students are learning and applying the
identified key concepts in each of its courses.


Assessment Handbook: Guidelines on

Writing Course Assessments

has two main purposes: It
offers those who write yearly end
-
of
-
course examinations specific information on the following:




Writing assessment items



Providing the optimal testing environment



Testing course specific concepts



Usin
g the PLTW testing template



Following a yearly timeline



Following PLTW assessments parameters


In addition, the Guidelines provide teachers and students with an
assurance of the types of questions and assessment experiences
they will encounter on the PLTW
High School and College Credit
Performance Versions of the final examinations.


A consistent application of these guidelines provides assurance to all
in the PLTW Network that its national program is achieving its goals.









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Writing Assessment It
ems


The skilled writer of assessments considers the information which is
being tested, the age and perception of the test taker, and proven test
writing strategies.


Content Information


Part A of each course assessment tests the basic content of the
cour
se, using a multiple
-
choice format.
Because it is important to
assess the major concepts of each course, five or six assessment
concepts have been developed for each course and included in the
appendices, along with specific item development requirements f
or
each course. Each assessment concept needs to be tested equally.
The test writer needs to identify the main content under each
assessment concept and develop questions that measure an
understanding of the important aspects of the content.


T
he purpose

of the
Part A
multiple
-
choice section is to test the
fundamental, basic content, as this section will be administered to all
students
. Students must also

complet
e

Part B (high school
performance version)
or

Part C (college credit performance version).
T
he more challenging questions should be written for sections B/C.


Age and Perception


The same content can be effectively assessed for various aged
students if the questions are written with those students in mind. If
students need to have an understandi
ng of specific vocabulary, it
should be included in the questions and not avoided, even when
considering students’ age. If difficult content must be learned, it
should be tested using vocabulary and sentence structure consistent
with a young adolescent.
Whereas an adult test taker might be able
to more easily understand what the test writer intends, the adolescent

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test taker needs to read questions which are clear in form and
purpose.


Proven Test Strategies


To provide a common approach to the writing
of test items, test
writers need to review the following test strategies and examples and
apply them consistently. Much of the information comes directly from
Guide to Assessment Literacy: Pennsylvania Assessment Through
Themes
, funded by The Office of Ed
ucational Research and
Improvement, U. S. Department of Education, Washington, D.C.,
August, 1999, pages 114
-

122.


In “Designing an Assessment,” Dr. Ray Wilkins identifies the following
steps in reviewing test items.




Content


validation of the correc
tness/accuracy of the content
knowledge being assessed; and grade
-
level appropriateness.



Accommodation


meeting special needs and learning styles of
students.



Form


types of items used; and balancing item types with the
way you expect students to respond
.



Fairness


bias
-
free test materials (i.e., gender balance,
representation of a variety of cultural perspectives).



Clarity


language is clear, focused, succinct and age
-
appropriate.



Multiple
-
Choice Questions


A multiple
-
choice item is composed of:



A st
em:
An apple appears to be red because red light




Options:
is absorbed by it; passes through it; bends around it
.



Key (correct answer):
reflects off it
.



Distractors: Options that are close, but not exactly correct.


Components of a stem (the question bei
ng made that elicits a
response):



Clear, concise language


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Third person format



Absence of clues to the right answer



Absence of negative stems and use of “all of the above.”

Components of the options (choices):



Four



Only one correct answer



Labels of A, B, C,

D



Numerals, if used, appearing in ascending order



Avoidance of qualifiers such as “never” or “always”



Uniform length, grammatical structure and form


Components of Directions (brief sentences that instruct students how
to respond to the question):



Written

clearly and concisely



Written in boldface



Written above the item and referring to the relevant text or
graphics


Components of Text or Graphic (charts, cartoons, graphs, pictures
that serve as stimuli for questions):



Text passages should be clear and conc
ise.



Text and subject matter should be age appropriate.



Images should be clear, easily understood and suitable for
reproduction.



Images should reflect

sensitivity to race, gender, ethnicity
issues.



Application of

Components


Each of the following test it
ems contains an error, followed by a
corrected version.


Poor Stem

Example 1


CAD is not the first tool to use
when starting a project. What
step in the design process comes before CAD?



A. Engineering Model



B. Sketches


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C. Materials List



D. Test
ing Procedure


The stem is misleading. The writer is attempting to determine if the
student understands that the first step in starting a project is to begin
with a sketch. By referencing CAD, the writer has introduced
irrelevant information that may cau
se confusion as to wh
at the
student should focus on.


Improved Stem

Example 1
:


Listed below are several steps in the design process. Which
step would come first?



Poor Stem Example
2


A prototype is what?

A.

A fully functional, full
-
si
ze model made of the

designed
materials that are used to test the design.

B.

A non
-
functional,
scale model made of cheaper
materials
used to test the design.

C.

A semi to fully functional model used to sho
w the
design
capabilities or features.

D.

Is a scale model used to
visualize the

design usually
made of paper.


The stem is poorly worded. Also, choice D does not match the
grammatical form of the other choices.]


Improved Stem

Example 2
:

A prototype can be defined as:


Improved choice D

Example 2
:

A scale model used to visualize th
e
design usually made of paper.



Poor Distractors



Example 1


Sketching is _______.

A.

A cumbersome way to do orthographic details.

B.

A fast way to represent ideas and details.

C.

Seldom used by design professionals.


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D.

The latest form of t
orture teachers use on th
eir
students.


In this case, all of the distractors use negative language. Students
could infer that by the language alone that B would be the correct
choice. Distractors should be believable alternatives that require
students to
think about the correct a
nswer.


Improved Distractors

Example 1
:


Sketching _______ .

A.

uses equipment to represent orthographic details
.

B.

is a fast way
to represent ideas and details.

C.

is seldo
m used by design professionals.

D.

is a form of solid modeling.



Poor Distractors



Example
2


What type of view would
be considered a commonly used
type
of pictorial view?

A.

Isometric

B.

Auxiliary

C.

Orthographic

D.

1 Point Perspective


The answer that the writer wants here is choice A. Isometric. It is
the most common type of pictorial view used in this
class and may
well be the most common type used overall. However, a perspective
drawing also results in a pictorial drawing. The most common type of
Perspective drawing is a 2 point, but unless significant emphasis has
been placed on that fact, from the s
tudent’s point of view the
distinction would be significant enough to indicate that this is an
incorrect response. Also, the way the stem is written does not give
enough information to direct the student away from Perspective

drawing as a plausible answer
.


Improved Distractors

Example 2
:


What type of view would be considered a commonly used type
of pictorial view?


A.

Isometri
c

B.

Auxiliary


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C.

Orthographic

D.

