Bachelor of Engineering with Honours - University of Canterbury

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Dec 14, 2013 (3 years and 6 months ago)

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19 UC/11BE(Hons)/1


1


UNIVERSITY OF CANTER
BURY

Te Whare Wānanga o Waitaha

Qualification Change

Proposal Description

R

Purpose of the proposal

To introduce standardised 15
-
point weights for the
courses

comprising the
Second

Professional E
xamination of the
seven

engineering specialisations for the Bachelor of Engineering (Honours)
.

This proposal excludes changes for
Chemical and Process Enginee
ring

as this programme changed to
15 points

for all three professional years

in 201
1
.

Justification

In late 2008 the University of Canterbury decided to adopt a standardised course s
ize for all undergraduate
qualifications. As part of this decision the engineering undergraduate qualification


BE(H
ons) was given dispensation
for a four
-
phase
process
beginning in 2009. Th
is

proposal
is

phase
three

of that process with phase one (the
intermediate year)
, and phase two (First Professional Year)

now operational. The proposal is part of strengthening one
of the professional degree qualifications offered by the
U
niversity and as such contributes to the broader academic
development of both
the College of Engineering and the University of Canterbury.


Civil and Natural Resources Engineering

The Department of Civil and Natural Resources Engineering proposes these changes after an extensive review process.
This has included reviewing the
recommendations of the most recent IPENZ accreditation panel, examination of trends
overseas, consideration of reports by recent Erskine visitors, review of comments from student liaison committee
meetings by the year co
-
ordinators, and the input from the
CNRE Advisory Board. The result of that review led to the
conclusion that there was no need for major changes in the structure of the first and second professional years. It also
led to the conclusion that the content offered in those two years was appro
priate. The review highlighted that re
-
organisation of content between courses could aid in student learning, as could re
-
ordering of material between
semesters and years. One significant outcome of the review was a decision to offer one Materials course

in the First
Professional Year instead of covering this material in five different courses. This has had a number of consequential
changes. In addition, the shift from 12 to 15 point courses has allowed us to break up the hydrology/geology course and
te
ach the hydrology with other water topics and the geology with soil courses, which will be better for students and
more consistent with international norms.


Electrical and Electronic Engineering

This set of changes to the Electrical and Electronic program
me is a further phase in the move to 15 point courses.
They
are part of the overall review of the degree programme undertaken as
the move to a common course size is
implemented. Consultation with Industry and across the departments has been undertaken and
the IPENZ accreditation
has also informed proceedings. There has been a re
-
arrangement of material and an attempt to avoid duplication
particularly in the computing area. N
ew courses in Design and Management

have been created
.


Forest Engineering

Forest En
gineering proposes these changes after an extensive review process. This has included reviewing the
recommendations of the most recent IPENZ accreditation panel, a full review of the Forest Engineering Program
me

in
2009, examination of trends overseas, consideration of reports by recent Erskine visitors, and the input from both the
SOFAC Advisory Board and departmental discussion. The Forestry Science courses within the program
me

were updated
and changes impleme
nted in 2010 and 2011. All Forest Engineering (ENFO) specific courses were also updated in that
time. Our program
me

also relies on courses from CNRE and these changes are being considered as they become
available.


Mechanical Engineering

This set of significant changes is the second phase of a 3 year roll
-
out of a new Mechanical Engineering degree structure,
following the 2008 University
-
wide requirement that all courses move to a 15
-
point weighting (or multiples thereof).
19 UC/11BE(Hons)/1


2


With the previo
us degree structure having been built around 12
-
point modules, this has necessitated extensive change
and rearrangement of material to ensure that the overall integrity and standing of the degree is not compromised.
Furthermore, this has been a timely opp
ortunity to re
-
assess the content and the current relevance of all material
within the degree across the wide range of disciplines that are represented in any mechanical engineering degree
program
me
.

