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Feb 2, 2013 (4 years and 4 months ago)

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English Language arts


2
nd

Grade
ELA Unit 4, Freedom




Unit Title


“A Long Journey to

Freedom”

Unit Code

2
nd

Grade ELA Unit 4, Freedom


Unit Overview


From Common Core:



Building on unit three’s “building bridges” focus, students recognize the long and multi
-
faceted effort
to break down barriers to racial equality in the United States. By reading the true stories of Harriet
Tubman, Henry “Box” Brown, Abraham Lincoln, Ruby
Bridges, the Greensboro Four, Martin Luther King
and others, students see the links between historical events. In writing, students will explore narrative
writing, and will write a narrative “from a box,” (i.e., in the style of
Henry’s Freedom Box
). Finall
y, in
honor of Poetry Month, students will be exposed to different poems of this era, and publish a poetry
anthology with several poems centered around the theme of freedom.


Essential Question
s

Reading

-

Why read? What can we learn from print?

-

Can
all of our experiences be put into words?

-

How do texts differ? Should I read different kinds of texts?

-

How do facts and information we learn from reading help to form an opinion?


Writing

-

How can we tell our story in a narrative?
(CC Essential Questi
on)

-

What makes writing worth reading?

-

How do effective writers hook and hold their readers? What makes writing easy to follow?


Social Studies

-

Are people ever justified in breaking the law?


Link to Interim Assessment




Reading Interim Assessment
ELA IA3: The reading passages in IA3 require students to answer a variety
of text
-
based questions, pay particular attention to the varying perspectives behind different
narratives, and compare and contrast different information about the same topic. In thi
s Unit, students
will not only be asked to answer W (text
-

based) questions about a narrative, but also, complete an in
depth analysis of their characters where they compare and contrast two different perspectives (or
journeys) around the same topic.

(This

is from PAVE. We don’t know about our IA 3)





English Language arts


2
nd

Grade
ELA Unit 4, Freedom




















Focus Standards

Number

Description

RL.2.6:


Acknowledge differences in the points of view of characters, including by speaking in a
different voice for each character when reading dialogue aloud.

RI.2.1:

Ask and answer such questions as who, what, where, when, why, and how to
demonstrate understanding of key details in a text.

RI.2.3:


Describe the connection between a series of historical events, scientific ideas or
concepts, or steps in technic
al procedures in a text.

RI.2.9:


Compare and contrast the most important points presented by two texts on the same
topic.

W.2.1:

Write opinion pieces in which they introduce the topic of book they are writing about,
state an opinion, supply reasons tha
t support the opinion, use linking words (e.g.,
because, and also) to connect opinion and reasons, and provide a concluding statement
or section.

W.2.3:


Write narratives in which they recount a well
-
elaborated event or short sequence of
events, include d
etails to describe action, thoughts, and feelings, use temporal words to
signal event order, and provide a sense of closure.

W.2.6:

With guidance from adults, use a variety of digital tools to produce and publish writing,
including in collaboration with
peers.


English Language arts


2
nd

Grade
ELA Unit 4, Freedom



Student O
bjectives for Reading

Lesson


Bend

in the Road

Objective

Guiding Questions

Standard

Activity & Assessment Notes

1

Launch



SWBAT
browse through
historical books,
pictures
,
recordings, and
videos

to list
one
vocabulary

word and
one important person

in the
freedom movement.















What does it mean
to be a free
person? What do
free people get to
do? Do you think
some people are
not free?

Introduction to unit:

Students will have varying
background knowledge on the
subject of freedom and civil
rights. Having students browse
through books
and pictures,
looking for important words or
figures that they recognize, will
help kick start this
understanding.

Include top
ics of
slavery and the civil rights
movement.


Students
can use post
-
its or an
observation booklet to record
thoughts and facts. They can
record
phrase
s that they think
will be

important to this unit, a
name or face that they think
will
be important to th
is unit,
vocabulary words, and i
mportant
figures
.

2

Fact Gathering
from early
historical figures /
Timeline creation


Students will
gather facts about
different historical
figures and events
significant to black
history.


Students will create
a timeline that
answers the
question: How did
different characters
in the civil rights
movement try to
be free?
(Standard
SWBAT identify facts

about
Harriet Tubman from the
informational text,
Moses:
When Harriet Tubman Led
H
er People to Freedom
.


SWBAT place facts they
learned on an interactive
class timeline with teacher
guidance (share).


Reading strategy:

Students will retell facts in
their own words.

How can we learn
facts from
informational
texts?


How do historical
ev
ents connect
to
one another?



RI2.1/RI2.3

For the first three weeks of this
unit, students will dive into six
different books about six
different journey’s to freedom.
The books will go in sequential
order and students will be taking
facts from each book
to place
onto the timeline. After each
book, students should discuss
how their character’s journey to
freedom is related to those that
have gone before them.


Students will create an
interactive class timeline to help
them keep track of different
people a
nd facts relating to their
journey to freedom.



English Language arts


2
nd

Grade
ELA Unit 4, Freedom


3

RI.
2.3)



SWBAT
determine how
Harriet Tubman became free
by referring back to
Moses:
When Harriet Tubman Led
Her People to Freedom
.


Reading strategy:

Students will use cause and
effect relationships to help
them determine her journey
to freedom.


How do historical
events connect
to
one another?



RI.2.1

Exit Ticket
: What did Harriet
Tubman do to become free? Use
evidence from the text to
support your answer.

4

SWBAT identify
two
facts
about slavery or Henry’s
escape
from the
informational

text
Henry’s
Freedom Box
.


SWBAT place facts they
learned on an interactive
class timeline (share).


Reading strategy:

Students will make
connections to their prior
knowledge and other texts
to
understand more
information about Henry.


How can we learn
facts from
informational
texts?


How do historical
events connect
to
one another?


RI 2.1 / RI 2.3

5

SWBAT
use evidence from
the text,
Henry’s Freedom
Box
, to
answer the question,
“What did this character do
to be free?”


Reading strategy:

Students will determine
important evidence from the
text to support their claim.


How can I go back
to the text to
support my
answer?