Sectional

Short Answer Questions


To provide variety in testing, to present information in a more
stimulatin
g way, and to write items which reflect a higher level of
thinking, the assessment writer has a number of additional testing
options available in a short answer format.


Example:
Comparing two graphics and having students select one
which answers a questio
n:


Look at the two graphics
labeled A and B that
represent

wired circuits
. Check the box below

the
circuit that represents the proper use of a diode in a
circuit.


Example:
Responding to a lab report:


Read the short lab report above. Notice that each
l
ine in the report is numbered. On the line below,
write the numbers that appear next to the lines in the
report that tell about recommendations and summary.


Example:
Selecting appropriate vocabulary:


Choose two of the words from the list below that most
accurately reflect the points represented in the
graphic above. Place an X on the line next to each of
the two words you select.


___rupture

___collapse

___stretch

___elongation






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Constructed Response


In a constructed response, students are asked to c
onstruct a
response to a prompt (i.e., task, exercise, statement of a problem).
The response may be written, drawn, diagramed, outlined, or other
means of communicating what students know about a topic.


Example:
Why are some materials used for specific p
urposes in
preference to others? Write your answer in several, clearly
written sentences in the space below. Provide at least three
examples to support your answer.


Example:
You have been asked to design a new sneaker. What are
some of the questions tha
t you would ask to help define
your task? List a minimum of two questions and indicate
your reason for asking
each
.


Example:
Engineers must indicate in their plans the drainage and
traffic flow of a new store site. Look at the graphic of the
constructio
n site and note the lettered items. Select the
area which would offer the best entrance to the area and in
several sentences

indicate two reasons why that site would
be good.



Rubric


One way of assessing students’ constructed responses is through the
us
e of a rubric. The rubric lists the key assessment elements and the
degree to which a response reflects those elements.


The process to follow in developing a rubric is as follows:


1.

Write a constructed response question and indicate the key
elements to be

addressed in the question.

2.

List the key elements.


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3.

Decide what a student would need to
achieve

in each element
to have a nearly perfect response or a score of 4.

4.

Decide what a student would need to
achieve

in each element
to meet a minimum standard or a
score of 1.

5.

Complete the scale for students to receive points 2 or 3.


Some rubrics use a 1(weakest)


5 (best) scale. The
difficulty with

an
odd numbered scale is the
tendency
on the part of the evaluator to
select a score of 3 or the middle of the road.

In a 1


4 scale, the
evaluator is required to select a score of 3 or 2 which is closer to the
best or closer to the weakest.



Performance Tasks


A good performance task should provide
students with

the
opportunity to demonstrate their understanding of m
ultiple
,

major
concepts.
The clear advantage of this form of examination is its
ability to assess student
s’

understanding in a form that is more
consistent to the way they were taught. Accurate assessment of
project based learning must
be
done to some de
gree in a
performance mode.


The development of a good performance task requires an
understanding of what it is that is to be assessed
,

the environment in
which the students will be assessed
,

and the abilities of the students.
The following points need to

be considered when developing a
performance task:




Begin with a complete understanding of what you expect the
final product to look like.



Reflect on the various solutions that potentially could be
produced by the students.



Identify the equipment, supplies

and any software necessary
for the completion of the task.



Confirm that the task can be successfully completed during
one 40


45 minute period.



Check to make sure the task

directly relates to the written
curriculum.


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Make sure the task

is free of bias.



De
fine the problem clearly
.



State t
he level of achievement for a perfect score. It is strongly
recommended that students be provided a rubric to clearly
define the expected results.


Performance tasks must clearly define the problem and the
parameters in wh
ich the student
s are

expected to develop a solution.


Your engineering firm has been hired to design a bridge
to connect Hughesville East and Hughesville West.
Present your solution to your instructor upon completion.


This task does not clearly identify
the problem and does not clearly
define the desired end result.

The following questions are not
answered
for

the student:


1.

What is the amount of time available to the student to complete
the assessment?

2.

What is it that the bridge must span? (e.g. river, r
ail road, gully)

3.

What is the distance that the bridge must span? Where can
supports be positioned?

4.

What is the intended purpose and demands of the bridge? (e.g.
highway, rail road, pedestrian traffic)

5.

What form is the student’s solution expected to take?
(e.g.
drawing, scale model)

6.

What tools, equipment, and materials are available for the
student to use? (e.g. “using only the materials supplied….”)

7.

How does the student know if
his/her

solution represents the
best possible solution?
(e.g. “To obtain a scor
e of 100% your
solution must adhere to the established size specifications and
suspend a minimum test weight of 40 pounds.”)


Scoring of this type of examination is best accomplished through the
use of a rubric. The rubric information presented on page
10

should
be considered when developing a performance task rubric.
The
challenge

for

the developer

is to construct a rubric that accurately
measures and succinctly states the desired outcomes.

Concepts
should be simply stated and the levels of performance
accurately
identified. The d
if
ference between each level of performance should

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be clearly stated and easily recognized by the reader. For the sake
of clarity and accuracy in assessment
,

it may be necessary to break
complex concepts and tasks down into s
ub
-
categories. In some
instances
,

it may be easier for the evaluator if the rubric is divided
into sub
-
sections or separate rubrics developed to accurately
describe the behavior necessary to demonstrate understanding of
complex concepts or perform complex

tasks.











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Sample Performance Task and Scoring Rubric


Part B

(50

points)


Explain in a
two page brochure
or PowerPoint presentation the marble sorter
project. Include the
following in your brochure:


A)

Title slide with the information specified by sc
hool or classroom policy

B)

Overview of the design process

C)

Current applications of closed and open loop programming systems

D)

Fabrication process and materials used to create the actual sorter

E)

What was learned from the project and what could be done better next

time


I
f you choose to create a PowerPo
int, it is to be of
“professional”
quality.

Therefore, keep the animations and the bells and whistles to a minimum. Use
lots of pictures and fewer words. Be clear and be concise.


Part B Rubric



4

3

2

1

Section 1:
Project
Organization








Title Page/Introduction

Contains all the
information
specified by
school and/or
teacher policy
.

Contains most of
the information
specified by
school and/or
teacher policy.
Missing only
1
component.

Contains some of
the informa
tion
specified by
school and/or
teacher policy.
Missing 2
components
.

Contains little or
none of the
information
specified by
school and/or
teacher policy.
Missing 3 or
more
components
.

Animations/Illustrations

There are few or
no
distracting
and/or
(inap
propriate)
animations/illus.
Those that are
included add to
the presentation
rather than
detract from it.

There are few

distracting and/or
(inappropriate)
animations/illus.

Some of those
that are included
detract from the
presentation
rather than add to
i
t.

There are many
animations/illus.
They are
annoying and
detract from the
presentation
.

No animations
are
present.