Up until 2005, the 2
nd

Professional year consisted of 12

compulsory courses (each worth 10
-
points), ensuring that all
students entered their final 3
rd

Professional year with a common background. In 2006 a change was made to conform to
the then
-
predominant engineering course size of 12
-
points which necessitated
making only 8 of the previous 12 courses
compulsory, with students having to select 2 of the other 4 courses as electives. An undesirable consequence of this has
been that students have been entering 3
rd

Professional with differing backgrounds (depending
on the choice of 2
nd

Professional electives). Hence an important objective in this re
-
structuring has been to design a set of 8 compulsory
courses to restore the earlier system in which all students covered the same material before entering 3
rd

Profession
al.

The equivalent exercise for the 1
st

Professional year took effect in 2011 in anticipation, and with the knowledge of this
proposed set of 2
nd

Professional course changes which are to take effect in 2012, with the final phase of 3
rd

Professional
year ch
anges to be effective for 2013. These documents set out the details of the new 2
nd

Professional courses only.


Mechatronics

This set of significant changes is the second phase of a 3 year roll
-
out of a new Mechatronics Engineering degree
structure, follo
wing the 2009 University
-
wide requirement that all courses move to a 15
-
point weighting (or multiples
thereof). Being a multi
-
disciplinary engineering degree and jointly delivered across departments, the Mechatronics
Engineering Programme has been a degre
e structure comprising courses of vary sizes


12 points, 15 points, and 20
points.

The implementation of 15 point course has necessitated further restructuring of the degree programme to ensure that
the overall integrity and standing of the degree is not

compromised. Furthermore, this has been a timely opportunity to
re
-
assess the content and reinforce UC Mechatronics Educational Philosophy


balanced core mechatronics training in
the first three years and guided streams in the fourth year.

The new Mecha
tronics Engineering 1
st

Pro 15 point structure implemented in 2011

consists of a 30
-
point course
“Mechatronics Design”, two engineering math
courses
, two mechanical
courses
, and two electrical
courses
. The new
Mechatronics Engineering 2
nd

Pro 15 point structure being proposed and to be rolled out in 2012 will comprise a 30
-
point course “Mechatronic System Design”, three compulsory mechanical
courses
, two compulsory electrical
course
s
and one elective electrical
course
. One of the desired o
utcomes is that all mechatronics students will have core
fundamentals and skill sets necessary to solve complex mechatronics engineering problems through synthesis of multi
-
disciplinary knowledge. Yet they can take up speciality courses in their own streng
th and interest in the final year.

This proposed set of 2
nd

Professional course changes is to take effect in 2012, with the final phase of 3
rd

Professional
year changes to be effective for 2013. These documents set out the details of the new 2
nd

Professio
nal courses only.



Computer and Software Engineering

These changes arise mainly from the restructuring of the 200
-
level curriculum resulting from the conversion to 15 points
for 2011


for example, it became necessary to remove some content from 300
-
lev
el that is now being taught at 200
-
level. In carrying out this restructuring we have also been mindful of gaps in our offering relative to the Association of
Computing Machinery (ACM) Computer Science and Software Engineering curricula and closer collabora
tion with other
departments in the Engineering College (ECE in particular).



Acceptability

This proposal arises from the university wide move to standardised course sizes. However
,

sitting alongside the
university move is ext
ernal referencing through the Washington Accord
which is manifested through the

IPENZ
managed accreditation review process.
Whilst the last formal review was in 2007 a number of specialisations have
conducted mini
-
reviews as an outcome of the 2007 review.

This has involved broad faculty consultation and has also
involved consultation with industry. The changing structure of
courses

and the programmes has been discussed
as a
part of these consultations and has been generally supported. Student consultati
on has also occurred
through faculty
19 UC/11BE(Hons)/1


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processes

and individual programme student representatives.

Goals of the programme

This is an existing degree programme



the goals remain unchanged.

Graduate profile

The proposed changes will assist in ensuring that t
he graduate profile
is achieved
.

