Community Analysis for Taft Union High School District

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Nov 8, 2013 (4 years and 4 days ago)

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1


Community Analysis for Taft Union High School District

Who:

Library Advisory Committee
-

comprised of TL(Kathy McLaughlin); library


assistants(Kelly Federoff and Dianne Kaszyski); Principal (Mark Richardson).


Goal:
to determine what
resources are needed

in the library to better serve the community


Who is the potential audience of the school library collection?

*
Community Description

The community of Taft, located in Kern County, is approximately 120 miles north of Los Angeles
and 3
5 miles west of Bakersfield in the southern portion of the San Joaquin Valley. The City of Taft
has a p
opulation of approximately 9,327
. Outlying areas in which the feeder districts are located and
the adjacent communities of Ford City, South Taft, and Taf
t Heights increase that number to 20,000.

The petroleum industry is at the heart of the Taft Union High School District’s tax base, and the high
school has partnered with the major oil producers and local businesses in the area to sponsor the Taft
Oil
-
Tec
hnology Academy. The academy provides a standards
-
based, college
-
prep curriculum for
grades 10
-
12
th
designed to introduce students to a variety of career opportunities in the oil and
technology industries and to prepare them for employment. One hundred for
ty students are currently
enrolled in our academy.

According the 2010 Household Income Statistics, the median household income in Taft, CA is $44,
690, and residents’ living below the poverty level in 2009 was 18.8%. The city offers only one public
librar
y facility, which is only open three days a week.


*
Overview of the School


Taft Union High School (TUHS) is a four
-
year comprehensive secondary school that has been in
operation since the fall of 1911. Located in the City of Taft, TUHS serves
approximately 950
square miles.


Taft Union High School has

expanded upon the small learning community concept that has been
successful in the Oil
-
Technology Academy and in 2004 implemented the Advancement Via
Individual Determination (AVID) program. There are currently 157 students in grades 9
-
12
th
enrolled
in th
e AVID program. Other smaller learning communities that have been implemented at TUHS
within the past five years include agriculture classes and Future Farmers of America (FFA).
Multimedia and Architecture Construction and Engineering (ACE) career pathways

have been in
place for the past four years and offer a range of introductory and capstone courses.


Businesses, interested community members, community colleges, four
-
year colleges and universities
have partnered with the Oil Technology Academy to provid
e guidance on the steering committees.
They also provide mentoring, job shadowing, field trips and financial support in the form of
underwriting scholarships for students and conferences for both
teachers and students.

2


Our Oil Technology Academy has been
showcased at national, state and regional conferences. In
2006 a student participating in the Taft Oil Technology Academy received the Horatio Alger
Scholarship in the amount of $20,000 and was featured on PBS. In 2009 all of the graduating Oil
Technology
Academy students received either full or partial scholarships to both private and public
universities.


Since its inception, The Taft High AVID program has provided students with an abundance of
college preparatory coursework, which has prepared them to e
nroll and be successful in the four
-
year
university setting. The program has consistently earned above to well above average rankings on the
one hundred plus indicators it is evaluated on by AVID center in San Diego. In 2009 22 of 26
graduating AVID studen
ts received either full or partial scholarships to private and public
universities.


In addition to the comprehensive high school, the TUHS District operates a continuation high school
and an independent study high school. Students in the district also have access to additional career
-
technical training through the Westside Regional Occupa
tion Program.


Taft is not an affluent community; however, approximately 50 individual and group organizations
support our graduating seniors with scholarships. Approximately $154,900 in scholarships was given
last year at Honors Night to deserving senior

students.

*
Overview of the teaching staff

Taft Union High School certificated staff is comprised of 81 employees, four administrators, 70
teachers, four guidance counselors, one school psychologist, one athletic director and one library
-
media specialist.
Of our 81 certificated staff members, five are Hispanic, and 76 are white; 45 are
male and 36 are female.


Figure 1: WASC Report



The TUHS teaching staff is comprised of 68 fully credentialed and two employees that hold a
preliminary credential and are in the process of meeting the requirements to obtain a clear credential.
One hundred percent of the TUHS teachers have fulfilled the
requirements of NCLB, and NCLB
compliant teachers teach 100% of the core classes. The certificated staff at TUHS is comprised of
two individuals with a doctorate degree, 35 with a master’s degree, and 44 with a bachelor’s degree.


