download - The 24th Asian-Pacific Weed Science Society Conference

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Nov 13, 2013 (4 years and 1 month ago)

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Asian
-
Pacific Weed Science Society

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ONLY ]




























PLATINUM SPONSOR
:

GOLD SPONSOR
:


SILVER SPONSOR
:




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Asian
-
Pacific Weed Science Society

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ONLY ]


PROGRAM
ME

AT GLANCE


Monday
,

October 21

16.00
-
19.00

Registration, Booth Preparation for
Poster/
Trade

Exhibition

19.00
-
21.00

Welcome Dinner for Invited Speaker
s

and Committee Members




Tuesday
,

October 22

0
7
.
3
0
-
09.
0
0

Registration

09.
0
0
-
10.
0
0

Opening Ceremony / Opening Address

10.
0
0
-
1
0
.
3
0

Coffee Break

1
0
.
3
0
-
1
1
.
3
0

Keynote Speaker

-

Prof
.

Dr
.

Steve Adkins.

Empowering weed science to meet
food security in the Asia
-
Pacific in the new millennium
.

11.30
-
12.00

Invited Plenary Speaker

-

Prof
.

Dr
.

Albert J. Fisher.
Management of multiple
-
herbicide resistant Echinochloa spp. in rice
.

1
2
.
0
0
-
1
3
.
0
0

Lunch and
Zohor

13.00
-
13.30

Invited Plenary Speaker

-

Prof
.

Dr
.

Kato Noguchi.
Momilactone plays a crucial
role in rice allelopathy
.

1
3
.
3
0
-
1
5
.
3
0

Concurrent Session
s

1, 2, 3
a, 3b

(
20

papers)

1
5
.
3
0
-
1
5
.
5
0

Tea Break

15.50
-
17.50

Concurrent Sessions 4, 5
a, 5b
, 6 (22

papers)

19.00
-
22.00

Conference Dinner and Cultural Show



Conferment of APWSS/WSSI Fel
l
owship Award




Wednesday
,

October 23


08.
0
0
-
08.40

Invited Plenary Speaker

-

K.H.

Park, S.H.

Kim, Y.K.

Kim, H.J.Joo, Y.S.

Hong.
Weed control potentials using robotic implements
.

08.40
-
10.40

Concurrent Session
s

7, 8, 9

(17

papers)

1
0.4
0
-
11.
0
0

Coffee Break

11.00
-
11.40

Invited Plenary Speaker

-

N. Yaduraju & A.
N
.

Rao.
Implications of weeds and
weed management on food security and safety in the Asia
-
Pacific region
.

11.
4
0
-
12.40

Lunch and Zohor Prayer

12.
4
0
-
1
4
.
4
0

Concurrent Session
s

10, 11, 12

(17

papers)

1
4
.
4
0
-
15.
2
0

Invited Plenary Speaker

-

A
.
R
.

Sharma, V.P. Singh and Raghwendra Singh.
Weed management in conservation agriculture systems


Problems and
prospects
.

15.20
-
15.35

Tea Break

15.35
-
17.35

Concurrent Session
s

13
,
14, 15

(15

papers)

19.00
-
21.00

APWSS Exco Meeting in Room 1



HIGI Meeting in Room 2










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Thursday
,

October 24

07.00
-
17.00

Field Trip 1 : Tangkuban Perahu + Syngenta Trial


Field Trip 2 : Kawah Putih Ciwidey





Friday
,

October 25

08.00
-
08.3
0

Invited Plenary
Speaker

-

Prof. Dr. Aurora

M
. Baltazar and David E. Johnson.
Challenges and problems in managing weeds in rice: Present and future
solutions.

08.30
-
09.00

Invited Ple
nary Speaker
-

Dr
.

Trevor James.
Can We Successfully Manage Weeds
By Manipulating The Weed Seed Bank?

09.00
-
09.30

Invited Plenary Speaker
-

Dr
.

Soekisman Tjitrosoedirdjo.
Weed Risk Assessment
-

A Review.

09.30
-
09.50

Coffee Break

09.50
-
10.20

Invited Plenary Speaker
-

Prof.
Dr.
Y.

Fuji
i.
Isolation And Identification Of
Allelochemicals From Traditional Crops And Their
Utilization In Agriculture.

10.20
-
12
.
0
0

Concurrent Sessions 16, 17, 18 (1
4

papers)

1
2
.
0
0
-
1
4
.
3
0

Lunch and Friday prayer

14.
3
0
-
1
5
.
3
0

APWSS
G
eneral
M
eeting

16.
3
0
-
17.
3
0

Closing
C
eremony and
A
wards
P
resentation






























Asian
-
Pacific Weed Science Society

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ONLY ]





7


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WELCOME




Dear Delegate, As the local committee chair of the
24
th

APWSS conference I welcoming you to
Bandung Indonesia and to the 24
th

APWSS
Conference. We very much hope that you will enjoy
a very productive and intellectually stimulating
conference week. With delegate from 17 countries
and an excellent range of prese
ntation we are
confident that this conference will be very
important.

With the theme ”The Role of Weed Science in
Supporting Food Security by 2020” display strong
bond and meaningful tri
-
partite cooperation
between Asian Pacific Weed Science Society
(APWS
S), Faculty of Agriculture Padjadjaran
University and the Weed Science Society of
Indonesia (WSSI). This is the 3rd time that
Indonesia is hosting the APWSS conference, since
the last one in 1991 that was held in Jakarta. We
are all aware that food securi
ty, or rather food
insecurity and food safety are high on the agenda
of key issues and priority among policy makers,
food industry players, agriculturalists and
agriculturists alike globally, and in the Asia Pacific
in particular.

For those participating i
n the Thursday October
24
th

field trips to the Syngenta Research Station in
Cikampek, and also trip to Tangkuban Perahu
Mountain in Lembang and Kawah putih in
Ciwidey. We hope our conference delegates and
their spouses will take opportunity to enjoy the
In
donesian country
-
side during the field trips. We
also hope that you enjoy the conference social
event, planned to maximize time to network whilst
also enjoying some of the cultural dance. Many of
you have travelled very long distances to be here.
We wis
h you to have a great conference and
enjoyable stay. You a very welcome!


Prof. Dr.
H.
Denny Kurniadie

Local committee chair




Welcome To The 24th Asian
-
Pacific Weed
Science Society Conference
.
On behalf of the
Asian
-
Pacific Weed Science Society, I am
delighted to welcome you to the 24
th

APWSS
Conference here in Bandung, Indonesia. The
theme

The Role of Weed Science in Supporting
Food Security by 2020


focuses the Conference
on the recent changes in weed science research
and practice that are targeting

improved food
quality and production security. During the
Conference you will hear from internationally
respected speakers who will reflect on recent
advances and highlight the challenges to come
in the developing field of weed science.


I would like to a
cknowledge all keynote
speakers, paper and poster presenters for
accepting the challenge to share their
knowledge and expertise. To our sponsors and
trade exhibitors, thank you for supporting this
conference, for without you we would not be in a
position t
o provide such an excellent program.
The APWSS encourages all delegates to visit the
trade exhibition and meet with their
representatives. In addition, an important part
of the conference will be for you to develop your
network of weed science contacts, so

we
encourage you to use the time between the
sessions and at the social events to do this.


I hope you find the Conference to be rewarding
for new information, new ideas and contacts. I
look forward to meeting you during the
Conference, and I trust you wi
ll take advantage
of the magnificent venue here in Bandung




Prof. Dr. Steve Adkins

APWSS, President













Asian
-
Pacific Weed Science Society

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ONLY ]


GENERAL CONFERENCE INFORMATION



On Site Information

Delegate seeking assistance throughout the conference should contact conference organizer
Dedi Widayat on +62
-
8122
-
0529
-
899

or visit the conference desk.



Name Badges

It is a requirement of the organizer that name badges must be worn.



Coffee Lunch Tea Dinner

During the conference (Tuesday to Friday) coffee, lunch and tea will be available during the
break sessions.



Poster Display

The poster
exhibit

is located adj
ace
nt

to the
Sanusi’s Graha

room confe
re
nce
venue
. All
posters must be in position by
09.00
-
17.00

on
Tuesday

October
22 until Friday October
25
.

Those delegate presenting poster are ask
ed to be at their
poster fo
r discussion

during the
morning and after
noon tea /
coffee

break of that day. All
posters

are available

for

viewing
throughout the entire conference.



Conference Dinner and Cultural Show

Delegate
seeking information about

c
onference
d
inner and
c
ultural
s
how

should contact
c
onference
d
inner and
c
ultural
s
how

organizer
Santi
Ros
niawaty +62
-
8122
-
4384
-
86 or Dedi
Widayat +62
-
8122
-
0529
-
899
.



Spouse Program
me

Delegate
seeking information about
s
pouse
p
rogramme

should contact
s
pouse
p
rogramme

organizer

Fiki Yulianto +62
-
8522
-
1224
-
984

or
Yudithia Maxiselly +62
-
8170
-
2512
-
04
.