Programme overview

The BE(
H
ons) is a four year undergraduate degree which normally comprises an intermediate year followed by three
years of increasingly focused study in one of eight different specialisations.
The current proposal is for the
Second
Professional year (Year 3
) of th
e qualification. The proposal will change the number of
courses

that constitute the
Second

Professional Y
ear
generally
from ten

courses

down to eight. Overall the degree will remain a 480 point, four
-
year (full
-
time) qualification.
The
degree will continue to
consist of both academic and practical components.

Proposed new regulations and prescriptions

(append to the Calendar Form at the end of Section A)


Proposed teaching/delivery methods

A range of teaching/delivery methods will

be utilised in the
Second Professional programmes of the eight
specialisations, including but not limited to:

-

lectures

-

laboratories

-

tutorials

-

industrial site visits

-

e
-
learning systems

-

industry speakers.

Assessment procedures

A range of assessment techniques will be utilised in the
Second P
rofessional programmes of the eight specialisations,
including but not limited to:

-

Formal examinations

-

Oral prese
ntations

-

Projects (individual and group)

-

Formal written reports

-

Field assessments

-

Laboratory exercises

-

In
-
semester tests.

Predicted student numbers/EFTS

Student numbers vary between specialisations,

but are normally limited to
:

Chemical and Process
-

63

Civil Engineering



100

Computer


15

Electrical Engineering


105

Forest


20

Natural Resources



25

Mechanical Engineering



95

Mechatronics


30


Resources

No new resources required


Plans for monitoring programme quality

Programme quality will
continue to be monitored internally and extern
ally. Individual specialisations are monitored
on
an annual
cycle

through course surveys and departmental curriculum review processes (e.g. annual curriculum retreats).
19 UC/11BE(Hons)/1


4


On a 5
-
yearly basis a full IPENZ accreditation review is undertaken with specialisati
ons responding to requirements and
recommendations that emerge as a part of this process. The University of Canterbury also undertakes 5
-
yearly reviews
of the BE(
H
ons) degree in concert with the IPENZ accreditation visits.


Degree regulations are reviewa
ble through the
normal Board of Studies, Faculty, and university
-
wide processes.



Calendar Regulations


Page 183 2011 Calendar

Civil Engineering

Regulation 19. Replace all with the following;



19. Second Professional Examination

(1)

ENCI 313 Civil
Engineering Design Studio 2

(2)

ENCI 335 Structural Analysis

(3)

ENCI 336 Structural Design

(4)

ENCN 304 Deterministic Mathematical Methods

(5)

ENCN 305 Computer Programming and Stochastic Modelling

(6)

ENCN 342 Fluid Mechanics and Hydraulics

(7)

ENCN 353 Geotechnical Engineering

(8)

ENCN 371 Project and Infrastructure Management


Page 183 2011 Calendar

Computer Engineering

Regulation 22. Replace all with the following


22 Second Professional Examination

(1)

ENCE360 Operating Systems

(2)

ENCE361 Embedded Systems 1

(3)

ENCE362 Digital Electronics

(4)

ENEL300 Electrical and Computer Engineering Design 2

(5)

ENEL301 Fundamentals of Engineering Economics and Management

(6)

ENEL320 Signals and Communications

(7)

ENEL321 Control Systems

(8)

Sufficient courses from;

(a)COSC263 Introduction to So
ftware Engineering

(b)COSC363 Computer Graphics

(c)COSC364 Internet Technology and Engineering

(d)COSC368 Humans and Computers

(e)ENEL370 Electronics 1

(f) Any 15 point 300 level option to be approved by the Director of Studies


Check to see about selectio
n

Page 184 2011 Calendar

Electrical and Electronic Engineering

Regulation 25. Replace all with the following


25. Second Professional Examination

(1)

ENEL300 Electrical and Computer Engineering Design 2

(2)

ENEL301 Fundamentals of Engineering Economics and Manag
ement

(3)

ENEL320 Signals and Communications

(4)

