CVHS Program Studies 2013-2014 FINAL REVISION Feb 8th with ...

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Nov 13, 2013 (3 years and 9 months ago)

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CENTRAL VALLEY HIGH SCHOOL

PROGRAM OF STUDIES

TABLE OF CONTENTS


Introduction

................................
................................
................................
...............................

2

G
raduation Requirements

................................
................................
................................
..........

3


Selecting the Proper Courses

Career Planning

................................
................................
................................
.....................

4
-
9

National Collegiate
Athletic Association (NCAA)

................................
................................
10

Dual Enrollment Program/SAT Prep Course/CVHS Cyber
................................
...................
11

Suggestions for Students Interested in a Vocational
-
Technical Education

............................
12

Course Descriptions

Language Arts

................................
................................
................................
...................

13
-
16

Social Studies

................................
................................
................................
....................

17
-
19

Science

................................
................................
................................
...............................

20
-
27

Mathematics

................................
................................
................................
......................

28
-
34

World Language

................................
................................
................................
................

35
-
43

Business Education

................................
................................
................................
............

44
-
48

Technology Education

................................
................................
................................
.......

49
-
51

Health/Physical Education

................................
................................
................................

52
-
53

Family & Consumer Science

................................
................................
............................

54
-
55

Fine Arts

................................
................................
................................
............................

56
-
57

Instrumental

................................
................................
................................
.......................

58
-
59

Choral

................................
................................
................................
................................

60
-
61

Drama and Theatre

................................
................................
................................
..................
62

General Music

................................
................................
................................
.........................
63

Beaver County Career & Technology

Center (BCCTC)

................................
..................

64
-
69


3


CENTRAL VALLEY HIGH SCHOOL

160 Baker Road Ext.


Monaca, PA 15061

(724) 775
-
4300 (724) 775
-
6560 FAX


PROGRAM OF STUDIES

20
1
3

-

201
4


School Code or CEEB # 392
-
693


Counselor Student Assignments:

All
Grade

Levels

9
-
12



Mrs. Debra

Kuntz



Ext. 16006


Mr. Donald Phillips



Ext. 13162



(
Assigned b
y

Student’s

Last Name)




(Assigned by Student’s Last Name)




A


K







L

-

Z



INTRODUCTION



Selection of a high school program is one of the
most important decisions a secondary
student must make. The selections you make will determine the avenues of opportunity available to
you in your post
-
high school years. Be careful, choose wisely and weigh these choices against your
life's goals. Selec
tion of certain courses could determine acceptance into post
-
high school
programs.



Subject selections should be reached as a joint decision with your parents. Both of you
should familiarize yourselves with the contents of this booklet so you may arrive
at the wisest
choice of courses for you. Selecting courses that are both challenging and comprehensive will
provide for your personal goals and will give you a rewarding experience.



Please keep in mind your teachers, counselors and administrators will assist you and answer
any questions you may have concerning your selections. Should you and your parents need to
schedule an appointment or need a question answered, please feel free to

call
(724)

775
-
4300,
Extension
16000
.


REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION



Certain requirements must be met in order to graduate from
Central Valley High

School
.
These subjects are required by both the Pennsylvania Office of Education and the
Central Valley
Sc
hool Board

and must be met by each student. These requirements are as follows:


4


CENTRAL VALLEY HIGH SCHOOL

G
raduation Requirements

Grades 9, 10,
1
1

and 12


Starting with the
20
1
2
-
201
3

school year, students of the Central Valley School District in grades
9,
10, 11

and 12

will be required to earn a minimum of
28 credits

in the following areas, along with
completing a Graduation Project and achieving at the proficiency level or above on PSSA Testing or
District local alternative assessments.


Credits needed for Graduation:



4 English



4 Social Studies



4 Science



5 Math



3

PE and Health






1
Software Applications



1 Speech



6

Electives



Total of 28 credits needed

All graduation credits must be earned in the Central Valley School District. Dual enrollment credit
will not
be
counted towards class rank.



Grading Scale Based on Percentages


90
-

100%

=

A








80
-

89%

=

B



70
-

79%

=

C



60
-

69%

=

D




0
-

59%

=

F



Forms of Grading



Class rank will be based on the percentage of the final grade for each course. Valedictorian and
Salutatorian will be based on this system
. New students who enter Central Valley High School must
earn a minimum of 14 of the 28 required graduation credits (or 50%) in order to be eligible for
Valedictorian and Salutatorian.
All failing percentages

on report cards, 50% and below,
will default
t
o 50% with the exception of final
s and
midterms.



Honor Roll Requirement


Highest Honors


93
-
100%

High Honors


87
-

92.999%

Honors



83
-

86.999%






A percentage of 69% or below in any course would eliminate students from consideration for Honor Roll.



Students receiving an Incomplete (I) will not be eligible for Honor Roll until the grade is completed.



Honor graduates

earning
a cumulative average of
85%

or above will be recognized at commencement.


5


CAREER PLANNING


The
Central Valley School District

is committed to the preparation of our students for both post
-
secondary education
and the world of work. We are committed to providing opportunities for our students to fulfill their aspirations.
Choosing your future is one of the most challenging and e
xciting decisions you will make. To plan for your career,
you must plan your high school academic program. The courses you take and your experiences and
accomplishments in high school can lead you to a rewarding future. A career is more than just a job.

It involves
education, work, and lifestyle. Achieving success and a fulfilling future requires thoughtful planning and
appropriate choices.

Every effort will be made to offer the entire curriculum to all students. However, the offering
of these classe
s will be based upon availability of staff and interest of students.



SELECTING THE PROPER COURSES

Suggestions For The College Bound Student:



1.

Students
planning to attend college

should take the most rigorous coursework available in advanced math,
science and
any two
year
s

of
the
same world

language

to meet minimum college entrance requirements.



2.

Students desiring to study engineering or any other math or science related major

in college should pursue four
years of advanced math and science.


3.

Students planning Business related majors in college should consider taking advanced mathematics, computer
and accounting courses.



4.

It is highly recommended that all college
-
bound s
tudents take an additional computer course beyond the
software applications requirement.



5.

CAD I (Computer Aided Drafting), Architecture Research & Development, and CAD II (Advanced CAD &
3D Design) courses would be beneficial for students planning to e
nroll in engineering, drafting, design, art, or
architectural studies in college.


6.

All college
-
bound students should complete a minimum of
two

(2) lab science courses

and two levels of

the

same world language
.


7.

Any student planning to participate in college athletics
must

take at least one (1) lab science course. Refer to
the N.C.A.A. Clearinghouse page and/or visit the website at
www.ncaa.org

for guidelines.


8
.

Careful plann
ing must be made in order to schedule a combined program of business education courses and
college entrance requirements. Students should consult with their counselor for scheduling assistance. Build
a solid foundation of high school learning that can be

built upon in college.