Certificated Staff Education Level
3%
43%
54%
Doctorate
Master's Degree
Bachelor's Degree
3


Administrators at TUHS a
verage 13 years in the district and 23.8 years in education. On average,
teachers have served 10.4 years within the district and 16.3 years in education. Individuals in pupil
personnel services average 14.5 years in the district and 19.8 years in education
.

Table 2
: SARC Report

Credential Information


Taft Union High






Teachers

09
-
10

07
-
08

08
-
09





With Credential

72

66

63

Without Credential

0

4

2






*
Description of the Student Population

Enrollment increased slightly from 902 in 2003 to 964 students in 2009. Though enrollment figures
are somewhat flat, the make
-
up of our student body is changing. In 2003 our student body was 75%
white with 45% of our student body identified as economically

disadvantaged. In 2003, 13.4% of our
student body was identified as Title I. Today our student body is 56% white, 49% economically
disadvantaged, and 15.9% of our students are identified as Title I.
Five

percent of our students are
identified as migrant,
down from 11% in 2003.


Figure 3
: WASC Report

The total
enrollment
for
the school was 9
63 for the 2009
-
2010 school year
.
Ninety
-
four students
were identified as needing to take the California English Language Development Test (CELDT)
in 2010 based on their home language surveys. Spanish was reported by 28.6% of our students’
parents as the primary language spoken in the home
, which is up from 11.2% in 2003. A small
Student Ethnicity
56.3% White
32.5% Hispanic
1.5 % Pacific Islander
1.1% African
American
1.1% American
Indian/Alaskan Native
.5% Filipino
.4% Asian
6.5% Multiple
4


number of families reported other primary languages including Tagalog, Arabic, Hebrew, Hindi,
Samoan, and American Sign Language. Thirty
-
six of the students CELDT tested are new to our
district. Seventy of the stud
ents tested are classified as beginning to intermediate in their English
language skills and are currently placed in ELD 1, ELD 2 or ELD 3 classes. Seventeen students
are classified beginning, nineteen beginning intermediate, and thirty
-
four are intermedi
ate.

The student body of TUHS is comprised of 256 students in grade 9, 240 students in grade 10, 219
students in grade 11, and 249 students in grade 12. There are 476 males and 488 females.





Figure 4
: WASC Report

The average class size at TUHS is
18 students per class. The core class areas (English, math,
social science and science) all have an average class size below 24 students. Currently, the
average class size for core classes is as follows: Social Science
-

23.45, English
-

19.58, Math
-

19.03,
and Science
-

20.21. Physical education, technology, fine arts and vocational arts classes
vary in size depending upon student interest and stat
ions available in the classroom.

Table 5: WASC Report

Grade Level Enrollment
26%
25%
23%
26%
Grade 9
Grade 10
Grade 11
Grade 12
Study Body Gender Breakdown
49%
51%
Males
Females
0
5
10
15
20
25
Number of Students
Schoolwide
English
Math
Social
Science
Science
TUHS Class Average
5


Approximately ten percent of the student body is classified

as English language learners, and 37% are
Re
-
designated Fluent English Proficient (RFEP). Of the RFEP students, 5.2% are English proficient.
English learners receive services in ELD 1, 2, and 3 classes as well as bilingual literacy and
reading/writing c
lasses, depending upon their designation and CELDT scores. EL Students are
mainstreamed into regular education classes and receive language assistance in their classes from
bilingual instructional assistants.

Forty percent of the student body at TUHS rece
ives free lunches and 8.4% are on a reduced lunch
program. A survey conducted in 2009 based on parent education level revealed that
20%% are non
-
high school graduates, 27% are high school graduates, 35% have some college, 11% are college
graduates, and 7%

have participated in graduate school or post graduate training.


*
Academic Achievement

Taft Union High School has met the growth target for prior school year every year since the last full
self
-
study in 2003 with the exception of the 2006/07 and 2007/08 s
chool years. Taft Union High
School did not meet the requirements for 2007 Adequately Yearly Progress because the School
-
Wide
Growth Target was not reached. Taft Union High School did not meet all requirements for 2008
Adequately Yearly Progress as deter
mined by the California Department of Education. During the
2008 Standardized Testing and Reporting (STAR) testing, an adult irregularity in testing procedure
occurred. Therefore, TUHS does not have a valid API for 2008.