ENEL321 Control Systems

(5)

Sufficient courses from;

(a)
ENEL370 Electronics 1

(b)
ENEL371 Power Electronics 1

(c)
ENEL380 Power Systems 1

(d)
ENEL381 Electrical Machines 1

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(e)
ENEL391 Electronic Devices 1

(f)
ENCE361
Embedded Systems 1

(g)
ENCE362 Digital Electronics

(h)
Any15 point 300 level option to be approved by the Director of Studies


Page 185

Forest Engineering

Regulation 28. Replace all with the following


28 Second Professional Examination

(1)

ENCN 305 Computer
Programming and Stochastic Modelling

(2)

ENCN

353 Geotechnical Engineering

(3)

ENC
N
371 Project and Infrastructure Management

(4)

ENFO

327 Wood Science

(5)

ENNR

320 Integrated Catchment Analysis

or
ENCI

335
Structural Analyses

(6)

FORE316 Forest Management

(7)

FORE342
Geospatial
Technologies in Forestry



Page 185

Mechanical Engineering

Regulation 31. Replace all with the following


31. Second Professional Examination

(1)

ENME301
Engineering

Design and Production Quality

(2)

ENME302 Computational and Applied Mechanical Analysis

(3)

ENME303
Controls and Vibrations

(4)

ENME304
Engineering
Fluid
Mechanics

(5)

ENME305
Thermodynamics and Heat Transfer

(6)

ENME307 Performance of Engineering Materials

(7)

ENME311 Engineering Design and Production

Management

(8)

ENME
313 Electro Technology for Mechanical

Engineers


Page 186 2011 Calendar

Mechatronics Engineering

Regulation 34. Replace all with the following;


34 Second Professional Examination

(1)

ENMT301Mechatronic System Design

(2)

ENCE361 Embedded Systems 1

(3)

ENEL371 Power Electronics 1

(4)

ENME204 Introduction to Thermo
-
Fluid
s Engineering

(5)

ENME302
Computational and Applied Mechanical Analysis

(6)

ENME303 Controls and Vibrations

(7)

ENCE362 Digital Electronics
or

ENEL301 Fundamentals of Engineering Economics and Management


Page186 2011 Calendar


Natural Resources Engineering

Regulatio
n 37. Replace all with the following;


37. Second Professional Examination

(1)

ENNR 313 Natural Resources Engineering Design Studio 2

(2)

ENNR 320 Integrated Catchment Analysis

(3)

ENNR 322 Ecological Engineering

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(4)

ENCN 304 Deterministic Mathematical Methods

(5)

ENCN 305
Computer Programming and Stochastic Modelling

(6)

ENCN 342 Fluid Mechanics and Hydraulics

(7)

ENCN 353 Geotechnical Engineering or ENGE486 Engineering Geomorphology

(8)

ENCN 371 Project and Infrastructure Management



Course Catalogue entry

ENCI 313 Civil Engineering
Design Studio 2

15 Points 0.1250 EFTS

Conceptual design of multi
-
disciplinary civil engineering

projects; regulatory planning; professional skills; economic,

social and environmental assessments.

P: ENCN 213, ENCN 261, ENCN 242 ENCN 371

R: ENCI 312, ENNR 313

EQ: ENNR 313

ENCI313
-
12S2 (C) Semester 2


ENCI 335 Structural Analysis

15 Points 0.1250 EFTS

Solid mechanics applied to structural systems. Analysis

of indeterminate structures. Introduction to structural

dynamics
and the response of structures to earthquakes.

P: ENCN 231, EMTH 210

R: ENCI 334

ENCI335
-
12S1 (C) Semester 1


ENCI 336 Structural Design

15 Points 0.1250 EFTS

Concrete and steel as structural materials. Design
of

members for tension, compression, shear, and flexure.

Welded and
bolted connections. Limit
-
state design

concepts. Serviceability.

