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School of Psychological Sciences and Health

Honours Class Statements

2012/13


Class Code

Class name

Page


Compulsory Classes


C8 417

Conceptual and Historical Issues in Psychology

(runs across both semesters)

2




Optional Class: semester 1 and 2


41402

Advanced Organisational Behaviour (Note:
this
class runs over semester 1 and semester 2
)

7

Optional Classes
: semester 1


C8 403

Psychoanalytic Personality Psychology

11

C8 413

Qualitative Methodologies in Practice

14

C8 415

Social Development

17

C8 416

Artificial Intelligence

19

C8 420

Clinical Aspects of Memory

23

Optional Classes: semester 2


C8 409

Forensic Psychology

25

C8 410

Human Performance

28

C8 411

Physiological Psychology

30

C8 432

Health Psychology

32

C8

499

Perception and
Action

34







2


COMPULSORY CLASS

C8

417


Conceptual and Historical Issues in Psychology


Class leader:
Dr Kellyanne Findlay (GH

578
)


Semester

1 and 2


Aims:

Conceptual and historical issues in psychology are themes which will have been
encountered in
every previous class. This class will directly consider the issues that
arise from consideration of these topics to enable a clearer understanding of where
the discipline of psychology came from, where it is going and what current status it
has in the sci
entific community. Conceptual issues which demand philosophical
methods of enquiry and often deal with the higher questions such as consciousness,
free will and ethical considerations are covered as these are essential to a full
understanding of human psy
chology and are relevant to every other area of
psychology studied. Conceptual and Historical Issues in Psychology is a required
topic for course accreditation by the British Psychological Society and while these
issues have been addressed tangentially in

every class, having them directly taught
will result in a more thorough grounding in the concepts and issues involved and
enable consideration of the issues in many different conceptual contexts rather than
being limited to those addressed in a specific p
revious class.


Content:

This class is taught over both semesters with one hour
-
long session per week. The
provisional timetable is provided below.

Week of term

Activity

Title

Staff member(s)

SEMESTER 1

1

Introduction +
PBL

Introduction to the class
and

introduction to Appy
-
days PBL task

Kellyanne Findlay,
Sally Wiggins + 4
GTAs/staff
members

2

PBL

Appy
-
days session 2

Kellyanne Findlay,
Sally Wiggins + 4
GTAs/staff
members

3

Personal Development week

4*

PBL

Appy
-
days session 3

Kellyanne Findlay,
Sally

Wiggins + 4
GTAs/staff
members

5*

Lecture 1

The wider picture: Where
did it all start?

Kellyanne Findlay

6

Personal Development week

7

Lecture 2

The scientific revolution of
the seventeenth century.
The Enlightenment and
the establishment of
opposing philosophical
Jimmie Thomson

3


camps: e.g. rationalism vs
empiricism

8

Lecture 3

The first attempts to
establish psychology as
an independent discipli
ne.
Initial directions: the
establishment of Wundt’s
laboratory, the
contribution of James,
Galton, Freud, Von
Helmholtz etc.

Jimmie Thomson

9

Personal Development week

10

Lecture 4

Strengthening the
scientific standing of
Psychology:
Behaviourism and
cognitive psychology. The
reaction against
Introspection, the concept
of the black box, the
computer metaphor.

Diane Dixon

11

Lecture 5

The input from brain
research. The emergence
of the single case study
and cognitive
neuropsychology: From
Phineas Gage
to Dee
Fletcher. From shaping
our understanding of the
nature of the brain to the
point where the tools are
shaping the questions
themselves.

Stephen Butler

12

Lecture 6

The mind
-
brain problem,
consciousness and free
-
will. Dualism, Monism,
Materialism, t
he structure
and function of
consciousness and free
will vs reductionistic
principles.

Steve Kelly

SEMESTER 2

1

PBL

Anarchy in the UEC
session 1

Kellyanne Findlay,
Sally Wiggins + 4
GTAs/staff
members

2

PBL

Anarchy in the UEC
session 2

Kellyanne
Findlay,
Sally Wiggins + 4
GTAs/staff
members

4


3

PBL

Anarchy in the UEC
session 3

Kellyanne Findlay,
Sally Wiggins + 4
GTAs/staff
members

4

Lecture 7

What is science? Is
psychology a science?
Should it be a science?

Kellyanne Findlay

5

Lecture 8

The cont
ribution of
quantitative and
qualitative research
methods. Can F, p, r, t
and z answer all the
questions? Should they?

Simon Hunter

6

Personal Development week

7

Lecture 9

Is `mental illness’ really
an illness? How has the
DSM affected our
perception of mental
illness?

Madeleine Grealy

8

Personal Development week

9

Lecture 10

Social constructionism

Jim Boyle

10

Lecture 11

Modularity of Mind.
Arguments for and
against the

encapsulation
of specific processing
ability.

Lizann Bonnar

11

Lecture 12

Parapsychology.
Debunking fakes, the
work of Rhine, Honorton
and Morris, different types
of psi and their
measurement.

Steve Kelly

*individual 5
-
minute presentations will take place during weeks 4 and 5. Video
cameras will be set up and a booking system will be in place for students to arrange
their recording. All video files should be submitted by the end of week 5 (semester
1).


Le
arning Outcomes:

Knowledge and understanding

1.

Students will evaluate the contribution of philosophical concepts to current
psychological theories

2.

Students will synthesise philosophical positions and psychological concepts.

3.

Throughout the class students wil
l be encouraged to reflect upon the
foundations of psychological knowledge

4.

Students will be able to evaluate and assess the validity of various accounts
of knowledge including ‘scientific’ knowledge in a psychological context.

5.

Students will be required to
appraise the historical context and current framing
of contemporary issues in psychology

5


6.

Students will comprehend how psychology initially evolved from earlier
explanations in philosophy, and recognise the legacy left by those contributors
to the rationali
st/empiricist and other debates.

7.

Students will be required to consider how psychology may progress in the
new millennium.

8.

Students will describe and discuss relevant content from the philosophy of
science including the nature and progress of theoretical ex
planation.

9.

Students will be able to critically evaluate a variety of approaches employed
during the 20th Century to explain mind and behaviour

Practical skills

10.

Students will prepare well
-
structured arguments and present them

11.

Students will critically
review issues in the application of psychological
knowledge


12.

Students will develop group working skills through participation in PBL tasks

13.

Students will continue to enhance skills in independent learning through
private study

Cognitive skills

14.

Students will

demonstrate synthesis in their thinking regarding the discipline


Place in Course:

This is a core class for all students taking honours year Psychology.


Methods of Teaching
:

The course will be presented by means of lectures and problem based learning

sessions. There will be two PBL tasks, one in each semester, and 12 lectures.


Assessment:

The final mark for this class will consist of,

Individual video
-
recorded presentation = 10%

Personal development portfolio = 30%

Final examination = 60%

Presentati
ons. The first PBL session will require students to record a short (5
-
minute) video describing the outcome of the task. Video cameras will be located in
rooms located around the department and students will be able to book a suitable
slot to record their p
resentation.

Personal development portfolio (PDP). Throughout the academic year, you will be
engaged in various personal development activities that are designed to enhance
your employability. These will be combined to produce a Personal Development
Portfo
lio that will be submitted at the end of term.

Final examination. The paper will consist of eight questions, and candidates will be
required to answer any four questions.

The University and the Department require students to attend lectures, seminars,
tut
orials, and practicals regularly and to perform satisfactorily in the associated work.
You are reminded that, although we do not take registers, attendance at lectures and
tutorials is compulsory. If you fail to attend, you may in accordance with Regulatio
n
15.1.12 be excluded from your Honours examinations.





6


Recommended textbooks:

The class textbook is,

Brysbaert, M. and Rastle, K. (2009).

Historical and Conceptual Issues in Psychology.
London: Prentice
-
Hall.

Other recommended reading:

Bersoff, D.N. (2003).
Ethical conflicts in psychology
. New York: American
Psychological Association.

Gross, R.D. (2003).
Themes, issues and debates in psychology
. London: Hodder
and Stoughton.

Hock, R. (1995).
Forty studies that changed psycholo
gy: Explorations into the
history of psychological research.

London: Prentice
-
Hall.

Jones, D. & Elcock, J. (2001).
History and theories of psychology: a critical
perspective
. London: Hodder Arnold.