AP and College
-
in
-
High
-
School Courses


CVHS

offers several AP and College
-
in
-
High
-
School credit courses. Through these college
-
level courses, a student has
the opportunity to earn credit or advanced standing at most of the nation’
s colleges and universities. These courses will
help develop the study habits necessary for rigorous course work and demonstrate maturity and readiness for post
-
secondary education. Enrollment in these courses is a commitment to hard work and academic ex
cellence.
CVHS

advanced level courses include:
AP
English,

AP or College
-
in
-
High
-
School
Statistics
, AP or College
-
in
-
High
-
School
Calculus

(through the University of Pittsburgh),
AP Environmental Science/Lab, AP Biology/Lab, AP Chemistry/Lab,
AP Physics/L
ab,
AP
Spanish
,

and College
-
in
-
High
-
School
Psychology

(through the Community College of Beaver
County).


Starting with the Class of 2015, a
ll Advanced Placement (AP) offerings are based on Advanced Placement/College
Board curriculum approval

and will have
an added

value

of
1
%
to their cumulative average per

AP course taken
.


Students taking AP courses will be required to take the AP Exam.


6


ARTS & COMMUNICATION


This

career area involve
s awareness, interpretation, application and creation of the arts and
communication skills. Students may be interested in exploring this field if they:




Are interested in art, music or writing



Are creative and enjoy entertaining others



Are good oral and/or written communicators



Are open
-
minded



Like to work in groups or
teams



POSSIBLE CAREER OPPORTUNITIES INCLUDE:


Entertaining
-
Performing Arts
: Acting and Redirecting, Dance, Drama/Theatre Arts

Visual & Performing Arts

Education:

Dance, Drama, Music, Physical Education

Communications:

Writer, Public Relations, Broadca
sting, Digital Media, Journalist, Photojournalist

Music:

Conducting, Piano, Voice

Fine Arts:

Architecture, Art, Art History, Ceramic Arts, Graphic Design & Visual Communications,
Drawing, Fashion Design & Illustration, Film/Cinema Studies, Film
-
Video Pro
duction, Visual Arts,
Industrial Design, Interior Design, Landscape Architecture, Jewelry Arts, Industrial Design, Interior
Design, Landscape Architecture, Jewelry Arts, Painting, Photography and Web Page Design, Florist



ELECTIVES TO CONSIDER
:




Advanced
Art



Advanced Musical Performance



Architectural Design



Art I, II and III Fine Arts/Crafts



Beaver County Career & Technical

Center Programs



Business Management



CAD I
&

II



Chorus/Band



CVTV News



English Grammar/Composition



Family & Consumer
Science Courses



Graphics &
Web Page
Design






International Business



Introduction to
Musical Performance



Introduction to Technology

&

Engineering



Journalism I
-
IV



Marketing



Materials Processing



Multi
M
edia Design



Music Appreciation



Music Theory



Musical Theat
re



Publications



Software Applications



World Languages



7


BUSINESS, FINANCE & INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY


C
areer
s

in this
area
are for students interested in working in the world of business, finance and
information services. Students may follow this

career path if they:




Are interested in a business environment



Are interested in accounting/mathematics



Would like to own their own business



Enjoy working with others, planning events and leadership roles



Are interested in technology



POSSIBLE CAREER
OPPORTUNITIES INCLUDE:


FINANCE

Accounting,
Banking, Business Administration, Financial Planning, Finance, Insurance and Risk
Management, International Business/Economics, Legal Administration, Marketing.


MANAGEMENT

A
dvertising, Entrepreneurship, Fashion
Merchandising, Hospital Administration, Hotel/Restaurant
Management, Human Resource Management, Logistics and Materials Management, Organizational
Behavior, Political Science, Real Estate, Retail Management and Travel
-
Tourism Management.


PROFESSIONAL

Soft
ware Engineer, Tax Examiner, Desktop Publisher, Sales Representative, Operations Analyst, Chief
Executive Officer.



ELECTIVES TO CONSIDE
R
:




Accounting I



AP Statistics



Automated Accounting



Business Calculus



Business Law



Business Management



C++



CAD

I & II



Calculus/AP Calculus



Child Development



Custom Manufacturing I & II



English Grammar/Composition



Foods I & II



Graphics &
Web Page
Design



Introduction to Technology

& Engineering



Marketing



Materials Processing



Mechatronics I & II



Multi
M
edia Design



Per
sonal Finance



Psychology



Publications



Robotics



Selected Themes in Social Science



Software Applications



World Languages I
-
VI


8


ENGINEERING

&
INDUSTRIAL
TECHNOLOGY


This ca
reer area
relates to design, development, installation or maintenance of physical systems.
Occupations involve responsibility for engineering and structural design in the manufacture, construction
or transportation of products or utilities.


STUDENTS MIGHT CONSID
ER THIS CAREER PATH IF THEY:




Enjoy building things



Prefer math and science



Enjoy design projects



Like research



Are detail oriented



Enjoy working as part of a team



Enjoy problem solving



POSSIBLE CAREER OPPORTUNITIES INCLUDE:


Engineer, (Aeronautical, Pet
roleum, Nuclear, Plastics, Chemical, Aerospace, Civil, Mechanical),
Architect, Drafter/Designer, Health & Safety Inspector, Robotics, Astronaut, Computer Networking
Manager, Air Traffic Control, Electrician, Civil Engineer, CAD/CAM, Diesel Mechanic, Plumbe
r,
Carpenter, Mason, Machine Operator & Systems Administration.



ELECTIVES TO CONSIDE
R:


All Chemistry classes

All Physics classes

Architectural Research & Development

Art I

Beaver County Career & Technical Center (BCCTC)

CAD I & II

Custom
Manufacturing I & II

Graphics &
Web Page
Design

Introduction to Technology

& Engineering

Materials Processing

Mathematics (
H
ighe
st

L
evels
)

Calculus
/AP Calculus; Business Calculus

Mechatronics I & II

Robotics

World Languages






9


HUMAN SERVICES


Human
services ca
reer
s

require skills and experiences related to meeting family and human needs. These
occupations include positions of high responsibility in caring for the personal needs and welfare of others
in social service and education.


STUDENTS MIGHT

CONSIDER THIS CAREER PATH IF THEY:




They are interested in caring for people



Enjoy communicating with others



Like serving others’ needs



Enjoy helping people reach their potential



Like to work with people of all ages



Are tolerant of differences among peopl
e



Are patient


POSSIBLE CAREER OPPORTUNITIES INCLUDE:


College Professor, Principal, Teacher, Marriage and Family Therapist, Psychologist, Recreation
Therapist, Athletic Trainer, Athletic Agent, Park Ranger, FBI Agent, Crime Lab Technician, Massage
Therapist, Cosmetologist, Travel Agent, Armed Services, Post Service Worker, Fire Fighter, Personal
Trainer, Health Services Manager, Music Therapist, Social Worker, Counselor, Funeral Director, Meeting

and Convention Planner, Customs Inspector, Police Off
icer.



ELECTIVES TO CONSIDE
R:


Advanced Sciences

Beaver County Career & Technical Programs

Business Law

Chil
d Development
&

Family Living

Chor
us

Drama and Theatre

English/Grammar Composition

Foods I & II

Human Anatomy/Physiology

Instrumental

Musi
c

Living on Your Own

Mathematics (Highe
st

Levels) Calculus/AP Calculus; Business Calculus

MultiMedia Design

Psychology

Sociology

Software Applications

World Languages


10


SCIENCE and HEALTH


Students with interest in the life, physical and behavioral
sciences may find this area rewarding. It
involves the planning, managing, and providing of therapeutic services, diagnostic services, health
information and biochemistry research and development.