Table 6: WASC Report



04/05

05/06

06/07

07/08

08/09

API Score

633

650

661

N/A

695

Met School
-
wide Growth
Target

Yes

Yes

No

No

N/A

Met Growth Target

Yes

Yes

Yes

No


N/A

Growth Attained

12

17

-
8

N/A


N/A


Met Subgroup Growth
Targets

Yes

Yes

No

N/A

No

School Ranking

3

3

4

N/A


N/A

Similar School Ranking

1

1

2

N/A


N/A



6



Analysis




Table 7: WASC Report



School wide

the percentage of students proficient in English Language dropped 3% in 2009.



School wide
, the percentage of students proficient in Mathematics increased 6.9% in
2009.


According to data released by the California Department of Education, senior participation rate for
California students grew 5.2 percent in 2008. The participation at TUHS grew 4% with 26% of the
2007/08 senior class participating in the SAT test.

This is the highest participation rate within the past
four years. Verbal scores rose by 13 points, Math scores rose by 19 points, and Writing scores
increased by 6 points.

Table 8: WASC Report



2004/05

2005/06

2006/07

2007/08

2008/09

SAT
Participation

24%

19%

22%

26%



SAT Verbal

459

490

459

472



SAT Math

480

500

469

488



SAT Writing

-

490

454

460






Schoolwide AYP Data Trends
0%
10%
20%
30%
40%
50%
60%
70%
80%
90%
100%
Academic School Year
% Proficient
Englis h Language
A rts
42.20%
53.50%
39.90%
50.80%
47.80%
Mathematics
40.80%
52.00%
46.30%
42.90%
49.80%
2004/05
2005/06
2006/07
2007/08
2008/09
7



Who Currently Uses the Collection?


The current library collection is mostly used by the English department. The English
department is the only department that uses the collection regularly and throughout the entire
year. The English department is
also
the only department that has all of its teachers using the
resources in the library
. Other departments at the school use it sparingly and
typically only have
one member from each department using its resources. It seems that only select teachers from
vario
us departments
occasionally
use the resources in the library and when they do, it’s usually
for one yearly project.
Students mostly use the library to check out books and use the computers.


The English department uses the computers in the library for res
earch, typing, presenting,
web site evaluation
, accelerated reader
, SIRS

and
essay submission.
They also use the library’s
collection of magazines, reference materials,
books, encyclopedias, dictionaries, poetry
collections, biographies,
online card catalo
gs with Destiny Quest,
videos,
and both fiction and
non
-
fiction collections. They pretty much use all of the library’s resources on a regular basis for
on
-
going projects throughout the year. They do research projects on authors, time periods (i.e.
Renaissa
nce, Depression),

controversial

issues, mythology
, careers

and poetry.


Some teachers visit the library for occasional use. One of the foreign language teachers
uses the computer lab on a weekly basis to have her

students practice with Rosetta Stone
. One
history teacher comes in a couple times a year to research the French Revolution. The Science
teachers come in once a year to do research for the science fair projects. Other than that, the
library only gets used by the students who come in to study, check

out books,
complete projects
and
use the computers. Departments, other than English, schedule a limited time in the library
and
use the resources infrequently.


The departments that never use the collection of resources in the library are the Fine Arts
(
drama, art, choir, video production, band, piano), Social Sciences (economics, government,
sociology, psychology), Math,
Physical Education,
Vocational Arts (foods, welding, auto,
construction), and Special Education

departments
. The other departments, lik
e Science, History,
and Foreign Language occasionally use the resources and it’s usually only one teacher from
those departments that typically come in. For example, boys
and girls
PE classes don’
t use the
library.

Chemistry,
biology
, anatomy, physics, and

health

classes don’
t use the library either.


Ten years ago, the library was a widely used and integral part of the school’s curriculum,
but ever since state test scores have become the driving force of the curriculum, the library has
been put on the bot
tom of the list.
After careful assessment, it appears that the library is
underutilized because of
tight
restraints

regulating the curriculum
, which are
driven by

state test
scores
. Teachers are locked into a
curriculum

schedule

that doesn’t
allow for time

in the library
to explore and use its resources. Teachers have expressed many times that they just don’t have
the time to visit the library anymore because they have to prepare students
for
the CST.