9


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APWSS EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE MEMBERS


President

:

Steve Adkins

Vice President

:

Denny Kurniadie

General Secretary

:

Do
-
Soon Kim

Treasurer

:

Michael Renton

Country
Representatives;




Australia

:

Steve Walker


Indonesia

:

Soekisman Tjitrosoedirdjo


Malaysia

:

Baki Hj. Bakar


Thailand

:

Chanya Maneechote


Vietnam

:

Duong Van Chin


Philippines

:

Aurora M. Baltazar


India

:

NT Yaduraju


Bangladesh

:

Rezaul Karim


Korea

:

Do
-
Soon Kim


Japan

:

Yoshiharu Fujii


Pakistan

:

Azim Khan


New Zealand

:

Anis Rahman


USA

:

Nilda Burgos


China

:

Chaoxian Zhang


Taiwan

:

Chwen
-
Ming Yang


Sri Lanka

:

Anurudhike Abeysekera







Asian
-
Pacific Weed Science Society

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ONLY ]


LOCAL
COMMITTEE MEMBERS


Chairman

:

Denny

Kurniadie

General Secretary/Treasurer

:

Santi Rosniawaty

Registration

:

Dedi Widayat

/

Uum Umiyati

/

Erni Suminar

/

Farida
Damayanti

/

Citra Bakti

/

Intan Ratna Dewi

Publication/Documentation

:

Sumadi

/

Aep Wawan Irwan

Exhibition

:

Ade Ismail

/ Fiky
Yulianto

Technical Support
/Audio

:

Rio Y
unanto

/

Teddy

/

Fiky Yulianto

/

Josep

Field Trip

:

Suseno Amien

/

Agus Wahyudin

/

Yudithia Maxiselly

Accommodation

:

Cucu Suherman

Logistics/Food/Beverages

:

Denny Sobardini

/

Susi Munigar

/

Nana Bana

/

Dani
Riswandi

Pre
-
Post Conference Tours

:

Anne Nuraini

Spouse Programme

:

Fiki Yulianto

/ Yudithia Maxiselly








SCIENTIFIC PROGRAM
ME

COMMITTEE


Baki Hj. Bakar

Malaysia

Denny Kurniadie

Indonesia

Marwat Khan

Pakistan

Soekisman Tjitrosoedirdjo

Indonesia

Kato Noguchi

Japan

Yushihiro Fujii

Japan

N. Yaduraju

India

Aurora Baltazar

Philippines

Steve Adkins

Australia

Anis Rahman

New Zealand

A.

R. Sharma

India








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APWSS FELLOW PROFILE

Prof.

Dr.

M.

Soerjani


He was born from a family of teachers in Tulungagung, on 15th October 1932. His father was
so proud of him and expected him to become an engineer like Soekarno, his father’s
idol
, the
first president of Republic of Indonesia. In his childhood his beloved m
other passed away,
and his schooling was
shouldered by

his big family, in Madiun,
Blitar Malang

and
Tulungagung; he completed his secondary schooling in 1948. The political situation at that
time demanded

him to defend the Indonesian independence and he jo
ined the army. The war
was won in a short time and he decided to continue his high school
education

and completed
in 1952. He, then, enrolled at the faculty of Agriculture Gajahmada University; while he was
a student he made himself available as
a voluntee
red

teacher at the Agricultural Vocational
School in Palembang, South Sumatera.
His volunteered

work earned him
recognition

from the
Department of Agriculture
and issued

him a decree installing him as a government employee.
In 1960 he won a scholarship to
complete his university education at the faculty of
Agriculture,

therefore, he went back to Gajahmada Univer
sity, and was graduated in 1964

wasan
engineer

(
Indonesian title of agricultural degree)
all right
, but not a civil engineer as
expected by his fa
ther. During his student life he was active in student’s movement, member
of Students

Guild,
and an

editor of university’s student digest.


Upon his graduation from Gajahmada University he was appointed by the Director of
National Biological

Institute Prof. Dr
.

O.

Soemarwoto, who was a professor at the faculty of
Agriculture, Gajahmada University
, as

a research
assistant

at the Indonesian Institute of
Science and moved his employment from the Department of Agriculture to the Indonesia
Institu
te

of Science, attached to Bogor Botanical Garden. He took special interest in the
physiology of Imperata
cylindrical
, and under the direction of Prof Dr. Otto his first research
finding was presented at the 9th Congress of Pacific Science Association in T
okyo 1966. Prof.
Dr. Otto Soemarwoto proposed a
Regional

Centre for Tropical Biology (BIOTROP) to
SEAMEO
(Southeast Asian

Minister of Educations
Organization
) and accepted, and he was
the first director of the regional
center
. M. Soerjani took a doctorate

programme
at
Gajahmada

University
, supervised

by Prof. Dr
.

Otto Soemarwoto. He was sent to Reading
University, UK, to take special course in Biostatistic; he obtained another scholarship from
British Council to continue his I.cylindrica research works in
WTO (Weed Research
Organisati
on), Oxford, and then to CABO (
Centrum voor Agrobiologisch Onderzoek voor
Landbouwgewassen) in Wageningen, the Nederlandsand and to learn
about autoradiography
in ITAL (
Instituut voor Toegepaste Atomoisch
-
energie voor Landbouwg
ewessen) in
Benekom, the Nederlands. Upon returning to Indonesia, those research findings during his
stay in UK, and the Nederlands were written into a
dissertation

for his doctorate degree and
submitted to Gajahmada University. His dissertation was accept
ed by a board of Professors
and he obtained his doctorate degree from Gajahmada University in 1970. He was then
appointed as the Program Manager of Tropical Pest Biology Program of BIOTROP.


The program of Tropical Pest Biology dwelled upon weeds and ectoparasites, 2 subjects that
were left
neglected

by ot
her institutes in the region. Dr
.

M.

Soerjani developed the program
on weeds
intelligently
. He drew a long term program by inviting world authorities on weed
science from UK
(the

director

of WRO, IBC, (Institute of Biological
Control)

from USA


Asian
-
Pacific Weed Science Society

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(scientist

from IPPC Oregon State and California
University)
, from Japan
(Tsukuba

University), the Ned
erlands
(NUFFIC
, KIT) from France, Australia etc. The written program
was regional and very comprehensive, consisted basically of 3 activities, (1) to do research on
the biology and ma
nagement of selected weeds, (2)

to train young scientist in the region h
ow
to do research, and to stimulate them to do research i
n their own country, and to (3)

present
research finding at the scientific meeting or symposium. The research topics should be in line
with BIOTROP goals, i.e. to identify critical biological problem
s the solution of which will
enhance the economic gain of the region. Imperata cylindrica and Eichhornia crassipes (
water
hyacinth
) were selected the first 2 weed species that should
be managed

properly.


The trainings were carried out with instructors fr
om USA, UK, Japan or the Nederlands and
participated by participants from the regions, Malaysia, Thailand, Vietnam, Laos Cambodia,
Philippines, of course Indonesia. The trainings were
organized

not only in Bogor Indonesia,
but
also

other SEAMEO member coun
tries such as Malaysia, Thailand, Philippines so were
the symposiums; activities on weed control and management were indeed
plentiful.
In its
early development there were short term (6 weeks) and long term (9 months) training courses.
In the long term trai
ning courses participants are obliged to write proposal and carried out it in
the field. To stimulate research activities in their own
countries funds

were provided and
research report were submitted to BIOTROP. This program has been instrumental in
develo
ping research institutes in the region such National Research Institute of Biological
Control of Weeds Thailand with the first director of Dr.

Banpot Napompeth, the alumni of
BIOTROP; many universities in Indonesia adopted curricula of BIOTROP weed science

training course into weed science curricula given to their students of Agriculture . Many
weed scientists in the Southeast Asian region, are alumni of BIOTROP, the program of which
was designed by Dr.

M.

Soerjani, such as Prof. Dr. Baki HJ Bakar, Dr.

Anw
ar Ismail, of
Malaysia Dr
.

Umporn Suwunamek, Dr.

Banpot Napompeth, of Thailand, Dr.

Soetikno, Dr
.

Soekisman, Dr.

Jody Munandir of Indonesia and many more.


Dr. M.

Soerjani contributed considerably to the awareness of weeds and the accompanying
impact to the policy
makers,

in inspiring young scientist interested to weed science and
carrying out research and other activities on weeds, developing research
organization

dedicated to which science, and above all providing many alternatives of weed control for
farmers to reduce the cost of agricultural production. At BIOTROP itself the output was
considerable, and BIOTROP is enjoying a good reputation of institution with s
trong
commitment

to weed science. Monumental books such as WEEDS OF RICE authored by Dr.

M.

Soerjani, or Aquatic Weeds of South East Asia written by Soerjani and Pancho are among
books about weeds beside other documents in the form of internal reports, pro
ceedings of
seminar or symposiums, BIOTROPIA publications, (
BIOTROP journal

that published
research results of BIOTROP researchers) are available at BIOTROP library, where students
or training participants can satisfy their
interest

on weeds
.


Dr.

M.

Soerj
ani also invited foreign researchers to do research works at BIOTROP such as,
Mr. D.

Robson of WRO, Dr.

Ikushima of Chiba
, Prof.

Dr.