STUDENTS MIGHT CONSIDER THIS CAREER PATH IF THEY:




Are
interested in the health care environment



Are interested in environmental issues



Enjoy working in science and experimentation



Like working outdoors



Enjoy interacting with and assisting people



Are conscientious and dependable



POSSIBLE CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

INCLUDE:


Physician, Athletic Trainer, Biologist, Chemist, Farmer, Lab Technician, Medical Researcher, Nursing,
Anesthesiology, Anesthetist, Occupational/Physical Therapist, Dietician, Animal Caretaker, Wildlife
Reserve Worker, Zoo Caretaker, Optician, He
althcare Technicians, Dental Hygienist, Pharmacist,
Pharmacy Assistant, Fish & Game Worker, Respiratory Therapist, Chiropractor, Agronomist,
Geographer, Marine Biologist, Veterinarian, Geneticist, Statistician, Zoologist, Ecologist, Pathologist,
Meteorolog
ist, Physicist.




ELECTIVES TO CONSIDE
R:


Advanced
and AP
Biology

Advanced

and AP

Chemistry

Advanced
and AP
Physics

AP Statistics

Astronomy/Oceanography

Beaver County Career & Technical Programs

Child Development & Family Living

English/Grammar
Composition

Environmental Science

Foods I & II

Human Anatomy

and
Physiology

Mathematics (Highest Levels)

Psychology

Sociology

Software Applications

World Languages



11


National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA)

Academic Standards for the
Student Athlete

Website Address:
www.ncaa.org






What is the NCAA?

The NCAA, or National Collegiate Athletic Association, was established in 1906 and serves as
the athletics governing body for more than
1,300 colleges,
universities, c
onferences and
organizations. The national office is in Indianapolis, but the member colleges and universities
develop the rules and guidelines for athletics eligibility and athletics competition for each of the
three NCAA divisions. The NC
AA is committed to the student
-
athlete and to governing
competition in a fair, safe, inclusive and sportsmanlike manner.




What is the NCAA Eligibility Center?

The NCAA Eligibility Center will certify the Academic and amateur credentials of all
college
-
bound student
-
athletes who wish to compete in NCAA Division I or II athletics. To assist with
this process, the Eligibility Center staff is

eager to foster a cooperative e
nvironment of education
and partnership with high schools, high school coach
es and college
-
bound student
-
athletes.




To be eligible to play at the Division 1 or Division 2 level
s, high school students must
graduate
high school
with a set of specific “core courses”, SAT scores, and
Percentage

A
verage
.
It is the
student’s responsibi
lity to make sure they are enrolled in enough “core courses” to be
eligible to play college sports.

Ultimately, the
individual
student
-
athlete is responsible for
achieving and protecting his or her eligibility status.

If there are a
ny questions or
concerns
regarding this process,

please see your guidance counselor.




Students who intend to participate in Division 1 or Divi
sion 2 college
-
level athletics s
hould go
online and review all eligibility requirements of the NCAA.

Students may access the Elig
ibility
Center’s resource page on our website at
www.ncaa.org
, clicking on “Resources” and then
selecting the type of student you are. Students can navigate through the resources to find helpful
information and
complete

their registration online
.

There is a fee to register.
Important
:
Print
two (2) copies of the “Transcript Release Form” and submit them to the
G
uidance
O
ffice
. While
online, view or print a copy of the “NCAA Guide for the College
-
Bound
-
Student
-
Athlete”.




Students who will be registering at the Eligibility Center should
register

to take the SAT

exam

in
the spring of their junior year. Online registration for
the SAT is available at
www.collegeboard.com
. During registration for the SAT, students should send an “Additional
Report” of their scores to the Clearinghouse


this is free to do when you register for the SAT.

T
he additional
R
eport

C
ode

for the
NCAA

is


9999
.




The
CEEB #

or
School Code

for Central Valley High School is


392
-
693
.





NCAA Eligibility to participate in college athletics is not determined until after high

school
graduation.




12


CENTRAL

VALLEY HIGH SCHOOL

D
ual Enrollment Program


Central Valley School District

is committed in preparing our students for post
-
secondary education. Dual
Enrollment allows schools to partner with eligible post
-
secondary partners to offer juniors and seniors
an
opportunity to earn college credit while completing their high school requirements.


ELIGIBILITY
:


1.

S
tudent must be a high school junior or senior
. Acceptance will be based on college admission’s standard
GPA.

2.

Must be able to provide own
transportation.

3.

Student must have the class time and days approved with his/her guidance counselor and a modified high
school schedule must be pre
-
arranged with the counselor prior to the official college course enrollment.
Student must also meet the indi
vidual post
-
secondary institution admission requirements for dual
enrollment.

4.

In order to remain in this program, the student must maintain a minimum
7
0
%

in each dually
-
enrolled
course.

5.

It is the student’s responsibility to
secure

a copy of the college tra
nscript
for

the
college admissions
process.


Dual Enrollment credits taken off
-
campus at local colleges will
not

factor into a student’s high school
percentage average

or class rank.

Students who are eligible, and register for a post
-
secondary course, must be
committed to the Dual Enrollment Program and follow the policies and timelines of each institution for class
registration/withdrawal.

Central Valley High School

offers a wide r
ange of courses for students. Students are
encouraged to take advantage of our many electives particularly in the arts, humanities, family and consumer
sciences and business departments.

For additional information and or
Dual Enrollment
F
orms
, please set

up an
appointment with your
high school guidance
counselor.



SAT Prep Course


This SAT Prep course, in conjunction with Regional Choice Initiative (RCI)
,

is designed to prepare students to take
the SAT exam.


Students will utilize a variety of resources:


su
ch as SAT preparation workbooks

and other
resources. The topics covered will reinforce/supplement concepts the students are learning in their core Math
ematics
and English courses.


These concepts will align with the eligible contents that will be assessed on the SAT exam.
Test taking strategies will also be taught. Students will be given the opportunity to gauge their progress and predict
their success o
n the SAT exam by using assessments.



This course will be offered as a five (5) or six (6)
-
week
course at Central Valley High School on Saturday mornings, in January and February, for students planning to take
the SAT Test.


C
entral Valley Cyber Academy


Central Valley High School offers a full cyber curriculum for our students.


Students may take cyber classes through
our complete cyber curriculum or a blended cyber/traditional model.


Cyber services are offered on an individual
basis based upon the stude
nt’s needs.


Our curriculum is built to mirror our current traditional courses.


Students
attending the Central Valley Cyber Academy will be held to the same academic standards as all Central Valley High
School students.


They will be able to participate i
n all school activities, and earn a Central Valley High School
diploma.


Students interested in our Cyber Academy option will work closely with their guidance counselor to
arrange their class schedule.



For more detailed information, please visit our scho
ol website at
www.centralvalleysd.org.


13


SUGGESTIONS FOR STUDENTS INTERESTED IN A

VOCATIONAL / TECHNICAL EDUCATION



The Beaver County Career & Technology Center (BCCTC)

is an off
-
campus extension
of
Central Valley High School

offering training in vocational and technical programs to meet the
needs of the employment community. This training will develop skills and attitudes for
employment or further education beyond high school, including certificate, associate and
baccalaurea
te degrees.