P: ENCN 213, ENCN 221, ENCN 231, ENCI 335

R: ENCI 332, ENCI 333

ENCI336
-
12S2 (C) Semester 2


ENCN 304 Deterministic Mathema
tical Methods

15 Points 0.1250 EFTS

Analytical and numerical methods for engineering

problems. Vector calculus. Systems of linear equations.

Systems of
ordinary differential equations. Partial

differential equations.

P: EMTH 210

C: ENCN
305

R: ENCI 302

ENCN304
-
12S1 (C) Semester 1


ENCN 305 Computer Programming and Stochastic Modelling

15 Points 0.1250 EFTS

Programming in Matlab. Exploratory data analysis, model

fitting, optimisation, maximum likelihood, residuals

analysis,
outlier detection, simulation, bootstrap methods.

P: EMTH 210

R: ENCI 303

ENCN305
-
12S1 (C) Semester 1


ENCN 342 Fluid Mechanics and Hydraulics

15 Points 0.1250 EFTS

Open channel flow; pipe networks; Navier
-
Stokes equations;

scale and dimensional analysis; inviscid flow; boundary

layers; turbulent flow; lift and drag.

P: ENCN 242, EMTH 210

R: ENCI 341

ENCN342
-
12S2 (C) Semester 2


ENCN 353 Geotechnical Engineering

15 Points 0.1250 EFTS

19 UC/11BE(Hons)/1


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Mohr's circle
; time
-
dependent soil behaviour; settlement;

capacity and failure of foundations; field investigations;

slope
stability; earth pressure theories and retaining

structures.

P: ENCN 253, EMTH 210

R: ENCI 351

ENCN353
-
12S2 (C) Semester 2


ENCN 371 Project and
infrastructure Management

15 Points 0.1250 EFTS

Project and infrastructure asset management, procurement

methods, estimating, finance and accounting, economic

appraisal, uncertainty and decision
-
making.

R: ENCI 363, ENCI 4
03

ENCN371
-
12S1 (C) Semester 1


ENCE 360 Operating Systems

15 Points 0.1250 EFTS

This course provides an overview of the concept of

operating systems. An operating system is the most

important
system software and manages
all the resources

of a computer. This course provides a detailed view of

operating system
functions such as process management,

memory management, I/O management, file management

and virtualisation.
This course also provides information

about concepts such

as mutual exclusion, and concurrent

processes. There is an
emphasis on design, implementation,

and evaluation of modern operating systems including

mobile and real
-
time
operating systems.

P: ENCE 260.

R: COSC 321

RP: COSC 110, COSC 261, COSC 262.

ENCE360
-
12S2 (C) Semester 2


ENCE 361 Embedded Systems 1

15 Points 0.1250 EFTS

Embedded Systems is the study of specialised computer

hardware, such as microcontrollers, programmed to perform

a
series of tasks, typically using a
high
-
level language such

as C, and targeted towards dedicated applications.

P: ENCE 260

R: ENEL 353, ENEL 323, COSC 361, ELEC 361, ENEL 340

ENCE361
-
12S1 (C) Semester 1


ENCE 362 Digital Electronics

15 Points 0.1250 EFTS

An introduction to logic theory and
its application to the

analysis, synthesis and simulation of digital logic

c
ircuits.
Ca

e

An introduction to logic devices and the digital assumption

made of switching anal
o
gue circuits. Also covered is the

implementation of circuit designs using a
hardward

description language with specific application to the design

of ALUs
and simple microprocessors.

P: ENCE 260, ENEL 270

R: ENEL 353 or ENEL 340

ENCE362
-
12S2 (C) Semester 2


ENEL 300 Electrical and Computer Engineering

Design 2

15 Points 0.1250 EFTS

Electrical and Computer Engineering design principles.

Electronic system design
-
and
-
build. Circuit design and

simulation.
Printed circuit board design. Embedded

system programming/development, construc
tion,

and documentation. Novel
product design, applying

project management and market consideration

elements. Individual on
-
paper design related to

student's specialisation. Industry
-
based design systems.

