Participation in Clicker (Optional) 5%

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Oct 24, 2013 (3 years and 9 months ago)

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CALIFORNIA STATE POLYTECHNIC UNIVERSITY, POMONA

CHE 311 TRANSPORT I Fall 20
1
3


Instructor:

Thuan K. Nguyen

Office Hour:

MWF
12
:00
-
1
:00

P
.M, Tuesday 8:00
-
10:00 AM

Room:

17
-
2108

Phone:

869
-
2631

E
-
mail:TKNguyen@csupomona.edu,

http://www.csupomona.edu/~tknguyen/


Purpose of the Course:


Welcome to CHE311 Transport Phenomena I. This course will present the principles of momentum transfer
and
its applicatio
n to the unit operations of chemical engineering and other areas of engineering and science.
Prerequisite:

CHE 202, ME 214, MAT 215, MAT 216.
Corequisite:

CHE 302


Course Objectives:


After completing this course the student will be able to:

1.

Solve the e
quation of motion (one dimensional, laminar flow) in rectangular, cylindrical, and
spherical coordinates for the pressure and velocity.

2.

Determine hydrostatic force on a curved surface and pressure change caused by rotation.

3.

Solve for the
pressure and

velocity from macroscopic momentum balances
.

4.

Determine pressure drop due to fluid friction in pipes.

5.

Determine pressure drop for flow in chemical engineering equipment: pumps and compressors,
packed beds, filters, and separators.

6.

Apply dimension
al analysis to correlate experimental data and to scale up equipment.

7.

Determine the required diameter for simple piping systems.

8.

Understand pressure, velocity, and flow rate measurement.


TEXT:
Fluid Mechanics for Chemical Engineers

by James Wilkes



REFERENCES:

(A)
Chemical Engineering Fluid Mechanics

by Ron Darby.

(B)
Fluid Mechanics for Chemical Engineering

by Noel de Nevers.

(C)
Fundamentals of Fluid Mechanics

by Munson, Young, Okiishi and Huebsch.


GRADING:


No late homework. No make
-
up quizz
es or tests

Participation in Clicker (Optional)

5%


Homework (best 9 of 10 assignments)

15%

Best 4 of 5 comprehensive quizzes 45%, closed books and closed notes

Comprehensive Final

40%, closed books
and closed notes


Make
-
ups will be given only if the absence is due to a legitimate reason approved by the instructor and
substantiated by written verification. Your course grade is based on the following absolute scale:


A : 93
-
100%, A
-

: 90
-
93% , B+ : 8
7
-
90% , B : 83
-
87% , B
-

: 80
-
83%


C+ : 77
-
80% , C : 73
-
77% , C
-

: 70
-
73%


D+ : 67
-
70% , D : 60
-
67% , F : 0
-
60%


Cheating, including copying is considered a serious o
ffense and will result in a zero for that entire
assignment or test.



Quiz and exam schedule


Quiz #1

Friday

Oct
11

Quiz #2

Friday

Oct 25

Quiz #3


Friday

Nov
8

Quiz #4

Friday

Nov
22

Quiz #5

Friday

Dec

6


Final Exam


Section 01
(
10:3
0 AM)

9:10
-
11:10 AM

Wednesday

Dec.
11

2013


Student Responsibilities:


It is essential for your success in this class to keep up with the required readings and assignments. If you
have any questions about the readings or the class in general, ask the instructor. I am your nu
mber one
resource for success in this class. Come to my office or make an appointment, and we will talk about your
problem. It is better to do so before things get out of hand
--

not after the fact.


It is your responsibility to participate in your learnin
g. Learning is not a spectator sport. It will take time
(minimum of 12 hours per week for this course), effort, work, and involvement. You must read your
assignments before class, note what you do not understand, actively seek answers to what you do not
kn
ow. You should ask questions in class or during office hours or of other students, study beyond the
minimum text assignments by searching course references. You must apply what you learn to solve
homework problems before the due date and ask for help when
you need it. You should study on a regular
basis and not cram for tests, participate in class by being actively involved in dialogue with your classmates
and instructor, think about what you are learning, and apply what you have learned to solve other rela
ted
problems.
Arriving late, leaving early, chatting with your neighbors, doing your other homework,
or having beepers and cellular phones turned on during class time are behaviors unacceptable in
this class.

These behaviors are extremely disrespectful to
your fellow students and your professor. It is
ultimately you who is responsible for you success in this class, not the instructor, not your fellow students.


WEEK TOPICS

TEXT READING




1

Introduct
ion to Fluid Dynamics

Chap. 1



Hydrostatics. Capillary Hydrostatics






2

Mass and Energy Balances

Chap. 1, 2




Bernoulli’s Equation





3

Momentum Balance

Chap.
2








4

Inviscid and Viscous Fluid Flow

Chap.
3






5

Viscous Flow in Pipes

Chap.
4



6
, 7

Flow in Chemical
Engineering Applications

Chap.
4




8

Dimensional Analysis

Chap. 4





9

Differential Analysis of Fluid Flow

Chap. 5, 6




10

Irrotational and Porous
-
Media Flows. Turbulent Flow

Chapter 7, 8, 9


Instruction for Homework

Homework must be turned in prior to
the start of class on the day that it is due. No late homework will be
accepted. Not all of the assigned problems will be graded, but you will not know in advance which will be
graded, so it is best to do them all. An engineer's work should be neat, well o
rganized, and easy to follow.
You are expected to follow this standard format for completing chemical engineering problems. Points may
be deducted for work that does not adhere to this format. An example of homework format is given below:

________________
______________________________________________________________


CHE 31101 Problem set #1


NGUYEN, THUAN 1/1


1. A narrow capillary tube is dipped into a liquid that wets the tube. We o
bserve that the liquid rises in the
tube, above the level of the free surface with a contact angle


= 60
o
. We want to derive a mathematical
model that relates the height of capillary rise h to the surface tension


and the inner capillary diameter D
c
.
Thi
s model (Fig. 1) will suggest another method for measuring the surface tension (Ref. I). Determine the
height of capillary rise if the liquid is water with surface tension


= 0.072 N/m and capillary diameter D
c

is
10
-
3

m.


I.
An Introduction to Fluid Dyn
amics

by Stanley Middleman.

Figure 1.

Rise of a liquid in a capillary.


Solution



If we approximate the meniscus as a part of a sphere surface with diameter D
c
, then the two
principal radii of curvature r
1

and r
2

are equal to each other, and are given by




r
1

= r
2

=
D
c




The pressure difference across the meniscus is then




p
atm



p
s

=

p =


Where p
s

is the pressure at the meniscus in the liquid phase. Since the system is in static equilibrium, the
pressure

p
1

must equal p
atm
, for these two pressures occur at points that lie in the same horizontal plane in
the same fluid.




p
s

+

gh = p
1

= p
atm


Therefore




gh = p
atm



p
s

=

p =

or



h =




h =
= 0.0145 m = 1.45 cm





_______________________________________________________________________________


How you get your answer is very important in engineering, therefore show all of your work on assignments,
quizzes, and exams. Mark your fina
l answer clearly by drawing a box around it, and be sure to include the
units! Except for the questions that require you to fill in the blank, no credit will be given for final answers
that do not show the work involved.
Staple all pages of an assignment t
ogether in the upper left corner.
.




Capillary rise h = 1.45 cm