RI 2.1/RI 2.3

Exit Ticket:

Students wil
l be able
to describe Henry’s journey to
freedom using a cause
-
and
-
effect
framework that incorporates
evidence form the text.

6

SWBAT
identify two facts
about schools in the south or
Mr. Rosenwald from the
literary text
Dear Mr.
Rosenwald
.


SWBAT place
facts they
learned on an interactive
class timeline (share).

How can we learn
facts from
historical fiction
?


How do historical
events connect
to
one another?



RI 2.1 / RI 2.3

Close Reading

1921: One
-
Room School

Have students read the first page
of the story independently. Then,
read the page aloud and prepare
discussion questions to help
students better understand
schools in the south. Have
English Language arts


2
nd

Grade
ELA Unit 4, Freedom



Reading strategy:

Students will make
predictions to help them
better understand the
events of the story.


stude
nts make predictions about
what the rest of the book will be
about. Make sure students use
evidence from other texts they’ve
read or use background
knowledge. Read the rest of the
story as an interactive read
aloud.

7

SWBAT
compare and
contrast this cha
racter’s
journey to freedom (Ovella
in
Dear Mr. Rosenwald
) with
others who came before her
(Harriet and Henry) to
determine how it is
connected to the past.


Reading strategy:

Students will summarize the
events of the stories to help
them compare and
contrast.


How can
I use what
I have learned to
compare and
contrast different
historical figures
and events?


RI 2.1/RI 2.3

8

SWBAT
derive historical facts
from the literary story,
Finding Lincoln
.


SWBAT place facts they
learned on an interactive
class timeline (share).


Reading strategy:

Students will visualize
important events of the
story to help them
understand what it was like
to be a student in 1951.


How can we learn
facts from
historical fiction
?


How do historical
events connect
to
one
another?


RI 2.1

Exit Ticket:

Students will answer
2 W questions related to the
story,
Finding Lincoln
, to ensure
they were monitoring
comprehension.

9

SWBAT
compare and
contrast this character’s
journey to freedom (Louis in
Finding Lincoln
) with others
who came before him
(Harriet, Henry, and Ovella)
to determine how it is
connected to the past.


Reading strategy:

Students will summarize the
events of the stories to help
How can
I use what
I have learned to
comp
are and
contrast different
historical figures
and events?


RI 2.1/RI 2.3

English Language arts


2
nd

Grade
ELA Unit 4, Freedom


them compare and contrast.



10

Reading
Assessment

BIR #1

Reading Assessment #1


Students will take Reading
Assessment #1 even though their
timeline is still incomplete. The
standards assessed have been
covered: RI 2.1 and RI 2.3.


11

W Questions as
the journey
continues /
Timeline Continues


Students will
answer W
questions about
fiction and non
-
fiction “journeys to
freedom” texts.
(Standard RI 2.1)


Students will
continue adding
information to
their
time line.

(Standard RI 2.3)

SWBAT derive historical facts
about Rosa Parks and the
Montgomery Bus Boycott
from the
reader’s

theater
script,
Rosa Parks
.


SWBAT place facts they
learned on an interactive
class timeline (share).


Reading strategy:

Students will activate prior
knowledge (text
-
to self and
text
-
to
-
text connections) to
better understand the
events of the Montgomery
Bus Boycott.


How can we learn
facts from
historical fiction
?


How do historical
events connect
to
one another?


RL.2.6

A
cknowledge differences in the
points of view of characters,
including by speaking in a
different voice for each character
when reading dialogue aloud
.


Close Reading:

Students will study the reader’s
theater script in Reading for one
day.
Students should
read

the
play independently with a
brief
teach on how a play should read.
Teacher should follow
-
up by re
-
reading the script and engaging
in a discussion.


Students should revisit the script
during Shared Reading and put
on a performance at the end of
the
week.

12

SWBAT identify
two
facts
about Ruby Bridges
from the
informational

text
The Story
of Ruby Bridges
.


SWBAT place facts they
learned on an interactive
class timeline (share).



How can we learn
facts from
informational
texts?


How do historical
events connect
to
one another?


RI 2.1

13

SWBAT
use evidence from
the text,
Ruby Bridges Goes
to School
, to
answer the

How do historical
events
connect

to
RI2.1/ RI
2.3:

Close Reading:

Ruby Bridges Goes to School: My
English Language arts


2
nd

Grade
ELA Unit 4, Freedom


question, “What did this
character do to be free?”




one another?

True Story

This is an autobiography of Ruby
Bridges’ life, obviously written by
Ruby Bridges herself.

A close
reading can be done until this
page:

In 1961 I was in first
grade. My mother took me to
the
Frantz school…
” The teacher
can re
-
read and continue reading
from there.

14

SWBAT

identify two facts
from the Greensboro Sit
-
Ins
using

the text,
Sit
-

In. How
Four Friends Stood Up by
Sitting Down
.


SWBAT place facts they
learned on an interactive
class

timeline (share).


Reading strategy:

Students will ask questions
about what they read to
clear up confusion or
wonder more about the
events.


How can we learn
facts from
informational
texts?


What do I do if I’m
confused while
reading
information?

RI 2.1

Exit Ticket
:

Graphic Organizer for
questions.

15

SWBAT
compare and
contrast this character’s
journey to freedom (the four
black men) with others who
came before him (Harriet,
Henry, Ovella, Louis, Rosa
Parks, Ruby Bridges) to
determine how it is
connected to the past.



How can we learn
facts from
informational
texts?


How do historical
events link to one
another?

RI 2.1/RI 2.3:

Exit Ticket:

Students will answer
2 W questions related to the
story,
Sit
-
In. How Four Friends
Stood Up by Sitting Dow
n
, to
ensure they were monitoring
comprehension.

16

SWBAT
ask

and answer 2 W
questions from the text,
Martin’s Big Words
.


SWBAT place facts they
learned on an interactive
class timeline (share).


Reading strategy:

Students will ask and answer
questions
to help them self
-

RI 2.1:


Reading Response:

SWBAT
answer the question, “How is this
character’s journey to freedom
connected to another character
of the past”?