Documentation preparation.

P: ENEL 200, ENCE 260,
ENEL 270

R: ENEL 350

ENEL300
-
12W (C) Whole Year (S1 and S2)


ENEL 301 Fundamentals of Engineering

Economics and Management

15 Points 0.1250 EFTS

Engineering projects and ventures require management.

This course identifies the different ma
nagement activities

involved and develops the skills necessary for managing

technology projects and professional practice. Specifically,

the
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course formally covers the following graduate

competencies required for engineers as per the Washington

Accord
Graduate (2009).

P: 15 points of any First Professional Engineering course

R: ENEL 350

ENEL301
-
12W (C) Whole Year (S1 and S2)


ENEL 320 Signals and Communications

15 Points 0.1250 EFTS

Communication engineering and signal processing.

Convolution, correlation, Fourier series and transform,

amplitude
modulation, angle modulation, analogue filters,

random processes, noise in modulated systems, discrete

signal
processing, digital transmission (PCM, TDM and FDM),

DTFT/DFT and FIR/IIR filter

design.

P: ENEL 220,EMTH 210, ENEL 321

R: ENEL 332, ENEL 351

ENEL320
-
12S2 (C) Semester 2


ENEL 321 Control Systems

15 Points 0.1250 EFTS

System modelling. Continuous
-
time and discrete
-
time

system dynamics. Time domain and
frequency domain

analysis.
Feedback control. Control system performance and

robustness. Control system design techniques.

P: ENEL 220, EMTH 210

R: ENEL 351

ENEL321
-
12S1 (C) Semester 1


ENFO 327 Wood Science

15 Points 0.1250 EFTS

Wood structure. Wood/fluid relationships. Biodeterioration

of wood. Wood preservation. Mechanical conversion.

Panel
products. Wood as an engineering material. Wood in

building. Use of wood residues. Wood chemistry. Pulp and

paper.

P: Subject to approval of

the Director of Studies, Forest

Engineering.

R: FORE 327

ENFO327
-
12S2 (C) Semester 2


ENNR 320 Integrated Catchment Analysis

15 Points 0.1250 EFTS

Integrated analysis of water, land, and ecology. GIS, spatial

analysis, soils,
hydro
-
meteorology, vegetation, catchment

hydrology, catchment
-
level policy, systems analysis.

P: ENCN 242

R: ENNR 306

ENNR320
-
12S1 (C) Semester 1


FORE 316 Forest Management

30 Points 0.2500 EFTS

Forest management as decision
-
making.
Operations

Research techniques for forest management. Information

requirements for forest management planning. Stand level

analysis. Forest estate level analysis. Integration of the

forest
estate with harvesting and marketing decisions.

Human factors: role

and style of leadership, communication,

motivation, teamwork and problem solving.

R: ENFO 316, FORE 316
-
prior to 2011, FORE 319, FORE 320,

ENFO 491
-
prior to 2011.

FORE316
-
12S2 (C) Semester 2


FORE 342 Geospatial Technologies in Forestry

15
Points 0.1250 EFTS

Information technology and its role in various forest

management situations, such as conservation

management,

b
iosecurity management, roading,

harvesting, asset management, product transportation

and logistics, and product
chain of
custody. Teaching of the

software and hardware skills required to analyse and solve

spatial problems in forest
management, including aerial

photography, geographic information system (GIS) software,

and global positioning
system (GPS) technology.

R: FORE 4
42 prior to 2011

FORE342
-
12S1 (C) Semester 1


19 UC/11BE(Hons)/1


9


ENME 301 Engineering Design and Production Quality

15 Points 0.1250 EFTS

Design process, creative design, simple structures,

shafts, bearings couplings and brakes; mechanical power

transmission. Production quality.

P: ENME 211 and ENME 222 (old regs.); or ENME 201, ENME 202

and ENME 221 (new regs.)