J
. Pancho of UPLB, J. Eussen of
the Nederlands and others
, beside

producing data in accordance with their
hypothesis

they
a
lso provided direct training for staff assigned to be the counter part of those visiting
scientists.




13


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The positive

impact of BIOTROP program on weeds control not only on governmental
institutions, but also on professional association, such as Weeds Scienc
e Society in Indonesia,
in the Philippines, Thailands and other were sprouted in the period of BIOTROP
disseminating

weed.
These professional
organizations

were responsible in
disseminating

information on weed management, and more in integrating stakeholders interested in weed
management from farmers, to retailers of herbicides
to agrochemical

companies and policy
makers. Indonesian Weed Science Society for example is given a
prestigious

pos
ition to
assess the accicacy of herbicides sold in Indonesian market. He was the person who initiated
the formation of Indonesian Weed S
cience Society in March 7, 1970

wrote down

the
regulation and established a journal, called “Weeds” to
accommodate

publ
ications of
information on weeds to be
disseminated

to members. He was the first chairman of Weed
Science Society of
Indonesia, and

organized

successful

1st Indonesian Weed Science
Conference
January

29
-
31
, 1971

only 8 months after its
inauguration
. In thi
s first Weed
Science Society conference DR.

M.

Soerjani clearly stated the objectives among others,
promoting the advancement of weed science, with ethic and good fellowship, coordinated
activities, publish research results for every one to share the info
rmation, and it was expected
that WSSI could function as
alias on

between its members and APWSS.


Dr.

M.

Soerjani’s participation in developing the Asian Pacific Weed Science Society since
its
birth

in Hawaii has been considerable. Together with his colle
ge Dr.

Marcos Mega of the
Philippines, Dr Barnes of Malaysia, Lez Matteuz of New Zealand
, Dr
.

Roy Nishimito of
Hawaai, DR. Larry Burril of Oregon State University
was

actively
nurturing

the society. He
was involved in the 2nd (in Kuala Lumpur) 3rd (in Mani
la
),

4th (in Rotorua, New Zealand),
5th (
Tokyo) APWSS conference and he was the president of APWSS and organized
successful 6th APWSS conference in Jakarta Indonesia. He was involved in the formulation
of the APWSS rules including
organizational

membership
s
. He was
offered by

FAO to take a
post as FAO weed expert in Rome, but he declined the offer
as he

was the president of
APWSS and in the preparation of organizing the 6th APWSS conference. He was and still is a
nationalist and also a man of his words that

can be depended on.


His involvement with weeds ended when he was requested by the Directorate General of
Higher Education, Minister of Education to move from the Indonesian Institute of Science to
the Department of Education and Culture and seconded to the famous University o
f
Indonesia, at the faculty of
Science

and Mathematics. As inspired by his mentor Prof. Dr.

Otto
Soemarwoto who led an Institute of
Ecology, at

Pa
d
ja
d
jaran University he also developed
one, Center for environmental Studies. He was concentrating more on the

environmental
problems in cities rather than that in agricultural or forest ecosystems. He was instrumental in
issuing laws related to environmental management no 23/1997 which formulates that
environment as a unit of space with all its materials,
energy
, forces, condition and living
organism including human and its
behaviors

in affecting life sustainability and welfare
including other living organisms. He later on revised the concept of environment being a
much wider, and
should

be understood in the con
text of cosmology, in line with Islamic
teaching , that environment is not limited to only on earth, but the whole universe, as God
creates so.







Asian
-
Pacific Weed Science Society

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ONLY ]


SPEAKER PROFILES




Steve Adkins is the leader of the Tropical and Subtropical Weed
Research Unit within the School of Agriculture and Food Science and
the Professor of Plant Physiology at the University of Queensland. Steve
received his Honours in Botany and Zoology in 1977
from the
University of London, UK and his PhD in 1981 from the University of
Reading, UK. He completed a series of postdoctoral fellowships at the
University of Saskatchewan, Canada and has since worked at Murdoch
University before coming to the University

of Queensland in 1988.

Steve is the president of the Asian
-
Pacific Weed Science Society and
principal research scientist on many tropical weed projects at Uqin the
fieldsof plant ecology, weed biology, and seed physiology. He has
supervised more than 50
PhD and MSc students in plant and weed
science and produced over 300 research publications. He has spoken
about weed biology and management at conferences in over 30
countries around the word. He has been a member of the Asian Pacific
Weed Science Society
for over 25 years.





Dr. Aurora M. Baltazar is adjunct professor of weed science at the Crop
Protection Cluster, University of the Philippines Los Banos (UPLB)
where she taught weed science and crop protection courses until she
retired in January 2012
. She obtained her BS and MS in Agriculture
from UPLB and her PhD from the North Carolina State University. She
worked as postdoctoral research associate at the University of Arkansas
where she was involved in the first studies to confirm the resistance o
f
barnyardgrass to propanil and determined strategies for control of
propanil
-
resistant barnyardgrass. She also conducted studies on
selectivity of postemergence grass herbicides which served as basis in
management strategies using grass herbicides for co
ntrol of emerged
grasses in rice.

From 2001 to 2003 she was the Asian Site Coordinator of the USAID
-
funded IPM CRSP (IPM Collaborative Research Support Program), a
collaborative program among Virginia Tech, UP Los Banos, and
Philippine Rice Research Institute. Through the IPM CRSP weed
res
earch program, she and her group have developed cost
-
reducing
weed management strategies to help increase income of rice
-
vegetable
farmers in tropical rainfed farms and documented the increase in
populations of a lowland ecotype of purple nutsedge in rice
-
vegetable
areas in the Philippines. Her collaborative research work with weed
scientists at the International Rice Research Institute has helped
determine how a lowland ecotype of purple nutsedge has developed
morphological and physiological mechanisms to
adapt to the flooded
environments of lowland rice. She served as APWSS president in 2001
-
2003 and is currently on the APWSS Executive Committee.





15


[ DRAFT ONLY ]



Dr
.

Yoshiharu Fujii is an alumnus of Kyoto University where he
graduated with BSc, MSc and PhD degrees. Currently, a professor at the
Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Dr Y. Fujii was a
senior research scientist at the National Institute of Agro
-
Environmental
Sciences, heading,
inter
-
alia
, the
Allelopathy Laboratory, and as
Research Group Leader, Risk Assessment of Alien Species for
Biodiversity National Institute for Agro
-
Environmentl Sciences. His

principal research interest focuses on Plant E
cology with emphasis on
allelopathy, screening of allelopathy and identification of
allelochemicals in action, utilization of allelopathy for agriculture. He
was a recipient of Life Time Achivement Award, International
Allelopathy Foundation

for 2009
-
2011.

An active scientist in the weed
science fraternity in Japan andworldwide, Dr Y. Fujii was the President
of International Allelopathy Society for YEAR. He published regularly
in high impact research journals in Japan and elsewhere.





Albert Fischer is the current holder of the Melvin D. Androus Endowed
Professorship for Weed Science in Rice and is Professor of Weed
Ecophysiology in Rice Systems at the Department of Plant Sciences of
the University of California in Davis. He is Presiden
t of the
International Weed Science Society (IWSS). He graduated in
Agricultural Sciences at the University of Uruguay and received his MS
and PhD in Crop and Weed Science from Oregon State University in the
USA. Before coming to UC Davis, he had conduct
ed research on weed
biology at North Dakota State University, USA. From 1989 to 1996 he
was Senior Scientist for Rice and Weed Ecophysiology at the
International Center for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT) in Cali, Colombia.
He was professor and researcher in

Weed Science at the Autonomous
University of Chapingo in Mexico and prior to that, he conducted
extension and research in Weed Science for the Ministry of Agriculture
of Uruguay.

His strategic and applied research addresses critical weed challenges to
California rice production, such as the evolution of herbicide resistance
in major weeds and the recent appearance of weedy forms of rice. His
program works towards: a) understanding the physiological,
biochemical and molecular mechanisms endowing herbicid
e resistance
in key weeds of rice, b) elucidating effects of landscape and crop
management on the genetic structure and the spread of herbicide
resistant weeds in rice, c) developing knowledge on weed biology and
the ecophysiology of rice
-
weed interactions
, and d) developing novel
weed management concepts for rice. His program integrates a wide
range of research activities whereby basic science supports novel
concepts for field
-
level solutions. He currently teaches courses on plant
physiology, herbicide me
chanisms of action and herbicide resistance in
weeds, and weed science. Has published 71 scientific refereed papers
and more than 60 scientific documents
.



Asian
-
Pacific Weed Science Society

[ DRAFT

ONLY ]




Having gained his PhD from Massey University in Soil Science
(environmental), Dr Trevor James
research interest now covers all
aspects of weed management. This includes general and specific
(environmental, noxious and herbicide resistant) weed control, seed
ecology with special interest in dynamics of the soil seed bank and its
implications for wee
d management,

and the impacts and control of
weeds in arable and horticultural crops and in pasture. Another
important part of his work is around herbicide use and safety, which
includes the interaction of herbicides and the environment (leaching,
movemen
t and persistence) and maximising their efficacy through use
of adjuvants and improved application systems. Some of Dr James’ key
achievements include the publication of books on common weeds, on
grasses, sedges and rushes and very recently on weed seeds.





