Program in Media Arts and Sciences

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Nov 14, 2013 (3 years and 10 months ago)

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Instituto Tecnológico de Massachussets


77 massachusetts avenue

cambridge, ma 02139
-
4307

tel 617.253.1000

tty 617.258.9344


http://student.mit.edu/catalog/mMASa.html

Program in Media Arts and Scienc
es

The Program in Media Arts and Sciences (MAS) focuses on the invention, study, and creative use of
new technologies that change how we express ourselves, how we communicate with each other,
how we learn, and how we perceive and interact with the world. T
he field draws on a number of
other disciplines, including computer science, cognitive sciences, communications, design, and the
expressive arts. The program offers undergraduate and graduate subjects (listed under MAS in Part
3) and a graduate program lea
ding to master's and doctoral degrees. Its academic programs are
intimately linked with the research programs of the Media Laboratory.


Graduate Study

Media Arts and Sciences offers a graduate program leading to master's and PhD degrees. Graduate
students
work closely with a research advisor in an apprenticeship relationship. Students enter the
program from a wide variety of backgrounds, including electrical engineering, physics, computer
science, cognitive science, mechanical engineering, art and design, a
nd the learning sciences.

For the master's degree, students are required to spend at least four terms in residence (one of
which may be a summer term) and to complete a satisfactory research thesis.

Students wishing to pursue a PhD degree must demonstrate
exemplary progress in the master's
program and gain approval from a departmental committee review. Requirements for the PhD
degree include successful completion of MAS general exams, and successful completion and
defense of a dissertation based on original

and significant research within one of the Media Lab's
research groups.

Research Assistantships

The Program in Media Arts and Sciences offers financial assistance to all successful applicants in
the form of research assistantships within the Media Laborat
ory, which are an important part of
the educational program. Research assistants receive academic credit for part of their research
activities.

Inquiries

Additional information about the programs in Media Arts and Sciences, graduate admissions,
research pr
ograms, and research assistantships may be obtained from Gigi Shafer, Room E15
-
401,
MIT, 617
-
253
-
5114, fax 617
-
253
-
8542,
mas@media.mit.edu
.

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Faculty and Staff

Faculty and Teaching Staff

Mitchel Resnick, PhD

Professor of Media Arts and Sciences

LEGO Papert Career Development Professor of Learning Research

Program Head

Professors

Hiroshi Ishii, PhD

Professor of Media Arts and Scie
nces

Tod Machover, MM

Professor of Music and Media

William J. Mitchell, BArch, MEDes, MA

Professor of Architecture and Media Arts and Sciences

Alexander W. Dreyfoos, Jr. (1954) Professor of Media Arts and Sciences

Nicholas Negroponte, MArch

Professor of M
edia Technology

Alex Pentland, PhD

Toshiba Professor of Media Arts and Sciences

Rosalind Picard, ScD

Professor of Media Arts and Sciences

Barry Vercoe, DMA

Professor of Media Arts and Sciences

Associate Professors

Cynthia Breazeal, ScD

Associate Professor
of Media Arts and Sciences

LG Career Development Professor of Media Arts and Sciences

Chris Csikszentmihályi, MFA

Associate Professor of Media Arts and Sciences

Muriel R. Cooper Career Development Professor

Judith Donath, PhD

Associate Professor of Media A
rts and Sciences

Asahi Broadcasting Corporation Career Development Professor of Research in Education

Neil Gershenfeld, PhD

Associate Professor of Media Arts and Sciences

Hugh Herr, PhD

Associate Professor of Media Arts and Sciences

NEC Career Development
Professor of Computers and Communications

Joseph Jacobson, PhD

Associate Professor of Media Arts and Sciences

John Maeda, PhD

Associate Professor of Design and Computation

Rudge (1948) and Nancy Allen Professor of Media Arts and Sciences

Patricia Maes, PhD

Associate Professor of Media Technology

Deb Roy, PhD

Associate Professor of Media Arts and Sciences

AT&T Career Development Professor of Media Arts and Sciences

Joseph Paradiso, PhD

Associate Professor of Media Arts and Sciences

Sony Corporation Career De
velopment Professor of Media Arts and Sciences

Ted Selker, PhD

Associate Professor of Media Arts and Sciences

Benesse Career Development Professor of Research in Education

Assistant Professor

Edward S. Boyden III, PhD

Assistant Professor of Media Arts and
Sciences

Research Staff

Senior Research Scientists

Walter Bender, MSVS

Andrew Lippman, PhD

Principal Research Associates/ Scientists

V. Michael Bove, Jr., PhD

Glorianna Davenport, MA

Christopher Schmandt, MSVS

Research Associate/Scientist

Henry Lieberman,
PhD

Professors Emeriti

Marvin Minsky, PhD

Professor of Media Arts and Sciences, Emeritus

Seymour Papert, PhD

Professor of Education and Media Technology, Emeritus




Graduate Subjects

MAS.510

Signals, Systems, and Information for Media Technology



(
)

(Subject meets with
MAS.160
)

Prereq:
18.02


Units: 2
-
0
-
4


Fundamentals of signals and information theory with emp
hasis on modeling
audio/visual messages and physiologically derived signals, including sampling,
sampling rate conversion, reconstruction, quantization, Fourier analysis, entropy, and
noise. Shannon's fundamental theorems. Meets the first half of the term
with MAS.160,
but assignments differ.

V. M. Bove, Jr., R. W. Picard


MAS.511

Systems and Signal Processing for Media Technology



(
)

Prereq:
MAS.510

or
6.003
, or permission of instructor

Units: 2
-
0
-
4


Fundamentals of signal processing and linear systems theory as applied to audio/visual
messages and physiologically
-
derived signals. Linear systems, difference equa
tion, Z
-
transforms, convolution, filtering. Additional topics may include filter design, feature
detection, communication systems. Meets the second half of the term with subject
MAS.160, but assignments differ.

V. M. Bove, Jr. , R. W. Picard


MAS.551

Desi
gn Without Boundaries

(New)



(
,
,
)

Prereq: None

Units arranged

Lecture:

W10
-
1

(
NE18
-
4TH
)


Provides opportun
ities to pursue real
-
world design projects that cross traditional
disciplinary boundaries, apply advanced technologies, and address significant social
issues. Among the projects to be explored are the design of a smart village in Zamban
Italy, continuation

of the eLens mobile communication project, continuation of the Paris
bus system project, and the development of new types of urban personal transportation
systems. Students are expected to contribute to conceptualization, development,
modeling, and protot
yping of one of the projects.