English Language arts


2
nd

Grade
ELA Unit 4, Freedom


monitor their
comprehension.


17

Mini
-
Bend: Fact
Wheels


In this next section,
before BIR
#2,
students will
complete a mini
-
research project (3
-
4 days) that will
require them to go
back to the texts.


Students will
answer W
questions about
one character of
their choice from
the texts read
aloud

to create a
Fact Wheel.

(Standard RI 2.1)



S
WBAT
answer W questions
about one historical figure
from this long journey to
freedom.


SWBAT clearly answer the
Who

and the
What

questions. Students will
record answers in their own
words on their fact wheel.

How can I go back
to the text to
search for
answers?


What knowledge
do I remember
that I still need to
prove?

RI 2.1:

In this week, students will make
“Fact Wheels” after answering W
questions about the “Journeys to
freedom”.
Teachers will generate
W questions for each book and
students will answe
r each (please
see PAVE rubric) and then place
answers into a fact wheel (please
see PAVE exemplar).


Students can work independently
or in partners.



Students will need access to
texts.

18

S
WBAT answer W questions
about one historical figure
from this

long journey to
freedom
.


SWBAT clearly answer the
When

and the
Where

questions. Students will
record answers in their own
words on their fact wheel.


How can I go back
to the text to
search for
answers?


What knowledge
do I remember
that I still need to

prove?

19

S
WBAT answer W questions
about one historical figure
from this long journey to
freedom
.


SWBAT clearly answer the
Why
and
How
(if applicable)
questions. Students will
record answers in their own
words on their fact wheel.


How can I go back
to the text to
search for
answers?


What knowledge
do I remember
that I still need to
prove?

20

SWBAT complete and
present a fact wheel

about
their
person
.


How can I present
my information so
that others can
learn these facts?


RI 2.1

21

Reading
Assessment

BIR #
2

Reading Assessment #
2


Students will take Reading
Assessment #2 which they should
be adequately prepared for,
given the extra time provided to
answer W questions when
creating fact wheels. If
necessary, this BIR can come
BEFORE
fact wheels.


English Language arts


2
nd

Grade
ELA Unit 4, Freedom


22

Compare/Contrast
Journeys to
Freedom


Students compare
and contrast
different “journeys
to freedom”
stories. (Standard
RI 2.9, RL. 2.6)


SWBAT
choose two historical
figures’ journeys to freedom
to compare. They will re
-
read texts to decide.


Teacher will also choose two
figures to model with.



How are these
peoples’ freedom
journeys similar
and different?

RL 2.6/RI2.9:

For this bend in the road,
students will complete an in
-
depth analysis to compare and
contrast two different freedom
figures.
All of the lessons have
been leading up to this point as
you have asked students to think
about how one historical figures’
journe
y relates to others who
came before him/her.


This analysis is meant to explore
character’s actions and personal
qualities (traits), and have
students think about individual
perspectives and how they may
be similar or different.

(Struggling students sho
uld be
encouraged to choose the person
they already wrote their fact
wheel on to compare to
someone else of their choice)



23

SWBAT compare and
contrast
personal
characteristics

of the two
figures

they chose using a
Venn diagram. Students will
go back
to the texts to find
information.

What personal
characteristics do
these figures
share?


How are these
figures’
personalities
different?

24

SWBAT compare and
contrast their figures’
actions

using a Venn
diagram. Students will go
back to the texts to find
information.



What is similar
about what these
figures did/how
they acted?


What is different
about what these
figures did/how
they acted?


25

SWBAT to illustrate their
historical
figures to go along
with their Venn diagrams.
They will determine the
most important events to
include in the illustration.


Reading strategy:

-

Students will visualize their
character using evidence
from the text.

-

Students will determine
importance to
figure out
what is most important to
include in the illustration.


How can I make a
realistic picture to
go along with what
I have described in
my Venn diagram?

Students will present their V
enn
diagrams
and illustrations after
scanning them into a powerpoi
nt
presentation.

26

SWBAT
share their Venn
diagrams using the
appropriate voice and

English Language arts


2
nd

Grade
ELA Unit 4, Freedom


personality of the character
they are speaking about.


27




Reteach Day #1



28



Reteach Day #2



29



Reteach Day #3



30

Final Unit
Assessment

Unit Assessment






English Language arts


2
nd

Grade
ELA Unit 4, Freedom



Student Objectives for Writing

Lesson

Bend in the Road

Objective

Guiding
Questions

Standard Activity &
Assessment Notes

1

Launch (same as
reading)



SWBAT
browse through
historical books,
pictures
,
recordings, and videos

to list
one
vocabulary

word and
one important person

in the
freedom movement.















What does it
mean to be a free
person? What do
free people get to
do? Do you think
some people are
not free?

Introduction to unit:

Students will have varying
background knowledge on the
subject of freedom and civil
rights. Having students browse
through books
and pictures,
looking for important words or
figures that they recognize, will
help kick start this
understanding.

Include top
ics of
slavery and the civil rights
movement.


Students
can use post
-
its or an
observation booklet to record
thoughts and facts. They can
record
phrase
s that they think
will be

important to this unit, a
name or face that they think
will
be important to th
is unit,
vocabulary words, and
i
mportant figures
.

2

Narrative Writing:

Personal


Students will write
a personal
narrative with a
clear beginning,
middle and end.


In this bend in the
road, students will
practice narrative
writing by first
noticing what
makes a good
narrative piece

using an
author

as
a mentor and
drafting their own
personal narrative.

The focus here
Part 1:

SWBAT
identify the elements
of a good narrative by
listening to
The Other Side

by Jacqueline Woodson.


They will be able to identify
the sequence of the story
and determine what
elements of the story come
in the beginning, the middle,
and the e
nd. They will also
identify that the story
includes characters,
dialogue, internal events
(thoughts and feelings), and
a believable world.


Part 2

(Independent Work)
:

SWBAT generate ideas for
their own narratives now
What is a
narrative?

What
are the elements
of narrative
writing?


How can I use a
rubric to guide
and improve my
writing?


What are good
ideas for my own
narrative?