Overall content

Thoroughly and
clearly states the
main points and
precise details
that accurately
focus on the
Adequately states
the

main points
and precise
details that
accurately focus
on the topic
.

States most of the
main points and
precise details
that accurately
focus on the
topic. May
Little or none of
the overall
content is
covered
.


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topic.

include
unnecessary
information
.

Organization

Clear
organiz
ation

into
a logical
sequence
.

Adequate
evidence of a
logical sequence
of information
.

Fair evidence of a
logical sequence
of information
.

No evidence of
logical sequence.
Unclear.
Confusing
.

Technical Writing

Writing is
concise and easy
to
read. No
grammatical or
spelling errors
.

Writing is
concise and easy
to read. One or
two grammatical
or spelling errors
.

Writing is not
smooth
.

T
hree to
four grammatical
or spelling errors
.

Writing is hard to
follow and
contains
numerous
grammatical and
sp
elling errors.

Section 2: Project
content

4

3

2

1

Explanation/overview
of Design Process used

Explanation is
clear and precise.
Has been
“translated”
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Providing the Optimal Testing Environment


All students deserve an opportun
ity to demonstrate their ability in a
quiet, welcoming testing environment. Students need to have
confidence that the
PLTW
test
s

will assess what they have learned
during the year and that the test
s

will require them to answer multiple
-
choice questions in

Part A and
performance tasks

in either Part B
(high school performance version) or Part C (college credit
performance version). Students must understand the difference in
the two parts and must inform the teacher which part (B or C) they
will be taking.


Students need to know what they
should

bring to the test

site
. Under
PLTW parameters, the end
-
of
-
course assessments will be
administered either in two, separate
40


45
minute
class periods
(see Testing Parameters) or
under

a special testing schedule.


It is imperative that the school administration
be

fully aware of the day
and periods when the end
-
of
-
course assessments will be
administered
in class

so that there will be no interruptions, such as,
scheduled fire drills, public address announcements, or

other such
distractions.


When students enter the classroom, the following should occur:



Students should sit quietly in their assigned seats, have only
required items on their desks, and have sufficient space
between their desks to discourage cheating.



Be
cause basic directions for the test will have been reviewed
on the previous day

by the teacher
,
s/he

may distribute the test
and testing materials immediately when the period begins.



As students will be aware of the types of test they will be
experiencing
in part A, students may begin as soon as they
receive their tests and write their names on the tests.



Teachers should post the time remaining in the period as a
reminder to students.



Students who have an IEP must be tested following guidelines
in their IEP
.



A minute before the end of Part A, the teacher should ask
students to make sure they have written their names on the test

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before they are collected. If a scantron sheet has been used in
Part A, students should make sure

that

they have written their
names

on
the sheet and that all answers are appropriately
darkened
.



All tests should be collected and kept secure, as make
-
up tests
may occur. PLTW suggests considering using scantron
-
type
scoring sheets so the original tests may be used for review the
followi
ng year.



The test is designed for students to have 40


45 minutes of
testing time. If a class period is 60 minutes long, the teacher
must adhere to the 40


45 minute testing time, which includes
the distribution and the collection of the test.


The ad
ministration of Parts B and C requires two different sections to
be distributed to students. Teachers are encouraged to divide
students by the part they will be taking. For example, those taking
Part B will sit in rows 1


3; those taking Part C will sit

in rows 4


6.


When students receive Part B (high school version) or C (college
credit version), they should make sure they have received the correct
version before they write their names
on the sheet
and begin the
assessment.


When the 40


45 minute te
sting time has elapsed, the papers should
be collected and later scored using the PLTW rubric

and answer key
.



Testing Course Specific Concepts


The Director of Curriculum and Instruction has reviewed each course
curriculum and has identified the key five
/six
assessment
concepts
that should be

used
to guide the development of the end
-
of
-
course
assessment items
. These key
assessment
concepts have bee
n
listed by course in
the appendices and reflect the total content for
each course
.


In developing each end
-
of
-
course assessment, the testing team will
develop multiple
-
choice questions for Part A to equally test each
concept. For example, if five key
assessment
concepts have been

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identified, there will be six multiple
-
choice questions
developed
for
each key
as
sessment
concept for a total of 30 questions. It is
essential that items 1


5 test the first key concept, items 6


10 test
the second key concept, and so on. This approach will provide an
opportunity for an item analysis of each key concept.



Parts B

(high school performance version) and C (college credit
performance version) will require students to demonstrate an
application of their understanding of the key concepts through
the
completion of performance tasks and/or specific assessment items.


The
use of five or more questions focusing on a single concept allows
students to demonstrate their understanding of a specific concept.
By analyzing the responses made by the class as a whole for each
question in Part A and grouping those responses by concep
t, the
teacher can determine how well the class understands each concept.
This information is invaluable in determining future remediation needs
of the class, as well as serving as an important tool for the teacher to
indicate potential areas of change in
methodology.



U
sing the PLTW Testing Template


All end
-
of
-
course assessments must use the PLTW testing template.
For consistency, all directions, font and size, and graphics are
provided.


Each PLTW
lead test developer

is responsible for completing the
t
emplate

for his/her specific course,

following PLTW parameters.


The tem
plate may be found in the appendices
.



Using a Yearly Timeline


Because of PLTW’s decision to involve representatives from high
schools, colleges, and PLTW in the development of each
end
-
of
-
course assessment, it is imperative that all participants adhere to the
following timeline:


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September 15 / Fe
br
uary 13

The
PLTW
lead test developer

identifies and
contacts all participants to share the timeline, to
provide feedback on the results

of the administration of the
previous year’s assessment, to review the key course concepts,
to review the test writing tasks, to divide the tasks up among
members of the team, and to establish the deadline for
submission of items to the coordinator.


Octo
ber 30 / March 31

The PLTW
lead test developer

meets with
all participants for a group rev
iew of all submitted test items.

Items will have been sent to all participants prior to the meeting
for their individual review. Final test items will be selected
for
the
test in development
.

Other items may be retained for future
tests. Once the tests have been administered, teachers may
use them for review purposes. The testing teams should
consider this in developing test questions each year.

Deadline
for sub
mission of final draft to lead test developer is
established.


November 15 / April 9

Final Examination edits due to t
he PLTW
lead test developer
.



November 24 / April 23

Completed examinations due to

the
Director of Curriculum & Instruction
.



Decembe
r 1 / May 1

Examinations are available on the PLTW web
site for downloading by teachers.




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Following PLTW Assessment Parameters


End
-
of
-
course assessments have been developed to provide a
consistent format to fit schools’ testing schedules. To assure
quality
data collection from all schools in the PLTW Network, schools need
to understand the importance of adhering to the following parameters:




All students enrolled in PLTW courses must take the end
-
of
-
course final assessment which
should

be administere
d when
the course is completed either at the end of a semester (under
a block schedule) or at the end of the school year.