W. Mitchell, F. Casalegno


MAS.622J

Pattern Recognition and Analysis



(
)

(Same subject as
1.126J
)

Prereq: A working knowledge of probability theory an
d linear algebra

Units: 3
-
0
-
9


Fundamentals of characterizing and recognizing patterns and features of interest in
numerical data. Basic tools and theory for signal understanding problems with
applications to user modeling, affect recognition, speech re
cognition and understanding,
computer vision, physiological analysis, and more. Decision theory, statistical
classification, maximum likelihood and Bayesian estimation, nonparametric methods,
unsupervised learning and clustering. Additional topics on machi
ne and human learning
from active research. Enrollment limited.

R. W. Picard


MAS.630

Affective Computing



(
)

Prereq: Permission of instructor

Units: 2
-
0
-
10

Lecture:

M10
-
12

(
E15
-
443
)


Explores computing that relates to, arises from, or deliberately influences emotion.
Topics include the interaction of emotion with cognition and perception; the role of
emotion in h
uman
-
computer interaction; the communication of human emotion via face,
voice, physiology, and behavior; construction of computers that have skills of emotional
intelligence; the development of computers that "have" emotion; and other areas of
current rese
arch interest. Weekly reading, discussion, and a term project required.
Enrollment limited.

R. W. Picard


MAS.632

Speech Interfaces and Mobile Devices



(
)

Prereq: Permission of instructor

Units arranged


Interaction with mobile computing systems
and telephones by voice, including speech
synthesis, recognition, digital recording, and browsing recorded speech. Emphasis on
human interface design issues and interaction techniques appropriate for cognitive
requirements of speech. Topics include human s
peech production and perception,
speech recognition and text
-
to
-
speech algorithms, telephone networks, and spatial and
time
-
compressed listening. Extensive reading from current research literature.

C. Schmandt


MAS.641J

Audio Processing by People and Mach
ines



(
)

(Same subject as
21M.566J
)

(Subject meets with
MAS.241
)

Prereq: Permission of instructor

Units: 3
-
0
-
6


Principles of information processing by the human auditory system, from detection of
frequency, intensity, and spectrum, to the development of their perceptual correlates as
pitch, loudness, and timbre. Machine models of the human auditory and musi
cal
experience using perceptually based sensor and interpretor constructs, sufficient to
enable machines to experience sound and music in a manner related to our own.
Exploring auditory and music cognition with the aid of real
-
time audio processors.
Modeli
ng musical common sense. Lectures same as MAS.241, with additional readings
and a group or individual project.

B. Vercoe


MAS.642J

Writing for Computer Performance



(
)

(Same subject as
21M.565J
)

Prereq:
MAS.641


Units: 3
-
0
-
6

Lecture:

T2
-
4

(
E15
-
483
)


Use of current tools and techniques for creating audio soundtracks that can be
synthesized by computer in real time. Techniques of compact definition and efficient,
global dissemination, such as via the Web. Development and use of

global standards for
audio and music rendering on remote sites. Participants are expected to create an
original work, performed in at least three remote sites to positive commentary, using the
above principles.

B. Vercoe


MAS.654J

Cognitive Architectures



(
)

(Same subject as
9.343J
)

Prereq: Permission of instructor

Units: 3
-
3
-
6


Knowledge acquisition, communication, and successful behaviors require adequate
models of the world. A
ctions based on such models depend on values assigned to state
variables, which are derived from a creature's beliefs and goals. How beliefs may be
acquired, updated, or aggregated in decision
-
making is formalized using a graphical
framework called an Anig
raf. The framework is analogous to a society of agents with
different beliefs and goals who strive to reach collective decisions for actions. Exposure
to Bayesian, causal, analogical, logical, and game
-
theoretic frameworks also included.

W. A. Richards


M
AS.664

Digital Innovations



(
)

Prereq: None

Units: 3
-
0
-
6


Seminar surveying the blossoming arena of social software, particularly applications
based on smart phones. Explore the possibilities of this technology through reseach
testbeds, which are
systematically deployed research lab prototypes that attempt to
shape human behavior and communication in organizations while systematically
observing the (often unexpected) social consequences. All students are expected to
participate in the exploratory p
hase of one of the technology testbed projects; form
teams to design novel experimental tools/artifacts and/or applications; run at least one
rigorous experiment; and write a summary project report.

A. Pentland, J. Rotberg, F. Casalegno


MAS.665

Developme
ntal Entrepreneurship



(
)

Prereq: Permission of instructor

Units: 3
-
0
-
9


Develop innovative business plans for the 1K competition in the area of social
innovation/sustainable development. Students form teams of four, usually including
both technol
ogy and business students, to repeatedly devise and revise business plans
that use innovations in technology and organization to create businesses that can
transform the lives of at least 1B people. Enrollment limited to 25.

A. Pentland


MAS.672

New Parad
igms for Human
-
Computer Interaction



(
)

Prereq: Permission of instructor

Units: 2
-
8
-
2

Lecture:

W1
-
3

(
E15
-
235
)


Focuses on radically novel approaches to human
-
computer interaction. Read and
discuss seminal papers from the fields of Ubiquitous Computing, Mixed Reality,
Augmented Reality, Wearables, Location
-
Aware Computing, Ambient Intelligence,
Ambient Interfaces, T
angible Interfaces, e
-
Textiles, Smart Networked Objects,
Intelligent Interfaces, Sentient Architecture, Software Agents and others. Students
required to participate in the discussion of the weekly readings, to engage in the design
of several applications a
nd to complete one larger design and implementation project.
Limited to 16 students.

P. Maes


MAS.690

Special Projects in Media Arts and Sciences



(
,
)

Prereq: Permission of instructor

Units arranged

TBA.


Special projects on individual or group basis. Registration subject to prior arrangement
of subject matter and supervision by staff.

Staff


MAS.712

Special Topics in Creative Learning Technologies



(
)

Prereq: P
ermission of instructor

Units: 2
-
0
-
7

URL:
http://llk.media.mit.edu/courses/mas712


Lecture:

W3.30
-
5.30

(
E15
-
283A
)


Project
-
oriented subject focuses on current research in innovative educational
technologies and creative learning environments. Students contribute directly to
ongoing research projects through design a
ctivities and field tests. Students work in
groups on final project.

M. Resnick


MAS.714J

Technologies for Creative Learning



(
)

(Same subject as
STS.445J
)

Prereq: Permission of

instructor

Units: 2
-
0
-
7

URL:
http://llk.media.mit.edu/courses/mas714



Explores the design of innovative educational technologies and creative learning
environments, drawing on specific case studi
es such as the LEGO Programmable Brick,
Scratch software and Computer Clubhouse after
-
school learning centers. Includes
activities with new educational technologies, reflections on learning experiences, and
discussion of strategies and principles underlyin
g the design of new tools and activities.