Lundy, T. Benjamin Jr. (2006). A

brief history of mo
dern psychology
. Chichester:
Wiley Blackwell.

Notterman, J.M. (2004). Persistent conceptual issues in psychology.
Theory &
Psychology
, 14, 239
-
260.

Pickren, W.A. & Dewsbury, D.A. (2002).
Evolving perspectives on the history of
psychology
. New York: A
merican Psychological Association.

Richards, G. (2002).
Putting psychology in its place
(2nd ed). London: Routledge.

Sheehy, N. (2004).
Fifty key thinkers in psychology
. London: Routledge.

Valentine, E.R. (1992).
Conceptual issues in psychology

(2
nd ed). London:
Routledge.

Students will be expected to search for, select and review current journal articles on
the topics covered.




7


OPTIONAL CLASSES


Semester 1 and 2 Class


41402


Advanced Organisational Behaviour

This class is offered by the Business School. It runs over
both

semesters
.


Lecturers

Prof Dora Scholarios,

d.scholarios@strath.ac.uk

0141 548 3135

Dr
Calvin Burns,
calvin.burns@strath.ac.uk

0141 548 4251

Belgin Okay,
belgin.okay@strrath.ac.uk

0141 548 3973


Dr. Burns will act as module co
-
ordinator.

Introduction

Purpose &

Prerequisites:

Advanced Organisational Behaviour
is an Honours year elective, which runs over
two semesters, offered in the degree subject Human Resource Management. The
class draws on current themes in HRM understood from the perspective of micro
-
organis
ational behaviour theory and research. Although the theoretical underpinning
of the material covered is primarily about work and organisational issues at the level
of individual behaviour in organisations, a contextual understanding of these issues
is also

encouraged. The class builds on themes first introduced in 1
st

and 2
nd

year
HRM, although those classes are not prerequisites for this class.


Class organisation

In academic session 2011
-
2012, the class will be organised as follows:


Semester One

will be structured around the Reframing Organizations book and
concepts. We will explore issues in organizational life from four perspectives: The
Structural Frame, the HRM Frame, the Symbolic Frame, and the Political Frame.

Semester Two

will be structu
red around selected research
-
led topics which follow
on from the four frames presented in Semester One.



Objectives

Semester One

will introduce you to the idea of ‘Reframing’ Organisations. Although
the emphasis in this class is on ‘micro’, or individual
-
level, approaches to
organisational behaviour, ‘Re
-
framing’ takes into consideration more ‘macro’ or
sociological and critical management approaches as well. As such, you will learn to
think about an organisation’s structure, culture, HRM policies, and i
ts power and
politics from different points of view. This offers you the opportunity to integrate and
apply the knowledge and critical thinking skills that you have gained during study for
your degree. Students will be required to write an individual ess
ay.

Semester Two

involves an in
-
depth exploration of selected research topics in
organisational behaviour. Students will be required to work in groups and make a
short group presentation about one of these topics from pre
-
set questions. This is
intended to allow student
s to critically evaluate the concepts covered in class and
experience how they can be applied in organisations.

8


Teaching Methods

The format of the class will be a two
-
hour teaching session each week. This will
involve a variation of formal lectures, guest
lectures, interactive discussion, problem
-
based learning tasks and debate structured around pre
-
assigned readings and
questions.

Course documents, lecture overheads, announcements, and guidance on readings
for the course material will all be accessible thr
ough the MyPlace pages. You should
be able to gain access to these pages when you register for the class.


Coursework and
Assessment

Your final grade will be based on:

Group Presentation = 5%

Individual Assignment = 25%

Self
-
directed Project = 30%

Final
Exam = 40%

The Group Presentations and Individual Assignment will be based on the case study,
Success is in the Eye of the Beholder : Reflections on a Culture Change Effort
.
The Group Presentations will take place in Semester 1 (weeks 10 and 11) and the
Individual Assignment will be due in week 12.

The Self
-
directed Project will be completed during Semester 2 and will be due in
week 10. Further details about this will be forthcoming. The Final Exam (3 hours
long) will be based on material from Semester
2 only.


Lecture Programme and Reading

Semester 1

Week

Date / Time

Topic

Lecturer

1

27 Sept 2011

No Lecture

(Honours Dissertation Workshop)


2

4 Oct 2011

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8

15 Nov 2011

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Preparation for Group Presentations
(No Lecture)


10

29 Nov 2011

10 am


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11

6 Dec 2011

10 am


12 pm

Group Presentations / Feedback


Calvin Burns

Dora Scholarios

12

13 Dec 2011

Individual Assignment due

(No Lecture)



Core Reading

Bolman, L.G. & Deal, T.E. (1997).
Reframing Organizations: Artistry, choice and
leadership

(2nd edition). London: Jossey
-
Bass.

Note: More recent editions of the above text are available in the library and are
acceptable alternatives.

Other core reading will be posted on the MyPlace page for this class.


Semester 2

Week

Date / Time

Topic

Lecturer

1

24 Jan 2012

10 am


12 pm

Safety Culture

Calvin Burns

2

31 Jan 2012

10 am


12 pm

Safety Culture

Calvin Burns

3

7 Feb 2012

10 am


12 pm

Recruitment & Selection

Dora Scholarios

4

14 Feb 2012

10 am


12 pm

Recruitment & Selection

Dora
Scholarios

5

21 Feb 2012

10 am


12 pm

Job Quality & Attitudes

Belgin Okay


6

28 Feb 2012

10 am


12 pm

Graduate Careers & Employability

Belgin Okay

7

6 March 2012

Self
-
directed Project (No Lecture)



8

13 March 2012

Self
-
directed Project (No Lecture)



9

20 March 2012

Self
-
directed Project (No Lecture)



10

27 March 2012

10 am


12 pm

Exam Review /

Self
-
directed Project due

Calvin Burns

Belgin Okay

Dora Scholarios


Core Reading:

Core reading for Semester 2 will be posted on the MyPlace page for
this class.


Feedback

You will receive written feedback from your lecturers on all formally submitted pieces
of coursework along with a percentage mark. However, you should not consider this
to be the only feedback you are given.

You will receive feedback in a variety of ways. For example, after you give a
presentation in class, your lecturer will likely comment on the strengths, weaknesses,
or other aspects of that presentation. This is feedback! If you discuss your ideas for
c
oursework with your lecturers or they provide clarification about the coursework,
this too is feedback! (Lecturers cannot be expected to show you how to complete
10


the assessment nor mark a first draft). Even when you ask a question in class and
your lectu
rer clarifies a point or issue, this is feedback! As part of becoming a self
-
learner (earning your Honours degree), it is up to you to note all forms of feedback
and act on it to address your learning and development needs.


Submission Extensions

Extensi
ons will only be given for serious medical reasons or on compassionate
grounds (e.g. death of a family member or close friend).

Where an extension has been granted, the Class Co
-
ordinator will agree a new
deadline. This deadline will be subject to the
normal penalties if it is not met.

Evidence of the above (doctor’s note / death certificate) will be sought by the Class
Co
-
ordinator to avoid a penalty for late submission.


Access to Materials

Students should be aware that the onus is on them to research

and select materials
needed for coursework, exams, or other assessment activities. They should not rely
only on materials that might be provided by lecturers. Appropriate material is
available through the library including e
-
journals.


Penalties for Lat
e Submission

The penalty scheme for the late submission of assessed work, which is the same
across Strathclyde Business School is as follows:

1 day late

= deduction of 5% of mark awarded

2 days late

= deduction of 10% of mark awarded

3 days late

= deduct
ion of 20% of mark awarded

4 days late

= deduction of 40% of mark awarded

5 days late

= deduction of 80% of mark awarded

After 5 days

= deduction of 100% of mark awarded

This applies to weekdays only where students are required to submit a hard copy of
the assessment but it includes weekends where students are required to submit
electronically. Failure to submit coursework will result in a student being deemed
“Not Qualified” to sit the final exam, and thus a mark of “Fail” will be recorded. Under
these

circumstances and at the discretion of the Class Co
-
ordinator, a student may
be permitted to re
-
sit the exam once the coursework has been submitted and
assessed at a “Pass” standard.