W2.3:

Write
narratives in whic
h they
recount a well elaborated
event or
short sequence of events,

inclu
de
details to describe actions,
thoughts,

and feelings, use
temporal words to signal event

order, and provide a sense of
closure.


After reading Jacqueline
Woodson’s

story and discussing
the elements of a narrative,
explain that this was Clover’s
story about meeting a new
friend. What are some stories
you could write about from your
own life?


This writing block can be
differentiated depending on the
student’s abilit
y to generate
English Language arts


2
nd

Grade
ELA Unit 4, Freedom


should be on
organization,
sequencing, “rising

action, climax,
falling action,” and
incorporating
thoughts and
feelings by
showing, not
telli
ng
.

knowing what a narrative
includes.
(Fill out a web of 5
different story ideas and
then star one to write
about).

ideas. Students

can be given a

specific prompt can be: “Tell a
story about a time when you had
a problem that needed to be
solved
” or “Tell a story about
something important that
happened in your life”
.


3

SWBAT
tell their narrative
out loud to a partner.

SWBAT
use a graphic
organizer to sketch a clear
beginning, middle, and end
.



What
needs to be
included in a

good
beginning, middle,
and end?

W2.3

In this first week, we want
students to start to see that
when

they recount a well
elaborated event, we have to
introduce the setting, characters
and problem in the beginning,
build up to the climax in the
middle, and provide a sense of
closure at the end.
Use
narrative texts, including
The
Other
Side
,
Finding
Lincoln
,
and

Freedom Summer
,

to
demonstrate how authors do
this.


Students who finish early each
drafting day should go back to
re
-
read and include more details
in that section of the story. They
should not move on to the next
part of the story until it h
as been
taught.



4

SWBAT draft

an interesting
beginning to their narrative
that introduces the
characters, setting and
problem of their story.


How can we
create an
interesting
beginning to make
our reader’s want
to read on?

5

SWBAT draft the middle
of
their narratives with
attention to the rising action,
climax, and falling action.


(Some students will benefit
from first completing a
graphic organizer and then
drafting the middle)


How can we
develop the
events in the
middle of

our
stories to make
our reader feel
like they are right
there?


6

SWBAT draft the end of their
narrative to provide a sense
of closure.

How can we
conclude our
stories without
writing “the end”?


7

SWBAT
revise their stories to
include more concrete
details and sequencing
words. They will work with a
partner to elaborate on the
events they have written
about.


Partners can use W
questions to help writers
clear up confusion in their
stories or elaborate on
events.


This is only the
first day of
revision, which is
meant to ensure
the main events
are clear and
elaborated on.


How do sequential
words move our
story

along?


How do we
include details in
W2.3

In this week, students will focus
on going deeper into their
stories by including more details
about character thoughts and
feelings. Students will also work
on including sequential words as
they cre
ate a natural flow in
their writing.


Continue to use narrative texts,
including
The Other Side,

to
demonstrate how authors do
this.

English Language arts


2
nd

Grade
ELA Unit 4, Freedom


our stories?
















8

SWBAT
revise their stories to
include dialogue between
the characters.


How can I show
that characters
communicate and
talk to each other?


How can I show
what I am thinking
or feeling to add
more to my story?



9

SWBAT
revise their stories to
include characters’ thoughts
and feelings. Remind
students to “show, not tell.”

10

SWBAT edit
their drafts
to
improve spelling,
punctuation, and the use of
quotation marks.


How can I make
my writing easier
to read?

11

SWBAT re
-
read their stories,
add a cover page, and reflect
on their narratives.


What can I do to
improve my next
narrative?

This lesson will

prep students to
write another narrative from a
different perspective. It will give
this piece a sense of closure
(since it will not be published)
and the focus they need to
continue.


12

Narrative Writing:

Slave’s Perspective


Students will write
a narrative
from
the perspective of

a slave escaping to
freedom (in
response to
reading Henry’s
Freedom Box).

Part 1:

SWBAT
identify the elements
of a good narrative by
listening to Ellen Levine read
her story,
Henry’s Freedom
Box
.


They will be able to identify
the sequence of the story
and determine what
elements of the story come
in the beginning, the middle,
and the end. They will also
identify that the story
includes characters,
dialogue, internal events
(thoughts and feelings),

and
a believable world.


Part 2 (Independent work):

SWBAT develop their main
character by brainstorming
characteristics, thoughts and
What is a

narrative?

What
are the elements
of narrative
writing?


How can I use a
rubric to guide
and improve my
writing?


How can we use
Ellen Levine’s
work as a prompt
to our own
narrative?


How will I develop
my main
character?

W 2.3

In this bend in the road, s
tudents
will be writing a narrative as if
they were
a slave escaping to
freedom, like Henry
. Every story
will start off with “I climbe
d into
the box and shut the lid

(or
some variation).
Students will
then write a narrative about
their journey to freedom

in the
box and what they did once they
arrived in the North.


Because students will have just
written

narratives,
we must hold
them accountable for including
more narrative elements
(dialogue & internal events)
while drafting before the
revision stage (t
his piece is
quick).




English Language arts


2
nd

Grade
ELA Unit 4, Freedom


feelings, and dialogue the
character will have
throughout their story and
recording it on a graphic
organizer.














13

SWBAT
tell their narrative
out loud to a partner.

SWBAT
use a graphic
organizer to sketch a clear
beginning, middle, and end
.


What
needs to be
included in a

good
beginning, middle,
and end?

14

SWBAT draft the
beginning
and middle of their story

by
including concrete details,
dialogue, thoughts, and
feelings (students will refer
back to their graphic
organizers to include
thoughts and feelings they
already brainstormed)



How can I show
that characters
communicate and
talk to each other?


How can I show
what I am thinking
or feeling to add
more to my story?


15

SWBAT draft the middle and
end
of their narrative by
continuing their use of
concrete details and also
providing a sense of closure.


How can
we
conclude our
stories without
writing “the end”?


16

SWBAT work with a partner
to
revise

their narratives

by
adding in more details to
help the reader feel like s/he
is right there.


What can I add to
my writing to
make the reader
feel like they are
right there with
the character?

17

SWBAT
edit

their narratives

for spelling, punctuation, and
quotation marks
.