1.

Students are enrolled in a two
-
year training program offered in their junior and senior year;
students spend half a day at the BCCTC and the remainder of the day at
Central Valley
High School

where they are enrolled in courses required for graduation.


2.

The
Cosmetology program

is the
only program

at the BCCTC that requires a student to
begin as a
10th grader
. This is necessary in order to insure that students have ample time in
which to acc
umulate the 1250 hours needed for certification as mandated by the
Pennsylvania State Board of Cosmetology. Because a student must begin the BCCTC as a
10th grader, it is very important that they set up an appointment with their counselor to
make sure all

graduation requirements will be met.


3.

Students attending the BCCTC will graduate with a
Central Valley

diploma; additionally,
the student will also receive a certificate from the BCCTC, that documents their hours in
training and the skills that have be
en developed.


4.

There are
1
8

program offerings

at the BCCTC. Any student enrolling must have
completed the 10
th

grade. Students must have the recommendation of the school district
before entering the BCCTC.


5.

All students attending the BCCTC are buss
ed to and from
Central Valley High School
.


6.

Lunch for the BCCTC student is provided at
Central Valley High School
.


7.

Due to strict credit requirements for graduation, students failing a required course may not
be able to attend the BCCTC unless they a
ttend summer school.


8.

Courses available at
Central Valley High School

for the BCCTC student are very limited.
A student desiring to schedule an additional major subject in Grades 11 or 12 should
consult with their assigned counselor.

9.

Students missing 20 days of excused or unexcused absences may be withdrawn from the
BCCTC and placed back in courses at
Central Valley High School
. Parents need to request
an Exemption. This exemption request must contain documentation showing extenuatin
g
circumstances.





14


LANGUAGE ARTS


Required Courses
(5 Credits Required for Graduation)



English 9 (Introduction to Literature)
-

Grade 9



English 10 (World Literature)
-

Grade 10



English 11 (American Literature)
-

Grade 11



AP English 11 (American
Literature)


Grade 11



English 12 (British Literature) or AP English 12
-

Grade 12



Speech
-

Grade 12


Elective Courses



English Composition / Grammar
-

Grades 11
-
12



Journalism I


Grades 10
-

12



Journalism II


Grades 10
-

12



Journalism III / IV


Grades 11
-
12



Classics
on

Film
-

Grades 11
-
12


Starting with the Class of 2015, a
ll Advanced Placement (AP) offerings are based on Advanced Placement/College
Board curriculum approval

and will have an added value of 1% to their cumulative average per AP course taken.

Students taking AP courses will be required to take the AP Exam.


Course Descriptors


English 9

(Introduction to Literature): Grade 9



Prerequisites:

o

None



Recommendations:

o

None


Students are introduced to literature elements and terminology within the various genres of literature:
short story, poetry, drama, and the novel. Emphasis will be placed on the five
-

paragraph essay, the
writing process, grammar
, revision, and introduction to revision strategies, along with reading
comprehension, vocabulary, and PSSA preparation. Students will participate in class discussions, group
activities, presentations, and technology.


English 10


(World Literature): Gra
de 10



Prerequisites:

o


English 9



Recommendations:

o


None


English 10 deals with all aspects of language arts, reinforcing the literary elements and terminology
within the genres of literature: the short story, poetry, drama, and the novel. PSSA writing, grammar,
and revision skills as applied to the writing pro
cess, along with reading comprehension and vocabulary
will be highlighted. The student will participate in class discussions, group activities, presentations, and
use of technology.



15


English 11


(American
Literature):
Grade 11



Prerequisites:

o


English 10




Recommendations:

o


None


Designed for the 11
th

grade student, this course focuses on American literature as it relates to its historical
era in order to correlate the time period with the text. Literary analysis, reading comprehension, the
writing proces
s, PSSA preparation, classroom discussion, presentations, critical thinking skills, and
vocabulary development will be highlighted during this course of study. Students will be familiarized
with major American authors and literary movements.


AP
English
11


(American
Literature):
Grade 11



Prerequisites:

o

Successful completion of English 10. Interested students will be required to submit an
essay on an assigned topic prior to acceptance into the class.



Recommendations:

o


Students enrolling in the AP course should have an
85%

average or better.


This course fulfills the 11
th

grade English requirement for students who demonstrate an exceptional
interest in, and commitment, to the study of American Literature. It is a mor
e challenging and rigorous
course of study governed by the AP Standards.


English 12


(British Literature):
Grade 12



Prerequisites:

o


English 11



Recommendations:

o


None


This course fulfills the 12
th

grade English requirement for students, both college
-
bound and non
-
college
-
bound. Designed for the 12
th

grade student, this course features a study of British literary works in
historical perspective, presented in a course anthology. Additionally, stud
ents will engage in writing
research, speaking, and critical thinking skills. This course will enable students to trace the roots of the
American literature experience to its British literature foundations.


AP English 12


(British Literature)
:


Grade 12
(option)



Prerequisites:

o

English 11. Interested students will be required to submit an essay on an assigned topic
prior to acceptance into the class.



Recommendations:

o

Students enrolling in the AP course should have an
85%

average or better.


This course

fulfills the 12
th

grade English requirement for students who demonstrate an exceptional
interest in and commitment to the study of British literature. It is a more challenging and rigorous course
of study governed by the AP standards.


16


Speech
:
Grade 12

-

Required



Prerequisites:

o

None



Recommendations:

o

None


This course focuses on clear communication and the art of rhetoric in terms of improving
students’ listening, speaking, verbal, and non
-
verbal interactions with others. Activities will
range and buil
d from the informal and/or simple to the lengthier and /or more formal
presentation styles. Throughout the various speaking opportunities, students will learn about the
psychology behind creating their appeals as well as using logic to express their ideas

coherently.
Types of projects may include dramatic readings, persuasive presentations, mock job interviews,
analysis of works of art, and/or using computers to create visual aids to supplement
presentations.



Composition/Grammar
:

Grade
s

10
-
12



Prerequ
isites:

o

None



Recommendations:

o

None


The purpose of this course is to give the student a better understanding of the relationships that
exist between and among words in sentences, a keener interest in the precise meaning of words,
fewer errors in usage, skills in mechanics, and as a result, g
reater facility in expressing thoughts.
Basic English grammar will be studied. While most students profit greatly from practice in basic
grammatical concepts, it should be understood that the emphasis for the course is composition.
Research writing will
be taught as a separate unit along with a variety of writing formats. Topics
covered will be valuable in preparation for the SAT.



Journalism I
:
Grade
s 10
-
12



Prerequisites:

o

None



Recommendations:

o

Students should have an 80% or higher average in prior Eng
lish courses


This course is intended for students who desire to explore the art of reporting and the profession
of journalism. Students receive instruction in all areas of journalism needed to pursue staff
positions of the school newspaper. Among the area
s covered are press law, interviewing, beat
reporting, feature writing, news stories, editorials, layout design, and journalistic ethics. This
course includes reading models of journalistic techniques and evaluates and analyzes journalistic
writing through

discussions and critiques.