Dr Hisashi Kato
-
Noguchi (Ph D) is a professor at the
Department of
Applied Biological Sciences, Faculty of Agri
cul
ture, Kagawa

University, Japan. He is an expert in allelopathy and allechemicals
research. His main research interest is in allelopathy, focusing especially
on allelopathic chemical communications. Dr Kato
-
Noguchi is also
interested in searching for new allelopathic s
ubstances in tropical and
subtropical plants. His research group have already found that there is
chemical communication between rice crop and barnyardgrass plants.
They also have found several new compounds that act as allelopathic
substances.. There are

still many plants unexplored, some of which may
contain unknown allelopapthic substances. Dr Kato
-
Noguchi’s research
group welcomes cooperative research to investigate those allelopathic
substances and to find the solutions for sustainable weed managemen
t
strategies by expandin
g our knowledge of allelopathy.





Dr.
Kwang
-
Ho Park

(Ph. D.) is a
Professor and Vice President, Korea
National College of Agriculture and Fisheries (KNCAF), Ministry of
Agriculture, Forestry and Rural Affairs, Korea
. His main research
interest is in
rice crop science and weed management
research.

Dr.
Kwang
-
Ho Park
’s
awards

are
awardee from the Daesan Foundation
for Rural Culture &

Society which is called as a Novel Prize in
Agriculture, Korea (2011), badge from Korea Government (2005),
awardee of Korea Agricultural Science and Technology(2002).













17


[ DRAFT ONLY ]



D
r
. A.

R. S
harma obtained his B.Sc. Agric degree from Himachal
Pradesh Agricultural University, Palampur (1981); M.Sc. from Punjab
Agricultural University, Ludhiana (1983); and Ph.D. from Indian
Institute of Technology, Kharagpur (1988). He served as Scientist at the

Central Rice Research Institute, Cuttack (1987
-
1996); Agronomist at the
Punjab Agricultural University, Ludhiana (1996
-
1998), Senior Scientist
at the Central Soil and Water Conservation Research and Training
Institute, Dehradun (1998
-
2001); and Principal
Scientist and Professor
of Agronomy at the Indian Agricultural Research Institute, New Delhi
(2001
-
2012). Dr. Sharma has made outstanding research contributions
in the field of tillage and weed management, conservation agriculture
and nutrient management.
He has published more than 150 research
articles and presented about 50 papers in various seminars/symposia. He
was conferred ICAR Jawaharlal Nehru Award, KRIBHCO Award for
Outstanding Research, ISCA Pran Vohra Award, CRRI Best Worker
Award, IARI Hooker Aw
ard, and FAI Dhiru Morarji Memorial Awards
and a recipient of the prestigious Fellowship of National Academy of
Agricultural Sciences (2004), Indian Society of Agronomy (2009), and
Indian Association of Soil and Water Conservationists (2010). Dr.
Sharma jo
ined as Director, Directorate of Weed Science Research,
Jabalpur, Madhya Pradesh, India in March 2012.




[PHOTO HERE]



















SOEKISMAN TJITROSOEDIRDJO


[PROFILE HERE]









Asian
-
Pacific Weed Science Society

[ DRAFT

ONLY ]



Dr
.

N
.

T
.

Yaduraju took graduate and post
-
graduate degrees from the
University of Agricultural Sciences, Bangalore, India and PhD from the
Reading University, UK. He undertook research and teaching in
agronomy, weeds and weed management at the Indian Agricultural
R
esearch Institute, New Delhi (1976 to 2000). He served as the
Director, National Research Centre for Weed Science (NRCWS) at
Jabalpur, India (2000 to 2005), where he set up of world
-
class facilities
for weed science research and provided leadership at the
national level.
He has over 200 research publications and is the Fellow of the Indian
Society of Weed Science (ISWS) and a recipient of the ISWS Gold
Medal. As National Coordinator (2006
-
2010),
National Agricultural

Innovation Project (NAIP)


a
World Bank
-
funded project implemented
by the Indian Council of Agricultural Research (ICAR), he
tried to build
a network of highly reputed and competent professionals in ICT4D in
agricultural information management and KM and facilitated the
development and implemen
tation of several projects worth over $ 50
million. Currently, Dr
.

Yaduraju is working at ICRISAT as Principal
Scientist for ICT4D.

































19


[ DRAFT ONLY ]


CONCURRENT SESSION



TUESDAY OCTOBER 22

13.30
-
15.30 :: CONCURRENT SESSIONS 1, 2, 3A, 3B


CONCURRENT SESSION 1: WEED INVASIVES AND ECOLOGY

VENUE: EXECUTIVE ROOM

CHAIRMAN: ABUL HASHEM

//
CO
-
CHAIRMAN:

M. CHOZIN


13.30
-
13.50

Setiabudi, S.Tjitrosoedirdjo, Sri S.Tjitrosoedirdjo, I. Mawardi, Saiful Bachri
.Invasion
of
Acacia nilotica

into savannas inside Baluran National Park, East Java, Indonesia
.


13.50
-
14.10

R.M. Kathiresan and S. Deivasigamani.
Invasive spread of water hyacinth in Veeranum
Irrigation System and the impact of herbicidal control on aquatic environment.


14.10
-
14
.30

J. Deka, I.C.Barua, N.Borah and N.C.Deka.
Weed flora and their management in aquatic
environments in Assam, India
.


14.30
-
14.50

Indah Wahyuni and Sri S. Tjitrosoedirdjo.
Observation on the development of impotant
weeds and invasive alien plant species

in Indonesia.


14.50
-
15.10

Duary, B. and Mukherjee, A.
Distribution pattern of predominant weeds in wet season and
their management in West Bengal, India.




CONCURRENT SESSION 2: WEED MANAGEMENT IN RICE

VENUE: BALE RUMAWAT

CHAIRMAN: AURORA BALTAZAR

//
CO
-
CHAIRMAN:

EDISON PURBA


13.30
-
13.50

C. Nithya and C. Chinnusamy:
Evaluation of bensulfuron methyl 60% DF in weed control
efficacy and grain yields of transplanted rice.


13.50
-
14.10

K. Jabran, M.N. Doğan
1
, M. Farooq, Ehsanullah, A. Ali.
Weed
management in dry direct
-
seeded rice in Pakistan
.


14.10
-
14.30

N. Lap, Irianto, Muhammad Yuli, R.K.Mann.
TOPSHOTä 60OD
-

a one
-
shot rice
herbicide for use in direct
-
seeded and transplanted rice in Asean countries.


14.30
-
14.50

Kevin C. Salamanez, Aurora M. Baltazar and Evelyn B. Rodriguez.
Effect of
propyrisulfuron on growth and acetolactate synthase activity of five weed species and three
rice (
Oryza sativa

L.) cultivars.

14.50
-
15.10

Sheeja K Raj, Nimmy Jose, Reena Mathew, C.
D. Sandhyadevi, Leenakumary, S.
Evaluation of broad spectrum herbicide
-

bispyribacsodium + metamifop on weed control and
productivity of direct
-
seeded rice in Kuttanad, Kerala, India.









Asian
-
Pacific Weed Science Society

[ DRAFT

ONLY ]



CONCURRENT SESSION 3A: WEED RESISTANCE

& HERBICIDE RESIDUES

VENUE: SANUSI

ROOM / RSP ROOM

CHAIRMAN:

ALBERT FISHER

//
CO
-
CHAIRMAN:

HARRIS BURHAN


13.30
-
13.50

M.Renton.
Simulation modelling can help understand and predict how management, weed
biology and genetics affect the development of herbicide resistance.


13.50
-
14.10

Kapila G. Prematilake, W P A S Nawaratne, S A N Dharsani and A K V S
Weerasinghe.

Investigations on possible development of resistance in
crassocephalum
crepidioides

(Benth) S. Moor and
Erigeron sumatrensis

weeds for glyphosate (EC36).


14.10
-
14.30

Edison Purba.
A population of goose grass (
Eleusine indica
) from oil palm field resistant to
glyphosate and paraquat.


14.30
-
14.50

C. Nithya and C. Chinnusamy:
Residual effect potassium salt of glyphosate applied to the
preceding transgenic stacked

cotton hybrid on the succeeding crops.


14.50
-
15.10

Nghia Nguyen Khoi, Ulrike Dörfler, Metka Suhadolc, Welzl Gerhard, Jean Charles
Munch, and Reiner Schroll.
Soil properties governing glyphosate herbicide biodegradation
in agricultural soils.




CONCURRENT SESSION 3B: HERBICIDE RESIDUES

VENUE:

SANUSI ROOM

CHAIRMAN:

MANN RICK

//
CO
-
CHAIRMAN:

ANIS RAHMAN


13.30
-
13.50

P.C.Rao,Ch.S.Ramalakshmi,M.Madhavi,A.Sirisha and G.Swapna.
Herbicide desorption
in alfisols and vertisols of Andhra Pradesh.


13.50
-
14.10

P.C. Rao, Ch.S.Rama Lakshmi, M.Madhavi, A. Sireesha and G.Swapna.
Herbicide
mobility under different moisture conditions in soils of Andhra Pradesh, India.