M. Resnick


MAS.720

Meaning Machines



(
)

Prereq: None

Units: 3
-
0
-
6

Lecture:

T10
-
12

(
E15
-
443
)


Examines aspects of knowledge representation and language use by machines and
humans. Emphasizes how linguistic meaning is grounded in non
-
linguistic physical and
social context. Ideas from semiotics, philosophy of mind, and cognit
ive psychology are
brought together with methods from computer science and systems engineering. A final
project requiring implementation of a grounded semantics for a symbolic
communication system provides hands
-
on experience with ideas discussed in class.


D. Roy


MAS.731J

The Society of Mind



(
)

(Same subject as
6.868J
)

Prereq: Must have read
Coreq: The Society of Mind
, permission of instructor

Units: 2
-
0
-
10

URL:
http://web.media.mit.edu/~dustin/6.868/


Lecture:

W EVE (7
-
9 PM)

(
32
-
155
)


Introd
uction to a theory that tries to explain how minds are made from collections of
simpler processes. Treats such aspects of thinking as vision, language, learning,
reasoning, memory, consciousness, ideals, emotions, and personality. Incorporates ideas
from p
sychology, artificial intelligence, and computer science to resolve theoretical
issues such as wholes vs. parts, structural vs. functional descriptions, declarative vs.
procedural representations, symbolic vs. connectionist models, and logical vs. common
-
s
ense theories of learning. Enrollment limited.

M. Minsky


MAS.750

Human
-
Robot Interaction



(
)

Prereq: Permission of instructor

Units: 2
-
0
-
7


In
-
depth exploration of the leading research, design principles, and technical challenges
in Human
-
Robot

Interaction (HRI), with an emphasis on socially interactive robots.
Topics include mixed
-
initiative interaction, situational awareness, multi
-
modal
interfaces and communication, human
-
robot teamwork, social learning, aspects of social
cognition, long
-
term

interaction, and evaluation with human subjects. Requires
presentations and critiques of class readings, student projects, and a final project
including publication of a quality paper.

C. Breazeal


MAS.751J

Relational Machines



(
)

(Same subject as

STS.447J
)

Prereq: Permission of instructor

Units: 2
-
0
-
7


Introduction to the issues, principles, and challenges toward building relational
machines: technological artifacts that ar
e designed to inspire a sense of relationship in
their users. Sample applications include learning companions for children, assistive
robots for the elderly, software agents that act as trainers or assistants, interactive game
characters that engage in soc
ial relationships, or machines that cooperate with humans
as members of human
-
robot teams. Readings cover a broad range of topics from
psychology, sociology, and human
-
computer/robot interaction as well as how these
ideas manifest in a wide range of applic
ations for technological systems. Requires
presentations and critiques of class readings and a final project that includes writing a
scholarly paper.

C. Breazeal, S. Turkle


MAS.761

Common Sense Reasoning for Interactive Applications

(New)



(
)

Prereq
: None

Units: 3
-
0
-
9


Explores the state of the art in common sense knowledge, and class projects design and
build interfaces that can exploit this knowledge to make more usable and helpful
interfaces. Enrollment limited to 25.

H. Lieberman


MAS.790

Spe
cial Projects in Media Arts and Sciences



(
,
)

Prereq: Permission of instructor

Units arranged

TBA.


Special projects on individual or group basis. Registration subject
to prior arrangement
of subject matter and supervision by staff.

Staff


MAS.825J

Musical Aesthetics and Media Technology



(
)

(Same subject as
21M.580J
)

Prereq: Permission of ins
tructor

Units: 3
-
3
-
3


In
-
depth exploration of contemporary concepts in music and media. Studies recent
music that uses advanced technology, and the artistic motivations and concerns implied
by the new media. Practical experience with computer music tech
nology, including
MIDI and post
-
MIDI systems. Special emphasis on the interactive systems for
professionals as well as amateurs. Midterm paper and term project required.

T. Machover


MAS.826J

Projects in Media and Music



(
)

(Same subject as
21M.581J
)

Prereq:
MAS.825J


Units: 3
-
3
-
6


Current computer music concepts and practice. Project
-
based work on researc
h or
production projects using the Media Lab's computer music, interactive, and media
resources. Requires significant studio work and a term project. Projects based on class
interests and skills, and may be individually or group
-
based. May be repeated for
credit
with permission of instructor.

T. Machover


MAS.834

Tangible Interfaces



(
)

Prereq: Permission of instructor

Units: 3
-
3
-
6


Explores design issues surrounding tangible user interfaces, a new form of human
-
computer interaction. Tangible user

interfaces seek to realize seamless interfaces
between humans, digital information, and the physical environment by giving physical
form to digital information and computation, making bits directly manipulable with
hands and perceptible at the periphery o
f human awareness. In the design studio
environment, students explore experimental tangible interface designs, theories,
applications, and underlying technologies, using concept sketches, posters, physical
mockups, and working prototypes.

H. Ishii


MAS.83
6

Sensor Technologies for Interactive Environments



(
)

Prereq: Permission of instructor

Units: 3
-
3
-
6

Lecture:

R1
-
4

(
E15
-
235
)


A broad introduction to a host of sensor technologies, illustrated by applications drawn
from human
-
computer interfaces and ubiquitous computing. After extensively
reviewing electronics for sensor signal conditioning, the lectures cover the
principles
and operation of a variety of sensor architectures and modalities, including pressure,
strain, displacement, proximity, thermal, electric and magnetic field, optical, acoustic,
RF, inertial, and bioelectric. Simple sensor processing algorithms a
nd wired and
wireless network standards are also discussed. Students are required to complete written
assignments, a set of laboratories, and a final project.

J. Paradiso


MAS.837

Principles of Electronic Music Interfaces

(New)



(
)

Prereq: Permissi
on of Instructor

Units: 3
-
0
-
9


Explores the ways in which electronic music is controlled and performed. A solid
historical perspective is presented, tracing the development of various families of
electronic musical controllers and instruments from their

genesis in the late 1800s
onwards. Design principles and engineering detail is also given for various current and
classic controllers. Involves lively discussion of evolving issues in the control of
computer music for live performance and interactive inst
allations, including computer
mapping of sensor signals and transduced gesture onto sound, music, and other media.
Weekly reading assignments are given, and a final project or paper is required.

J. Paradiso


MAS.845

Special Topics in Cinematic Storytellin
g



(
)

Prereq: Permission of instructor

Units arranged

Consult instructor


Seminar explores approaches to representation for very distributed cinematic
storytelling. The re
lationship between story creation and story appreciation is analyzed.
Readings are drawn from literary, cinematic criticism, as well as from descriptions of
interactive, distributed works. Students analyze a range of storytelling techniques;
develop a prop
rosal using visualization techniques, and prototype a working story
experience. Individual or group final projects.

G. Davenport


MAS.849

Special Topics in Multimedia Production



(
,
)

Prereq: Permission of instructor

Units arranged

Consult instructor


Individual or group work of advanced and experimental scope. Registration contingent
upon prior determination of subject matter and plan for treatment, as well as
arrangeme
nt for staff supervision and project funding.