How can I make
my writing easier
to read?

18

SWBAT re
-
read their stories,
add a cover page, and reflect
on their narratives.


How can I
use
what I learned in
narrative writing
to apply to other
kinds of writing?


19

Poetry Writing


Students will
create a “Freedom
SWBAT read “
Words Like
Freedom


by Langston
Hughes.


What are the
different themes
of poems about
freedom?

For this bend in the road,
students will explore different
poems from this time period
.


English Language arts


2
nd

Grade
ELA Unit 4, Freedom


Poetry Anthology”
in which t
hey write
different poems
inspired by black
history.


SW
BAT write a poem about
freedom or about another
topic inspired by Langston
Hughes’ poem.



Classes should use
the Poem of
the Week
routine to supplement
this bend in the road (it would
be helpful if students were
already familiar with these
poems).


Students will notice how themes
of freedom and equality are
present in each poem, and will
di
scuss how authors use
techniques to have reader’s
attend to different words and
read poems in certain ways.


20

SWBAT write a poem based
on or inspired by Eloise
Greenfield’s poem
Harriet
Tubman
.


SWBAT write a poem

based
on what they feel after
experiencing Henry’s
Freedom Box.



How do poets
write just a few
words about big
ideas?


How do poets use
line breaks to
make their poetry
more powerful?

For the next section of this
writing unit,
students can either
work through three poetry
centers or complete these as a
whole group.



1.

Freedom Box
: S
tudents climb
into a box, and feel what Henry
felt when he was in his freedom
box. Students write about what
they feel.



2.
Listening Center
: Students
listen to part of Martin Luther
Kings, “I have a dream” and
write a poem about the words
that they hear.


3.
Picture Center: Students look
at Norman Rockwell’s “The
Problem We All Live With” and
write a poem based on what
they observe in the pa
inting.


MAKE 2 or 3 DAYS

21

SWBAT write a poem

inspired by
Martin’s Big
Words
.


SWBAT write a poem after
listening to MLK’s
I Have a
Dream
speech.


22






SWBAT write a poem based
on what they observe in
Norman Rockwell’s “The
Problem We All Live
With”
.


SWBAT write a poem based
on and inspired by other
pictures from the civil rights
movement.


23

SWBAT publish their poetry
anthology.

They will create
a cover page to represent
their poetry.

How can I make
my poems clear
and easy to read
for
others to
enjoy?

CUT OUT

English Language arts


2
nd

Grade
ELA Unit 4, Freedom



24

Opinion Writing:


Students will
complete a short
opinion essay that
answers the
prompt:
“Choose
one of the people
studied in this unit
who you think is
the greatest hero
in this long journey
to freedom. Give
two or three
strong
reasons for
choosing this
person.”

(W2.1)

Part 1:

SWBAT
record the elements
of opinion writing by
examining an exemplar.


Students should notice that
opinion pieces have (1) an
introduction that introduces
their topic and expresses
their opinion,
(2) paragraphs
that include specific
evidence that provides
reasons/support for their
opinion, and (3) a strong
closing statement.


Part 2 (Independent Work):

SWBAT choose the person
they think is the greatest
hero and bullet three
reasons why on a graphic

organizer.


What makes a
strong opinion
piece?


What sets a weak
opinion piece
apart from a
strong opinion
piece?


What is my own
opinion on the
topic?

W2.1

Write opinion pie
ces in which they
introduce the
topic or book they are
writing about, state an

opinion,
supply reasons that support the
opinion,

use linking words (e.g.,
because, and, also) to

c
onnect
opinion and reasons, and
provide a

concluding statement or section.


In this last week, students will
write an opinion piece using
paragraphs. Studen
ts will
introduce the person the believe
is the greatest hero and provide
at least 3 strong reasons why the
person was chosen (using words
like “because” and “also” to link
ideas). Encourage students to
add details to strengthen their
evidence and use a s
trong
closing statement.

25

SWBAT
draft an introduction
that introduces the topic and
expresses their opinion.


What makes a
good
introduction?


What topic are we
studying?


26

SWBAT
draft three reasons
that support their opinion
using evidence
from the
texts read in the unit.



How can I
organize each
reason?


What evidence
can I use to
support my
reason?

27

S
WBAT draft a concluding
sentence that restates their
thesis in different words and
includes a personal comment
about their person.



What makes a
strong concluding
sentence?


How do I make my
writing sound like
it is over?

English Language arts


2
nd

Grade
ELA Unit 4, Freedom


28

SWBAT
revise their opinion
pieces by answering W
questions asked by their
partner to clear up confusion
and ensure they used clear
evidence to support their
reasons.



How can I make
my argument
clearer?


How can I
convince my
reader to agree
with me? Have I
effectively proven
my point using
evidence?


29

SWBAT publish their opinion
essay to include their
introduction
, supporting
reasons, and concluding
statement.



30

Multimedia
Presentation
:


Students can
publish their
opinion pieces
or
poetry pieces (TBD
by grade)
by
scanning
an artistic
representation

of
the piece and
putting it into a
powerpoint
slide.


Opinion or poetry
p
ieces should be
recorded and
played as the
drawing is
projected.



SWBAT visually represent
one of their poems or their
opinion pieces (if this did not
take place earlier in the
unit). They can scan in their
work at another time of day
and record their p
iece.


This will be teacher directed
and mostly occur outside of
class time.


How can I visually
represent my
piece?

W.2.6

(opinion), SL.2.5


These slides and recordings
could be posted on a web page
to be viewed by friends and
relatives. Arrange the slide
s
chronologically to reinforce the
linking of ideas in this long
journey to freedom.




English Language arts


2
nd

Grade
ELA Unit 4, Freedom


Pacing Calendar/Unit at Glance

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

LAUNCH

SWBAT browse through
historical books,
pictures, recordings,
and videos to list one
vocabulary word and
one important person
in the freedom
movement.

LAUNCH

SWBAT browse through
historical books,
pictures, recordings,
and videos to list one
vocabulary wor
d and
one important person
in the freedom
movement.


SWBAT identify facts
about Harriet Tubman
from the informational
text,
Moses: When
Harriet Tubman Led Her
People to Freedom
.