14.10
-
14.30

P. Janaki, C.Chinnusamy and B. Jaya Kumar.
Persistence of oxyfluorfen in
acid soil
under tea crop grown insouthernIndia.


14.30
-
14.50

K. M. Durga Devi , C.T. Abraham, S. Krishnan.
Changes in chemical and biological
characteristics of soil under long
-
term application of herbicides in rice
-
rice system
.


14.50
-
15.10

A.Anwar I
smail, Liew Fei Ling and S.M. Rezaul Karim.
Residual activity of glyphosate
in three soil types on germination and establishment of mungbeans
.














21


[ DRAFT ONLY ]


15.50
-
17.50

::
CONCURRENT SESSIONS 4, 5A, 5B, 6


CONCURRENT SESSION 4: ALLELOPATHY AND
ALLELOCHEMICALS

VENUE: EXECUTIVE ROOM

CHAIRMAN: Y. FUJII

//
CO
-
CHAIRMAN: ISMAIL SAHID


15.50
-
16.10

A K M Mominul Islam and Hisashi Kato
-
Noguchi:

Isolation and

characterization of
allelopathic substance from
Leucas aspera.


16.10
-
16.30

Pattharin Wichittrakarn, Montinee Teerarakand Chamroon Laosinwattana.
Allelopathic potential of
Tagetes erecta

L.; optimal extraction solvent and its partially
separation of active compounds.


16.30
-
16.50

Moinuddin Ahmed and Irum
-
us Islam.
Allelopathic ef
fects of
Chenopodium murale

L. on
four crop test species.


16.50
-
17.10

Sobar Darana.
Allelophatic activity of lantana leaf extract (
Lantana camara
)on the weed in
tea (
Camellia sinensis
).


17.10
-
17.30

Y. Nornasuha and B.S. Ismail.
Comparative allelopathic effects of
Chromolaena odorata

(L.) King & Robinson and
Mikania micrantha

H.B.K. on selected weeds.


17.30
-
17.50

I.M.P.S. Ilangamudali and S. H. S. Senarathne.
Allelopathic effects of
Hyptis suaveolens

on seed germination and growth of selected bioassay species.




CONCURRENT SESSION 5A: QUARANTINE & SPECIAL WEED PROBLEMS

VENUE:

BALE RUMAWAT

CHAIRMAN:ABDUL SHUKOR JURAIMI

//
CO
-
CHAIRMAN:
SOEKISMAN

TJITRO
SOE
DJIRDJO


15.50
-
16.10

Arifin Tasrif and
Ridwan Alaydrus:

Strategic management of invasive plant species with
reference to the role of agricultural quarantine on the prevention of transboundary
movements.


16.10
-
16.30

Sri S. Tjitrosoedirdjo and Jesus C. Fernandez.
Building capacities in weed
andinvasive
alien plant species management in Southeast Asia: the SEAMEO BIOTROP experience.


16.30
-
16.50

S.Tjitrosoedirdjo I.Mawardi, Setiabudi, Syaiful and Sri S.Tjitrosoedirdjo.
Chemical
control of
Acacia nilotica
under medium density regime
populations and broadleaved weeds
inBekol Savanna Baluran National Park, East Java, Indonesia
.


16.50
-
17.10

Steve W. Adkins, Naeem Khan, Thi Nguyen, Asad Shabbir, Ikramullah Khan, Zahid
Hanif, Amalia Belgeri, Ruey Toh and Sally Allan.
The invasive alien p
lant parthenium
weed: impacts upon crop production, human and livestock health and plant biodiversity.


17.10
-
17.30

Muhammad Ehsan Safdar, Asif Tanveer, Abdul Khaliq, and Muhammad Shahbaz
Naeem.
Germination and seedling growth of maize as influenced by rh
izopheric soils of
Parthenium hysterophorus

L.








Asian
-
Pacific Weed Science Society

[ DRAFT

ONLY ]


CONCURRENT SESSION 5B: QUARANTINE & SPECIAL WEED PROBLEMS

VENUE: BALE RUMAWAT / RSP ROOM

CHAIRMAN:

STEVE ADKINS

//
CO
-
CHAIRMAN:

A.S.K ABEYSEKERA


15.50
-
16.10

Muhammad Ehsan Safdar, Asif Tanveer, Abdul Khaliq, Muhammad Shahbaz
Naeemand Salman Ahmad.
Tree species as potential source of bio
-
herbicides for
controlling
Parthenium hysterophorus
L.


16.10
-
16.30

A. Shabbir, K. Dhileepan, C. O’Donnell and S.W. Adkins.
Combining biological control
with plant competition: implications for improved management of parthenium weed
(
Parthenium hysterophorus
L.).


16.30
-
16.50

Steve W Adkins, Asad Shabbir and Sadiq Ali.
Suppressive plants as part of an integrated
management pro
gram for
parthenium

weed.


16.50
-
17.10

Jai Knox and M.S. Paul.
Threats of
Parthenium hysterophorus
and its management through
bioagents.


17.10
-
17.30

Dr Naeem Khan, Doug George and Steve W Adkins.
Using suppressive pasture species to
manage parthenium
weed in northern Pakistan.




CONCURRENT SESSION 6: ECONOMICS AND WEED MANAGEMENT

VENUE:

SANUSI ROOM

CHAIRMAN:

BUDDHI MARAMBE

//
CO
-
CHAIRMAN:

SRI S.TJITROSOEDIRDJO


15.50
-
16.10

A.N. Rao.
Economic weed management approaches for rice in Asia.


16.10
-
16.30

K. Govindarajan and C. Chinnusamy.
Economic impact of Integrated Weed Management
(IWM) on onion in the western zone of Tamil Nadu in India.


16.30
-
16.50

K. Govindarajan and C. Chinnusamy.
Yield loss assessment due to weeds in tomato in
western

zone of Tamil Nadu, India.


16.50
-
17.10

K. Govindarajan and C. Chinnusamy.
A comparative cost analysis of with and without
chemical weed management practices of onion production in the western agro climatic zone
ofTamil Nadu, India.


17.10
-
17.30

Veeres
h Hatti, M.T.Sanjay , T.V.Ramachandra Prasad, R.Devendra and Basavaraj
Kumbar.
Influence of weed management practices on yield and economics of irrigated
maize (
Zea mays
L.).


17.30
-
17.50

M.Madhavi, T.Ramprakash, A.Srinivas and M.Yakadri.
Integrated weed
management in
maize (
Zea mays

L.) for supporting food security in Andhra Pradesh, India.











23


[ DRAFT ONLY ]

WEDNESDAY OCTOBER 23

08.40
-
10.40

::
CONCURRENT SESSIONS 7, 8, 9


CONCURRENT SESSION 7: WEED INVASIVES AND ECOLOGY

VENUE: EXECUTIVE ROOM

CHAIRMAN: SOEKISMAN
TJITRO
SOE
DJIRDJO

//
CO
-
CHAIRMAN: N.T. YADURAJU


08.40
-
09.00

K. D. K. Karunarathna, S. R. Weerakoon, S. Somaratne O.V, .D.S.J. Weerasena and A.
S. K. Abeysekera.
Phenotypic and genotypic variation in different weedy rice (
Oryza sativa
f
. spontanea
)
bio
-
type populations inMatara and Kurunagala Districts, Sri Lanka.


09.00
-
09.20

A.S.K Abeysekera, M.S. Wickramarathne, L. Nugaliyadde and D.E. Johnson.

Agronomical variation and ecological distribution of weedy rice (
Oryza sativa spontanea
) in
Sri Lanka.


09.20
-
09.40

Dwi Guntoro, Muhammad Achmad Chozin, Edi Santosa, Soekisman Tjitrosemito

and
Abdul Harris Burhan.
Morphology and genetic diversity of
Echinochloa crus
-
galli

(L.)
Beauv. accessions from West Java, Indonesia.


09.40
-
10.00

I.C. Barua, J. Deka and M. Devi.
Invasive weeds and vegetation dynamics in Assam, India.


10.00
-
10.20

K. Brindha and C. R. Chinnamuthu.
Degrading phenolic compounds and exhausting food
reserves stored in the tubers of
Cyperus rotundus

with hydrolytic enzy
me.


10.20
-
10.40

Hongchun Wangand Liyao Dong.

Influence of environmental factors on seed germination
and seedling emergence of annual bluegrass (
Poa annua

L.).




CONCURRENT SESSION 8: ALLELOPATHY AND ALLELOCHEMICALS

VENUE: BALE RUMAWAT

CHAIRMAN:

KATO
-

NOGUCHI

//
CO
-
CHAIRMAN: REZAUL KARIM


08.40
-
09.00

M. A. Chozin, Y. Delsi, R. Saputra, S. A. Arifin and S. Zaman.
Some sttudies on
allelophatic potential of
Cyperus rotundus

L.


09.00
-
09.20

Zahid Ata Cheema, Muhammad Farooq and Sardar Alam Cheema.
Application of
allelopathy for weed management and growth promotion in wheat.


09.20
-
09.40

M. Ameena, V.L. Geetha Kumari and Sansamma George.
Potential application of
nutsedge (
Cyperus rotundus

L.)

extracts for weed suppression and identification of
allelochemicals.