G. Davenport


MAS.857J

Optical Engineering



(
)

(Same subject as
2.717J
)

Prereq:
2.710

or permission of instructor

Units: 3
-
0
-
9


Theory and practice of optical methods in engineering and system design. Emphasis on
diffraction, statistical optics, holography, and imaging. Provides engineering
methodology skills necessary

to incorporate optical components in systems serving
diverse areas such as precision engineering and metrology, bio
-
imaging, and computing
(sensors, data storage, communication in multi
-
processor systems). Experimental
demonstrations and a design project
are included.

P. T. So, G. Barbastathis


MAS.858

Creative Holography Workshop



(
)

Prereq: Permission of instructor

Units: 3
-
3
-
3


An introduction to the history, methods, and aesthetics of holographic image making.
Students create holograms in the

lab on a weekly basis, learning to use holography as a
medium of expression and as a tool for the investigation of three
-
dimensional ideas in
design, architecture, environmental design, and engineering studies. Lab fee. Enrollment
limited.

B. Connors


MA
S.862

The Physics of Information Technology



(
)

Prereq: Permission of instructor

Units: 3
-
0
-
9


Familiar devices that collect, store, manipulate, transmit, and present electronic
information operate near profound fundamental physical limits. Subje
ct provides a self
-
contained introduction to the governing equations in a range of relevant domains, and
then studies operational device principles in order to understand how they work, how
they can be used, what the limits on their performance are, and ho
w they might be
improved. Following a review of the foundations of thermodynamics and noise,
electromagnetics, and the quantum description of materials, the device applications
include semiconductor logic, magnetic storage, wireless and optical communicati
ons,
and quantum information and computation.

N. Gershenfeld


MAS.863

How to Make (Almost) Anything



(
)

Prereq: Permission of instructor

Units: 3
-
9
-
0


Provides a hands
-
on introduction to the resources for designing and fabricating smart
systems,
including CAD/CAM/CAE; NC machining, 3
-
D printing and scanning,
injection molding, laser and waterjet cutting; PCB layout and fabrication; sensors and
actuators; analog instrumentation; embedded digital processing; wired and wireless
communications. Emphas
is on learning how to use the tools as well as understand how
they work.

N. Gershenfeld, J. DiFrancesco


MAS.864

The Nature of Mathematical Modeling



(
)

Prereq: Permission of instructor

Units: 3
-
0
-
9

Lecture:

M1
-
4

(
E15
-
135
)


Surveys the range of levels of description useful for the mathematical description of real
and virtual worlds, including analytical solutions

and approximations for difference and
differential equations; finite difference, finite element and cellular automata numerical
models; and stochastic processes, nonlinear function fitting and observational model
inference. Emphasis on efficient practical

implementation of these ideas.

N. Gershenfeld


MAS.865J

Quantum Information Science



(
)

(Same subject as
6.443J
,
8.
371J
)

Prereq:
2.11

or
8.05
;
6.050J

or
18.06


Units: 3
-
0
-
9

Lecture:

TR11
-
12.30

(
36
-
153
)


Subject examines q
uantum computation and quantum information. Topics include
quantum circuits, quantum Fourier transform and search algorithms, physical
implementations, the quantum operations formalism, quantum error correction,
stabilizer and Calderbank
-
Shor
-
Steans codes,

fault tolerant quantum computation,
quantum data compression, entanglement, and proof of the security of quantum
cryptography. Prior knowledge of quantum mechanics and basic information theory is
required.

I. Chuang


MAS.879

Special Topics in the Center
for Advanced Visual Studies



(
,
,
)

Prereq: Permission of instructor

Units arranged

TBA.


Special projects on group or individual basis. Registration subject to prior a
rrangement
of subject matter and supervision by staff.

S. Benton


MAS.881

Principles of Neuroengineering

(New)



(
)

Prereq:
8.03
,
6.003
, and
9.01

or similar experience; or permission of instructor

Units: 3
-
0
-
9


Covers principles underlying current and future technologies for brain analysis and
engineeri
ng, for neurology, psychiatry, and neuroscience. Focuses on using biophysical,
biochemical, and anatomical models to understand technology design constraints
governing ability to observe and alter brain function. Topics include functional
magnetic resonanc
e imaging, electromagnetic recording/stimulation,
neuropharmacology, optical cellular imaging, and gene/stem
-
cell therapy. Design
projects by student teams. Enrollment limited to 28 students.

E. S. Boyden, III


MAS.882

Applications for Neuroengineering

(N
ew)



(
)

Prereq:
MAS.881
; or
6.003
,
8.03
, and
9.01.

Permission of instructor also required

Units: 1
-
8
-
3

Lecture:

T3

(
E15
-
235
)


Project
-
focused subject in which students take a top
-
down approach to developing
technologies that address critical clinical and basic
-
science problems of human brain
function. Focus is on application of engineering principles
to development of
systematically powerful tools. Problem domains include neurological/psychiatric
disorders, consciousness, and human cognitive augmentation. Student work in teams to
apply cross
-
disciplinary (molecular, physical, nanotechnological) buildin
g blocks to
design new tools for the analysis and engineering of the brain. Enrollment limited to 14
students.

E. S. Boyden, III


MAS.890

Special Projects in Media Arts and Sciences



(
,
)

Prereq: Permission of instructor

Units arranged

TBA.


Special projects on individual or group basis. Registration subject to prior arrangement
of subject matter and supervision by staff.

Staff


General

MAS.910

Research in Media Technol
ogy



(
,
,
)

Prereq: Permission of instructor

Units arranged

TBA.


For research assistants in Media Arts and Sciences, where the assigned research is
approved for academ
ic credit by the department.

Staff


MAS.912

Teaching in Media Arts and Sciences



(
,
)

Prereq: None

Units arranged [P/D/F]

TBA.


Laboratory, tutorial, or classroom teachi
ng under the supervision of a Media Arts and
Sciences faculty member. Students selected by interview. Enrollment is limited by the
availability of suitable teaching assignments.

Staff


MAS.921

Proseminar in Media Arts and Sciences



(
)

Prereq: Permis
sion of instructor

Units: 3
-
0
-
9


Designed specifically for new doctoral students in the Media Arts and Sciences (MAS)
program. Explores inellectual foundations of MAS, unifying themes connecting MAS
research, and working practices of MAS researchers. St
udents discuss foundational
papers, critique current MAS research, and work on collaborative projects related to key
MAS themes. Restricted to MAS doctoral students.

Staff


MAS.940

Preparation for S.M. Thesis



(
,
,
,
)

Prereq: Permission of inst
ructor

Units arranged

TBA.