17


Journalism II
:
Grades
10
-
12



Prerequisites:

o

Journalism I



Recommendations:

o

None


This course is intended for students who desire to plan, write, publish, and distribute a school newspaper.
After completing Journalism I, each Journalism II student will be assigned an editorial position on the
school newspaper. The newspaper staff will plan each issue, write and edit stories, write headlines and
photo captions, layout and paste up pages, take
and process photographs, and manage the business aspects
of newspaper production. Students must work as a team to create a scholastic publication.



Journalism III
:

Grades 11
-
12



Prerequisites:

o

Journalism I, Journalism II



Recommendations:

o

Teacher approv
al



After completing Journalism II, students who have demonstrated exceptional organizational and
technological skills will be assigned an executive editorial position on the school newspaper staff.
Journalism II s
tudents will
assist

in the planning, writing, publishing, and distribution of the school
newspaper.


Journalism IV
: Grades 11
-
12



Prerequisites:

o

Journalism I, Journalism II



Recommendations:

o

Teacher approval



After completing Journalism III, students who have
demonstrated exceptional organizational and
technological skills will be assigned an executive editorial position on the school newspaper staff.
Journalism III s
tudents will assist in the planning, writing, publishing, and distribution of the school
newsp
aper.


Classics
on

Film
:
Grade
s

11
-
12



Prerequisites:

o

None



Recommendations:

o

None


Designed as an elective for 11
th

and 12
th

graders, this course introduces selected classic novels to
students through the written text in comparison to the film adaptation, dramatic interpretation of film,
and the craft of film
-
making. For example, selections might include items such as
Citizen
Kane
, the
American Film Institute’s all
-
time top film, and others displaying innovative film techniques,
outstanding performance, award
-
winning screenplays, and adaptations of text.


18


SOCIAL STUDIES


Core Courses (4 Credits Required for Graduation)



Civics and Pennsylvania History
-

Grade 9



World History
-

Grade 10



American History
-

Grade 11

/
or

AP U.S. History
-

Grade 11 (This is an E2020 Cyber
C
ourse)



Economics and Government
-

Grade 12


Elective Courses



Geography
-

Grades 9
-
12



Sociology
-

Grades 10
-
12



Selected Themes in Social Science
-

Grades 11
-
12



Psychology
-

Grade 12 (College
-
in
-
High School Credit)



The History and Perspectives of the Holocaust



Cyber AP U.S. History



Course Descriptors



Civics and Pennsylvania History

Grade 9



Prerequisites:

o


None



Recommendations:

o


None


This course examines the political structure of the United States, concentrating on, but not limited to, the
principles and documents of government, rights and responsibilities of citizenship, how the governme
nt
works, and international relations. Pennsylvania history will begin with an introduction to basic economic
principles and cover the early development of state government, industry and various other socio
-
economic issues and institutions particular to th
e Commonwealth of Pennsylvania and the United States.
This course is taught within the guidelines of the Pennsylvania Academic Standards for History and
Civics/Government.



World History

Grade 10



Prerequisites:

o


None



Recommendations:

o


Successful completion of Grade 9 required social studies course


This course examines the political and cultural contributions of individuals and groups, including, but not
limited to, inhabitants, political leaders, and reformers. In addition, primary do
cuments, artifacts and
historical places will be studied as well as their impact on history. There will also be a part of the course
focusing on how continuity and change have influenced history as well as conflict and cooperation among
social groups and o
rganizations. This course is taught within the guidelines of the Pennsylvania Academic
Standards for History.




19


American History

Grade 11



Prerequisites:

o


None



Recommendations:

o


Successful completion of Grade 10 required social studies course


The course

is designed to show the contributions that individuals and groups made to the development of our
country from 1865 to the late 20
th

Century. It will emphasize historical places, documents, and artifacts of the
time period. Applying historical thinking ski
lls, each student will see the importance of conflict and
cooperation and the influence of continuity and change on the people of the United States. This course is
taught within the guidelines of the Pennsylvania Academic Standards for History.


AP U.S.

Hi
story

Grade 11
(This is an E2020 Cyber course)



Prerequisites:

o


Successful completion of
World History
-

Grade

10.




Recommendations:

o


Students enrolling in the AP course should have an
85%

average or better.


AP U.S. History is a college
-
level course that prepares students for the Advanced Placement U.S. History
Exam. This fast
-
paced, upper
-
level course is designed for highly motivated students. This course is a survey
of American History from the Age of Expl
oration and Discovery to the present. Emphasis is placed on critical
and evaluative thinking skills, essay writing, interpretation of original documents, and historiography.
Students will demonstrate comprehension of a broad body of historical knowledge;
express ideas clearly in
writing; work with classmates to research an historical issue; interpret and apply data from original documents;
identify underrepresented historical viewpoints; write to persuade with evidence; compare and contrast
alternate inte
rpretations of an historical figure, event, or trend; explain how an historical event connects to or
causes a larger trend or theme; develop essay responses that
include a clear, defensible thesis statement and
supporting evidence; effectively argue a position on an historical issue; critique and respond to arguments
made by others; raise and explore questions about policies, institutions, beliefs, and actions in a
n historical
context; evaluate primary materials, such as historical documents, political cartoons, and first
-
person
narratives; evaluate secondary materials, such as scholarly works or statistical analyses; and assess the
historical significance and cultu
ral impact of key literary works (e.g.
Common Sense, Uncle Tom’s Cabin
).



Economics and Government

Grade 12



Prerequisites:

o


None



Recommendations:

o


Successful completion of Grade 11 required social studies course


The economics section of the course add
resses economic systems, markets, the role of government in the
economy, scarcity, choice, global economic interdependence, work, and earnings. The government section of
the course addresses principles of government, major documents of American government,

the rights and
responsibilities of citizens, the functions of government, and international relations. This course is taught
within the guidelines of the Pennsylvania Academic Standards for Economics and Civics/Government.


Geography

Grades 9
-
1
2




Prerequisites:

o


Students must have a 70% or higher grade average in prior social studies courses.



Recommendations:

o


None


20


This is an elective social studies course for grades 9 through 12. The course focuses on the five
fundamental themes in geography;
location, place, human
-
environment interaction, movement, and
region. Students will analyze how physical and human characteristics define and distinguish an area. In
addition, basic geographic literacy skills will be stressed. The course is taught within t
he guidelines of the
Pennsylvania academic standards for geography.


Sociology

Grades 10
-
1
2




Prerequisites:

o


Students must have a 70% or higher grade average in prior social studies courses.



Recommendations:

o


None


This course examines societies in gen
eral with a focus on society within the United States. The course
covers the sociological perspective, global cultures, social stratification, and social movements. The
course contains both a national and a global perspective, looking at how these issues i
mpact the world’s
societies. The class places an emphasis on developing the skills necessary to complete the required
research paper on a topic related to the course content. The course is taught within the guidelines of the
Pennsylvania Academic Standards
.


Selected T
hemes

in
Social Science
:

Grades 11
-
12



Prerequisites:

o


Students must have a 75% or higher grade average in prior social studies courses.