09.40
-
10.00

Asif Tanveer, Muhammad Ehsan Safdar, Muhammad Yasin and Ijaz Rasool Noorka.
Allelopathic inhibition of germination and seedling vigor of some selected crops by
Achyranthes
aspera

L.


10.00
-
10.20

A. Junaedi, M. A. Chozin, A. P. Lontoh, Md. A. Salam, S. B. Lee, K. H. Kim, E. H.
Kim and M. Chung.
Promising allelophatic rice lines derived from the recombinant inbred
lines of Nongan/Sathi
.







Asian
-
Pacific Weed Science Society

[ DRAFT

ONLY ]


CONCURRENT SESSION 9:

NEW
INNOVATION IN WEED MANAGEMENT

VENUE: SANUSI ROOM

CHAIRMAN:

MICHAELRENTON

//
CO
-
CHAIRMAN:

ARIFIN TASRIF


08.40
-
09.00

S. Walker, M. Widderick and T Cook.
Innovative approaches to manage glyphosate
-
resistant weeds in subtropical grain region of
Australia.


09.00
-
09.20

C.R.Chinnamuthu and K.Brindha.
New domain approach to manage the world’s worst
weed the
Cyperus rotundus

with engineered nanoparticles.


09.20
-
09.40

Jin
-
Won Kim, Chuan
-
Jie Zhang, Tae
-
Yong Lee, and Do
-
Soon Kim.
Plant phenomics may
h
elp herbicide research and development.


09.40
-
10.00

C.R. Sixtus, J.G. Hampton, T.R. Glare, and G.D. Hill.

Is the gorse pod moth an effective
biocontrol agent of gorse in New Zealand?


10.00
-
10.20

Edwin Wijaya and Yakup Parto
.
The effect of salvinia (
Salvinia molesta

D.S.Mitchell)compost on growth of cutting pepper (
Piper nigrum
L.).


10.20
-
10.40

M.H.S. Ariyaratne.
Alien, invasive duck weed (
Wolffia

sp.) as feed for tilapia (gift strain)
(
Oreochromis niloticus
) fingerling production.




12.40
-
14.40

::
CONCURRENT SESSIONS 10, 11, 12


CONCURRENT SESSION 10: WEED ECOLOGY AND COMPETITION

VENUE: EXECUTIVE ROOM

CHAIRMAN:

DEIRDRE LEMERLE

//
CO
-
CHAIRMAN:

STEVE WALKER


12.40
-
13.00

Deirdre Lemerle and Hanwen Wu.
Crop competition for weed management in
conservation cropping systems.


13.00
-
13.20

Abul Hashem, Peter Newman and Catherine Borger.
Competitive hierarchy in weed
suppression by barley, canola and wheat cultivars.


13.20
-
13.40

Zahid Hussain and Khan Bahadar Marwat.
How the competition of
Xanthium strumarium

L. affects the phenological characters of maize crop.


13.40
-
14.00

Maria Fitriana, Yakup Parto, Munandar and Dedik Budianta.
Maize productivity and
weed species shifts due to organic matter treatments and NPK fertilizer applications i
n
Sumatera Uplands, Indonesia.


14.00
-
14.20

Yakup Parto and Erizal Sodikin.
The analysis of weed community and dominant weed
species shifts throughout growing season and crop growth stages in lowland rice fields of
southern Sumatera
.









25


[ DRAFT ONLY ]


CONCURRENT
SESSION 11: WEED MANAGEMENT IN RICE

VENUE: BALE RUMAWAT

CHAIRMAN:

A.N RAO

//
CO
-
CHAIRMAN:

DAVID JOHNSON


12.40
-
13.00

Nimmy Jose, C. T. Abraham, Reena Mathew and Leenakumary, S.
Biology and
management of weedy rice in direct
-

seeded puddled rice.


13.00
-
13.20

R. Sathya Priya , C. Chinnusamy and P. Manickasunda.
Bio
-
efficacy evaluation of new
combination herbicide (bispyribac sodium 4% se + metamifop 10% SE) on weeds of direct
-
seeded rice.


13.20
-
13.40

C. Chinnusamy and P. Janaki.
Long
-
term herbici
dal weed management integrated with
nitrogen sources in transplanted lowland rice
-
rice cropping system.


13.40
-
14.00

C. Chinnusamyand N. Sakthivel.
Pre
-
and post
-
emergence herbicide combinations for
broad spectrum control of weeds in transplanted rice.


14.00
-
14.20

P. Saravanane, S. Mala and V. Chellamuthu.
Management of diverse spectrum of weeds
in aerobic rice (
Oryza sativa
) of Puducherry, India.


14.20
-
14.40

R. K. Ghosh, S. Sentheragai, S. Bera, P. K. Jana, T. Saha and S. Mallick.
Chemical
weed
management with propanil and combination of pyrazosulfuron ethyl and pretilachlor
in direct
-
seeded puddled rice at Gangetic West Bengal.




CONCURRENT SESSION 12:

TILLAGE PRACTICES IN WEED MANAGEMENT PRACTICES

VENUE:

SANUSI ROOM

CHAIRMAN:

C.CHINNUSAMY

//
CO
-
CHAIRMAN:

STEVE ADKINS


12.40
-
13.00

Vijaymahantesh, H., Nanjappa, H.V. and Ramachandrappa, B.K.
Effect of tillage and
integrated nutrient management in pigeonpea (
Cajanus cajan
l.) and fingermillet (
Eleusinae
coracana
l.) cropping

system in relation to weed dynamics.


13.00
-
13.20

Husni Thamrin Sebayang, Titin Sumarni and Muhamad Noor Azizu.
Effect of tillage
systems and time of weeding on the growth and yield of corn (
Zea mays

L.).


13.20
-
13.40

Hasanuddin, Manfarizah, and Adnan.
The application of glyphosate and paraquat on
minimum tillage in soybean.


13.40
-
14.00

N.Sakthivel, P.Murali Arthanari and C.Chinnusamy
. Tillage and weed management
practices in ma
ize
-

sunflower cropping system
.


14.00
-
14.20

Pijush K. Mukherjee and Pushpajit Debnath.
Weed control practices in maize (
Zea mays
L.) under conventional and conservation tillage practices.


14.20
-
14.40

R.R. Upasani, Sheela Barla, S.S. Surin, M.K. Singhand R. Thakur.
Tillage sequence and
weed managem
ent in rice (
Oryza sativa
)
-

wheat (
Triticum aestivum
) cropping system
.








Asian
-
Pacific Weed Science Society

[ DRAFT

ONLY ]


15.35
-
17.35

::
CONCURRENT SESSIONS 13, 14, 15


CONCURRENT SESSION 13: WEED INVASIVES AND ECOLOGY

VENUE: EXECUTIVE ROOM

CHAIRMAN:

ANIS RAHMAN

//
CO
-
CHAIRMAN:

HARRIS BURHAN


15.35
-
15.55

Denny Kurniadie and Uum umiyati.
Weed mapping in two corn production centers in
West Java Province of Indonesia.


15.55
-
16.15

Duary, B. and Mukherjee, A.
Distribution pattern of predominant weeds in wet season and
their management in West
Bengal, India.


16.15
-
16.35

Swarna Herath, O. Namuco, Evangelina S. Ella, Aurora M. Baltazar, Abdelbagi M.
Ismail and David E. Johnson.

Emergence and growth of weedy and cultivated rice in
response to flooding and seed burial depths.




CONCURRENT SESSI
ON 14: WEED MANAGEMENT FIELD CROPS

VENUE: BALE RUMAWAT

CHAIRMAN: N. T.YADURAJU

//
CO
-
CHAIRMAN:

EDISON PURBA


15.35
-
15.55

A. Rahman, M.R. Trolove and T.K. James.

Efficacy and crop selectivity of topramezone
for post
-
emergence weed control in maize.


15.55
-
16.15

Hidayat Pujisiswanto, Prapto Yudono, Endang Sulistyaningsih, Bambang Hendro
Sunarminto.
Acetic acidas a pre
-
emergence herbicide on maize germination.


16.15
-
16.35

Veeresh Hatti, M.T.Sanjay, T.V.Ramachandra Prasad, K.N. Kalyana Murthy and
Basa
varaj Kumbar.
Bio
-
efficacy and phytotoxicity of pre and post
-
emergence herbicides
for weed management in irrigated maize (
Zea mays
L.).


16.35
-
16.55

Shah Fahad and Zahid Hussain.
Comparative study of cultural and chemical weed control
methods in wheat
crop.


16.55
-
17.15

D. Ravisankar, C. Chinnusamy and P. Muthukrishnan.
Influence of glyphosate K
-
salt
applied in preceding transgenic corn hybrids on succeeding green gram.


17.15
-
17.35

M. T. Sanjay , T.V. Ramachandra Prasad , Sannathimanna and R.Devendr
a.
Bio
-
efficacy of ethoxysulfuron 15 WG (Sunrice 15 WG) for management of sedge and
broadleaved weeds in sugarcane.
