Selection of thesis topic, definition of method of approach, and preparation of thesis
proposal. Independent study supplemented by individual confere
nces with faculty. In
some cases, coregistration with 21W.793 or equivalent required.

A. Lippman


MAS.945

Preparation for General Exams



(
,
,
,
)

Prereq: Permission of instructor

Units: 0
-
12
-
0 [P/D/F]

TBA.


Selected readings for Media Arts and Sciences doctoral students in preparation for their
qualifying exams.

Staff


MAS.950

Preparation for Ph.D. Thesis



(
,
)

Prereq: Permission of instructor

Units arranged

TBA.


Selects thesis subject, defines method of approach, and prepares preliminary thesis
outline. Independent study, supplemented by frequent individual conferences with staff
m
embers. Restricted to doctoral candidates.

Staff


MAS.960

Special Topics in Media Technology



(
,
,
)

Prereq: Permission of instructor

Units arranged

Subject Cancelled



Supplementary work on individual or group basis. Registration subject to
prior
arrangement for subject matter and supervision by staff.

Staff


MAS.961?MAS.968

Special Topics in Media Technology



(
,
)

Prereq: Permission of instructor

Units arranged

MAS.961:

TBA.

MAS.962:

Lecture:

TR1
-
2.30

(
32
-
144
)

MAS.963:

TBA.

MAS.964:

TBA.

MAS.965:

TBA.

MAS.966:

TBA.

MAS.967:

TBA.

MAS.968:

TBA.


Supplementary work on individual or

group basis. Registration subject to prior
arrangement for subject matter and supervision by staff.

Staff


MAS.969

Special Topics in Media Technology



(
,
,
)

Prereq: Permission of instructor

Units arranged

TBA.


Supplementary work on individual or group basis. Registration subject to prior
arrangement for subject matter and supervision by staff.

Staff


MAS.ThG

Graduate Thesis



(
,
,
,
)

Prereq: Permission of
instructor

Units arranged

TBA.


Program of research and writing of thesis; to be arranged by the student with
supervising committee.

Staff



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-
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-
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-
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-
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Copyright ?
2006 Massachusetts Institute of Technology



Produced: 26
-
MAR
-
2008 05:10 PM


Comparative Media Studies

Established in 1999

2000, the program in Comparative Media Studies
integrates the study of
contemporary media (film, television, digital systems) with a broad historical understanding of
older forms of human expression. The program embraces theoretical and interpretive principles
drawn from the central humanistic discipli
nes of literary study, history, anthropology, art history,
and film studies, but aims as well for a comparative synthesis that is responsive to the distinctive
emerging media culture of the 21st century. Students explore the complexity of the media
environ
ment by learning to think across media, to see beyond the boundaries imposed by older
medium
-
specific approaches to the study of audio
-
visual and literary forms.

The comparative and cross
-
disciplinary nature of both the graduate and undergraduate programs
is
embodied in a faculty drawn from Art and Architecture, Anthropology, Foreign Languages and
Literatures, History, Literature, Music and Theater Arts, Philosophy, Writing and Humanistic
Studies, Science, Technology, and Society, Media Arts and Sciences, P
olitical Science, and Urban
Studies and Planning.

Graduate Study

The graduate program comprises a two
-
year course of study leading to a Master of Science in
Comparative Media Studies. The program aims to prepare students for careers in fields such as
journ
alism, teaching and research, government or public service, museum work, information
science, corporate consulting, media industry marketing and management, and educational
technology.

Students normally take three subjects per semester, for a total of 12 s
ubjects. All students take
three introductory seminars (Media Theories and Methods I and II, and Major Media Texts) during
their first year, as well as CMS.950, a workshop subject that offers hands
-
on experience in media.
Elective subjects are drawn from t
hree categories: theory and criticism; history, society, politics;
and case studies. The required thesis may take a variety of forms, including traditional expository
prose, but students are encouraged to choose projects that exploit other appropriate medi
a.

Students may enter the program with a degree from a wide range of undergraduate majors,
including the liberal arts, the social sciences, journalism, computer science, and management.

Graduate subjects include:

Required Subjects

CMS.790



Media Theories
and Methods I

CMS.791



Media Theories and Methods II

CMS.796



Major Media Texts

CMS.801



Media in Transition

CMS.950




Workshop I

CMS.951




Workshop II

CMS.980




Master's Thesis

CMS.990




Colloquium in Comparative Media

Electives

CMS.83
0



Studies in Film

CMS.835



Photography and Truth

CMS.840



Literature and Film

CMS.845



Interactive and Non
-
linear Narrative: Theory and Practice

CMS.851



Feeling and Imagination in Art, Science, and Technology

CMS.710



Anthropology of Sound

CM
S.871




Media in Cultural Context

CMS.874




Visualizing Cultures

CMS.876




History of Media and Technology

21H.418



From Print to Digital: Technologies of the Word, 1450

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C䵓⸸82J




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2005

C䵓⸸88




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C䵓⸸10



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C䵓⸸20



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C䵓⸹10



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C䵓⸹15



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C䵓⸹17



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C䵓⸹20



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C䵓⸹22



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C䵓⸹25



Film⁍畳 c

C䵓⸹35



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C䵓⸹65



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C䵓⸹92



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C䵓⸹93



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湧ni渠䍯m灡rativ攠䵥摩a

C䵓⸹94



呯灩捳⁩渠䍯m灡rativ攠䵥摩a⁓瑵摩敳

C䵓⸹95




剥獥Rr捨⁩渠䍯m灡rativ攠䵥摩a

C䵓⸹97




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C䵓⸹98




呯灩捳⁩渠䍯m灡rativ攠䵥摩a

CMS.999




Topics in Comparative Media

For detailed d
escriptions of graduate subjects in comparative media studies, see CMS.790

CMS.999
in
Part 3
.

Inquiries

For more information on the undergraduate and graduate programs in Comparative Media Stud
ies,
contact the CMS Office, Room 14N
-
207, MIT, Cambridge, MA 02139; 617
-
253
-
3599; fax 617
-
258
-
5133;
cms@mit.edu
.

back to top

Faculty and Staff

Directors

Henry Jenkins III, PhD

Peter de Florez Professor of Humanities

Professor of Comparative Media Studies and Literature

William Uricchio, PhD

Professor of Comparative Media Studies

Steering Committee*

James Buzard, PhD

Professor of Literature

S
ection Head, Literature

James Paradis, PhD

Robert M. Metcalfe Professor of Writing

Program Head, Writing and Humanistic Studies

Janet Sonenberg, MFA

Professor of Theater Arts

MacVicar Faculty Fellow

Section Head, Music and Theater Arts

Jing Wang, PhD

S.