SWBAT place facts they
learned on an
interactive class
timeline with teache
r
guidance (share).


Reading strategy:

Students will retell facts
in their own words.

Part 1:

SWBAT identify the
elements of a good
narrative by listening to
The Other Side

by
Jacqueline Woodson.


Part 2 (Independent
Work):

SWBAT generate ideas
for their o
wn narratives
now knowing what a
narrative includes.

SWBAT determine how
Harriet Tubman
became free by
referring back to
Moses: When Harriet
Tubman Led Her People
to Freedom
.


Reading strategy:

Students will use cause
and effect relationships
to help the
m determine
her journey to freedom.


SWBAT tell their
narrative out loud to a
partner.

SWBAT use a graphic
organizer to sketch a
clear beginning, middle,
and end.


SWBAT identify two
facts about slavery or
Henry’s escape from
the informational text
Henry’s Freedom Box
.


SWBAT place facts they
learned on an
interactive class
timeline (share).


Reading strategy:

Students will make
connections to their
prior knowledge and
other texts to
understand more
information about
Henry.


SWBAT draft an
interesting beginning to
their narrative that
introduces the
characters, setting and
problem of their story.


SWBAT use evidence
from the text,
Henry’s
Freedom Box
, to
answer the question,
“What did this
character do to be
free?”


Reading
strategy:

Students will determine
important evidence
from the text to
support their claim.


SWBAT draft the middle
of their narratives with
attention to the rising
action, climax, and
falling action.

SWBAT identify two
facts about schools in
the south or
Mr.
Rosenwald from the
literary text
Dear Mr.
Rosenwald
.


SWBAT place facts they
learned on an
interactive class
timeline (share).


Reading strategy:

Students will make
predictions to help
them better
understand the events
of the story.


SWBAT draft the
end of
SWBAT compare and
contrast this character’s
journey to freedom
(Ovella in
Dear Mr.
Rosenwald
) with others
who came before her
(Harriet and Henry) to
determine how it is
connected to the past.


Reading s
trategy:

Students will
summarize the events
of the stories to help
them compare and
contrast.


SWBAT revise their
stories to include more
concrete details and
SWBAT derive historical
facts from the literary
story,
Finding Lincoln
.


SWBAT place facts they
learned on an
interactive class
timeline (share).


Reading strategy:

Students will visualize
important events of the
story to help them
understand what i
t was
like to be a student in
1951.


SWBAT revise their
stories to include
dialogue between the
SWBAT compare and
contrast this character’s
journey to freedom
(Louis in
Finding
Lincoln
) with others
who came before him
(Harriet, Henry, and
Ove
lla) to determine
how it is connected to
the past.


Reading strategy:

Students will
summarize the events
of the stories to help
them compare and
contrast.


SWBAT revise their
stories to include
Reading Assessment
BIR #1


SWBAT edit their drafts
to improve spelling,
punctuation, and the
use of quotation marks.


English Language arts


2
nd

Grade
ELA Unit 4, Freedom


their narrative to
provide a sense of
closure.

sequencing words.
They will work with a
partner to elaborate on
the events they have
written abo
ut.

characters.


characters’ thoughts
and feelings. Remind
students to “show,
not
tell.”

SWBAT derive historical
facts about Rosa Parks
and the Montgomery
Bus Boycott from the
reader’s theater script,
Rosa Parks
.


S
WBAT place facts they
learned on an
interactive class
timeline (share).


Reading strategy:

Students will activate
prior knowledge (text
-
to self and text
-
to
-
text
connections) to better
understand the events
of the Montgomery Bus
Boycott.


SWBAT re
-
read the
ir
stories, add a cover
page, and reflect on
their narratives.


SWBAT identify two
facts about Ruby
Bridges from the
informational text
The
Story of Ruby Bridges
.


SWBAT place facts they
learned on an
interactive class
timeline (share).


Part 1:

SWBAT identify the
elements of a good
narrative by listening to
Ellen Levine read her
story,
Henry’s Freedom
Box
.


Part 2 (Independent
work):

SWBAT develop their
main character by
brainstorming
characteristics,
thoughts and feelings,
and dialogue the
cha
racter will have
throughout their story
and recording it on a
graphic organizer.


SWBAT use evidence
from the text,
Ruby
Bridges Goes to School
,
to answer the question,
“What did this
character do to be
free?”


SWBAT tell their
narrative out loud to a
par
tner.

SWBAT use a graphic
organizer to sketch a
clear beginning, middle,
and end.


SWBAT identify two
facts from the
Greensboro Sit
-
Ins
using the text,
Sit
-

In.
How Four Friends Stood
Up by Sitting Down
.


SWBAT place facts they
learned on an
interactive
class
timeline (share).


Reading strategy:

Students will ask
questions about what
they read to clear up
confusion or wonder
more about the events.


SWBAT draft the
beginning and middle
of their story by
including concrete
details, dialogue,
thoughts, and f
eelings
(students will refer back
to their graphic
organizers to include
thoughts and feelings
they already
brainstormed)


SWBAT compare and
contrast this character’s
journey to freedom
(the four black men)
with others who came
before him (Harriet,
Henry,

Ovella, Louis,
Rosa Parks, Ruby
Bridges) to determine
how it is connected to
the past.


SWBAT draft the middle
and end of their
narrative by continuing
their use of concrete
details and also
providing a sense of
closure.


SWBAT ask and answer
2 W questions from the
text,
Martin’s Big
Words
.


SWBAT place facts they
learned on an
interactive class
timeline (share).


Reading strategy:

Students will ask and
answer questions to
help them self
-
monitor
their comprehension.


SWBAT answer W
questions about one
historical figure from
this long journey to
freedom.


SWBAT clearly answer
the
Who

and the
What

q
uestions. Students
will record answers in
their own words on
their fact wheel.


SWBAT edit their
narratives for spelling,
punctuation, and
SWBAT answer W
questions about one
historical figure from
this long journey to
freedom.


SWBAT clearly answer
the
When

and the
Where

questions.
Students will record
answers in their own
words on their fact
wheel.