Recommendations:

o


None


This is an elective social studies course for grades 11 and 12. The course will

examine various topics in
the Social Sciences. The class will explore themes from the study of Archaeology, Criminology, Culture,
Demography, Economics, Education, History, International Relations, Law, Political Science, Religion,
and Technology in Socie
ty. Topics within these areas will be examined through reading assignments,
lectures, audio
-
visual materials, online sources of information, and class discussions. The class places an
emphasis on teaching students how to use technology for academic work an
d on developing research
skills required for success in college.

Psychology

Grade 12

(College
-
in
-
High
-
School Credit)



Prerequisites:

o


Students must have a 75% or higher grade average in prior social studies courses.



Recommendations:

o


None


The course introduces the concepts and methods used by psychologists to study behavior and mental
processes. Important findings and applications from psychology’s subdivisions are covered. How we
learn and remember, the role of the nervous system in behavi
or, and the nature of stress and coping are
among the topics considered.
This course can be taken for College
-
in
-
High
-
School credit.


The History and Perspectives of the Holocaust
: Grades 11
-
12

This course will encompass topics from 1933
-
1945 and the
events leading up to this era, as well as topics
related to genocide throughout history.


Themes will include, but are not limited to:


leaders, women,
children, heroes, victims, and the countries involved.


Instructional methods will incorporate novels,
l
ectures, films, and guest speakers.


Emphasis will be placed on current world issues and how they have
been impacted by the Holocaust.


21


SCIENCE


Required Courses

(4 Credits Required for Graduation)



Earth Science



Biology I/Lab



Choice of
:

Chemistry I/Lab, Physics I/Lab, Conceptual Chemistry or
Conceptual

Physics



Any elective listed below


Elective Courses



Biology II/Lab



Advanced Biology/Lab



AP Biology/Lab



Conceptual Chemistry


(Optional Requirement)



Chemistry I/Lab


(Optional Requirement)



Chemistry II/Lab



Advanced Chemistry/Lab



AP Chemistry/Lab



Conceptual Physics


(Optional Requirement)



Physics

I

/Lab



(Optional Requirement)



Physics II/Lab



Advanced
Physics /Lab



AP Physics/Lab



Astronomy/Oceanography



Environmental



AP Environmental/Lab



Human Anatomy & Physiology/Lab



Human Genetics


Starting with the Class of 2015, a
ll Advanced Placement (AP) offerings are based on Advanced Placement/College
Board curriculum approval

and will have an added value of 1% to their cumulative average per AP course taken.

Students taking AP courses will be required to take the AP Exam.


Course Descriptors


Earth Science: Grade 9

-

Required



Prerequisites:

o


None



Recommendations:

o


None

This
course will be separated into two major units: one on meteorology and one on geology. In
meteorology, the focus will be on the structure and composition of the atmosphere as well as how gases
cycle within our atmosphere. The production of energy from the
sun and stars will be related to the
various types of electromagnetic radiation. The processes of evaporation and condensation as they
pertain to the hydrologic cycle and the how these processes interact with the oceans will also be
discussed. In geology,

the use of topographic maps will be studied. In addition, plate tectonics and the
composition of the earth, rocks and minerals, and earth history will be explored.


22


Astronomy/Oceanography
:


G
rade
s

10
-
12



Prerequisites:

o

70%

average or better in
Algebra I or

Foundations of Algebra I



and
Earth
Science



Recommendations:

o


None


This course will examine the fields of Astronomy and Oceanography. In Astronomy, earth’s place in
space will be explored. An in
-
depth look will be taken at the sun, moon, planets

and stars. Light,
telescopes and the history of the space program will also be studied. In Oceanography, the properties of
the ocean and ocean water will be examined. Tides, waves, currents, and the structure of the sea floor will
also be studied. In addi
tion, the processes of weathering and erosion as it pertains to water, glaciers, wind,
and waves will be discussed.


Environmental Science/Lab
:


Gra
de
s

10
-
12



Prerequisites:

o


None



Recommendations:

o


None


Environmental science is a comprehensive curriculum
which emphasizes critical thinking, environmental
responsibility, and global awareness. This program is designed to provide students with a balanced
approach to the diverse study of the environment including topics such as watersheds and wetlands,
renewab
le and nonrenewable resources, environmental health, agriculture and society, integrated pest
management, ecosystems and their interactions, threatened/endangered/extinct species, humans and their
impact on the environment, and environmental laws and regul
ations. The goal is to provide an up to date
introductory global view of essential themes in environmental science with emphasis on details and case
studies that help students process and retain general principles of ecology while challenging the students
to think globally but act locally for the social, moral, and political issues concerning our environment.
Students will develop the science background they need to analyze for themselves many of the
contemporary topics regarding natural and human
-
caused st
resses put on our natural world.


AP Environmental/Lab
:

G
rade
s

11
-
12



Prerequisites:

o

Environmental Science



Recommendations:

o

Students enrolling in the AP course should have an
85%

average or better.


The goal of the AP Environmental Science course is to provide students with the scientific principles,
concepts, and methodologies required to understand the interrelationships of the natural world, to identify
and analyze environmental problems both natur
al and human
-
made, to evaluate the relative risks
associated with these problems, and to examine alternative solutions for resolving or preventing them.
Environmental science is interdisciplinary; it embraces a wide variety of topics from different areas
of
study. Yet there are several major unifying constructs, or themes, that cut across the many topics included
in the study of environmental science.




23


The following themes provide a foundation for the structure of the AP Environmental Science course.




Science is a process.



Energy conversions underlie all ecological processes.



T
he Earth itself is one interconnected system.



Humans alter natural systems.



Environmental problems have a cultural and social context.



Human survival depends on developing practic
es that will achieve sustainable systems.



Biology I/Lab
:

G
rade
s

9
-
10

-

Required



Prerequisites:

o


None



Recommendations:

o


None


Biology I offers students, who plan to enter post
-
secondary education, the opportunity to study the core
elements of living
organisms. As the course progresses, students will build on fundamental scientific
principles in scientific problems solving and biochemistry to discover the processes that are vital for the
existence of all living creatures. Some essential cell processe
s that will be studied in detail include cell
structure, biochemistry, photosynthesis, cellular respiration, and genetics. Students that participate in this
course will periodically be challenged to think critically on how societies deal with current know
ledge
gained through science that can lead to ethical controversies and problems.



Biology II/Lab
:

Grades 10
-
12



Prerequisites:

o


70% average or better in
Biology I



Recommendations:

o


70%
average or better in
Algebra I or
Foundations of Algebra I


Biology I
I lays a foundation for the basic understanding of our world’s living organisms. Throughout this
course students will appreciate fundamental scientific processes and principles, as well as understand the
characteristics of life and the relationships share
d between all organisms. The core emphasis of Biology
II is to study the diversity of life on Earth as students explore the living kingdoms in a progression from
simple to complex. Students will examine the realm of living organisms beginning with the mo
st
primitive bacteria, proceeding through protists, fungi, plants, and the variety of invertebrate and
vertebrate animals, culminating with the study of chordates. This is to be a lab
-
oriented class involving
both microscopic examinations and gross anatom
y. Dissections of various specimens in a variety of
phyla will be an integral portion of this course.






24


Advanced Biology/Lab: Grades 11
-
12



Prerequisites:

o

Biology II and Chemistry I



Recommendations:

o

Geometry or
Foundations of Geometry

o

Chemistry II

o

Students enrolling in the AP course should have an
85%

average or better.


