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fanaticalpumaMechanics

Nov 5, 2013 (3 years and 7 months ago)

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Thirteenth Lecture Hour

8:30


9:20 am, Sunday,
September 16



Software Management Disciplines

Process Automation

(from Part III, Chapter 12 of Royce’ book)

Review

The Four Parts of the
Course


Software Management
Renaissance


The conventional software
management process.


Five improvements to make
the waterfall process work.



A Software Management
Process Framework


Phases


Artifacts


Workflows


Checkpoints



Software Management
Disciplines


Planning


Organization


Automation


Process control and
instrumentation


Tailoring



Looking Ahead


Modern project profiles


Next
-
generation

software
economics


Modern process transitions

Topics for Today


Automation building blocks


The project environment


Round
-
trip engineering


Change management


Infrastructures


Stakeholder environments

Levels of Automation


Meta
-
process


Organization’s policies, procedures, and practices for
the line of business


Inventory of preferred tools, artifact templates,
guidelines, project repositories, skill sets, library.


Macro
-
process


Project’s policies, procedures, practices, project
environment and collection of tools to produce artifacts.


Micro
-
process


Project team’s policies, etc., for achieving an artifact.
Tools.

Automation and Tools

Workflow Tools


Management


Project planning and control,
on
-
line status assessments.


Environment


Configuration management
and change control


Requirements


Integrate documents and
visual representations for
specifications and use cases.


Design


Visual modeling


Implementation


Integration of programming
environment with change
management tools, visual
modeling tools, and test
automation tools.


Assessment and
deployment


Test automation, test
management, and defect
tracking tools.

The Three Project Environments


The Prototype
Environment


Architecture testbed


Performance trade
-
offs


Technical risk analysis


Make/buy tradeoffs


Fault tolerance trades


Transitioning risks


Test scenarios


The Development
Environment


Development tools


Round
-
trip engineering
tools


The Maintenance
Environment


Mature version of the
development
environment


Four Important Environment
Disciplines


Integration of tools to support round
-
trip
engineering for iterative development.


Change management automation to manage
multiple iterations AND change freedom.


Infrastructure to enable environments derived
from a common base.


Promotes inter
-
project consistency, reuse of training,
and reuse of lessons learned.


Stakeholder environment extensions


Provides cost savings for information exchange and
approvals for engineering artifacts.

Round
-
trip Engineering


Primary reason: allow freedom in changing
software engineering data sources.


New needs for automation:


Heterogeneous components, platforms,
languages, complexity of building, controlling
and maintaining large
-
scale webs of
components.

Round
-
trip Engineering

Change Management


Change management is more critical in
modern processes.


Artifacts are begun early, use rigor, and evolve
over time.


Software Change Orders (SCO) are used to
create, modify, or obsolesce components.


Change Orders are used to track status and
performance.


Software Change Order

Configuration Control


Configuration Control Board


Manages releases


Makes change decisions


Membership


Software manager(s), system engineer (sometimes), key
software architect (sometimes), customer
representatives.


General comment


It’s never dull! Can be the most fun and exciting
software management job of all.


Release History

Representative Changes

Infrastructure


Organizational Policy


Process definition


major
milestones, intermediate
artifacts, engineering
repositories, metrics, roles
and responsibilities.


What gets done, when does
it get done, who does it,
how do we know that it is
adequate (checkpoints,
metrics and standards of
performance.


Three Levels


Highest: long
-
term process
improvement, general
technology, education,
mandatory quality control.


Intermediate: domain
-
specific technology, reuse
of components, processes,
training, tools, and
personnel.


Lowest: efficiency items,
project
-
specific training,
compliance with customer
requirements and business
unit standards.

Organization Environment


Provides answers as to how things get done.


Provide tools and techniques to automate the
process.


Standardized tool selections.


Standard notations for artifacts.


Tool adjuncts such as artifact templates (architecture
description, evaluation criteria, release descriptions,
status assessments


Activity templates (iteration planning, major milestones,
configuration control boards.

Organization Environment
(cont’d)


Additional components


Reference library for planning, etc.


Existing case studies


Project artifacts library


Audit and compliance traceability frameworks.

Stakeholder Environment


Stakeholders will participate.


Participation should be constructive and
value
-
added to the development.


On
-
line extension to stakeholder
environment enables hands
-
on evaluations,
use of same tools to manage and monitor
the project, and minimizes customer travel
and paper exchanges.

Extension to Stakeholder Domain

Extension Issues


How much access freedom is supported?


Who pays for the environment and tool
investments.


How secure is the information exchange.


How is change management synchronized.


How to avoid abuse by customer.


How to avoid disruption to the development.

Assignment for Next Class
Meeting


Read Chapter 12 of Royce’ book, on process
automation.


Learn and discuss the types of automation tools which
should be used.


Learn and discuss the elements of organization policy.


Learn and discuss the elements of organization
environment.


Learn and discuss the pros and cons of extension to the
stakeholder environment.