27


[ DRAFT ONLY ]


CONCURRENT SESSION 15: WEED MANAGEMENT FIELD CROPS

VENUE: BALE RUMAWAT

CHAIRMAN:

R.K. GHOSH

//
CO
-
CHAIRMAN:

M. CHOZIN


15.35
-
15.55

R. Sathya Priya, C. Chinnusamy and P. Manickasundaram.
Effect of new molecule
oxyfluorfen (23.5% EC) on weeds in groundnut and their residual effect on succeeding
crops.


15.55
-
16.15

K.Sivagamy and C.Chinnusamy.
Evaluation of bio
-
efficacy,
weed control efficiency and
yield in herbicide
-
resistant transgenic stacked corn hybrids (TC1507× NK603) for crop
productivity.


16.15
-
16.35

K.Sivagamy and C.Chinnusamy
. Effect of potassium salt based glyphosate applied in
preceding transgenic stacked
maize hybrids on succeeding green gram.


16.35
-
16.55

Ch.S.Rama Lakshmi, P.C. Rao, A. Sireesha, M.Madhavi and G.Swapna.
Effect of
oxadiargyl on enzyme activities in spinach grown soil.


16.55
-
17.15

M.T. Sanjay, T.V. Ramachandra Prasad, V.K. Kiran Kumar a
nd P. Thimme Gowda.
Evaluation of chlorimuron ethyl (kloben 25 wp ) + quizalofop
-
p
-
tefuryl (Pantera 4 EC) for
weed management in irrigated soybean.


17.15
-
17.35

V. Pratap Singh, S.P.Singh, V.C.Dhyani, Neeta Tripathi, A.Banga and Vimal Raj
Yadav.
Effect o
f establishment methods on shifting of weed flora in rice
-
wheat cropping
system
.






























Asian
-
Pacific Weed Science Society

[ DRAFT

ONLY ]


FRIDAY OCTOBER 25

09.50
-
11.30

::
CONCURRENT SESSIONS 16, 17, 18


CONCURRENT SESSION 16: WEED MANAGEMENT IN RICE

VENUE: BALE RUMAWAT

CHAIRMAN:

KIM DO
-
SOON

//
CO
-
CHAIRMAN:

NANIK SRIYANI


10
.
2
0
-
10.
4
0

Shaikh Tanveer Hossain and Hideki Sugimoto.
Weed management of organic rice: in
perspective of Bangladesh and Japan.


10.
4
0
-
1
1
.
0
0

C. Chinnusamyand P. Janaki.
Long
-
term herbicidal weed management
integrated with
nitrogen sources in transplanted lowland rice
-
rice cropping system.


1
1
.
0
0
-
1
1
.
2
0

Sharif Ahmedand Bhagirath Singh Chauhan.
Effect of application timings of soil applied
herbicides on weed growth and crop yield in dry
-
seeded rice in Bangla
desh.


1
1
.
2
0
-
11.
4
0

W.G.N. Gunawardana, M. Ariyaratne, P. Bandaranayake and B. Marambe
. Control of
Echinochloa colona
in aerobic rice: Effect of different rates of seed paddy and post
-
plant
herbicides in the dry zone of Sri Lanka.


11.
4
0
-
1
2
.
0
0

Muhammad Farooq, Ahmad Nawaz, Zahid Ata Cheema and Sardar Alam Cheema.
Weed dynamics and management in conventional and conservation rice
-
wheat cropping
systems.




CONCURRENT SESSION 17: ALLELOPATHY AND ALLELOCHEMICALS

VENUE: BALE RUMAWAT

CHAIRMAN:
ISMAIL SAHID

//
CO
-
CHAIRMAN: Y. FUJII


10
.
2
0
-
10.
4
0

Edwin Wijaya and Yakup Parto
.The effect of salvinia (
Salvinia molesta

D.S.Mitchell)compost on growth of cutting pepper (
Piper nigrum
L.).


10.
4
0
-
1
1
.
0
0

Asif Tanveer, Muhammad Ehsan Safdar, Azeem Tariqand Mubashar Nadeem.
The
roles of
Rhynchosia capitata

(Roth) DC.metabolites in poor seed germination of field crops.


1
1
.
0
0
-
1
1
.
2
0

Ramesh K. Singh and Babu Lal Meena.

Influence of rice residue management practices
and herbicides on weed growth and yield in wheat (
Triticum aestivum
).


1
1
.
2
0
-
11.
4
0

Chuah Tse
-
Seng.
Effects of oil palm rachis residues in combination with pretilachor on
goosegrass (
Eleusine indica
) grown
with chinese spinach (
Amaranthus oleraceus
).















29


[ DRAFT ONLY ]


CONCURRENT SESSION 18: WEED S AS BIORESOURCES

VENUE: EXECUTIVE ROOM

CHAIRMAN:TREVOR JAMES

//
CO
-
CHAIRMAN:

SETIABUDI


10
.
2
0
-
10.
4
0

T. Girija, V.C Vijaya and C. T. Abraham.
Parasites,
Dendrophthoe falcata, Helicanthus
elastica

and

Macrosolen capitellatum

using stomatal characters and isotope discrimination
studies.


10.
4
0
-
1
1
.
0
0

D. K. Pandey.
Are the weeds capable of germination at higher temperatures weeds in
waiting for global
warming?


1
1
.
0
0
-
1
1
.
2
0

K. R. Aneja, V. Kumar, P. Kumar.
Colletotrichum,

a hemibiotrophic plant pathogen: A
potential mycoherbicidal agent.


1
1
.
2
0
-
11.
4
0

Nurariaty Agus and Sri Nur Aminah, N.
Conservation of parasitoid
Diadegma
semiclausum

L. through flowering weeds management in cabbage plantations
.


11.
4
0
-
1
2
.
0
0

Sri Nur Aminah Ngatimin, Nurariaty Agusand Syatrawati.
The potential of flowering
weeds as the bio
-
resourcesfor predatory insects in Bantimurung
-
Bulusaraung National
Park,South
Sulawesi, Indonesia.
































Asian
-
Pacific Weed Science Society

[ DRAFT

ONLY ]




KEYNOTE SPEAKER & INVITED PLENARY SPEAKERS












KEYNOTE SPEAKER


EMPOWERING WEED SCIENCE TO MEET FOOD SECURITY

IN THE ASIA
-
PACIFIC IN THE NEW MILLENNIUM


Steve Adkins




























31


[ DRAFT ONLY ]


IMPLICATIONS OF WEEDS AND WEED MANAGEMENT ON FOOD SECURITY
AND SAFETY IN THE ASIA
-
PACIFIC REGION


N.T. Yaduraju
1*
and A.N. Rao
2

1
Knowledge

Sharing & Innovation, International Crop Research Institute for the Semi
-
Arid
Tropics (ICRISAT), Patancheru
-

502 324;
Hyderabad, India; Email:
N.Yaduraju@cgiar.org

2
Former Agronomist (Weed Scientist), International Rice Research Institute (IRRI),
Consultant Scientist, Plot: 1294A; Road: 63A; Jubilee Hills;

Hyderabad


500033, A.P., India;

*Email: anraojaya@hotmail.com


ABSTRACT
Food security has once again become a major issue for the world as the world
population increased from 3.5 billion in 1970 to 8 billion in 2011 and is expected to reach 9
billion by 2050. Increasing population is putting pressure both on availabl
e cultivatable land
and on yields required. In 2011, 925 million people suffered from chronic malnutrition, on
average 16% of the population in the developing world, and this can be expected to worsen if
there is no increase in world food production.
With
approximately 3.5 billion people, Asia
-
Pacific region is home for 58% of the world’s population. Reducing the existing large crops
yield gaps is one of the appropriate approaches to meet the growing regional food security
demands. Crop yield gap reduction
is possible by optimizing crop productivity through
identification and alleviation of major impediments such as weeds, which are more adapted to
wide range of environments. Weeds continue to cause yield losses ranging from 10 to 60%
depending on the crop a
nd associated environment. Appropriate weed management has the
potential to ensure food security by enhancing productivity and increasing profitability of
farmers by cutting costs. Judicious selection, integration and application of herbicides will
guarant
ee customers the safety of foods they consume. However, impact of globalization,
climate change, genetically modified crops etc have also been felt on weeds and weed
management. Severe scarcity of labour, shortage of water for rice cultivation, emphasis o
n
organic and conservation agriculture etc are redefining the way we address weed problem.
The solutions followed by the developed countries may not suit the vast majority of the
countries in the Asia
-
Pacific region. It is time we evolved our own strategie
s and approaches.
Besides these technological challenges, these countries have to grapple with the problems of
different sort; the ignorance of vast majority of farmers about the weed problem, the
inadequate capacity of the extension personnel and the inse
nsitive administrators and policy
makers. The weed scientists in these countries have a daunting job at their hands to deal with
this multitude of problems. The scientists have plenty to gain from networking and
collaboration with weed scientists from the
developed countries in the region as well as from
the other parts of the world.


Keywords
:

Yield gap, integrated weed management, food security, climate change, Asia
Pacific region.