Each end
-
of
-
course assessment is composed of three sections:



Part A: Multiple
-
choice

questions testing a basic





understanding
of the course



Part B: High School Performance Credit Version



Part C: College Credit Performance Version



Students seeking
high school credit

must take Part A and
Part B.



Students seeking
college credit

must take Part A and Part C.



Parts B and C will

require students to complete short answer
questions and
/or

a
performance task
.



The test will require
a total of
two class periods of 40


45
minutes each to administer. Part A may be given on one day
during a 40


45
minute
class period; Part B/C must be

administered the following day during a 40


45
minute
class
period. The time range includes the distribution and collection
of the test.



Schools which choose to include the assessment within a
special testing schedule may do so. Under this plan, studen
ts
will have 80


90 minutes to complete Part A and Part B/C.
The time range includes the distribution and collection of the
test.



Students with an IEP must be provided with the testing
conditions stated in the IEP.



Part A may be scored using a s
cantron m
ethod; Parts B/C must
be scored using the test’s rubric

and, if necessary, the answer
key
.




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In reporting test results to PLTW, teachers must provide three
scores for each student: Part A, Part B or C (reported
separately), and the Total score. Teachers
are not to include
students’ names in the reporting process.





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Appendix A


IED Assessment Concepts


I Design


1.

The process of design can be divided into seven distinct steps. This
seven step process can be applied to either individually or in a group
set
ting to identify and solve specific problems.

2.

The principles and elements of design can be identified and applied to
the design process.



II Sketching & Visualization


1.

Applying proper sketching techniques allows an individual to visualize
and communicate

ideas to others as 2 dimensional geometric figures to
aid in solving problems.

2.

By selecting and applying the appropriate pictorial sketch, ideas and
design can be developed improved on and communicated to others.

3.

Annotating sketches results in the accurat
e conveyance of data in a
design solution.



III Geometric Relationships


1.

Major geometric shapes (isosceles triangle, right triangle, scalene
triangle, rectangles, squares, rhombus, trapezoid, pentagon, hexagon,
and octagon) can be constructed and used to

communicate ideas and
solutions.

2.

The Cartesian System, using absolute, relative and polar coordinates
can be used to construct two and three dimensional models.



IV Modeling


1.

Modeling is an important part of the design and development process. It
begins

with an idea or conceptual model. The conceptual model can be
better defined and analyzed through mathematical models and
expressed graphically.

2.

CAD software is applied to develop computer models that accurately
state the solution to a problem. The softw
are can also be used to help
analyze and improve on a design. The computer model can then be
reproduced as a physical model of the final solution.


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3.

CAD software allows the construction of computer models or
assemblies. Individual parts are assembled taking
into account

both
assembly and driving constraints to produce both stationary and
animated models.

4.

Analysis of the physical properties of a model while establishing
acceptable limits or tolerances is necessary in order to finalize the
design and plan for p
roduction.

5.

The documentation or precise communication of the specific size and
shape of an object is crucial to its accurate reproduction.



V Presentation


1.

Communications techniques involve voice variation, eye contact,
posture, attire, practice and prep
aration.

2.

The audience and type of presentation dictate the type of visual aids and
form of presentation.

3.

The audience and type of presentation dictate the type and form of
written documentation.



VI Production & Marketing


1.

Production requires an understa
nding of material characteristics,
necessary resources, manufacturing processes, specifications and
constraints. Effective production requires accurate production planning.

2.

Automated manufacturing involves CNC, FMS and CIM.

3.

Effective manufacturing requires

an understanding of the resources
necessary, material handling including cost analysis of the final product.
Maintaining quality control is critical in effective production.

4.

Marketing involves effective packaging and product analysis.







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Appendix B


PO
E Assessment Concepts


I
Communication, Documentation & t
he Design Process


1.

Sketching is a fast form of graphical communication that helps organize
thoughts, generate ideas, record dimensions, and transfer information
from place to place.

2.

Technical writin
g is a specialized field that requires skill in writing clearly
and concisely, an understanding of technical products and processes,
organization abilities, and a knowledge of numerous software tools.
Often tables, charts and graphs are used to clearly sho
w data.

3.

To find effective solutions to design challenges, a systematic method is
employed by engineers working in design teams.



II
Engineering Systems


1.

A mechanical system is composed of several mechanical devices that
typically involve moving parts t
hat transmit power and accomplish a
specific pattern of motion.

2.

Mechanical design is the process of selecting mechanical components
and assembling them together to accomplish a desired function.

3.

Thermodynamics is the

branch of science concerned with the na
ture of
heat and its conversion to mechanical, electrical, and chemical energy.

4.

Hydraulic systems utilize a liquid in a confined area to transfer energy
which allows moving large loads with seemingly little effort.

5.

Pneumatic systems typically involve a sou
rce of compressed air being
controlled by valves and causing output devices such as cylinders to
operate in a controlled way.

6.

An electrical circuit is an unbroken path of a material that will conduct
electricity.


Series circuits have one path; parallel ci
rcuits provide more
than one path.


7.

There is a direct mathematical relationship between the electromotive
force and the amount of electrons it can move.


The electromotive force
is frequently referred to as “voltage.” The flow of electrons is called
“curre
nt.”


The force that holds the current back is called “resistance.”

8.

Power, measured in watts, can be found by multiplying the voltage by
the current.

9.

Everyday products, including cars, microwaves, ovens, hair dryers,
coffee pots, dishwashers and washing ma
chines, all use control systems
to handle their operation.

10.

At the heart of a digital control system is a microprocessor that does the
processing of sensor information.


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III Statics & Strength of Materials


1.

Statics is used to mathematically analyze the forc
es on a structure.

2.

If two or more forces are acting on a body, vectors can be graphically
added or subtracted to determine what would be the result of all the
forces applied.

3.

Complex structures can be analyzed by breaking them down into
components.

4.

Streng
th of Materials deals with the behavior of solid bodies subjected to
various types of loading to determine the stresses, strains, and
displacements caused by the loading.

5.

All objects can be deformed with the application of an external force. The
external f
orce is called “stress.”


Strain is the degree of deformation.



IV Materials & Materials Testing


1.

All materials are formed from atoms joined together to form molecules
and these molecules combine to form various compounds. These can be
grouped into categ
ories or groups, including organic, metals, ceramics,
polymers, and composites.

2.

Each group possesses identifying characteristics and chemical structure.

3.

There are six major properties of materials: chemical, physical,
mechanical, electrical, thermal, and d
imensional.

4.

Properly selecting a material for a product application is dependent on
the material’s characteristics and how the product will be produced.