C. Fang Professor of Chinese Language and Culture

Section Head, Foreign Languages and Literatures

Faculty and Teaching Staff

Assistant Professors

Beth Coleman, PhD

Assistant Professor of Writing and New Media

Nick Montfort, PhD

Assistant Professor of Dig
ital Media

Visiting Lecturers

Philip Tan, MS

Stacey Schulman, MA

Chris Weaver, MS

Frank Espinosa, BA

Research Staff

Research Managers

Joshua Green, PhD

Scot Osterweil, BA

Postdoctorate Associate

Alice Robison, PhD

*The Comparative Media Studies program is
jointly administered by three Humanities sections:
Literature, Foreign Languages and Literatures, and Writing and Humanistic Studies. Though the program
has no direct appointments, more than thirty faculty members from across the School of Humanities,
Arts

and Social Sciences regularly teach in the program.



Graduate Subjects

Proseminars

CMS.790

Media Theories and Methods I



(
)

Prereq: Permission of instructor

Units: 3
-
3
-
6


An advanced introduction to core theoretical and methodological issues in
comparative
media studies. Topics covered typically include the nature of theory, the gathering and
evaluation of evidence, the relationship of media to reality, formal approaches to media
analysis, the ethnographic documentation of media audiences, cultur
al hierarchy and
taste, modes of production, models of readership and spectatorship.

H. Jenkins


CMS.791

Media Theories and Methods II



(
)

Prereq:
CMS.790


Units: 3
-
3
-
6

Lecture:

TR12.30
-
2

(
NE25
-
375
)
Lab:

W EVE (7
-
10 PM)

(
14E
-
310
)


An ad
vanced introduction to core theoretical and methodological issues in comparative
media studies. Topics covered typically include globalization, propaganda and
persuasion, social and political effects of media change, political economy and the
institutional

analysis of media ownership, online communities, privacy and intellectual
property, and the role of news and information within democratic cultures.

H. Jenkins


CMS.796

Major Media Texts



(
)

Prereq: Permission of instructor

Units: 3
-
3
-
6


Intensi
ve close study and analysis of historically significant media "texts" that have
been considered landmarks or have sustained extensive critical and scholarly discussion.
Such texts may include oral epic, story cycles, plays, novels, films, opera, television

drama and digital works. Emphasizes close reading from a variety of contextual and
aesthetic perspectives. Syllabus varies each year, and may be organized around works
that have launched new modes and genres, works that reflect upon their own media
practi
ces, or on stories that migrate from one medium to another. At least one of the
assigned texts is collaboratively taught, and visiting lectures and discussions are a
regular feature of the subject.

D. Thorburn


CMS.801

Media in Transition



(
)

Prereq
: Permission of instructor

Units: 3
-
0
-
9


Centers on historical eras in which the form and function of media technologies were
radically transformed. Includes consideration of the "Gutenberg Revolution," the rise of
modern mass media, and the "digital re
volution," among other case studies of media
transformation and cultural change. Readings in cultural and social history and
historiographic method.

J. Ravel


CMS.810

The Nature of Creativity

(New)



(
)

(Subject meets with
24.263
)

Prereq: None

Units: 3
-
0
-
9

Lecture:

R EVE (7
-
10 PM)

(
4
-
144
)


Introduct
ion to problems about creativity as it pervades human experience and behavior.
Questions about imagination and innovation studied in relation to the history of
philosophy as well as more recent work in philosophy, affective psychology, cognitive
studies, a
nd art theory. Readings and guidance with student's focus of interest.

I.Singer


CMS.820

Philosophy of Film

(New)



(
)

(Subject meets with
24.213
)

Prereq: None

Units: 3
-
0
-
9

Lecture:

W EVE (7
-
10 PM)

(
5
-
231
)
Lab:

W EVE (7
-
10 PM)

(
1
-
150
)


Philos
ophical analysis of film art, with an emphasis on the ways in which it creates
meaning through techniques that define a formal structure. Particular focus on aesthetic
problems about appearance and reality, literary and visual effects, communication and
al
ienation through film technology.

I. Singer


Electives

CMS.830

Studies in Film



(
)

(Subject meets with
21L.706
)

Prereq: Permission of instructor

Units: 3
-
3
-
6

Lecture:

T EVE (7
-
10 PM)

(
16
-
676
)


Meets with 21L.706, but assignments differ. See description under 21L.706.

P. Donaldson


CMS.835

Phot
ography and Truth



(
)

(Subject meets with
21A.348
)

Prereq: Permission of instructor

Units: 3
-
0
-
9

Lectu
re:

T EVE (7
-
10 PM)

(
4
-
145
)


Meets with 21A.348, but assignments differ. See description under subject 21A.348.

J. Howe


CMS.840

Literature and Film



(
)

(Subject meets with
21L.435
)

Prereq: Permission of instructor

Units: 3
-
3
-
6

Subject Cancelled



Meets with 21L.435, but assignments differ. See description under subject 21L.435.

A. Kibel


CMS.843

The Role of the Gam
er: Theory, Criticism, and Practice

(New)



(
)

(Subject meets with
CMS.607
)

Prereq: One introductory CMS subject or permission of instructor

Units: 3
-
0
-
9

Subject Cancelled



A
n overview of emerging game studies scholarship, examining gamers and their
relationships with digital content as well as with other gamers in virtual and online
spaces. Draws upon industrial ?best practices? as well as underlying humanistic and
social sci
entific theory and criticism for understanding player
-
game interactions and
processes of identity formation and participation in online communities. Historically
situated analytic perspectives will include effects, uses and gratifications, reader
-
response,

and reception theories. Examines case studies in a variety of topics including
new methodologies in computer interface design, usability testing, and market research,
development and production issues related to contemporary game design and platforms.
Stu
dents taking the graduate version (CMS.843) complete additional assignments.
Limited to 30 students

A. Chisholm


CMS.845

Interactive and Non
-
Linear Narrative: Theory and Practice



(
)

(Subject meets with
21L.489J
,
21W.765J
)

Prereq: Permission of instructor

Units: 3
-
0
-
9


Meets with 21L.489J/21W.765J, but assignments differ. See description under subject
21W.76
5J.

E. Barrett


CMS.846

The Word Made Digital

(New)



(
)

(Subject meets with
21W.764J
,
CMS.609J
)

Prereq: No
ne

Units: 3
-
0
-
9

Lecture:

MW9.30
-
11

(
14E
-
310
)


Considers the many uses of text, language, and writing in creative digit
al media.
Focuses on non
-
narrative uses of text, such as in information display, visual and lyrical
settings, and human
-
legible computer code. Considers the use of text within the context
of computing and different computing platforms. Draws on concepts an
d approaches
from poetics, the material history of texts, and computer science. Assignments include
individual and group writing projects, which involve reading and modifying computer
programs. Previous programming experience and writing coursework helpful
. Students
taking the graduate version of this subject (CMS.846) complete additional assignments.
limited to 18 students

N. Montfort


CMS.863J

Computer Games and Simulations for Investigation and Education

(New)



(
)

(Same subject as
11.252J
)

(Subject meets with
11.127J
,
CMS.590J
)

Prereq: None

U
nits: 3
-
6
-
3

Lecture:

TR1
-
2.30

(
NE25
-
372
)


Understand how we learn from computer games and simulations, and delve into

the
process of building and testing their own simulations. First, students explore the design
and use of games and simulations in the classroom, and the research and development
issues associated with desktop computer
-
based, handheld computer based and no
n
-
computer based media. Students then develop their own simulations and games, study
what and how people learn from them (including field testing of products), and how
games and simulations can be implemented in educational settings. All levels of
computer

experience welcome. Graduate students are expected to complete additional
assignments.