This course will cover those topics regularly covered in a college biology course for biology
majors. The college course in biology differs significantly from the Biology II

with respect to
the kind of textbook used, the range and depth of topics covered, the type

of laboratory work
done by students, and the time and effort required of students. The

Advanced Biology course is
designed to be the equivalent of the first semest
er college

introductory biology course usually
taken by biology majors during their first year of

college.


This class is designed to help
students develop a conceptual framework for modern biology and an appreciation of science as a
process. The followi
ng major themes will be covered in order to prepare students for taking the
AP Biology course:






Science as a Process



Evolution



Energy Transfer



Continuity and Change




AP Biology/Lab
:

G
rade
s

11
-
12



Prerequisites:

o

Advanced Biology



Recommendations:

o


Students enrolling in the AP course should have an
85%

average or better.


The AP Biology/Lab course is designed to be the equivalent of the second
-
semester college
introductory biology course usually taken by biology majors during their first year

of c
ollege.

It
aims to provide students with the conceptual framework, factual

knowledge, and analytical
skills necessary to deal critically with the rapidly changing

science of biology. The following
major themes will be covered in order to prepare student
s for taking the AP Biology/Lab exam:






Relationship of Structure to Function



Regulation



Interdependence in Nature



Science, Technology, and Society






25


Human Anatomy & Physiology/Lab
:

G
rade
s

10
-
12



Prerequisites:

o

70%
average or better in
Earth Science an
d

Biology I



Recommendations:

o

Chemistry I or Descriptive Chemistry


This course is a college level course that offers an in
-
depth study of the anatomy and physiology of the
human body. The course encompasses the 11 systems of the human body, common diseases and
dysfunctions, and the chemistry and cell physiology necessary

to understand biological processes within
the human body. Also covered are some common treatments and medications, life styles and living habits
that will emphasize a healthful living. Students will learn through diverse methods including
presentations
of classroom materials, lab exercises including dissections of animals for comparison, and
online interactive activities.




Chemistry I/Lab
:

G
rade
s

10
-
12



Optional Requirement



Prerequisites:

o


70%

average or better in
Algebra I or
Foundations of
Algebra I



Recommendations:

o


None


This course is designed to enable the students to attain a depth of understanding of fundamentals and a
reasonable competence in dealing with chemical problems. The course contributes to the development of
the students’ ab
ilities to think clearly and to express their ideas, orally and in writing, with clarity and
logic. This course gives an introduction to the structure and properties of atoms, molecules, and ions,
stoichiometry; electronic structure of the atoms, periodic
properties of the elements; chemical bonding;
molecular geometry and bonding theories; intermolecular forces, liquids, and solids; basic fundamentals
of properties of solutions. Teaching methods include interactive lecture, discussion, demonstration,
comp
uter simulation, laboratory work, and group work.




Chemistry II/Lab
:


G
rade
s

10
-
12



Prerequisites:

o


70%
average or better in Chemistry I



Recommendations:

o


Foundations of Geometry


This course continues the development of the students’ abilities to think
clearly and to express their ideas,
as well as develop their math skills. This course covers chemical principles such as thermochemistry,
gases and gas laws; liquids, and solids; properties of solutions; calories, and heat of chemical reactions;
redox chem
istry; and organic chemistry. Teaching methods include interactive lecture, discussion,
demonstration, computer simulation, laboratory work, and group work
.





26


Conceptual
Chemistry
/Lab
: Grades 10
-
12



Optional Requirement



Prerequisites:

o

None


This course is designed to introduce students to the basic concepts, procedures, and applications of
physics to the world in which they live while familiarizing them to some basic laboratory skills,
techniques, and equipment commonly used in experimental s
cientific investigations. This course covers
similar concepts as Physics I and II with less emphasis on mathematical problem solving.
This course
offers a descriptive treatment of the basic principles of classical physics, such as motion, energy, sound,
li
ght, electricity and thermal physics.


Teaching methods include interactive lecture, discussion,
demonstration, computer simulation, laboratory work, and group work.


Advanced Chemistry/Lab
: Grades 11
-
12






Prerequisites:


o

Chemistry I

and II
/Lab

o

Students enrolling in the AP course should have an 85% average or better.


Advanced Chemistry is designed to offer a
more in depth presentation of atomic nature of matter,
chemical behavior, bonding theory, quantum theory,

stoichiometry and gas laws.

This

course covers the
chemistry and chemical principles typical of first semester college

and university general chemistry
courses. Students learn the usefulness and relevance of

chemistry
in both their intended areas of study
and in the everyday world.
This course is designed to enable the students to attain a depth of
understanding of fundamentals and a reasonable competence in dealing with chemical problems. The
course contributes to the development of the students’ abilities to think clearly and to ex
press their ideas,
orally and in writing, with clarity and logic.


AP Chemistry/Lab:
Grades 11
-
12



Prerequisites:


o

Advanced
Chemis
try



Recommendations:

o

Students enrolling in the AP course should have an 85% average or better.


AP Chemistry is designed to offer a rigorous and challenging course that covers the chemistry and
chemical principles typical of college and university general chemistry courses. Students learn the
usefulness and relevance of chemistry in both their intend
ed areas of study and in the everyday world.
This course is designed to enable the students to attain a depth of understanding of fundamentals and a
reasonable competence in dealing with chemical problems. The course contributes to the development of
the
students’ abilities to think clearly

and to express their ideas, orally and in writing, with clarity and
logic. This course provides a rigorous treatment of college
-
level chemistry with such topics as:




kinetics



equilibrium



electrochemistry



organic
chemistry



thermodynamics


Emphasis on problem solving and extensive laboratory work prepare students for the AP examination in
chemistry.



27


Conceptual

Physics:

Grades 10
-
12

-

Optional Requirement



Prerequisites:

o


None


This course introduces students to the basic concepts and principles of physics through classroom
explanations and demonstrations, interactive lecture, lab work and group work, and hands
-
on
activities. This course offers a
descriptive treatment of the basi
c principles of classical physics.
Motion, energy, properties of matter, sound, electricity and thermal physics are treated in a
conceptual, largely non
-

mathematical format.
Students will learn how physics concepts apply to the
world around them and how p
hysics really is an integral part of their daily lives.



Physics I/Lab: G
rades 10
-
12



Optional Requirement



Prerequisites:

o

70 % average or better in Algebra II or Foundations of Algebra II



Recommendations:

o

70% average or better in Trig/Pre
-
Calculus


Through theory and laboratory practices, the student will learn the meaning of fundamental
measurement, acquire these measurements, and analyze their significance to a precise value.
Mechanics will be studied thoroughly. The concepts of velocity and accele
ration will be
specifically applied to a body moving in a straight path, curved path and as a projectile. Both
linear and rotary motion will be covered in terms of the unbalanced force causing the motion.
This course will terminate with the application of
forces in work, power and the Conservation of
Energy Principle.

Teaching methods include interactive lecture, discussion
, demonstration
,
computer simulation, laboratory work, and group work.