8.

Production Processes must be selected, ordered, automated and
controlled in order to produce an economi
cal and functional product.
These processes can be determined through analysis.

9.

Utilizing precision measuring equipment, parts are inspected for size,
strength, weight, roughness, and other factors to ensure they are being
made to specifications. The proce
ss of keeping the product consistent is
called “quality control.”

10.

An understanding of variation and the distinction between “common” and
“special” causes is at the heart of Statistical Process Control.

11.

Engineers synthesize data from destructive and nondest
ructive tests,
evaluate the results and apply knowledge of materials to new products
or to the improvement of existing products.

12.

There are three types of stresses possible: tension, compression and
shear.

13.

If a stress or load is removed from a material, it
will either return to its
original shape and size (elastic behavior), or it will remain permanently
deformed by the stress (plasticity).

14.

“Brittle” suggests little plastic behavior, while a ductile material is capable
of considerable plastic deformation.



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V

Engineering for Reliability


1.

Failure rate for the entire production run can be determined through
sample testing. These failure rates are expressed in either a
mathematical probability or a function of time.


Usually, items which are
in continuous use wi
ll have failure rates expressed as Mean Time
Between Failure (MTBF).


There are four typical reasons for failure:


poor design, poor construction, poor operating instructions, and operator
error/misuse.



2.

Failure rates can be predicted for new products bas
ed on experience
with similar products.

3.

Moral and ethical choices must be made in almost every project.
Sometimes a decision is between two negative options.



VI Introduction to Dynamics / Kinematics


1.

Dynamics is separated into two major divisions: “kin
ematics,” which is a
study of motion without reference to the forces causing the motion, and
“kinetics,” which relates the forces on bodies to their resulting motions.

2.

The distance an object travels over a time period is called
“displacement.” Velocity is
found by dividing the displacement by the
time interval of the displacement. Acceleration is the change in velocity
divided by the time interval. These are called vector quantities.

3.

Trajectory motion is an object moving in a 2
-
dimensional plane.

4.

Trajectory

motion in a parabolic path can be broken down into two
components: vertical and horizontal. The velocity remains constant in the
X direction but the Velocity in the Y direction changes with time in both
magnitude and direction due to the force of gravity.







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Appendix C


DE Assessment Concepts


I
Fundamentals


1.

Electron flow is the current produced by the movement of free electrons
toward a positive terminal.

2.

Conventional current flow is current produced by the movement of
positive charges toward a negat
ive terminal.

3.

Three important parts of an atom are protons, neutrons and electrons.

4.

Direct current is current flowing in only one direction. Alternating current
is current that is constantly changing in amplitude and polarity.

6.

Very large units and very sma
ll units can be abbreviated with
standardized notation. Prefixes eliminate the need for using zeros in the
value.

7.

Conductors have very little resistance; insulators have a large amount of
resistance. Resistance is measured in ohms.

8.

A resistor is a device t
hat inserts resistance into a circuit in order to
reduce the current or create an IR drop. Resistors are measured in ohms
and rated in watts for the power they can dissipate.

9.

There is a direct mathematical correlation between voltage, resistance
and curren
t in all electronic circuits.


Current is directly proportional to
Voltage applied and inversely proportional to resistance.

10.

The path or paths followed by the current flow is called a circuit. All
circuits must contain a source of electromotive force (caus
ing the
electrons to flow through closed loops from the high potential side of the
source to the low potential side), a load, and a conductor.

11.

The purpose of a switch is to either open or close a path for the
electrons to flow.

12.

Symbols are used to draw a c
ircuit, and these symbols are based on
industry standards.

13.

A capacitor stores a static electrical charge. The rate the capacitor
charges or discharges depends on the resistance in the circuit and can
be predicted mathematically.

14.

Analog and Digital Signals

have different waveforms with distinctive
characteristics.









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II
Number Systems, Boolean Algebra, Gates & Adding


1.

Binary and
h
exadecimal number systems are essential to designing and
constructing digital circuits.

2.

Binary and
h
exadecimal number system
s form the basis of all digital
systems.

3.

Binary (base 2), hexadecimal (base 16) and hecimal (base 10) are
similar and are based on the same place value principles, which is a key
component to understanding different bases.

4.

Control of high and low logic lev
els is necessary to implement complex
digital circuitry.



5.

Gates are devices that are used to control these logic levels.



6.

Combinations of these gates are necessary to create all types of
circuits.



7.

To more easily
distinguish

these circuits, each gate ha
s its own symbol.



8.

These symbols are necessary to graphically represent circuits for
documentation
.

9.

Each Integrated Circuit (IC) has a unique purpose, multiple gates and a
pinout diagram identifying pin function.

10.

The truth table (the relationship betwee
n the outputs and the inputs) is a
concise way of presenting the logic of a circuit.

11.

Boolean algebra is the mathematics of digital systems

and is the
mathematical relationship of each gate
.

12.

The rules, laws and theorems of Boolean algebra can be used to
man
ipulate and simplify logic expressions.

13.

All Boolean expressions can be expressed in one of two forms: sum
-
of
-
products or product
-
of
-
sums.

14.

Logic expressions can be systematically simplified using a graphical
process called Karnaugh mapping.

15.

AOI logic circui
t can be expressed using all NAND or all NOR gates.

16.

Logic circuits can be designed from either Boolean expressions or truth
tables.

17.

The fewer the number of gates used, the simpler an expression is
considered to be.

18.

Boolean algebra is made up of certain wel
l
-
defined rules and laws, which
must be used correctly.

19.

Adder circuits are important in digital systems in which numerical data is
processed.

20.

Adders are built with basic gates (AND, OR, NOT, XOR).

21.

Adder circuits can be designed, tested and built using eith
er discrete
gates or MSI chips which will perform mathematical operations on binary
numbers.

22.

Binary numbers are used to add and subtract numbers in electronic
systems.




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III
Combinational Circuit Design


1.

Interconnected gates are referred to as combination
al logic circuits.

2.

Combinatorial logic circuits can be expressed by using a Boolean
expression, truth table and symbols and can be simplified using K
-
maps,
and Boolean algebra.

3.

IC chips are classified by the number of equivalent gate circuits on each
chip.

4.

SSI (Small Scale Integration) have less than 12 gates, MSI(Medium
Scale Integration): 12
-
99 gates, and LSI(Large Scale Integration): 100
-
9999 gates.

5.

Multiplexers and demultiplexers are digital components that provide the
solution to the bottleneck of mult
iple data sources and destinations.


6.

PLDs can be programmed, erased and reprogrammed many times
allowing easier design modifications.

7.

PLDs offer design flexibility, reduce board space and package count and
can be used to develop digital designs more quickl
y than fixed

function
logic
.