E. Klopfer


CMS.864

Game Design

(New)



(
)

(Subject meets with
CMS.608
)

Prereq: One subject

in Comparative Media Studies or permission of instructor

Units: 3
-
3
-
6

Lecture:

TR3
-
4.30

(
1
-
273
)
Lab:

M EVE (7
-
10 PM)

(
NE25
-
375
)


A historical examination and analysis on the evolution and development of games and
game mechanics. Topics will include a large breadth of genres and types of games,
including sports,
game shows, games of chance, schoolyard games, board games,
roleplaying games, and digital games. Assignments include essays documenting
research and analysis of a variety of traditional and eclectic games. Project teams will
be required to design, develop
, and thoroughly test original games. Students taking the
graduate version of this subject (CMS.864) complete additional assignments.
Enrollment limited to 20.

P. Tan


CMS.865

Videogame Theory and Analysis

(New number CMS.300)



(
)

(Subject meets wit
h
CMS.965
)

Prereq: None

Units: 3
-
0
-
9


Introduction to the interdisciplinary study of commercial videogames as texts,
examining their cultural, educational, and social functions in c
ontemporary settings.
Readings in educational theory and analysis of the conception and design of a
videogame selected in consultation with the instructor.

Instructor TBD

CMS.871

Media in Cultural Context



(
,
)

(Subject meets with
SP.493
,
21L.715
)

Prereq: Permission of instructor

Units: 3
-
3
-
6

URL:
http://cms.mit.edu/academics/courseInfo.php?courseID=21L.715


Lecture:

W EVE (7
-
10 PM)

(
2
-
136
)


Meets wit
h 21L.715, but assignments differ. See description under 21L.715.

Fall:
S. Brouillette

Spring:
W. Uricchio


CMS.874

Visualizing Cultures



(
)

(Subject meets with
21F.027J
,
21F.590
,
21H.917J
)

Prereq: None

Units: 3
-
0
-
9


Examines how visual images shape the identity of peoples and cultures.
A prototype
digital project looking at American and Japanese graphics depicting the opening of
Japan to the outside world in the 1850s is used as a case study to introduce the
conceptual and practical issues involved in visualizing cultures. Guest lecturer
s include
professionals engaged in various aspects of collecting, analyzing, and presenting
graphic images. Students create and present a project involving visualized cultures.
Taught in English. 21F.590 is for students pursuing a minor in Japanese; studen
ts
complete some assignments in Japanese. Enrollment limited.

S. Miyagawa, J. Dower


CMS.876

History of Media and Technology



(
)

Prereq: Permission of instructor

Units: 3
-
3
-
6


Mutually influential histories of communications media and technologi
cal development,
focusing on the shift from analog to digital cultures that began mid
-
century and
continues to the present. Theoretical and philosophical works, histories canonical and
minority, literature and art, as well as production issues toward the a
dvancement of
student projects and research papers. Each topic in the series reflects a particular theme
in the history of media and technology.

B. Coleman


CMS.880

From Print to Digital: Technologies of the Word: 1450
-
Present



(
)

(Subject meets wit
h
21H.418
)

Prereq: Permission of instructor

Units: 3
-
0
-
9


Meets with 21H.418, but assignments differ.

Explores the impact of new technology on the recording and distribution of word
s at
three different times: the invention of the printing press ca. 1450; the adaptation of
electricity to communication technology in the nineteenth century (telegraph, telephone,
phonograph); and the emergence of digital media today. Assignments include
essays
and online projects.

Instructor TBD

CMS.882J

Film, Fiction, and History in India, 1905
-
2005



(
)

(Same subject as
21H.577J
)

Prereq: None

Units: 3
-
0
-
9


Examines how th
e history of modern India has been recorded and reconstructed in
diverse media. Primary documents, films, novels, short stories and secondary
documents written by historians serve as tools of analysis to explore the connections
between history and popular
culture. Themes include Indian nationalism, British
imperialism, Partition and Independence, communalism, urban
-
rural linkages, and the
construction of class, caste, and gendered identities.

H. Roy


CMS.888

Advertising and Popular Culture: East Asian Pers
pectives



(
)

(Subject meets with
21F.036
,
21F.190
)

Prereq: Permission of instructor

Units: 3
-
0
-
9

Lecture:

TR3.30
-
5

(
14N
-
313
)


Meets with 21F.036 but assignments differ. See description under subject 21F.036.

J. Wang


CMS.910

Literature and Technology



(
)

(Subject meets with
21L.708
)

Prereq: Permission of instructor

Units: 3
-
0
-
9


Meets with 21L.708 but assignments differ. See description under 21L
.708.

K. Fendt


CMS.915

Understanding Television



(
)

(Subject meets with
21L.432
)

Prereq: Permission of instructor

Units: 3
-
3
-
6

Lecture:

TR3
-
4.30

(
1
-
134
)
Lab:

M EVE (7
-
9 PM)

(
1
-
134
)


Meets with 21L.432 but assignments differ. See descript
ion under 21L.432.

D. Thorburn


CMS.917

Documenting Culture



(
)

(Subject meets with
21A.337
)

Prereq: Permission of instructor

Units: 3
-
0
-
9


Meets with 21A.337, but assignment
s differ.

Examines how and why people seek to capture life on film. Examines the motives of
documentary and ethnographic filmmakers, including curiosity about exotic peoples,
concern with documentary as a form of science, and an interest in capturing the t
ruth
about cultural life. Students view documentaries about people in the US and abroad,
examining the relationship between film images and "reality," tensions between art and
observation, and the ethical relationship between filmmakers and those they film
.

C. Walley


CMS.920

Popular Narrative



(
)

(Subject meets with
SP.492
,
21L.430
)

Prereq: Permission of instru
ctor

Units: 3
-
3
-
6

Lecture:

TR3.30
-
5

(
2
-
139
)


Meets with 21L.430, but assignments differ. Can be taken for graduate cred
it when
topic is approved for Comparative Media Studies. See description under 21L.430.