Pass Mark

The overall pass mark, taking account of all elements of asse
ssment, is
40%
.
However, students must also attain a minimum mark of
30%

in the examination
component in order to pass. So irrespective of your essay mark, if you do not
achieve 30% in the exam you will be deemed to have failed to reach an acceptable
lev
el of performance


your examination mark alone will be returned to Registry.
The rationale for this is to require at least a basic level of performance in the exam
whilst still allowing for some compensation between exam performance and essay
attainment
within the overall assessment.

As this is an honours
-
level class, you will
not have the opportunity to re
-
sit a failed exam paper.

All students are expected to attend for examination at the University of
Strathclyde at the dates and times posted.


11


Semester 1 Classes


C8 303


Psychoanalytic Personality Psychology


Class Leader:

Dr Jim Baxter

Semester
1


Aims:

This class will consider the historical and conceptual development of Psychoanalytic
Personality Psychology
, tracing its development from
Freud’s work, through the work
of the early Object Relations theorists, to modern approaches to Object Relations
and Attachment theory.


The class will build on coursework in C8 317 ‘Individual Differences’. The class aims
to assess critically the contrib
ution that Psychoanalytic and Attachment theorists
and
practitioners

can make to understanding personality. The class will promote
theoretical insight and reflective learning by engaging students with nomothetic
studies of various aspects of psychoanalytic

principles in practice such that links to
discussions of theory are established. In addition to lectures, students will analyse
personalities of two notable characters in history,
critically assessing

what unique
insights into their natures psychoanalytic

theory can add to those of approaches
rooted in cognitive
-
behavioural theories with which students will already be familiar
from the third
-
year classes mentioned above. Students will thereby be further
encouraged to identify the links between background l
iterature and the complexity of
whole personalities.


Content and Curriculum

Lecture Blocks:

1)

Sigmund Freud and The Shadow of the Object

2)

WRD Fairbairn and Endopsychic Structure

3)

Melanie Klein

4)

Heinz Kohut & Erich Fromm

4)

Christopher Bollas and t
he Transformational Object

6)

Links to Attachment Theory

7)

Affect Regulation and Mentalisation.


Learning Outcomes

Cognitive skills:

1) Students will further develop the critical and analytical skills encouraged in classes
earlier in their curriculum.

2
) Students will be encouraged to detect links between the discrete observations
provided by empirical research on aspects of personality psychology and examples
of those observations occurring in real
-
world examples.

Knowledge and understanding:

3) Studen
ts will be encouraged to make links between material in this class with that
presented in previous classes and the need to draw upon it in assessing the course
material

12


4) They should realise the importance of assessing the methods used by
psychoanalytic t
heorists practitioners in terms of the theoretical strengths upon which
it is based.

5) Students should be able to form a critical overview of current personality theory
and be able to identify the strengths and weaknesses of different methods of data
collection and analysis.


Transferable skills:

6) Critical assessment of advanced concepts. Problem identification. Development of
team working skills in collaborative learning and report writing tasks.



Teaching, Learning Strategies, and A
ssessment


Sum
mative assessment:


Final examination. Candidates will be invited to answer two questions from a choice
of six in a two
-
hour exam. No resit.


Formative assessment:

Satisfactory levels of participation in student
-
led projects will be a course
-
requirement. E
ach of these projects will require students to research and apply
theories and concepts introduced in lectures to personality case studies. Students
will work in online groups of four or five collaboratively to produce a report on two
case studies, offerin
g each other constructive criticism at each stage of the
preparation of their reports. These projects will build on VLE
-
based practices to
which students were introduced in c8 105 & C8 106 Basic Psychology.


In Project 1, students will analyse a video of k
ey aspects of the life of a well
-
known
public figure, assessing how details of his behaviour reflect on his personality in
terms of material presented in classes and on the basis of further directed reading.
In doing so students will research, develop, a
nd apply concepts introduced in the first
half of the lecture course.


In Project 2 students will collaboratively produce an analysis’ of another well
-
known
public

figure paying special attention to the possible origins in early life of aspects of
that in
dividuals character. In so doing they will be required to integrate material on
the psychology of individual differences from the whole BA course, including all of
the present class.


On completion of each project each group will be required to agree what

standard of
degree mark they believe their work would obtain in an examination and why. This
work will be monitored by the class leader who will provide limited comments and
feedback on each groups’ work, only once it is completed.



Prescribed Reading (a
nd other resources)


General Texts:

Larsen, R.J, and Buss, D.M. (2009) Personality Psychology
.

This is a general text
which students may wish to buy

13


Lenzenweger, M and Clarkin
, J (2005) Major Theories of
Personality

Disorder
(Short loan)


Other Reading:

1.

Atkinson, L., & Goldberg, S. (2004) Attachment Issues in Psychopathology and
Intervention.. Two copies in Short Loan.

2.

Bollas, C. (1987)) The shadow of the object : psychoanalysis of the unthought
known Short Loan 3 Hour Loan (D 150.95 BOL
)

3.

Bowlby, J. Attachment & Loss (1998) (Volumes 1,2, & 3). Pimlico,

4.

Cioffi, Frank (1999). Freud and the Question of Pseudoscience.

5.

Costa, P.T., & Widiger, T.A. (Eds.). (1994) Personality Disorders and the Five
-
Factor Model of Personality. Washington DC. AP
A. 1994. Andersonian Library
Catalogue No. D 616.858 Per (short loan).

6.

Eysenck, H.J. Personality and Individual Differences: A Natural Science
Approach. (1985). Andersonian Library Catalogue No. D 155.2 Eys
-

one
further copy in short loan.

7.

Fairbairn, W
.R.D. (1994) Psychoanalytic Studies of the Personality..
Andersonian Library Catalogue No. D 131.34 Fai.

8.

Fonagy, P. et al. (2002). Affect Regulation, Mentalisation, and the Development
of the Self. Chs. 1 & 3 especially. In Library.

9.

Fonagy, P. (2001). A
ttachment Theory and Psychoanalysis. In library
-

24 hr
short loan.

10.

Fromm, E. (1974) The Anatomy of Human Destructiveness.. Andersonian
Library Catalogue No. D 152.42 Fro.

11.

Grotstein, J.S., & Rinsley, D.B. (Eds.) (1994) Fairbairn and the Origins of Object

Relations Andersonian Library Catalogue No. D 150.195 (Short Loan)

12.

Guntrip, H. (1961) Personality Structure and Human Interaction. Andersonian
Library Catalogue No. D131.34 Gun. Guntrip was a student and analysand of
W.R.D. Fairbairn.

13.

Laing, R.D. (1969).

Self and Others. In library


24hr short loan.

14.

Lenzenwenger, M.F., & Clarkin, J.F. (Eds). Major Theories of Personality
Disorder Guildford Press (2005). Available as e
-
book.

15.

Livesley, W.J. (Ed.) (1995) The DSM IV Personality Disorders. Andersonian
Librar
y Catalogue No. D 616.858 DSM (2 copies in short loan).

16.

Segal, H. (2008) Introduction to the Work of Melanie Klein (24 hour short loan).


Additional:

A folder containing a selection of journal articles relevant to this class is available on
24 hour loan fr
om the general office. These articles are required reading.




14


C84
13


Qualitative Methodologies in Practice


Class leader
:

Dr Sally Wiggins

Semester
1


Overview and aims
:

This class offers students the opportunity to develop a deeper theoretical and
practical understanding of advanced qualitative research methodologies. The class
will consist of small
-
group work and is based around a series of problem
-
based
learning (PBL) tasks. Students should thus be prepared to work actively and
collaboratively w
ith fellow students throughout the class; this style of learning is
demanding, though is designed to encourage deeper learning of core issues and
skills. The various ‘problems’ presented to groups will require students to conduct
literature searches, eval
uate different qualitative methodologies, design small
-
scale
projects, and collect (e.g. using interviews or focus groups) and analyse (e.g. using
discourse analysis or conversation analysis) a data sample. While the class focuses
on qualitative approache
s, the group activities should enable students to develop
their understanding of psychological research methods more broadly, and be able to
evaluate critically the assumptions and implications of various approaches. The
class aims to support and develop
students’ understanding of the epistemological
and theoretical assumptions behind various qualitative methodologies as well as
offering opportunities to practice research skills in a structured environment. The
class should appeal to those with a particul
ar interest in qualitative approaches to
research and those seeking to establish a research career in psychology.