Asian
-
Pacific Weed Science Society

[ DRAFT

ONLY ]


WEED MANAGEMENT IN CONSERVATION AGRICULTURE SYSTEMS


PROBLEMS
AND PROSPECTS


A.R. Sharma*, V.P. Singh and Raghwendra Singh

Directorate of Weed Science Research, Jabalpur, Madhya Pradesh 482 004, India

*Email: sharma.ar@rediffmail.com


ABSTRACT
Conservation agriculture has drawn the attention of resource management
scientists throughout the globe since early 1970s, following widespread resource degradation
problems and rise in energy prices. It is estimated that >125 M ha of the cropped area is u
nder
conservation agriculture systems in countries like USA, Canada, Australia, Brazil, Argentina,
Australia as well as in some south and central Asian countries. In south Asia including India,
some initiatives were undertaken since early 1990s to develop
resource conserving
technologies in rice
-
wheat cropping system. Conservation agriculture (CA) technologies
involve minimum soil disturbance, providing a soil cover through crop residues or other cover
crops, and crop rotations. Weeds are a major constraint

in adoption of CA
-
based technologies.
Conservation tillage influences weed infestation, and thus interactions between tillage and
weed control practices are commonly observed in crop production. There are reports available
that zero tillage increased as w
ell as reduced infestation of certain weed species in different
crops. In rainy season when the weed problem is generally more, growing crops with zero
tillage required additional measures for effective weed control, including use of non
-
selective
herbicid
es like paraquat and glyphosate. Zero
-
till sowing in standing crop residues along with
application of herbicides in proper combination, sequence or in rotation led to lower weed
population and higher yield than conventional planting. However, changing from

tillage
-
based farming to no
-
till farming is not easy. No
-
till incurs a greater risk of crop failure or
lower net returns than conventional agriculture, and this perception has seriously hindered its
adoption in countries outside north and south America. Y
ields of no
-
till crops may be lower
by 5
-
10%, especially on fine
-
textured and poorly
-
drained soils. No
-
till farming demands use
of extra N fertilizer and heavy reliance on herbicides. Herbicide
-
resistant weeds are already
becoming common on no
-
till farms i
n some countries. The continued practice of no
-
till is,
therefore, highly dependent on development of new her
bicide formulations and integrated
weed management options.


Keywords:

Conservation agriculture, no
-
till farming, non
-
selective herbicides, crop r
esidues,
rice
-
wheat system, weed management















33


[ DRAFT ONLY ]


WEED RISK ASSESSMENT

-

A REVIEW

S.Tjitrosoedirdjo
1
*
, T.Setyawati
2
, A.Susmianto
3

, A.Subyakto
4
, R. Irianto
5
, and A.Witt
6

1
Team member of IAS Group,
2
National Project Coordinator,
3
Director of Central
Conservation and Rehabilitation Research and Development,

4
Silviculturalist and
5
Entomologist of CCRRD,
6
CABI Africa, Nairobi, Africa

*Email: Sukisman.indo.net.id


ABSTRACT

Weeds are known to reduce crop yield, their entry to a country, therefore, must
be prevented Weeds are also known as invasive alien plant species. They have bilogical
characters that support their behaviour. Those characters specified by many scientists
were
integrated to identify them. The integrated information is also organized into a Weed Risk
Assessment Model to predict plants if they have a potency to be come a weed or an nvasive
species.
Risk is defined as likelihood of undesired event occuring as
a result of behaviour or
action.

There are 2 WRA models, pre
-

and post
-
border ones. The first pre
-
WRA was
developed in Australia, and widely adopted internationally. It consists of 49 questions that
must be answered either yes, no or unknow with prescribed

score point. Total score point of
>6 is rejected to total point of <1 ia accepted, while total score of 1
-
6 must be rvaluated
futher. Despite its wide aceptance internationally, AWRA does not seperate between
consequences and likehood, and modified accodi
ngly, modification is also suited to local
situation. It is suggested that Indonesia for pre
-
border WRA adopts HWRA. Post
-
border
WRA is for priorititation of management actions
using numerical ratings, and is divided into
two main sections: I. Significance

of Impact and II. Feasibility of Control or Management.
Each section is based on a scale of 100 points. Significance of Impact is further divided into
A
. Current Level of Impact and
B
. Innate Ability of Species to Become a Pest. A species with
a combined

score of over 50 points for significance of impact to be seriously disruptive and
needing appropriate attention. Species receiving high scores for feasibility of control will be
easier to control than those receiving lower scores. Many more post border W
RA have been
developed, and it is suggested that Indonesia adopts post
-
border WRA that was developed in
South Australia.


Keywords
: Risk, Likehood, Consequences, Pre
-
border Weed Risk Assessment, Post
-
border
Weed Risk Management,


















Asian
-
Pacific Weed Science Society

[ DRAFT

ONLY ]


MANAGING WEEDS IN RICE: CHALLENGES, PROBLEMS,

AND SOLUTIONS


A.M. Baltazar
1*
and D. E. Johnson
2

1
University of the Philippines Los Banos, College, Laguna, Philippines

2
International Rice Research Institute, Los Banos, Laguna, Philippines

*Email:
aurorabaltazar17@yahoo.com


ABSTRACT
Although the Green Revolution has increased rice production by 130% in the
past 40 years, there is a need to produce 35% more rice with less water, land, labor, and
chemicals in the next 20 years. To meet this challenge, rice scientists have developed wate
r
-
saving production technologies without flooding and transplanting, two basic practices that
suppress weed growth. Weed management perspectives are changing and bringing into
greater focus the critical role of managing “millennial” weeds in rice in the 20
00s. Flooding
to suppress weed growth without injury to wet
-
seeded rice remains a challenge to researchers
faced with the water
-
weed
-
rice dilemma of obtaining good rice germination and good weed
control. Answers to this challenge include studying rice and

weed adaptation mechanisms
during germination under hypoxia in the search for flood
-
tolerant rice varieties. Increasing
evolution of herbicide
-
resistant weeds requires herbicides with new modes of action and
innovative non
-
chemical control options. Deeper

understanding of multiple resistance
mechanisms is needed to manage
Echinochloa crusgalli
,
Sagittaria

spp and
Cyperus
spp,
weeds which have evolved multiple resistance to herbiicdes. Use of imidazolinone
-
resistant
rice provides effective control of weedy

rice but should include measures to avoid evolution
of herbicide resistant weeds. Potential future technologies being explored are physiological
approaches to develop allelopathic rice and C
4

rice and biotechnological approaches to
enhance rice competiti
veness or reduce weed competitiveness.


Keywords
:
Aerobic rice, direct
-
seeded rice, herbicide resistant weeds, herbicide
-
resistant rice






















35


[ DRAFT ONLY ]


MANAGEMENT OF MULTIPLE
-
HERBICIDE RESISTANT
ECHINOCHLOA

SPP.
IN RICE


Albert J. Fischer

Department

of Plant Sciences University of California
-
Davis, One Shbields Ave.95616,
Email:
ajfischer@ucdavis.edu


ABSTRACT
Echinochloa phyllopogon

is a major weed of rice. Populations of this species
in California have e
volved resistance to multiple herbicides within a system where rice is
mostly water seeded, continuously flooded and grown in a mostly monocropping system that
is heavily dependent on herbicides. Use of specific enzyme inhibitors, enzyme activity
assays
following induction by substrate and LCMS/MS suggested multiple resistance was due
to enhanced herbicide metabolism via inducible P450s, GSTs and glycosyl transferases.
Resistant plants have also insensitivity to ethylene stimulation by quinclorac, mechani
sms to
detoxify cyanide associated with ethylene biosynthesis, and to mitigate photooxidative stress
caused by paraquat. Resistance could relate to enhanced stress tolerance and better adaptation
to sub
-
optimal environments. These could, in turn, pre
-
sele
ct for herbicide resistance
evolution in weed populations. Use of synergistic herbicide combinations, alternation of
herbicides with different mechanisms of action, alternation of dry and water seeding methods,
and use of stale seedbed techniques in combi
nation with no
-
till are attempts at mitigation of
resistance evolution. New options are needed to diversify a system where sustainability is
compromised by resistance evolution to multiple herbicides in different weeds.


Keywords:

target site, non
-
target site resistance, multifactorial, cross
-
resistance, multiple
resistance,
Echinochloa
,
Cyperus
, stale
-
seedbed, glyphosate, stress tolerance, synergism.

























Asian
-
Pacific Weed Science Society

[ DRAFT

ONLY ]


CAN WE SUCCESSFULLY MANAGE WEEDS BY MANIPULATING

THE
WEED SEED BANK?


Trevor James* and Anis Rahman

AgResearch, Ruakura Research Centre, Private Bag 3123, Hamilton 3240, New Zealand

*Email:trevor.james@agresearch.co.nz


ABSTRACT
The soil weed seed bank determines the density and diversity of the weed
problem
s growers are likely to face in their crops. However, the weed seed bank is also
arguably the most resilient phase of the life cycle of weeds. Undermining weeds by
successfully manipulating the soil weed seed bank requires a well
-
planned, systematic and
lo
ng
-
term approach. This begins by being able to determine with some degree of certainty the
content and size of the seed bank. Of the two classical methods, seed enumeration or seed
germination, the germination method is simpler and provides adequate estima
tion of species
and numbers. The next requirement is for an understanding of some key ecological traits for