8.

Most common PLDs are based on AND/OR logic gate arrays and are
programmable with SOP expressions.



IV
Flip
-
Flops


1.

The building block for sequential logic is the flip
-
flop.

2.

Flip
-
flops are circuits that can maintain their stat
e indefinitely as long as
power is supplied, and change their states when directed by a control
input. Flip
-
flops are given a
clock

input, which specifies specific
moments in time to change state. Their output is connected back into
their input, so that th
eir proceeding state depends on both their current
state and their control input.

3.

In sequential logic the current state (output) depends on the past state
,

as well as the current inputs.

4.

Flip
-
flops can be wired together to form counters, shift registers an
d
various memory devices.

5.

Flip
-
flops can be used in synchronous or asynchronous modes.

6.

Flip
-
flops have practical applications, especially in the area of
elementary memory storage and frequency division
. Common uses for
Flip
-
flops include Frequency Division
, Data Storage, Switch Debouncing
and Logic Synchronization







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V
Shift Registers & Counters


1.

Shift
r
egisters and
c
ounters are closely related and consist of an
arrangement of flip
-
flops.

2.

Manufacturers use shift registers in IC form for applications such

as
printers and modems.

3.

Shift
r
egisters are primarily used for the storage and transfer of digital
data.

4.

There are 4 basic types of
s
hift
r
egisters which are classified by the input
and the output.

5.

There are two broad categories of counters: asynchronous
and
synchronous.



VI
Families & Specifications


1.

There are many families of logic devices
,

each with
its

own unique
specifications.

2.

Voltage levels differ between logic families.

3.

Propagation delay and power dissipation are important IC family
specification
s.

4.

Each logic family has its own definition of High and Low.

5.

Each logic family has its own noise margin characteristic.

6.

There are a maximum number of gates that can be driven off one output.

7.

Fan
-
out characteristics of digital ICs are determined by output d
rive and
input loading specifications.

8.

Transistor to transistor logic devices use current controlled transistors
which are durable but consume energy and create heat.


Complimentary
metal oxide semiconductor logic devices use voltage controlled
transistors

which use much less power but are static sensitive.



VII
Microprocessors


1.

Microprocessors are embedded inside other devices so that they can
control the features or the actions of the product.

2.

Microprocessors are small and have low cost and
low
power
co
nsumption.

3.

A microprocessor

is a digital integrated circuit that can be programmed
with a series of instructions to perform specified functions on data.

4.

It is possible to replace entire logic circuits comprised of discrete gates
using a single microprocess
or.

5.

A microprocessor is composed of three basic elements: a control
section, an arithmetic logic unit, and a register unit..


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6.

A microprocessor becomes a microcomputer with the addition of input
and output devices and additional memory storage.

7.

It is necessa
ry to interface a microprocessor to control external devices
with different amperage and voltage requirements.

8.

A microprocessor that is primarily used to control external devices is
sometimes called a microcontroller.





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Appendix D


CIM Assessment Concept
s


I
Computer Modeling


1.

Student will be able to demonstrate the ability to store, retrieve copy, and
output drawing files depending upon system setup.

2.

Students will be able to utilize instructor identified 2D computer sketching
functions and produce 2D sk
etches using available sketching features
.

3.

Students will be able to define sketched objects with dimensions and
geometric constraints.

4.

Students will be able to apply necessary sketched features to generate a
solid model.

5.

Students will be able to incorporat
e various coordinate systems in the
con
struction of 2
D geometrical shapes and be able to calculate the x and
y coordinates given a radius and angle.

6.

Students will analyze drawings with appropriate inquiry functions.

7.

Students will be able to demonstra
te the

application and modification

of
placed features.

8.

Students will be able to develop multi
-
view drawings such as top, front,
right side, isometric, section and auxiliary views from the solid model.

9.

Students will be able to demonstrate the proper application
of annotations
and reference dimensions while conforming to established drafting
standards.

10.

Students will be able to create assembly models through the integration of
individual parts and sub
-
assemblies to include Views, Balloons, and Bill Of
Materials (BO
M).



II
CNC Machining


1.

Students will define and identify the three primary axes used in CNC
machining including reference and position points
.

2.

Students will contrast open and closed loop control systems.

3.

Students will be able to identify and explain the

function of the major
components of a CNC machine to include: drive systems, work holding
devices, tool changers and the
categories of machine movement.

4.

Students will explain the importance of cutting tool materials and how they
affect the speed and feed
rates used by machine tools.

5.

Students will be able to plot points using absolute, relative (incremental)
and polar coordinates
,

as well as
to
identify significant Points on geometric
shapes (ex. Center point, end point) and the optimum location for the
Pro
gram Reference Zero (PRZ) point.


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6.

Students will be able to write a basic NC part program using necessary G
and M codes including remarks that describe the function of each code.

7.

Students will be able to employ a CAD/CAM/CNC software solution to
create a par
t while applying simulation software to perform a dry run to
veri
fy setup and program operation.

8.

Students will be able to make precision measurements, using both
standard and metric systems, to the degree of accuracy required by plan
specification using ap
propriate instruments.

9.

Students will be able to convert measurements between metric and
standard inch systems.

10.

Students will be able to read technical drawings identifying and
understand
ing

the dimensional tolerances and limits.

11.

Students will demonstrate
their ability to operate the user interface of a
CAM package and access help using appropriate documentation and help
screens, set up a CAM package, perform basic file operations, generate
and
to
edit tool paths by applying appropriate machining processes
to
geometry imported from a CAD program.



III
Robotics


1.

Students will explore the chronological development of automation leading
to robotics, current career opportunities.

2.

Students will be able to identify the four classifications of robots, their
appli
cations, specifications and work envelope.

3.

Students will evaluate the positive impact robots have on manufacturing
as well as
on society
.

4.

Students will identify and sketch the mechanical components to a robot to
include: end effectors, drive systems, contr
ollers and specific tool
applications.

5.

Students will be able to effectively program a robot to perform several
tasks.



IV
Computer Integrated Manufacturing


1.

Stu
dents will be able to identify
and explain the individual components of a
flexible manufacturi
ng system and how they are interrelated.

2.

Students will explain the positive and negative impacts associated with
CIM technology as they affect the manufacturing process.

3.

Students will identify some basic characteristics of a manufacturing
operation that le
nd themselves to computer integrated manufacturing.

4.

Students will identify some of the typical components and sub systems
that make up an automated machining, assembly and process
-
type
manufacturing operation.


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5.

Student will identify the three categories of
CIM manufacturing systems,
including the positive and negative aspects of each.

6.

Students will understand the various applications of a Programmable
Logic Controller as related to its use in a CIM system and how it differs
from a computer interface.