SWBAT re
-
read their
stories, add a cover
SWBAT answer W
questions about one
historical fig
ure from
this long journey to
freedom.


SWBAT clearly answer
the
Why
and
How
(if
applicable) questions.
Students will record
answers in their own
words on their fact
wheel.


SWBAT read “Words
Like Freedom” by
SWBAT complete and
present a fact wheel
about their text.


SWBAT write a poem
based on or inspired by
Eloise Greenfield’s
poem
Harriet Tubman
.


SWBAT write a poem
based on what they feel
a
fter experiencing
Henry’s Freedom Box.


English Language arts


2
nd

Grade
ELA Unit 4, Freedom


SWBAT
work with a
partner to revise their
narratives by adding in
more details to help the
reader feel like s/he is
right there.


quotation marks.


page, and reflect on
their narratives.


Langston Hughes.


SWBAT write a poem
about
freedom or
about another topic
inspired by Langston
Hughes’ poem.

Reading Assessment
BIR #2


SWBAT write a poem
inspired by
Martin’s Big
Words

or
a sweet smell
of roses
.


SWBAT write a poem
after listening to MLK’s
I Have a Dream
speech.


SWBAT choose two
historical figures’
journeys to freedom to
compare. They will re
-
read texts to decide.


Teacher will also
choose two figures to
model with.


SWBAT write a poem
based on what they
observe in Norman
Rockwell’s “The
Problem We All Live
Wit
h”.


SWBAT write a poem
based on and inspired
by other pictures from
the civil rights
movement.


SWBAT compare and
contrast
personal
characteristics

of the
two figures they chose
using a Venn diagram.
Students will go back to
the texts to find
information
.


SWBAT publish their
poetry anthology. They
will create a cover page
to represent their
poetry.

SWBAT compare and
contrast their figures’
actions

using a Venn
diagram. Students will
go back to the texts to
find information.

Part 1:

SWBAT record the

elements of opinion
writing by examining an
exemplar.


Students should notice
that opinion pieces
have (1) an introduction
that introduces their
topic and expresses
their opinion, (2)
paragraphs that include
specific evidence that
provides
reasons/support

for
their opinion, and (3) a
strong closing
statement.


Part 2 (Independent
Work):

SWBAT choose the
person they think is the
greatest hero and bullet
three reasons why on a
graphic organizer.


SWBAT to illustrate
their historical figures
to go along with
their
Venn diagrams. They
will determine the most
important events to
include in the
illustration.


Reading strategy:

-

Students will visualize
their character using
evidence from the text.

-

Students will
determine importance
to figure out what is
most i
mportant to
include in the
illustration.


SWBAT draft an
introduction that
introduces the topic
and expresses their
opinion.



SWBAT share their
Venn diagrams using
the appropriate voice
and personality of the
character they are
speaking about.


SWBAT
draft three
reasons that support
their opinion using
evidence from the texts
read in the unit.

Reteach Day #1


SWBAT draft a
concluding sentence
that restates their
thesis in different
words and includes a
personal comment
about their person.


Reteach
Day #2


SWBAT revise their
opinion pieces by
answering W questions
asked by their partner
to clear up confusion
and ensure they used
clear evidence to
support their reasons.


Reteach Day #3


SWBAT publish their
opinion essay to include
their introduction,
supporting reasons, and
concluding statement.


Final Unit Assessment


SWBAT visually
represent one of their
poems or their opinion
pieces (if this did not
take place earlier in the
unit). They can scan in
their work at another
time of day and record
their

piece.


English Language arts


2
nd

Grade
ELA Unit 4, Freedom



This will be teacher
directed and mostly
occur outside of class
time.





English Language arts


2
nd

Grade
ELA Unit 4, Freedom



Suggested Texts
: READING

Title/Author

Description

Read Aloud or

Student Text

DREAM

Book?


Reading Book 1
:
Moses: When Harriet Tubman
Led Her People to Freedom

(c.1820
-
1913) (Carole
Boston Weatherford and Kadir Nelson)

Informational Text

Read Aloud/Student Text

Yes

Reading Book 2
:
Henry’s Freedom Box
(1840s
)
(
Ellen Levine
)

Informational

Text

Read Aloud/Student Text

Yes

Reading Book 3
:
Dear Mr. Rosenwald

(1920)
(Carole Boston Weatherford)

Literary Story

Read Aloud/Student Text

Yes

Reading Book 4:

Finding Lincoln
(
1951) (Ann
Malaspina)

Literary Story

Read Aloud/Student Text

Yes

Reading Book 5:

Rosa Parks
(1955)

Play

Student Text/Readers
Theater

Grace’s document

Reading Book
6
:
The Story of Ruby Bridges
(1960)
(Robert Coles and George Ford) (E)

Informational Text

Read Aloud/Student Text

Yes

Reading Book 7
:

Sit
-
In: How Four Friends Stood Up
by Sitting Down

(1960) (Andrea D. and Brian
Pinkney)

Informational Text

Read Aloud/Student Text

Yes

Reading Book 8
:

Martin’s Big Words: The Life of
Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

(1963)

Informational Text

Read Aloud/Student Text

Yes

Supplemental Read Alouds

or Close Reading Books

Martin Luther King Jr. and the March on
Washington

Informational Text

Student Text

Yes

Ruby Bridges Goes to School

Informational Text

Student Text

Yes

A Picture Book of Jesse Owens

Informational Text

Student Text

Yes

Freedom on the Menu

Literary Story

Read Aloud

Yes


Suggested Texts
: WRITING

Title/Author

Description

Read Aloud or
Student Text

DREAM

Book?