Syllabus:

The class syllabus is organised around three PBL tasks or ‘problems’, each of which
will be undertaken by small groups of students,

who will have a choice over specific
elements of the problem or the topic focus. Software, such as nVivo, will
not

be
taught as the emphasis is on understanding the theoretical bases for using
qualitative methodologies, rather than developing practical s
kills per se. For
example, one problem requires each group to work as a ‘committee’ reviewing
published qualitative research; the actual topic(s) will vary depending on group
members’ interests. The syllabus, consistent with a problem
-
based learning
fram
ework, will therefore not have any fixed ‘topics’, but students will be required to
cover core theoretical issues within qualitative research methods, e.g. the status of
interviews as a means of data collection, the nature of ‘cognition’ and how this is
th
eorised within different methodologies. The main research methods and
methodologies which will be covered are: interviews, focus groups, naturally
occurring observation, interpretative phenomenological analysis (IPA), discourse
analysis (DA) and conversat
ion analysis (CA). The learning outcomes will guide
students and the tutor in ensuring competence has been achieved in particular
areas. Specifically, students will be guided in addressing the following key issues:

1.

What are the underlying assumptions of
different qualitative methodologies
and how can these be used to guide research questions?

2.

What kind of knowledge is produced from different data collection methods
and analytical approaches?

3.

What are the implications of qualitative analyses for our unders
tanding of
psychological phenomena?


15



Learning outcomes:

By the end of the class, students should:



Demonstrate a critical understanding of the theoretical and
epistemological bases of different qualitative research methodologies.



Have a working knowledge
of at least one data collection technique
such as interviewing, focus group and recording naturalistic interaction.



Be able to analyse qualitative data using approaches such as
discursive psychology and interpretative phenomenological analysis.



Be able to

reflect on the process of learning used within the class.


Place in course:

The class will be open to Honours level psychology students as an elective class. It
relates to many aspects of the psychology degree so students will find that they need
to draw on social, developmental, cognitive, biological and research methods
classes.

The class specifically focuses on conceptual issues within research
methodologies.


Teaching hours and method of teaching:

This is a first semester class, running three hours per week for seven weeks.
Classes are likely to be held on Tuesdays 9am
-
11am a
nd Thursdays 9am
-
10am
(room tbc). Each class will focus around small
-
group activities with brief
introductions from the tutor. The tutor will then guide each group in turn, with the
emphasis on supporting self
-
directed learning. At various points, the c
lass will
convene as a whole to assess progress through the learning outcomes. Internet
support is provided through Myplace, and discussion boards and various interactive
tools will be made available to help support students’ learning. Students will also

receive a class handbook, which outlines the structure of classes, procedures for
working in groups and guidance for developing their independent learning skills.


Subject and generic skills covered:

Students should be able to independently search for, a
nd critically evaluate,
research papers and methodologies. They will be required to discuss and formulate
their own arguments on the material, summarising and presenting this where
appropriate; small group work is the main method of working in the class.

They
should also be able to understand the processes involved in applying theories and
methods in research practice. The class will also provide opportunities to practice
and improve oral communication skills.


Assessment:

The formal assessment for the c
lass will consist of one individually written report,
worth 100% of the class assessment, based on the final problem
-
based learning task
conducted within the class. As this is an Honours class, there is no opportunity to re
-
sit the class assessment.


Recommended reading:

There is no prescribed textbook for this course due to the diversity of material, the
nature of problem
-
based learning and the need to source contemporary research in
16


the field. An annotated reading list will be provided. Indicative
reading on this list
includes:



Seale, C., Gobo, G., Gubrium, J.F. and Silverman, D. (2004)(Eds.)
Qualitative
research practice
. London: Sage.



Smith, J.A. (2008)(Ed.)
Qualitative psychology: A practical guide to research
methods
. 2
nd

edition. London: Sage.



Willig, C. and Stainton
-
Rogers, W. (2008)(Eds.)
The Sage handbook of
qualitative research in psychology
. London: Sage.



17


C8

415


Social Development


Class leader
:

Professor Kevin Durkin (kevin.durkin@strath.ac.uk)

Semester 1


Course description

This is an advanced optional class in social development.


Social development is a specialised, though broad area of developmental
psychology. It covers the development of all aspects of social behaviour, social
influence and social reasoning. This
class is intended for students who already have
some grounding in developmental psychology and who wish to study advanced
topics in depth.


A general introduction explains the historical and conceptual underpinnings of
research into social development. Pa
rticular attention is paid to the interacting
contributions of biological, cognitive and environmental factors. The lecture
-
based
component of the course proceeds to cover a range of core topics.


The class places great emphasis on independent and collabor
ative student learning.
Thus, in addition to the core topics presented via lectures, several other,
complementary topics are identified and students are guided towards autonomous
learning in these areas. A major component of the course evaluation is base
d on a
collaborative review project.


Social development is an area of great interest outside of academe. For example,
policy makers, educators, parents, and others raise many questions about the social
behaviour of young people and possible ways to int
ervene; there is recurrent interest
in possible negative influences on the young, problems in development, exposure to
risks, and the scope for positive influences. Reflecting these interests, the class
focuses on the ways in which research can be put to

effective use and how it can be
communicated beyond the scientific literature. Practical exercises are included to
facilitate students’ skills in evaluating and ‘translating’ research for applied purposes.


Key topics

The course takes a primarily topi
c
-
based approach. Lectures address several of the
core topics and students are guided to undertake independent and collaborative
work in a range of related topics.


Key topics include: Infant social behaviour and understanding; attachment;
aggression;

prosocial behaviour; gender; ethnicity and ethnic attitudes; social
cognitive development; social development in adolescence; social development in
adulthood


Learning outcomes

Knowledge and understanding

1.

Students should acquire an understanding of
the breadth and scope of current
research in social development.

2.

Students will be familiarised with a range of advanced concepts in
developmental psychology

18


3.

Students will develop an awareness of the relationship between theory and
research in this field an
d work in neighbouring developmental specialities,
especially cognitive development, and also in social psychology.

4.

Students will acquire an awareness of the diverse range of methodologies
employed in study of social development.

5.

Students will develop skil
ls in the presentation and critical analysis of research
findings which bear on topics of perennial interest and concern among
policymakers and the lay community.

Cognitive skills

6.

Students will advance their skills in applying a critical approach to
psycho
logical research findings.

7.

Students will advance their skills in using the research literature to inform
positions on topics of real world controversy and concern.

8.

Students will gain an appreciation of the connections among different sub
-
disciplines of ps
ychology.

Practical skills

9.

Students will advance their skills in independent and collaborative learning.

10.

Students will be familiarised with behavioural rating scales used routinely in
clinical practice.

11.

Students will add to their experience of
constructing, presenting and
evaluating academic reports, both written and oral.


Reading

Recommended readings will be provided for each lecture/ sseminar topic. Students
are encouraged to use the primary research literature to ensure that their
understan
ding and knowledge bases are up
-
to
-
date and informed by the best
available work.


Assessment

The course is assessed by an exam, by online (peer assessed) collaborative report,
and by class presentation (team
-
based and peer
-
evaluated). The examination
accou
nts for 80% of the final mark. The online collaborative report accounts for 15%
of the final mark. The remaining 5% is based on a team presentation, which is peer
assessed. The pass mark for the whole course is 40%.



This is a level 4 class so there is

no resit available.


Marks for the examination will be based on traditional criteria, including
demonstrable familiarity with an advanced body of relevant literature, relevance of
answer to the question set, skills in structuring and argument, and critic
al analysis.
Marks for the collaborative report will be based on demonstrable familiarity with an
advanced body of relevant literature, skills in structuring and argument, overall
coherence and cohesion, quality of illustration, and critical analysis. Ma
rks for the
peer presentation will be derived from scores on checksheets completed by the peer
audience.





19


C8 416

Artificial Intelligence


Class leader:
Dr Tony Anderson (GH room 6.54b)

Semester

1


Aims:

This course attempts to explore some of the
connections between Psychology
(particularly cognitive psychology / cognitive science) and Artificial Intelligence (AI).
Both the importance of AI for psychological theorising and the importance of
Psychology for the practice of building working programs
in AI will be considered.
The aim of the course is to consider the implications for psychology of developments
in AI, to discuss the theoretical implications of contrasts between program
functioning and what is known about human functioning, and to consid
er the
adequacy of the computational metaphor in general. Please note that the description
and discussions of program functioning will require no specialist (e.g. computer
programming or mathematical) knowledge, and will very much focus on
psychological an
d philosophical issues.