7.

Student
s will compare and contrast the benefits and drawbacks of the
three categories of CIM manufacturing systems.

8.

Students will recognize the working relationship between the CNC mill and
the robot.

9.

S
tudents will be able to identify the components of a
n

FMS.

10.

St
udents will identify and study the relationship between a CNC milling
machine interface and a jointed arm robot interface through a
communication handshaking process.

11.

Students will explore the individual components used in selected CIM
systems.

12.

Students wi
ll analyze and select components for a CIM system for a
specific industrial application.

13.

Students will understand the difference between a PLC and a computer
with interface.

14.

Students will recognize and understand the necessary safety precautions
associated

with a fully automated CIM system.

15.

Students will recognize and explain the significance of teamwork and
communication when they combine the designs of the individual groups
into a complete miniature FMS.

16.

Students will demonstrate how their individual comp
onents work together
to form a complete CIM system.

17.

Students will assemble and test their individual component designs by
integrating them into a complete miniature FMS built from the
Fischertechnik models.





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Appendix E


CEA Assessment Concepts


I

Overv
iew of Civil Engineering and Architecture


1.

The fields of Civil Engineering and Architecture have influenced the
evolution of how people live and work.

2.

Making responsible decisions is important in the actions of engineers
and architects, as choices will aff
ect the lives and well
-
being of others.



II

Introduction to Projects


1.

Current Civil Engineering and Architectural common practices must be
identified and utilized to develop a viable solution to a project.

2.

All designs continuously evolve as they are deve
loped.

3.

Critiques and reviews are used to inform and provide suggestions for
improvement.

4.

A high
-
quality presentation of a project will determine its acceptance and
support implementation.

5.

Project documentation is necessary to solve complex design problems
and provide accurate communication.



III

Project Planning


1.

A client’s needs, wants, and desires are all essential components of a
project.

2.

The selection of a site and the project being planned are inter
-
related.

3.

Planning of a project is essential to its
success.



IV

Site Planning


1.

Responsible designers maximize potential of the property, minimize
impact on the environment, and create an attractive visual and functional
space.

2.

Codes and building requirements define and constrain the location of
structure
s, utilities, and landscape components placed on a site.

3.

The use of a site defines the utilities/services needed and how they are
delivered.



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V

Architecture


1.

A responsible architectural designer takes into consideration the
environment, the aesthetics, th
e structural integrity, and the safety and
needs of occupants.

2.

A good designer balances cost consideration with functionality and
aesthetics.

3.

Graphic communication is essential to successful communication and
implementation of a design project.

4.

Mathemati
cs and physics are important tools in the design process.

5.

Application of the principles and foundations of art will enhance the form
and function of a design project.



VI

Structural Engineering


1.

Structural design encompasses how a structure is to be used
, the
conditions of that use, the occupants or users and the geometric shapes
from which it will be comprised.

2.

A responsible designer takes into consideration the environment,
aesthetics, structural integrity, available materials and their properties,
and

the safety of occupants.

3.

Graphic communication is essential to successful implementation of a
design project.

4.

Mathematics and physics are important tools in the analysis of a design.



VII Presentations and Reviews


1.

The presentation of an idea determin
es its acceptance and potential for
development.

2.

Analysis of a project idea or proposal leads to opportunities to reflect on
expectations, outcome, and areas for improvement.






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Appendix
F

(Directions to the Teacher)



Project Lead The Way

Rules and Gr
ading Criteria





This three part
examination

is intended to serve as both the
Year End Exam

for
Project Lead The Way and as the
College Credit
Examination

for Rochester
Institute of Technology.
All students are required to take Part A of the
examination
.

Part B of the
examination

should only be taken by those students
completing the high school
examination
. Part C of the
examination

should only
be taken by those students seeking to apply for college credit. Only students
who have a class average of ‘B’

are eligible to take the college credit part of the
examination
.


The length of the entire
examination

is
two
40
-

45

minute periods
.
Based on
your school’s calendar and your class schedule, the test can be administered
over two sessions provided each
part is given in its entirety during the session.


Practice Examination:
The “old” final examination becomes the practice
assessment. Use it as a model for your students. One suggestion would be to
give the practice final
examination
as a study guide or h
ave students work in
teams to complete the practice exam. In this manner students will be aware of
what to expect on the final
examination
and can adequately prepare for it.
Practice examinations are available on the PLTW web site.



Part A :
35
Multiple

Choice Questions
-

50 Points


(
R
efer to the scoring chart at the end of this section for assistance in
converting the Part A score into a percentage)


Supplies / Tools:

CLOSED NOTES


CLOSED BOO
K. One sheet (8 ½ x 11) of
notes is allowed. Students
ARE
all
owed to use calculators but
NOT
allowed to use any form of simulation tool.


Grading the Final Examination:

An answer sheet has been provided for Part A. The questions in
Part A have been developed to correspond to specific assessment
concepts. The answe
r sheet provides a key indicating which
questions align with specific assessment concepts. Teachers can

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use this information to determine the degree to which their students
have mastered the major concepts of the course.



Part B : High School Performance

Examination


50 Points

Note: This portion of the exam wil
l include

performance assessments,
short answer questions or a combination of both. The appropriate
directions listed belo
w for administering and scoring

performance and
short answer examinations
should be listed under “Guide
l
ines
.”



Supplies / Tools:

OPEN NOTES


CLOSED BOO
K. Students should be encouraged
to use their portfolios/engineering notebook. Students
ARE
allowed to use both calculators and a simulation tool.


Guidelines
:

Performance Ex
amination
:

In the performance portion of the examination, the process of
obtaining the solution is paramount. The point distribution for each
step is indicated below.



Short Answer Examination
:

For the short answer problems the process of obtaining the an
swer
is as important as the answer itself. Thus, the point distribution
should be 4 points for the process, 2 points for the correct answer,
and 2 point for miscellaneous items (i.e. wrong sign, missing units,
etc
.
).


Grading the Final Examination:

An answ
er sheet
and a scoring rubric
ha
ve

been provided for Part
B. Use these as aids for computing the student’s final grade.



Part C : College Credit Examination


50 Points

Note: This portion of the exam may include performance assessments,
short answer ques
tions or a combination of both. The appropriate
directions listed below for administering and scoring performance and
short answer examinations should be listed under “
Guidelines.”



Supplies / Tools:

OPEN NOTES


CLOSED BOO
K. Students should be encourag
ed
to use their portfolios/engineering notebook. Students
ARE
allowed to use both calculators and a simulation tool.




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Guidelines
:

Performance Examination:

In the performance portion of the examination, the process of
obtaining the solution is paramount.
The point distribution for each
step is indicated below.