Writing Anchor Text 1
:
The Other Side

(1950s)
(Jacqueline Woodson and E.B. Lewis)

Literary Story

Read Aloud

Yes

Writing Anchor Text 2
:
Freedom Summer
(Deborah
Wiles)

Literary
Story

Read Aloud

Yes

Writing Anchor Text 2:

Henry’s Freedom Box: A
True Story from the Underground Railroad

(1849)
(Ellen Levine and Kadir Nelson)

Informational Text

Listening: See Below
for Ellen Levine read
aloud and link

Yes

Poems:

“Words Like

Freedom
” (Langston Hughes)

Literary Poem

Read Aloud

Online

Poems
: “Rosa” (Rita Dove)

Literary Poem

Read Aloud

Online

Poems
: “
Harriet Tubman” (Eloise Greenfield)

Literary Poem

Read Aloud

Online

Poetic Language:
Martin’s Big Words

Informational Text

Read Aloud

Yes

Poetic Language:
a sweet smell of roses

Literary Story

Read Aloud

Yes



English Language arts


2
nd

Grade
ELA Unit 4, Freedom


Suggested Texts
: ASSESSMENTS

Title/Author

Description

Read Aloud or
Student Text

DREAM

Book?

Used for Assessment
:

A Sweet Smell of
Roses
(1963) (Angela Johnson and Eric
Velasquez)

Literary Story

Read Aloud

Yes

Used for Assessment
:

Harriet Tubman”
(Eloise Greenfield)

Literary Poem

Read Aloud

Online

: ASSESSME
uggested Texts
: ASSESSMENTS

Additional Resources

Ellen Levine Reads Henry Freedom's Box

(Scholastic, Author Interviews)

http://www.2.scholastic.com/browse/video.jsp?pID=1640183585&bcpid
=1640183585&bclid=6814353001&bctid=5705791001

RL.2.6

Note: In this video, the author
reads the story and gives an
interview.

Martin Luther King Jr.'s "I Have a Dream" Speech

http://www.americanrhetoric.com/speeches/mlkihaveadre
am.htm

SL.2.3

An interactive tour of the Underground Railroad:
http://teacher.scholastic.com/activities/bhistory/underground_railroad/i
ndex.htm

RL.2.3

A website dedicated to the life of Jesse Owens:
http://www.jesseowens.com/

RL.2.3



Terminology / Vocabulary

Term/Vocabulary Word

Definition

action

Student and Adult Definition:
the plot of a drama or work of fiction


autobiography

Student Definition:
a biography written by the person it is about

Adult Definition:
an account of a person's life written by that person

biography

Student Definition: a history of a person's life

Adult Definition:
an account of someone's life written by someone else.

conc
lusion

Student and Adult Definition:
the last part of something

feelings

Student Definition:
a state of mind

Adult Definition:
the emotional side of someone's character; emotional responses or
tendencies to respond

Linking words


narrative

Student Definition:
something (as a story) that is told or written

Adult Definition:
a spoken or written account of connected events; a story

record

Student and
Adult
Definition:
to set down in writing

thoughts

Student Definition: t
he act or process of
thinking

Adult Definition:
an idea or opinion produced by thinking or occurring suddenly in
the mind

time order words




English Language arts


2
nd

Grade
ELA Unit 4, Freedom


Art , Music, and Media

Title

Image/Link

Norman Rockwell,
The Problem We
All Live With

(1963)

http://hubpages.com/hub/The
-
Problem
-
We
-
All
-
Live
-
With
---
Norman
-
Rockwell
-
the
-
truth
-
about
-
his
-
famous
-
p
ainting

Photographs of Ruby Bridges

(1963)

http://hubpages.com/hub/The
-
Problem
-
We
-
All
-
Live
-
With
---
Norman
-
Rockwell
-
the
-
truth
-
about
-
hi
s
-
famous
-
painting

Disney, “
Disney’s Ruby Bridges

(1998)

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0138068/


Making Interdisciplinary Connections

This Unit Teaches



Art
: Photography, Norman Rockwell



Geography
:
Southern states and Canada



History
: Slavery (e.g., Lincoln and Tubman), Civil Rights Movement
(e.g. Ruby Bridges and Martin Luther King, Jr.)

This Unit Could Be Extended To
Teach




History:

Civil War (e.g., slavery, states’ rights), Civil Rights (e.g.,
Susan B. Anthony)



FROM PAVE

Description of Unit Assessments & Connection to Interim Assessment
: Reading

Name

Type

Description

Schedule

Materials

Exit Ticket

Graded
Assignment

Students will answer the
question, “What did your
character do to be free?” in a
reader’s response format.
Students will answer this
question after reading about a
character’s journey to
freedom.


Rubric (needs
creation)

Exit Ticket:
Fact Finder

Graded
Assignment

Students will generate one
fact based on the
informational text they read
that day.


Rubric (needs
creation)

Fact Wheel


Project

Students

will answer teacher
generate “W
” questions about
an informational text.
Students will transform their
answers into a creative fact
wheel.


Please see
attached rubric
and exemplar.


Reading
Assessment 1

Quiz

Students will read an
informational text about Rosa
Parks and answer W quest
ions
about the passage.


Assessment


Reading
Quiz

Students will read two

Assessment

English Language arts


2
nd

Grade
ELA Unit 4, Freedom


Assessment 2

passages and answer W
questions and then compare
important points.


Compare and
Contrast
Poster
and
Illustrations

Graded
Assignment

Students will complete
a V
enn
diagram poster and
an
illustration

based around two
characters and their journeys
to freedom.

Students will use
evidence from the text.



Unit
Assessment

Test

Students have three reading
passages with a variety of W
questi
ons and a compare and
contrast in a V
enn diagram.


Assessment


Description of Unit Assessments & Connection to Interim Assessment
: Writing

Name

Type

Description

Schedule

Materials

Graphic
Organizer

Graded
Assignment

Students complete a graphic
organizer by sketching their
beginning, middle, and end.


Teacher to create
graphic organizer
suited for kids at
that point in the
year.

Narrative Draft

Graded
Assignment

Students to complete a draft
of a narrative.


See attached
organizational
rubric.

“My Freedom
Box”

Graded
Assignment

Students write a narrative as if
they were traveling in Henry’s
freedom box.


Rubric (needs
creation)

Poetry
Anthology

Graded
Assignments

Students publish a poetry
anthology of the poems they
have created throughout the
poetry centers.


Rubric (needs
creation)

Opinion Piece


Graded
Assignments

Students write an opinion
piece to help them reflect on
all the historical figures’ long
journeys

to freedom.



Rubric (needs
creation)