Learning outcomes:

This class attempts to explore some of the connections between Psychology
(particularly cognitive psychology/cognitive science) and Artificial Intelligence (AI).
Both the importance of AI for psychological theori
sing and the importance of
Psychology for the practice of building working programs in AI will be considered.
The broad aim of the class is to consider the implications for psychology of
developments in AI, to discuss the theoretical implications of contra
sts between
program functioning and what is known about human functioning, and to consider
the adequacy of the computational metaphor in general.


On completion of the class, students should be aware of the historical origins of
Artificial Intelligence an
d some of the key philosophical issues that are implicated in
conceptualising the mind as a symbol manipulation system. For example, students
should understand the broad nature of computation as symbol manipulation, and the
significance of computers and th
eir programs (as symbol manipulation machines par
excellence) as potential analogies for brains and minds. They should also be aware
of the doctrine of functionalism and its implications for how we think about human
mentality. Students should also understa
nd the differences between Artificial
Intelligence programs that are based on symbol manipulation architectures, as
opposed to those that are based on parallel distributed processing, and what
implications these different architectures have for theorising
about the mind. Finally,
and bringing the historical dimension of the course (from early origins, through the
heyday of „good old fashioned AI‟ symbol manipulation systems to connectionism) to
a conclusion, the course explores currently cutting edge topics

(particularly artificial
life and simulated evolution) and tries to anticipate likely future directions for
computer models of the mind.


These main objectives will be explored in relation to a number of specific issues
within the different topic areas, n
amely:

i. the knowledge problem in language comprehension, and the depth
-
breadth trade
-
off required to circumvent it;

20


ii. the notion of „brute force computation‟ and the issue of whether a program based
on such an approach would be adequate to model huma
n problem
-
solving;

iii. whether a production system architecture provides a plausible model for human
knowledge and expertise;

iv. the limitations of a microworlds approach to vision, and the issue of whether
Marr‟s more real
-
world approach is psychologi
cally adequate;

v. the nature of information processing in PDP networks, their human
-
like
performance properties, and the issue of whether they are inherently incapable of
encoding any more than mere associations;

vi. whether AI is fundamentally misguide
d in its theorising about human mentality,
the critique arising mainly from Gibsonian and situated cognition perspectives, and
finally

vii. the recent ‘artificial life’ research with its emphasis on embodiment and physical
evolution.


Cognitive skills

1.

To

develop the ability to critically evaluate theories and models in artificial
intelligence/cognitive modelling.

2.

To develop the ability to evaluate and discuss scientific papers in the area of
artificial intelligence with particular reference to perception,

language,
thinking, learning and problem solving.

3.

To develop the ability to solve problems and to analyse, interpret, and discuss
factual information and data critically.


Knowledge and understanding

4.

To provide the student with a broad
-
based knowledge and understanding of
theoretical issues related to perception, language, thinking, learning, problem
-
solving and (to a lesser extent) development.

5.

To provide students with an historical perspective of ma
jor programs, theories
and concepts within this area.


Practical skills

6.

Communication and teamwork skills through peer collaboration and group
work.

7.

To improve transferable skills such as discussing and formulating arguments,
summarizing, and presenting ma
terial.


Place in course

This class builds upon topics covered in

third year psychology
, but explores them in
greater depth than was possible in the earlier classes, and in particular it explores
the procedural details of how some AI programs work, contras
ting these (where
appropriate) with what is known about human mental processes. The class explores
themes that link to other Honours classes, notably
Perception & Action
.
In such
cases,
Artificial Intelligence
adopts a perspective that complements the othe
r
classes, rather than overlaps with them.


Prerequisites

There are no specific prerequisites for this course; it builds upon material covered in
a number of third year classes and assumes no specialist previous knowledge.


21


Methods of teaching, and teachin
g hours:

There are two lecture hours per week over seven teaching weeks. Lectures are
somewhat seminar
-
based in that questioning is encouraged both during and after
each lecture. The sequence of lectures are supplemented by three tutorials, for
which there

is guided reading. The tutorials are peer based (followed by a tutor
-
led
plenary discussion) and permit the students to explore and extend their conceptual
and theoretical understanding via the discussion of issues such as, „Has artificial
intelligence re
search illuminated the human mind?” The final examination counts for
100% of the final mark. It contains six questions, of which students are required to
answer two.


The University and the Department require students to attend lectures, seminars,
tutoria
ls, and practicals regularly and to perform satisfactorily in the associated work.
You are reminded that, although we do not take registers, attendance at lectures and
tutorials is compulsory. If you fail to attend, you may in accordance with Regulation
15
.1.12 be excluded from your Honours examinations.


Reading:

Key text:

Bermudez, Jose Luiz
,

(2010) Cognitive Science: An Introduction to the Science of
the Mind. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press


Recommended Reading:

1.

Aitkenhead, A.M. &

Slack, J.M. (1985)
Issues in Cognitive Modelling
, Hove,
East Sussex: Erlbaum.

2.

Bechtel, W. & Abrahamsen, A. (2002)
Connectionism and the Mind: an
Introduction to Parallel Processing in Networks
. Oxford: Blackwell.

3.

Boden, M. A. (1977)
Artificial Intelli
gence and Natural Man.

Brighton:
Harvester.

4.

Boden, M.A. (1988)
Computer Models of Mind.

Cambridge: Cambridge
University Press.

Bruce, V, Georgeson, M.A., and Green, P.R.
(2003)

Visual Perception

Physiology, Psychology and Ecology (3
rd

ed)
.

London: Psy
chology Press.

5.

Costall, A. & Still, A. (Eds.) (1987)
Cognitive Psychology in Question
. New
York: St. Martin's Press.

6.

Dawson, M.R.A. (2004)

Minds and Machines: Connectionism and
Psychological Modeling
. Oxford: Blackwell.

7.

Eysenck, M.W. & Keane, M.T. (2005)

Cognitive Psychology: a student's
handbook
. Hove, East Sussex: Psychology Press.

8.

Feser, E. (2005)

Philosophy of Mind: A beginner’s guide
. Oxford: Oneworld
publications

9.

Garnham, A. (1988)
Artificial Intelligence: An Introduction
. London: Routledge
and
Kegan Paul.

10.

Green, J. (1986)
Language understanding: a cognitive approach
. Milton
Keynes: Open University Press.

11.

Haugeland, J. (ed.) (1981)
Mind Design
. Montgomery, Vermont: Bradford
Books.

12.

Johnson
-
Laird, P.N. (1988)

The Computer and the Mind: an Introduction to
Cognitive Science
. London: Fontana Press.

22


13.

Kahney, Hank (1986)
Problem solving: A cognitive approach
. Milton Keynes:
Open University Press.

14.

Langton, C. (1995)

Artificial Life: An Overview
, Cambridge, MA: M
IT Press.

15.

Marr, D. (1982)
Vision
. San Francisco: W.H. Freeman.

16.

Quinlan, P. (1991)
Connectionism and Psychology: A Psychological
Perspective on New Connectionist Research
. London: Harvester Wheatsheaf.

17.

Rumelhart, D., McClelland, J.L. and the PDP researc
h group (1988)

Parallel Distributed Processing

(2 volume set). London: MIT Press.

18.

Sobel, C. P. (2001)

The Cognitive Sciences: An Interdisciplinary Approach
.
London: Mayfield Publishing Company

19.

Suchman, L.A. (1987)

Plans and situated actions
. Cambridg
e: Cambridge
University Press.

20.

Whiby, Blay

(2008)
Artificial Intelligence: A beginner’s guide
. Oxford:
Oneworld publications

21.

Winograd, T. and Flores, F. (1986)
Understanding Computers and Cognition:
a New Foundation for Design
. Norwood, New Jersey: Abl
ex.

22.

Winston, P.H. (1992)
Artificial Intelligence
. Reading, Massachusetts:
Addison
-
Wesley.