8


The other component to low utilization of the library i
s due to an unwillingness of
teachers to change their styles of teaching, change their regular method of delivery, or change
their set curriculum. Many veteran teachers are used to the traditional methods of teaching using
print sources

and are set in thei
r ways, comfortable with their normal routine. Teachers,
unfortunately, are
also comfortable
relying
solely
on their textbooks, and are not willing to make
the time to include resources

from the library. Teachers also have so many other demands, like
meeti
ngs, training, and extra
-
curricular activities that coming to the library and learning how to
use its services gets put on the back burner.


Potential Use of the Collection?


Research has shown that physical activity can help improve students’ performance.
Because physical education is such an important part of a
student’s overall well
-
being
, I think
getting the physical education department more involved in the library would
b
e a win
-
win
situation. The students who are more physically active and healthy are more likely to concentrate
better in class and perform better on standardized tests. Since our school has put so much
emphasis

on improving test scores
, it makes sense to fo
cus on getting students healthy and fit. It
would have a positive impact on the school in many ways. There’s a strong relationship between
physical fitness and academic performance. One way to focus and start that direction is by
getting the physical educa
tion department using resources in the library.

The physical education department teachers should first meet up with the teacher
librarian
at the beginning of the year
and come up with a workable plan on how to integrate the
library into their program. Al
l PE teachers should schedule t
ime in the library

at the beginning of
the year.
The idea is to have the teachers bring the students into the library at least once a month
to begin with


that would give them ten trips over the course of the year.
They coul
d alternate
each month
-

one month using electronic resources and the other month using print resources.
The classes would meet in media center
one month
to use the computers
taking advantage of
online
physical fitness
programs
.
Students can log onto websit
es and interact with online
programs, and they could use programs like FitStats and
iW
orkout, which students can log their
calories, heart rates, fitness levels and goals.
The other month classes would meet in the library
to research using print resources

like magazines, books, reference materials and encyclopedias.

Students would research things like diabetes, obesity, nutrition, healthy weight management,
exercise, emotional health, disease prevention, diet, safety and injuries
, and
famous athletes
.
Activities could be decided between the TL and physical education teachers to insure that they
meet and address the needs of the students.



9



Implications of Findings


According to Johnson, “School library media specialists
should

seek to balance buildin
g
collections that support curricular goals with building a core collection that meets more broad
-
based goals” (116). Collection development should aim to accommodate the changing curricular
needs and recreational interests of the learning community. As th
e data in
dicates, Taft Union
High School, serves a wide spectrum of students and programs. We have a slightly diverse
population
, with 37% Re
-
designated English language proficient
,
45% economically
disadvantaged,
and have about 18% of our students below t
he poverty line. Our school offers an
array of programs like Oil
-
Tech and career
-
technical training through the Westside Regional
Occupation Program. We have courses that range from ELL to AVID. It’s apparent that our
needs are well diversified and cover a

wide range.
Because of this, the collection should be
evaluated on a continual basis to make sure it’s meeting the needs of all its users, especially the
curricular needs of the school. The
library should offer a balanced
multicultural
collection that
ref
lects and meets the educational needs of the diverse cultural and ethnic groups in the
community.

Another implication to consider is collection analysis to measure the success of the
collection and develop and manage it effectively.
“Collection analysis
is now an important part
of collection development and management responsibilities and every librarian should
understand it” (Johnson 254). With such an
d

large community of learners, it’s absolutely
necessary to continually conduct analysis to make sure th
e collection is full of the right resources
for
the learning community.
Taft High serves a vast community of learners and the library should
be able to provide resources for students in every program offered on campus
-

from agriculture
to yearbook to jazz
band. A wealth of resources should be available for every type of student as
well


from special education to honors.


Works Cited

Johnson, Peggy.
Fundamentals of Collection Development and Management
. American Library


Association. Chicago: 2009.

“Taft Union High School WASC Report.” Taft Union High School Website. 2010.


http://www.taft.k12.ca.us/19651041124225177/site/default.asp
.