R: ENME 340

ENME301
-
12S1 (C) Semester 1


ENME 302 Computational and Applied Mechanical Analysis

15 Points 0.1250 EFTS

Par
tial differential equations and their classification;

boundary and initial conditions; analytical solution

methods.
Introduction to computational solution

techniques and packages in solid mechanics (FEM), fluid

dynamics (CFD) and
heat/mass transfer.

P:
EMTH 210 or MATH 264 or EMTH 204; EMTH 271, ENME 222

and ENME 332 (old regs.) or EMTH 210, EMTH 271,

E
NME 202,

and ENME 204 (new regs.).

R: ENME 342; EMTH 391

ENME302
-
12S2 (C) Semester 2


ENME 303 Controls and Vibrations

15 Points 0.1250
EFTS

Design and analysis of feedback control systems for

dynamic systems. Focus is on using these tools for design

and
problem solving using classical feedback control

methods, including: Laplace transforms, block diagrams,

dynamic
response, steady
-
state e
rror analysis, stability

analysis, root locus plots, frequency response analysis.

P: (1) EMTH 210 and (2) Either (ENME 223 and ENME 331) or

ENME 203.

R: ENME 333

ENME303
-
12S1 (C) Semester 1


ENME 305 Thermodynamics and Heat Transfer

15 Points

0.1250 EFTS

Entropy and its application as a thermodynamic property;

Representation and analysis of thermodynamic cycles (ideal

and practical); Heat transfer modes (conduction, convection and radiation) and their analysis; Heat exchangers;

Combustion.

P: ENME 225 (old regs.); ENME 204 (new regs.)

R: ENME 345; ENME 354

ENME305
-
12S2 (C) Semester 2


ENME 307 Thermodynamics and Heat Transfer

15 Points 0.1250 EFTS

Modelling elastic and plastic behaviour. Mechanisms of

ductile/brittle overload,
fatigue, creep and corrosion. Linear

elastic fracture mechanics. Prediction of remaining life due

to fatigue, creep, corrosive environments. Fracture safe

design and fracture control plans. Correlation between

chemical, structural and physical
characteristics of metals

and
plastics necessary for appropriate material selection,

design and processing.

P: ENME 227 (old regs.); ENME 207 (new regs.)

R: ENME 457; ENME 477

ENME307
-
12S2 (C) Semester 2


ENME 311 Engineering Design and Production Manageme
nt

15 Points 0.1250 EFTS

Engineering design reports, design for fatigue, fasteners,

welded joints, cranes; use of engineering codes, pressure

vessel design, hydraulic machinery. Production process

design and management.

P: ENME 340 (old regs
.) or ENME 301 (new regs.)

R: ENME 341, ENME 336

ENME311
-
12S2 (C) Semester 2


ENME 313 Electro Technology for Mechanical Engineers

15 Points 0.1250 EFTS

An introduction to the basic principles of circuit theories,

RL and RC circuits,
transduction principles, mechanical

measurements, instrumentation techniques, operational

amplifiers, data acquisition, Programmable Logic Control,

power electronics and electric machines and control.

P: ENME 211 (old regs.); or ENME 201 and ENME 221 (new
regs.)

19 UC/11BE(Hons)/1


10


R: ENME 339, ENME 443

ENME313
-
12S1 (C) Semester 1


ENMT 301 Mechatronics System Design


30 Points 0.2500 EFTS

Design process, mechatronic system modelling, design

methodology and tools, creative design, machine elements,

mechanical power transmission, sensors, actuators,

computer vision, intelligent control.

P: ENMT 201

ENMT301
-
12W (C) Whole Year (S1 and S2)

Limited entry. See limitation of entry regulations.


ENEL 371 Power Electronics 1

15 Points
0.1250 EFTS

Single switch dc/dc converters. PWM, dc to ac converters,

ac motor control. Controlled and uncontrolled rectifiers,

brushed dc motor control.