23


C8 420

Clinical Aspects of Memory


Class leader:

Dr
Sinéad Rhodes (GH Room 6.51)


Semester 1


Aims:

The aim of the class is to provide students with a comprehensive grounding in the
theories, methods and evidence base of the cognitive factors implicated in clinical
disorders. The class will provide students with the opportunity to apply theoretical
knowl
edge to common mental health problems such as Obsessive Compulsive
Disorder (OCD). Critical evaluation of short
-

and long
-
term memory models and their
application to common clinical disorders will form the focus of lectures, reading and
class discussions.
The class has a strong research focus and will require the
students to apply critical thinking skills to the evaluation of theoretical models of
memory in relation to clinical disorders.


Content:

The course will cover three major areas.

1.

Theoretical mode
ls of memory, namely working, episodic and semantic.

2.

Measurement of memory in clinical populations. Students will receive hands
-
on
experience in cognitive assessments.

3.

Memory in clinical disorders. Theoretical principals and evaluative skills learned
in
part i will be applied to the evaluative appraisal of memory research within the
areas of ADHD, OCD, and schizophrenia.


Learning Outcomes:

1.

Students will develop the ability to critically evaluate theories and models in
cognitive psychology.

2.

Students will develop the ability to evaluate and discuss the cognitive mediators
of common clinical disorders.

3.

Students will be familiarised with a range of methodologies employed within the
cognitive assessment of clinical disorders and will develop an
understanding of
the appropriateness of these methodologies in clinical assessment.

4.

Students will develop transferable skills in relation to the acquisition of
information associated with clinical psychology and psychiatry and in particular
awareness of co
mmon mental health problems.


Place in Course:

This is an advanced fourth year option, suitable for students who have identified
cognitive and/or clinical psychology as one of their core interests. It builds on work
undertaken at Level 2 (Brain and Behavi
our) and Level 3 (Cognition). The class
complements the ongoing research emphasis of the Honours year evident through
dissertations.


Methods of Teaching
:

The course will be presented by means of lectures, class discussion and methods
workshop classes d
esigned to facilitate the links between theory and practice.



24


Assessment:

Assessment is a seen examination which will be uploaded on myPlace 24 hours
prior to the examination. Students will need to answer two questions from six
questions set which will r
equire knowledge of both underlying theoretical models and
research evidence relating to specific disorders.


The University and the Department require students to attend lectures, seminars,
tutorials, and practicals regularly and to perform satisfactori
ly in the associated work.
You are reminded that, although we do not take registers, attendance at lectures and
tutorials is compulsory. If you fail to attend, you may in accordance with Regulation
15.1.12 be excluded from your Honours examinations.



Reco
mmended reading:


Wood, S.J., Allen, N.B., & Pantelis, C. (Eds) (2009). “The neuropsychology of mental
illness”. Cambridge University Press.

ADHD: Martinussen, R., Hayden, J., Hogg
-
Johnson, S. & Tannock, R. (2005). A
meta
-
analysis of working memory impai
rments in children with attention
-
deficit/hyperactivity disorder.
Journal of the American Academy of Child and
Adolescent Psychiatry, 44, 4
, 377
-
384.

OCD: Cutler, C. and Graf, P. (2009). Checking
-
in on the memory deficit and meta
-
memory deficit theories
of compulsive checking.
Clinical Psychology Review, 29,

393
-
409.

Schizophrenia: Doughty, O.J. and Done, D.J. (2009). Is semantic memory impaired
in schizophrenia? A systematic review and meta
-
analysis of 91 studies.
Cognitive
Neuropsychiatry, 14, 6,
473
-
5
09. All recommended journal articles will be selected
to ensure they are available in electronic form via the library.





25


Semester 2 Classes


C8 409

Forensic Psychology

Class Leader:


Dr Jim Baxter
j.baxter@strath.ac.uk
. Room GH 665.


Semester
2


Rationale

This class will consider the historical and conceptual development of Forensic
Psychology, such that its theoretical and empirical bases in experimental, cognitive
-
behavioural, clinical, and personality psychology are demonstrated. The class will
build on
students’ earlier work, specifically on their knowledge of the psychology of
individual differences and, more generally, on their skills in applying research
methods in psychology. The class aims to assess critically the contribution that
Forensic Psycholo
gy researchers and practitioners can make to the criminal justice
system. The class will promote theoretical insight and reflective learning by engaging
students with both nomothetic and idiographic studies of various aspects of the work
of forensic psycho
logists such that links to discussions of theory are established. In
addition to lectures students will analyse real examples of the forensic psychologist’s
work; specifically by reporting on the psychological dynamics of a police interview,
and by applyin
g psychological theory to the analysis of a criminal personality.


Syllabus


1) Eyewitness testimony. Children as witnesses.

2) The psychology of interrogations.

3) False confessions.

4) Detecting deception.

5) Death
-
scene investigation.

6) Criminal cond
uct & Offender profiling.

7) Stalking.


NOTE: CLASSES IN BLOCKS FIVE, SIX, AND SEVEN WILL SHOW
IMAGES FROM PROFESSIONAL JOURNALS AND THE MEDIA OF
DEATH SCENES WHICH SOME PEOPLE MAY FIND DISTURBING.


Learning Outcomes


Cognitive skills:

1) Students will further develop the critical and analytical skills encouraged in classes
earlier in their curriculum.

2) Students will be encouraged to detect links between the discrete observations
provided by empirical research on aspects of forensic p
sychology and examples of
those observations occurring as signals against noise in real
-
world examples of the
subjects of such research.


Knowledge and understanding:

26


3) Students should understand the breadth of work that forensic psychologists do,
both a
s practitioners and researchers. They should be aware of the firm grounding of
forensic practice and research in mainstream cognitive
-
behavioural and personality
theories and understand the contribution that these disciplines can make to the
criminal justi
ce system.

4) They should realise the importance of assessing the methods used by Forensic
Psychologists in terms of the theoretical strengths upon which forensic practice and
research is based.

5) Students should be able to form a critical overview of cu
rrent forensic research
issues and be able to identify the strengths and weaknesses of existing forensic
practice.


Practical skills:

6) Development of team working skills in collaborative learning and report writing
tasks.

7) Students will gain experienc
e of writing the types of reports which forensic
psychologists are asked to prepare when working as experts within the judicial
system, a skill transferable to other forms of professional report
-
writing.


Assessment
:

Summative assessment

Final examination:

Candidates will be invited to answer two questions from a
choice of six in a two
-
hour exam. No resit.


Formative assessment

Satisfactory levels of participation in student
-
led projects will be a course
-
requirement. Each of these projects will require stud
ents to research and apply
theories and concepts introduced in lectures to forensic case studies. Students will
work in online groups of four or five collaboratively to produce a report, akin to the
reports commissioned by lawyers and law
-
enforcement agenc
ies, on two case
studies, offering each other constructive criticism at each stage of the preparation of
their reports. These projects will build on VLE
-
based practices to which students
were introduced in PY 101 & PY 102 Basic Psychology.


In Project 1, s
tudents will analyse a transcript of a police interview with a suspect,
assessing its fairness and looking for manipulative and pressurising techniques
applied by interviewers likely to compromise the evidential worth of the statement
obtained. In doing so

students will research, develop, and apply concepts introduced
in the first half of the lecture course.


In Project 2 students will collaboratively produce a ‘personality profile’ of a known,
convicted offender, critically assessing the strengths and wea
knesses of the profiling
method in so doing.

On completion of each project each group will be required to agree what standard of
degree mark they believe their work would obtain in an examination and why.


This work will be monitored by the class leader
and colleagues who will provide
limited comments and feedback on each groups’ work, only once it is completed.



27


Reading

Needs, A., & Towl, G. (Eds.). (2003).
Applying Psychology to Forensic Practice.

Bartol, C., & Bartol, A. (2004).
Introduction to
Forensic Psychology.

Carson, D
.
(2003).

Handbook of Psychology in Legal Contexts.

Howitt, D. (2008).
Forensic and Criminal Psychology (3rd Edition).


Specialised texts
:

Blackburn, R. (1995).

The Psychology of Criminal Conduct.

Cupach, W.R., & Spitzberg, B
.H. (2004).

The Dark Side of Relationship Pursuit.

Gudjonsson, G.H., (2003).
The Psychology of

Interrogations and Confessions: A
Handbook.