Short Answer Examination:

For the short answer problems
,

the process of obtaining the answer
is as important as the answer itself. Thus, the point distribution
should be 4 points for the process, 2
points for the correct answer,
and 2 point for miscellaneous items (i.e. wrong sign, missing units,
etc
.
).


Grading the Final Examination:

An answer sheet has been provided for Part B and a scoring rubric.
Use these as aids for computing the student’s fin
al grade.


Scoring Conversion Chart


Score

%

Score

%

Score

%

Score

%

35

100

25

71

15

43

5

14

34

97

24

69

14

40

4

11

33

94

23

66

13

37

3

9

32

91

22

63

12

34

2

6

31

89

21

60

11

31

1

3

30

86

20

57

10

29

0

0

29

83

19

54

9

26



28

80

18

51

8

23



27

77

17

49

7

20



26

74

16

46

6

17








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Appendix
G

(Testing Template)




















Course Title


Final Examination


Part A





Fall 2003



Name: _______________________________________


Period: _____________


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Multiple Choice

(
The following template
has been developed in a word table format to assist the test develop
er

in
inputting questions and answers

in a consistent format. By clicking in the box next to the #1 the
stem can be typed in while maintaining formatting. By following the same procedure

next to each
letter, answers and distractors can also be added. This
paragraph

will be eliminated from the final
examination.
)


Directions:

Select the letter of the response which best completes the item
or answers the question.


1.



A
.


C
.



B
.


E
.



2.



A
.


C
.



B
.


D
.



3.



A
.


C
.



B
.


D
.



4.



A
.


C
.



B
.


D
.



5.



A
.


C
.



B
.


D
.



6.



A
.


C
.



B
.


D
.



7.



A
.


C
.



B
.


D
.




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8.



A
.


C
.



B
.


D
.



9.



A
.


C
.



B
.


D
.



10.



A
.


C
.



B
.


D
.



11.



A
.


C
.



B
.


D
.



12.



A
.


C
.



B
.


D
.



13.



A
.


C
.



B
.


D
.



14.



A
.


C
.



B
.


D
.



15.



A
.


C
.



B
.


D
.



16.



A
.


C
.



B
.


D
.



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-


17.



A
.


C
.



B
.


D
.



18.



A
.


C
.



B
.


D
.



19.



A
.


C
.



B
.


D
.



20.



A
.


C
.



B
.


D
.



21.



A
.


C
.



B
.


D
.



22.



A
.


C
.



B
.


D
.



23.



A
.


C
.



B
.


D
.



24.



A
.


C
.



B
.


D
.



25.



A
.


C
.



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B
.


D
.



26.



A
.


C
.



B
.


D
.



27.



A
.


C
.



B
.


D
.



28.



A
.


C
.



B
.


D
.



29.



A
.


C
.



B
.


D
.



30.



A
.


C
.



B
.


D
.



31
.



A
.


C
.



B
.


D
.



32
.



A
.


C
.



B
.


D
.



33
.



A
.


C
.



B
.


D
.



34
.



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-


A
.


C
.



B
.


D
.



35
.



A
.


C
.



B
.


D
.





Note to the test developer:



When developing the answer key, please provide a

question
breakdown by assessment concept.



Remember to remove this note from the final assessment.



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Course Title


Final Examination


Part B

For High School Credit




Fall 2003





Name: _______________________________________


Period: __
___________


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-

High School Performance Examination



Notes to the test developer:



Part B is worth 50 points.




Students may be assigned preparation work prior to the administration of
the examination.




This portion of the examination must contain a performanc
e assessment.
This entire section may consist of a performance assessment or it may be
developed as part performance and part short answer assessment.




Please refer to the “Directions to the Teacher” listed below. Should the
student need to provide addit
ional supplies or materials, revise the
directions as necessary.

Supplies / Tools:

OPEN NOTES


CLOSED BOO
K. Students should be encouraged to
use their portfolios/engineering notebook. Students
ARE
allowed to use
both calculators and a simulation tool.




P
lease refer to the “Directions to the Teacher” listed below to insure
consistency between question / task scoring and question / task
development. If necessary, revise the directions to the administering
teacher.

Guidelines
:

In the performance portion of
the examination, the process of obtaining
the solution is paramount. The point distribution for each step is indicated
below.

This should not be an all or nothing assessment. Students
must have an opportunity to earn partial credit for the
successful compl
etion of part(s) of the solution.


For the short answer problems, the process of obtaining the answer is as
important as the answer itself. Thus, the point distribution should be 4
points for the process, 2 points for the correct answer, and 2 points for
m
iscellaneous items (i.e. wrong sign, missing units, etc.).




Part B must be able to be completed during
one 4
0
-

45

minute period.




An answer key must be developed. Performance tasks require a scoring
rubric. Refer to the materials on rubric development
to ensure
consistency. The answer key for short answer questions should indicate
the major points necessary to earn credit for each question.


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Course Title


Final Examination


Part C

For College Credit




Fall 2003





Name: ____________
___________________________


Period: _____________


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College Credit Performance Examination



Notes to the test developer:



Part B is worth 50 points.




Students may be assigned preparation work prior to the administration of
the examination.




This portion o
f the examination must contain a performance assessment.
This entire section may consist of a performance assessment or it may be
developed as part performance and part short answer assessment.





Please refer to the “Directions to the Teacher” listed belo
w. Should the
student need to provide additional supplies or materials, revise the
directions as necessary.

Supplies / Tools:

OPEN NOTES


CLOSED BOO
K. Students should be encouraged to
use their portfolios/engineering notebook. Students
ARE
allowed to us
e
both calculators and a simulation tool




Please refer to the “Directions to the Teacher” listed below to insure
consistency between question / task scoring and question / task
development. If necessary, revise the directions to the administering
teacher.

Guidelines
:

In the performance portion of the examination, the process of obtaining
the solution is paramount. The point distribution for each step is indicated
below.

This should not be an all or nothing assessment. Students
must have an opportunity to e
arn partial credit for the
successful completion of part(s) of the solution.


For the short answer problems the process of obtaining the answer is as
important as the answer itself. Thus, the point distribution should be 4
points for the process, 2 points
for the correct answer, and 2 points for
miscellaneous items (i.e. wrong sign, missing units, etc.).




Part B must be able to be completed during
one 40
-

45

minute period.




An answer key must be developed. Performance tasks require a scoring
rubric. Ref
er to the materials on rubric development to ensure
consistency. The answer key for short answer questions should indicate
the major points necessary to earn credit for each question.



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-

Appendix
H

(Part B/C Performance Task Rubric
)


Student Name: ______
__
_______________
__________
_________


Period:
_______________

Date:________
____
_________________






Rubric Template


Point Value
Awarded


4

3

2

1

Skill or concept
to be assessed