P: ENEL 270, ENEL 220 or ENMT 201

R: ENEL 335

ENEL371
-
12S2 (C) Semester 2


ENME 204 Introduction to
Thermo
-
fluids Engineering

15 Points 0.1250 EFTS

Fluid Properties; Fluid Statics; Control Volume Analysis;

Mass, Momentum, and Energy Equations; Bernoulli

Equation
and Applications; Boundary Layer Concept; Pipe

Flows and Losses; First
and Second Law of Thermodynamics;

Evaluation
of Thermodynamic Properties; Ideal and Real

Gases; Condensable Substances; Heat Transfer Modes;

Electrical Analogy.

P: Subject to the approval of the Dean of Engineering and

Forestry

R: ENME 224; ENME 225; ENME
345

ENME204
-
12S1 (C) Semester 1


ENNR 313 Natural Resources Engineering Design Studio 2

15 Points 0.1250 EFTS

Conceptual design of multi
-
disciplinary natural resources

engineering projects; regulatory planning; professional

skills;
eco
nomic, social and environmental assessments.

P: ENCN 213, ENCN 242, ENCN 261, ENCN 281, ENCN 371

R: ENCI 312, ENCI 313

ENNR313
-
12S2 (C) Semester 2


ENNR 320 Integrated Catchment Analysis

15 Points 0.1250 EFTS

Integrated analysis of water,

land, and ecology. GIS, spatial

analysis, soils, hydro
-
meteorology, vegetation, catchment

hydrology, catchment
-
level policy, systems analysis.

P: ENCN 242

R: ENNR 306

ENNR320
-
12S1 (C) Semester 1


ENNR 322 Ecological Engineering

15 Points 0.1250

EFTS

Principles of ecological engineering, ecosystem

biogeochemical dynamics, toxicology, stormwater and nonpoint

source
pollution control, sub
-
surface contaminant

transport.

P: ENCN 242, ENCN 281

R: ENNR 305

ENNR322
-
12S2 (C) Semester 2


COSC 263
Introduction to Software

Engineering

15 Points 0.1250 EFTS

An introduction to the tools and techniques of software

engineering. Topics covered include object
-
oriented

programming and design, test
-
driven development and

software
project management.

P: (1) COSC 121; (2) COSC 122; (3) 15 points from Mathematics,

Statistics, Engineering Mathematics or MSCI 110. MATH
101

is not acceptable. MATH 120/STAT 101 are strongly

recommended.

R: COSC 205, COSC 224

COSC263
-
12S1 (C) Semester 1

19 UC/11BE(Hons)/1


11



COSC 363 Computer Graphics

15 Points 0.1250 EFTS

The course focuses on all aspects of fundamental computer

graphics, including 2D/3D object representations,

transformations, modelling and rendering algorithms. The

course also aims to provid
e a good foundation for OpenGL

programming, which is a widely accepted standard for

developing graphics applications.

P: (1) ENCE 260, (2) 30 points of 200
-
level Computer Science,

(3) 30 points of EMTH or 15 points of MATH/STAT (MATH
120

recommended). MATH

101 is not acceptable.

RP: COSC 110, COSC 261, ENCE 260

COSC363
-
12S2 (C) Semester 2


COSC 368 Humans and Computers

15 Points 0.1250 EFTS

The course provides an introduction to Human
-
Computer

Interaction (HCI). HCI is concerned with
understanding,

designing, implementing and evaluating user
-
interfaces

so that they better support users in carrying out their

tasks. On
completing the course you will have knowledge

of the theoretical foundations of designing for interaction

between
humans

and computers. You will also have

practical experience in implementing and evaluating

graphical user

i
nterfaces.

P: (1) 45 points of (200
-
level Computer Science and

ENCE 260), (2) 30 points of EMTH or 15 points of MATH/STAT

(MATH 120 recommended). MATH 1
01 is not acceptable.

R: COSC 225

RP: From 2011 onwards: COSC 110, COSC 263. Before 2011:

COSC 110

COSC368
-
12S1 (C) Semester 1