Inbau, F.E. et al. (2002).
Criminal Interrogations and Confession 4
th

Ed
.

Lassiter, G.D. (2004).
Interrogations,
Confessions, and Entrapment
.

Meloy, J.R. (Ed.). (1998).
The Psychology of Stalking
.

O’Donahue, W., & Levensky, E. (Eds.).
Handbook of Forensic Psychology.

Ressler, R., Burgess, A., & Douglas, J. (1998).
Sexual Homicide.

Rowe, D.C
.
(2001).

Biology and Crime
.











28


C8 410

Human Performance


Class Leader
:

Professor Madeleine Grealy


Semester
2


Aims:

An aspect of human performance that is of increasing academic interest is the study
of the psychological factors associated with performance in sport, and participation in
other types of physical activity. Psychological factors play a critical role in the
attainment of success in sport and they determine the adoption and maintenance of
the exercise behaviours associated with a healthy lifestyle. This class aims to
examine issues relating to the psychology of elite performance, individual and group
processes

in sport, motor skill acquisition and exercise and psychological well
-
being.


Content:

The class will cover four major areas.

(i) Psychology of elite performance: The relationships between anxiety and
performance will be examined, and theoretical issues

associated with focusing and
maintaining concentration will be discussed.

(ii) Individual and group processes in sport: An evaluation of leadership styles and
team dynamics, and the theories that have driven practice for building motivation and
confidenc
e will be analysed.

(iii) Motor performance: Current theoretical issues in the development of skilled
motor behaviours will be appraised.

(iv) Exercise and psychological well
-
being: An assessment of coping with adversity
and injury in sport will be undert
aken and the evidence for exercise impacting on
cognition and mood will be assessed.

Throughout the class workshops will be used to describe the interventions used by
sport psychologists and to determine the extent to which these practices are based
on sci
entific evidence.



Learning Outcomes:

(i) To develop a critical appraisal of the literature in sport and exercise psychology.

(ii) To appreciate the extent to which theories and models of social and cognitive
psychology can be applied in a practical sett
ing.

(iii)To equip students so that they can further their knowledge or careers, at the level
of basic health professionals or as researchers, teachers, counsellors and leaders in
sport and exercise psychology.

(iv) To impart transferable skills in relati
on to the comprehension of experimental
study, statistical analysis and the use of information technology.


Methods of Teaching
:

The course will be presented by means of lectures and workshops designed to
facilitate the links between theory and practice.


Assessment:

Final examination.

The paper will consist of six questions, and candidates will be
required to answer any two questions.


29


Recommended textbooks:

Students will be expected to consult a range of journal articles but may find the
following text
books to be useful introductions to the field:


Weinburg,R.S. & Gould, G. (2011) Foundations of Sport and Exercise Psychology.
Fifth Edition. Human Kinetics.

Cox, R.H. (2011) Sport Psychology: Concepts and Applications. Seventh Edition.
McGraw
-
Hill.

Moran
, A. (2012) Sport and Exercise Psychology: A Critical Introduction. Second
Edition. Psychology Press.

Magill, R.A. (2010) Motor Learning and Control: Concepts and Applications. Ninth
Edition McGraw
-
Hill.



30


C8 411


Physiological Psychology


Class Leader:


Dr. Marc Obonsawin (Rm. 6.62GH)


Contact details
:


m.c.obonsawin@strath.ac.uk





0141 548 2573

Semester

2


Aims


i)

To provide a selective overview of the physiological and neural subtrates of
motivational
states

ii)

To provide an overview of the physiological basis of sexual differentiation

iii)

To provide some understanding of how genes might contribute to the regulation
of motivational states

iv)

To stimulate thinking about how the brain carries out the
self
-
regulation of
motivational states


Syllabus


Genes and heredity

Evolution

The development of the nervous system: the role of genes and the environment

The output systems of the brain: motor, autonomic and endocrine

The physiological basis of the reg
ulation of hunger and appetite

The physiological basis of the regulation of sexual motivation

The physiological basis of sexual differentiation

The physiological basis of negative emotions

The physiological basis of positive emotions

The neural basis of se
lf
-
regulation


Learning outcomes

i)

familiarity with the current understanding of the physiological basis of
motivational states

ii)

understanding of the physiological basis of sexual differentiation

iii)

understanding of interaction between genes and the environment
in forming the
behavioural phenotype

iv)

an understanding of the approaches used to study brain anatomy and brain
function

v)

a familiarity with the current understanding of how the brain regulates
motivational states

vi)

using evidence, logical and parsimonious
thinking in developing hypotheses


Subject and generic skills

Students will have the opportunity to integrate their new knowledge about the
physiological basis of motivation with their knowledge and understanding of the
psychological basis of behaviour. S
tudents will also obtain additional practice in
extracting relevant information from empirical and review papers


Teaching, learning and assessment methods

The class will usually meet for 3 hours every week. Students will be expected to
read a substantial

amount of material.
The purpose of the lectures will be to provide
31


the basic information to allow the student to gain as much as possible from the
required

readings
. Performance on the final examination accounts for 100% of the
final mark. Students will be required to answer two questions. Questions will be
essay questions that will require the
integration

of material from different lecture
blocks. Students must
not assume that a question will require an understanding of
only one block of the course. The contents of the lecture material, the discussion
periods, the textbook readings, and the journal papers supplied for discussion are all
subject to examination.


Place in the Course

Physiological Psychology

provides an opportunity to learn about the physiological
basis of how we regulate emotion and other states. The class introduces information
and concepts that will help you to think differently about the topics

you covered in
other classes.


Readings


Textbooks

There is one
essential
textbook. This textbook is available in the John Smith
Bookstore on campus, and there are copies available on Short Term Loan from the
Library.


Breedlove SM, Watson NV and
Rosenzweig MR (2010) Biological Psychology: An
Introduction to Behavioral, Cognitive, and Clinical Neuroscience, 6
th

Edition.
Sinauer:Sunderland, Massachusetts.


There is an additional textbook that will be of use for the section on genes and
heredity,

and it is the textbook that some of you may have used last year in
Biological Aspects of Behaviour: This textbook is also available on Short Term Loan
from the library.


Kolb B and Whishaw IQ (2004) An Introduction to Brain and Behaviour. Second
Edit
ion. Worth Publishers:New York.


Journal articles


In addition to the essential textbook, there are journal articles to read. A list of these
papers will be made available to students.



32


C8432


Health Psychology






Class Leader:

Diane Dixon

Semester
:


2


Aims:

This course will provide students with a comprehensive grounding in the theories,
methods and evidence base of health psychology. In addition, the course will
provide plenty of opportunities for students to apply their knowledge to rea
l world
health problems. This combination of knowledge and practical application will
enable students to make informed judgements about post
-
graduate study and
training within the discipline. It will also support any effort to gain employment within
heal
th related jobs, such as health promotion.

Course content:

The syllabus has been informed by the British Psychological Society’s core health
psychology syllabus. The course is composed of three modules.


Module One: Theories and Models of Health

1.

Epidemiol
ogy of health and illness and role of behaviour in health and illness

2.

Health beliefs and social cognition models

3.

Illness perceptions

Students will engage in guided study of key papers relevant to each theory or model.
Published papers that employ each mo
del to develop and test interventions to
change key health behaviours will be required reading. This reading and
accompanying class discussions will be used to support students towards
developing a
knowledge

of the core theoretical frameworks used in heal
th
psychology.
Workshops

will focus on how theory is used in intervention design.


Module Two: Stress and Coping

1.

Biological and Psychological models of stress

2.

Self
-
harm and Suicide

Lecture content of this module will be supported by guided study of key pa
pers.
Students will also work to engage with and critically appraise Government run public
health campaigns such as 'Steps For Stress'. Students will also be required to
attend a workshop on self
-
harm delivered by an experience mental health nurse.


Modu
le Three: Long
-
term Conditions and Health Care

1.

Models of disability

2.

Pain

3.

Screening and adherence

Lectures will be supported by two in
-
class practical sessions. The first of these
sessions will be used to examine measurement issues in health psychology in

more
detail. Students will be provided with the opportunity to critically appraise standard
measurement instruments they will have encountered during their reading.