Staff


CMS.922

Media Industries and Systems



(
,
)

(Subject meets with
CMS.610
)

Prereq: P
ermission of instructor

Units: 3
-
0
-
9

URL:
http://cms.mit.edu/academics/courseInfo.php?courseID=CMS.610


Subject Cancelled



Examines the interplay of art, technology, and comm
erce shaping the production,
marketing, distribution, and consumption of contemporary media content. Combines
perspectives on media industries and systems with an awareness of the creative process,
the audience, and trends shaping content. Guest speakers f
rom the media industry.
Projects encourage students to think through the challenges of producing media in an
industry context. Meets with CMS.610 but assignments differ.

Fall:
J. Green

Spring:
C. Weaver


CMS.925

Film Music



(
)

(Subject meets with
21M.284
)

Prereq: Permission of instructor

Units: 3
-
3
-
6

Lecture:

MW3.30
-
5

(
4
-
160
)
Lab:

M EVE (7
-
10 PM)

(
2
-
105
)
+final



Meets with 21M.284 but assignments differ.

Surveys the styles and dramatic functions of music in sound films from the 1930s to the

present. Predominant attention given to landmark scores by American and European
composers, including Korngold, Steiner, Rozsa, Raksin, Prokofiev, Copland, Herrmann,
Rota, Morricone, Williams, and Elfman. Subsidiary topics include new trends in
contempora
ry film
-
scoring; pop scores; the impact of electronics, and specialized genres
(e.g., westerns, musicals, documentaries, animated films). Viewing, listening, and
reading assignments. Some background in the study of film and/or music is expected.

M. Marks


CMS.935

Documentary Photography and Photojournalism: Still Images of a
World in Motion



(
)

(Subject meets with
21W.749
)

Prereq: Permission of instructor

Units: 3
-
0
-
9

Lecture:

T EVE (7
-
10 PM)

(
1
-
132
)


Meets with 21W.749, but assignments differ.

B. D. Colen


Workshops

CMS.950

Workshop I



(
)

Prereq: Permission of instructor

Units: 3
-
3
-
6


Provides an opportunity for direct project development experience and emphasizes
intellectual growth as well as the acquisition of technical skills. Students attend regular
meetings to present and critique
their work and discuss its implications.

N. Monfort


CMS.951

Workshop II



(
)

Prereq:
CMS.950


Units: 4
-
2
-
6

Lecture:

W11.30
-
3.30

(
NE25
-
375
)
Lab:

T EVE (7
-
10 PM)

(
14N
-
233
)


A continuation of Workshop I. Provides an opportunity for direct
project development
experience and emphasizes intellectual growth as well as the acquisition of technical
skills. Students attend regular meetings to present and critique their work and discuss its
implications.

N. Montfort


CMS.965

Videogame Theory and A
nalysis

(New number CMS.841)



(
)

(Subject meets with
CMS.865
)

Prereq: None

Units: 3
-
3
-
6


Introduction to the interdisciplinary study of commercial videogames as texts,
examini
ng their cultural, educational, and social functions in contemporary settings.
Readings in educational theory and analysis of the conception and design of a
videogame selected in consultation with the instructor. Graduate students complete
additional assig
nments.

P. Tan


CMS.980

Master's Thesis



(
,
,
)

Prereq: Permission of advisor

Units arranged

TBA.


Completion of a graduate thesis, to be arranged with a faculty membe
r, who becomes
the thesis supervisor. Required of all CMS students.

Staff


CMS.990

Colloquium in Comparative Media



(
,
)

Prereq: None

Units: 2
-
0
-
1 [P/D/F]

Lecture:

R EVE (
4.30
-
7.30 PM)

(
2
-
105
)


Exposes students to the perspectives of scholars, activists, mediamakers, policymakers,
and industry leaders on cutting edge issues in media. Registered CMS graduate student
s
only.

Fall:
Staff

Spring:
Staff


CMS.992

Portfolio in Comparative Media



(
,
,
,
)

Prereq:
CMS.950

or Permission of Instructor

Units arranged

Lecture:

F2
-
5

(
1
-
135
)


Students work individually with an advisor to produce a portfolio project which
combines technical skills and a substantial intel
lectual component. This subject can
fulfill the second part of the workshop requirement for CMS graduate students.

Staff


CMS.993

Teaching in Comparative Media



(
,
,
)

Prereq: Permission of instructor

Units arranged

TBA.


For qualified graduate students interested in teaching. Offers experience in classroom
and/or tutorial teaching under the supervision of a Comparative Media Studies faculty
member.

Staff


CMS.994

Topic
s in Comparative Media Studies



(
,
,
)

Prereq: None

Units arranged

TBA.


Supplementary work on individual or group basis. Registration subject to prior
arrangement for s
ubject matter and supervision by staff.

Staff


CMS.995

Research in Comparative Media



(
,
,
,
)

Prereq: Permission of instructor

Units arranged

URL:
http://cms.mit.edu/
academics/courseInfo.php?courseID=CMS.603


Lecture:

MW1
-
2.30

(
1
-
132
)
Lab:

M EVE (7
-
10 PM)

(
1
-
132
)


Opportunity for research in comparative media studies under the supervison of a
member of the Program. Used for graduate independent study.

Staff


CMS.996

Topics in Comparative Media Studies



(
,
)

Prereq: None

Units arranged

TBA.


Supplementary work on individual or group basis. Registration subject to prior
arrangement for subject matter and supervision by staff.

Staff


CMS.997

Topic
s in Comparative Media



(
)

Prereq: None

Units: 9
-
3
-
0

URL:
http://cms.mit.edu/academics/courseInfo.php?courseID=CMS.997



Discussion of current interest special topics not

otherwise included in the curriculum.
Undergraduates should register for CMS.602. Topic for Fall 2007: Television
Ecosystem.

S. Schulman, A. Chisholm


CMS.998

Topics in Comparative Media



(
,
)

Prereq: Permission of instructor

Units arranged

URL
:
http://cms.mit.edu/academics/courseInfo.php?courseID=CMS.600


Subject Cancelled



Supplementary work on individual or group basis. Registration subject to prior
arrangement fo
r subject matter and supervision by staff. Undergraduates should register
for CMS.600. Topic for Fall 2007: Videogame Theory. Topic for Spring 2008: New
Media Literacies.

A. Robison


CMS.999

Topics in Comparative Media



(
,
)

Prereq: Permission of i
nstructor

Units arranged

URL:
http://cms.mit.edu/academics/courseInfo.php?courseID=CMS.601


Lecture:

F
10
-
1

(
14E
-
310
)


Supplementary work on individual or group basis. Registration subject to prior
arrangement for subject matter and supervision by staff. Undergraduates should register
for CMS.601.

Topic for Fall 2007 and Spring 2008: Character Design and World
Making.

F. Espinosa



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2006 Massachusetts Institute of Techn
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-
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-
2008 05:10 PM