Physics II/Lab: Grades 10
-
12



Prerequisites:

o

70 % average or bet
ter in Physics I



Recommendations:

o

none


As with Physics I, this course includes laboratory work and stresses the solution of

problems and
analysis of data.
The Conservation of Energy Principle will be stressed as the fundamental
principle involved in
ther
mal and wave energy exchange
. The effect of heat energy will be
discussed as related to solids, liquids and gases. The course will include a study of wave energy
as related to sound and light waves. The student will study the basic concepts of physics opti
cs,
which will include reflection, refraction, diffraction and polarization. Basic electricity will also
be covered with an emphasis on electrostatics, direct current circuits, alternating current and
electromagnetism.

Teaching methods include interactive

lecture, discussion
, demonstration
,
computer simulation, laboratory work, and group work.





28


Advanced
Physics/Lab: Grades 11
-
12

(fall semester only)



Prerequisites:

o

Physics I and

Physics

II/Lab



Recommendations:

o

Students enrolling in the AP course should have an 85% average or better.


Advanced Physics is designed to offer a more in
-
depth presentation of Newtonian Mechanics,
Fluid Mechanics, and Thermal Physics. This course provides a rigorous treatment of coll
ege
-
level physics. St
udents learn the usefulness and relevance of
physics

in both their intended areas
of study and in the everyday world
.

The course contributes to the development of the students’
abilities to think clearly and to express their ideas,
orally and in writing, with clarity and logic.
Emphasis on problem solving and extensive laboratory work prepare students for the AP
Physics
B course
.



AP Physics B/Lab: G
rades 11
-
12

(spring semester only)



Prerequisites:

o

Advanced Physics



Recommendations:

o

Students enrolling in the AP course should have an 85% average or better.


AP
Physics

is designed to offer a rigorous
treatment of college
-
level physics
.
It will continue the
studies of
Newtonian Mechanics, Fluid Mechanics, and Thermal Physics as begun in Advanced
Physics. It will also include an in
-
depth study of electricity and magnetism; waves and optics;
and atomic and nuclear physics.
Emphasis on problem solving and extensive labor
atory work
prepare students for the AP
Physics B
examination
.



Human Genetics
: Grades 11
-
12

A course focusing on the components of human genetics including human inheritance, genetic
disorders, chromosomal mutations, and social and ethical issues surroun
ding genetics (cloning,
sex selection, designer babies, genome, organ replacements, life expectancy, etc).


29


MATHEMATICS


Required Courses

(5 Credits Required for Graduation)


PATHWAY 1







Algebra I











Geometry



Algebra II



Elective



Elective


PATHWAY

2



Foundations of Algebra I


(2 semesters

-

2 credits)



Foundations of Algebra II

(
2

semester
s

-

2

credit
s
)



Foundations of Geometry

(
1

semester
s
-
1 credit
)



Elective Courses



Algebra III



Calculus

(1 semester)



AP
/CHS

Calculus

AB

(College
-
in
-
High School Credit)

(2semesters
-
2 credits)



AP
/CHS

Calculus

BC

(College
-
in
-
High School Credit)

(2semesters
-
2 credits)



AP Statistics (College
-
in
-
High School Credit)

(2 semesters
-
2 credits)



College Algebra



CHS
Business Calculus

(College
-
in
-
High School Credit)



Fundamentals of
Algebra



Personal Finance



Trig/Pre
-
Calculus



Computer Science C++


Starting with the Class of 2015, a
ll Advanced Placement (AP) offerings are based on Advanced Placement/College
Board curriculum approval

and w
ill have an added value of 1% to their cumulative average per AP course taken.

Students taking AP courses will be required to take the AP Exam.


Mathematics Descriptors


Algebra I:
Grade 9



Prerequisites:

o

Math 8 or Pre
-
Algebra



Recommendations:

o

80%

average or better in

Math 8

or

Pre
-
Algebra


The class will entail detailed coverage of algebraic concepts. Strong emphasis will be placed on
the application of basic arithmetic to algebraic concepts. Topics will include rational and
irrational algebraic e
xpressions, factoring, solving equations, quadratics, polynomials, exponents
and radicals. The course will also build a necessary vocabulary in mathematics for future courses
as well as for this course.


30


Geometry:
Grades 9
-
10



Prerequisites:

o

Algebra I



Recommendations:

o

70% average or better in
Algebra I


Geometry introduces new material with a review of algebra skills in context of geometry
concepts. Its content builds and connects synthetic, coordinate and transformational approaches.
Points, lines, pl
anes, similarity, congruence, and other relationships in plane and solid geometry
are organized and developed as a deductive mathematical system. Students progress gradually
from informal arguments to more formal presentations of proof. The course will con
nect math to
student experiences, school
-
to
-
work, and other disciplines, as well as a variety of other math
topics.




Algebra II:
Grade

10



Prerequisites:

o

Algebra I
and
/or

Geometry



Recommendations:

o

70% average or better in
Algebra I

and Geometry


Elementary
a
lgebra is reviewed and expanded to develop the complex number system, quadratic
equations and their roots and graphs,
matrices,
and exponential and logarithmic functions.
Algebra skills are reviewed in the context of new concepts. The course in
corporates the power of
the graphing calculator
, which will be a required tool.




Foundations of Algebra I:

Grade 9



(2 semesters


2 credits)



Prerequisites:

o

Math 8 or Pre
-
Algebra

(
8
th Grade) or Algebra I (
8
th Grade)


The class will entail detailed
coverage of algebraic concepts, but will be taught at a less rigorous
pace by being taught o
ver two semesters
. Strong emphasis will be placed on the application of
basic arithmetic to algebraic concepts. Topics will include rational and irrational algebr
aic
expressions, positive and negative numbers, factoring, solving equations, quadratics,
polynomials, exponents and radicals. The course will also build a necessary vocabulary in
mathematics for future courses as well as for this course.








31




Foundations of Algebra II:
Grade
10
-

(2 semesters


2 credits
)



Prerequisites:

o

Foundations of
Algebra I



Recommendations:

o

70%
average or better in Foundations of
Algebra I


Foundations of Algebra II will be taught at a less rigorous pace. It will review a
nd expand basic
algebra skills to develop the complex number system, quadratic equations and their roots and
graphs, and
rational functions and rational exponents
. The course will also incorporate the
power
of the graphing calculator
.




Foundations of Geo
metry:
Grade 11
-

(1 semester


1 credit
)



Prerequisites:

o

Foundations of Algebra I
I




Recommendations:

o

70%
average or better in Foundations of Algebra I
I


Foundations of Geometry introduces new material with a review of algebra skills in context of
geometry

concepts. This class will be taught at a less rigorous pace by being taught over two
semesters. Its content builds and connects synthetic, coordinate and transformational approaches.
Points, lines, planes, similarity, congruence, and other relationships i
n plane and solid geometry
are organized and developed as a deductive mathematical system. Students progress gradually
from informal arguments to more formal presentations of proof.





Algebra III:
Grades 11
-
12



Prerequisites:

o


Trig/Pre
-
Calculus



Recommendations:

o

70% average or better in
Trig/Pre
-
Calculus


Students will use matrices and determinants to solve systems of equations. Additionally students
will solve problems using arithmetic and geometric sequences and series, use Pascal's triangle,
th
e Binomial theorem and counting principles.