Place in course:

This is an advanced fourth year option, suitable for students who have identified
health psychology as one of their core interests. It builds on work undertaken in
second and third year (Social and Health Psychology; Social Identity and Social
Cognition
;
Individual Differences).

33


Learning outcomes:

Knowledge & understanding

1.

Students will acquire an understanding of the breadth and scope of health
psychology

2.

Students will be familiarised with a range of basic and advanced concepts in
health psychology

3.

Stude
nts will develop an awareness of the relationship between theory and
research and how theory and research are applied to real world health problems.

4.

Students will acquire an awareness of the diverse range of methodologies
employed within health psychology

Cognitive skills

1.

To develop the ability to critically evaluate theories and models in health
psychology

2.

To develop the ability to evaluate and discuss the health psychology and
behavioural medicine evidence base.

3.

To develop the ability to solve problems an
d to analyse, interpret, and discuss
factual information and data critically

Practical skills

1.

Students will advance their skills in independent and collaborative learning

2.

Students will develop team working skills during small group in
-
class practical
exer
cises

3.

Students will be familiarised with standard health outcome measures used in
practice

4.

Students will develop skills in applying their academic knowledge to develop
practicable interventions to address real world health issues

5.

Students will develop skil
ls in the presentation and critical analysis of research
findings which bear on topics of perennial interest and concern among
policymakers and the NHS


Methods of Teaching and Learning:

The course employs traditional lectures to deliver the core knowledge

component of
the course. In
-
class workshops provide the forum for students to: i) use that core
knowledge to address real world health problems; ii) critically evaluate the core
evidence base; iii) integrate their learning across topics; iv) communicate
their
knowledge and understanding to their peer group; v) develop the skills required to
answer the essay section of the examination paper.


Reading

The recommended text is Jane Ogden
Health Psychology: a text book
,
published by
McGraw Hill.

The book is
now in its 5
th

edition but any edition

is suitable. Students
will also be provided with a comprehensive reading list of journal articles. Up to 2
papers per module will be required reading; details of these papers will be provided.


Assessment:

The cou
rse is assessed by one
2
-
hour, 2
-
section examination. The two sections are:

a short answer section and an essay section. The short answer section consists of
four compulsory short answer questions based on the content of all the lectures,
workshops and u
p to two key papers from each module. The essay section requires
students to choose on
e essay from a choice of four.



34


C8 499

Perception and Action


Class Leader:

Professor Jimmie Thomson (Room GH663)

Semester 2


Aims:

1) To examine the theoretical and
philosophical issues constituting the problem of
perception, paying particular attention to the contrasting approaches taken by
'constructionist' and 'direct' theories of perception.

2) To examine the ways in which perceptual information is used in motor a
ction
planning and in the regulation of activity.

3) To examine the different kinds of spatial representations involved in navigating
around the large
-
scale environment and to consider the implications for a general
-
purpose model of perception.


Content:


Week 1:

Assumptions underlying constructionist and computational theories of
perception. Criticisms of the constructionist approach. Characteristics of the direct or
ecological approach to visual perception.


Week 2:

Optical flow as the foundation of vis
ion. Flow variables speci
fying self
-
movement and external layout. Empirical inve
stigations of sensitivity to
optical flow
in humans and other species.


Week 3:

Optical motion and the perception of events. Johansson's theory of
biological motion percept
ion. Computation and decoding principles versus smart
mechanisms and higher
-
order variables in perception.


Week 4:

Visual timing in perceptuo
-
motor control and i
ts optical basis. The optic
variable

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natu牡氠r捴楶楴
楥猠獵捨⁡猠捡瑣tingⰠ
h楴瑩igⰠ
牵rn楮iⰠ橵mp楮i⁡nd d物v楮i⸠


eek‵:

Mode汳映pe牣rp瑵o
-
mo瑯爠捯n瑲t氮†A捴楯n⁰污nn楮i⁡nd⁴he⁶楳畡氠
捯n瑲t氠l映汯捯mo瑩tn. The⁢汩nd⁷a汫lng⁰a牡r楧m⸠Keep楮i⁴牡捫rof po獩瑩潮⁩ ⁳ a捥
w楴iou琠v楳ion⸠


eek‶:

V楳畡氠捯n瑲t氠楮lh楧h汹
-
獫楬汥l⁡捴楶楴楥猠獵捨 a猠汯ng
-
橵jpingⰠfoo瑢a汬Ⱐ
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-
ba獥.


eek‷:

佲Oen瑡瑩tn⁴o⁴he 牧e
-
獣s汥lenv楲onmen琮†
Me捨an楳i猠景爠rav楧a瑩tn

p污le猠shat

a牥u琠of⁳楧h琮†Spa瑩t氠o物en
瑡t楯i⁳ 牡reg楥猠and⁴he楲
deve汯lmen琠楮i
捨楬d牥r⸠ 䥭I汩捡瑩tns
景爠rn e捯汯l楣慬⁴heo特f
pe牣数瑩on.


Learning outcomes:

(i)

A sound grasp
of the

major issues in the contemporary study of perception and
action.

(ii)

Ability to

critically appraise current theorising in perception and action.

(iii)

Understanding of contemporary experimental research on the role of optical
flow in perception and the ability to critically evaluate such research.

35


(iv)

Understanding
of contemporary

research on
perceptuo
-
motor control and ability
to critically evaluate key experimental studies in the field.

(v)

Understanding of the place of perception & action within the broader study of
psychology as a whole.


Place in Course:

This class forms part of the Cognition

core component of the School’s third and
fourth year teaching. The class amplifies some of the concepts introduced in the
second year class
Cognition and Neuropsychology

but at a much more advanced
level. In addition, a range of new concepts are introduc
ed, leading to a sophisticated
understanding of the issues in contemporary perception and action theory. Some of
the concepts introduced in the class will complement topics discussed in
C8402
Human Performance.




Methods of Teaching:

Lectures, practical
demonstrations and films.


Teaching Hours:

This is a second semester class. There will be two meetings of the class per week (a
one
-
hour and a two
-
hour block) over seven weeks, interspersed with three reading
weeks.


Assessment:

Assessment will be based on

the final degree examination held in May. The paper
will consist of six questions and candidates will be required to answer two questions.


Recommended reading:

Guidance on reading will be given on a week by week basis throughout the class
and will consist principally of journal articles and key book chapters. However, the
following general textbooks will be found useful.


Bruce, Green & Georgeson (2003)

Visual
Perception: Physiology, Psychology and
Ecology

(3rd edition).

London: LEA

This is probably the best general textbook available at the moment. It has three
sections covering physiology, psychology (including computational approaches) and
ecology (which
means the theory of direct perception). The third section is thus the
most useful for this course. There is also a very good concluding section (Part IV) in
which the authors critically evaluate the major approaches to perception.


Gordon (2004
)
Theorie
s of Visual Perception

(4th edition).

London: Wiley.

Offers summaries of all the major theoretical approaches to perception, including
Gestalt theory, Brunswik, Gibson, Marr, and the implications of neurophysiological
and empiricist approaches. Attempts
critical appraisal, although some of this lacks
depth.


Michaels and Carello (1981)

Direct Perception.

Eaglewood Cliffs, N.J.: Prentice
Hall.

Still a highly regarded book in neo
-
Gibsonian circles, it attempts to explore the
ramifications of Gibson's thi
nking and to report research inspired by Gibson's work.
Very good on the direct approach, but bear in mind that Michaels and Carello are
36


self
-
styled disciples whose aim is to defend rather than criticise Gibsonian theory.
Very good question and answer se
ction at the end in which the authors reply to a
range of common criticisms of the direct approach.


Shiply and Zacks (2008)

Understanding Events: From Perception to Action.

Oxford:
Oxford University Press.

Nijhawan and Khurana (2010)
Space and Time in Per
ception and Action.
Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Two recent books that focus on the relationship between perception and action and
discuss up to date studies in the field.


Wagman and Pagano (2009)
Studies in Perception and Action X.

Hove: The
P
sychology Press.

Short papers summarising presentations made at the most recent conference of the
International Society for Ecological Psychology.


Milner and Goodale (2006)
The Visual Brain in Action
(2
nd

Edition
)
.

Oxford: Oxford
University Press. An impo
rtant book describing their theory of two visual systems.
This theory is often described as offering a means of reconciling Gibsonian and
constructionist approaches to visual perception.