K-U-D (Know, Understand, Do) Chart

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Nov 14, 2013 (3 years and 11 months ago)

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Short Sto
ry Unit: “The Power of Story”

K
-
U
-
D (Know, Understand, Do) Chart


Grade/Course: English 9/10 Short Story LFS Unit

Unit Title: “The Power of Story”


Common Core State

Standards

Addressed
:

CC9
-
10RL
2:
Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development
ove
r the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details;
provide an objective summary of the text.


CC9
-
10RL
3:
Analyze how complex characters (e.g., those with multiple or conflicting motivations)
develop over the c
ourse of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme.


CC9
-
10W
4:
Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are
appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. (use writing rubric
s to assess outcome)

CC9
-
10W
6:
Use technology, including the Internet, to produce, publish, and update individual or shared
writing products, taking advantage of technology's capacity to link to other information and to display
information flexibly and dyn
amically.

CC9
-
10SL
1:
Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborat
ive discussions (one
-
on
-
one, in
groups, and teacher
-
led) with diverse partners on

grades 9
-
10 topics, texts, and issues,

building on others'
ideas and expressing their own c
learly and persuasively.


CC9
-
10SL5:
Make strategic use of digital media (e.g., textual, graphical, audio, visual, and interactive
elements) in presentations to enhance understanding of findings, reasoning, and evidence and to add interest.




Know

Under
stand



Do

(Note: concepts,
facts, formulas,
key vocabulary)

Literary Terms:

Antagonist

Protagonist

Static Character

Round Character

Dynamic Character

Foreshadowing

Flashback

Symbolism

Personification

Irony

Imagery

Tone/Mood

Autobiographical

Biographical

Plot

Setting

Exposition

Rising Action

Climax

Falling Action

Resolution

Conflict

(Big idea, large
concept
,
declarative
stateme
nt

of
an
enduring
understanding
)


An author’s
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灲業pry⁦畮 瑩潮o
瑨攠獴潲y.











⡓歩汬猬⁣潭灥瑥湣楥猩


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-
V
-

-
o畢物u
-
Arg畭敮u
-
T䵡爱㈮r摦


䅮Alyze c
潭灬ex⁣桡牡cte牳


䅮Alyze
瑨攠灬潴t
獥煵e湣e
潦⁡⁳瑯 y


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瑨敭t映 ⁳瑯 y


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啳r⁤楧楴a氠le摩愠楮

p牥se湴慴楯湳




Short Sto
ry Unit: “The Power of Story”

Student Learning Map

School District: DSCYF


Course/Subject:

English 9













How does the study of fictional stories and characters assist in the understanding of relationships
in everyday life?





Concept
:

Plot develo
pment

Concept
:

Theme/Main Idea and Details

Concept
:

Character Analysis




Lesson Essential Questions
:




How does plot sequence
affect the telling of a story?



How do authors build
suspense in a story?

Lesson Essential Questions
:




Why is it important to

understand the themes

and
details

within a story?



How do details support the
theme?

Lesson Essential Questions
:




How does character
development affect the
telling of a story?



How can experiences change
people/characters?



How do authors develop
characters
within a short
story
?




Vocabulary
:



Exposition
, Rising Action,
Climax, Falling Action,
Resolution, Mood/Tone
,
Flashback, Foreshadow,
Irony

Vocabulary
:



Main Idea, Theme, Details,
Autobiographical
,
Biographical,
Conflict, Man
vs. Society, Man vs. Natur
e,
Man vs. Self

Vocabulary
:



Protagonist, Antagonist,
Narrator,
Static Character,
Round Character
, Dynamic
Character




Additional Information/Resources
:

Utilize McDougal/Littell 9
th

grade text,
Possibilities (Janet
Goode),
teacher
-
made PowerPoint, audio
-
text, CCSS writing rubrics, Thinkfinity resources, Flip
Cameras, Microsoft Word.

Key Learning
:
An author’s language, stylistic choices, and devices lead to the primary function
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啮楴⁅獳敮瑩a氠兵l獴s潮
W



Culminating Activity

(Activity that students will do with the unit’s concepts and skills to demonstrate mastery.)


Unit

Topic
:
Short Story





Title/Concept

Public Service
Announcement


Culminating Activity
Essential Question


How can reading short stories benefit people?



Paragraph Description



Students will write and film a public service
announcement

(this can be completed individually or
with a partner)
. The PSA wil
l express the benefits of
reading short stories. Use an excerpt from the story to
support your thesis. Students and teacher will evaluate
PSA using the established rubric.



Mini
-
Lesson

(Quick lesson prior to activity.)


Students will view two PSA’s and l
ist the components of
a well written PSA.


Time (In Days)

4


5 Days

Steps or Task Analysis

(Details of activity.)


1)

Brainstorm 5


10 benefits gained from reading
short stories.

2)

Choose at least three to convey in the
announcement.

3)

Pick an excerpt from on
e of the stories that helps
to prove the point you are making.

4)

Write your PSA
. Then proof read. Make
adjustments.

5)

Brainstorm a list of inexpensive props to use in
your PSA. Collect props

6)

Rehearse PSA.

7)

Next film the PSA. View and decide if you need
to retak
e.


Summarize/Share


Present your PSA to the class/school. Complete
a self
-
evaluation.



Differentiation


Complete a PowerPoint, brochure or poster version of
your PSA.




Revise/Review

This will be completed by teacher upon completing
the unit.



Resour
ces & Materials


Flip cameras, Microsoft PowerPoint, Microsoft
Publisher, short stories, props, etc.







Rubric for Culminating Activity



Scale



Criteria




4



3



2



1




Requirements





All requirements
are met and
exceeded.




All require
ments
are met.




One
requirement was
not completely
met.




More than one
requirement was
not completely
met.






Content




Covers topic in
-
depth with details
and examples.
Subject knowledge
is excellent.




Includes
essential
knowledge about

the topic. Subject
knowledge
appears to be
good.




Includes
essential
information
about the topic
but there are 1
-
2
factual errors.




Content is
minimal OR
there are several
factual errors.





Originality





Product shows a
large amount of
or
iginal thought.
Ideas are creative
and inventive.




Product shows
some original
thought. Work
shows new ideas
and insights.




Uses other
people's ideas
(giving them
credit), but there
is little evidence
of original
thinking.




Uses other
people's
ideas,
but does not give
them credit.





Organization





Content is well
organized using
headings or
bulleted lists to
group related
material.




Uses headings or
bulleted lists to
organize, but the
overall
organization of
topics appears
flawed.




Content is
logically
organized for
the most part.




There was no
clear or logical
organizational
structure, just
lots of facts.




Attractiveness




Makes excellent
use of

font, color,
graphics, effect
,
etc.
,

to enhance th
e
presentation.




M
akes good
use
of
font, color,
graphics, eff
ect,
etc.
, to enhance
the
presentation.




Makes use of
font, c
o
lor,
graphics,
effects, etc.
-

occasionally
thes
e
detract
from the
presentation
content.




Use of font,
color, g
raphics,
effects etc. but
these
ofte
n
distract from the
presentation
content.




Mechanics




No
misspellings or
g
rammatical
errors.



Three or less
misspellings or
g
rammatical
errors.


Four
misspellings or
g
rammatical
errors.


More than four
misspellings or
g
rammatical
errors.



S
tudent Assessments

(How students will indicate learning and understanding of the concepts in the unit.

Note: Can have multiple assessments, one on each page
.)


Unit Topic:

Short Story Unit

The Power of Story


Title


Vocabulary Quizzes

Description


Stude
nts will use words learned in context via short
stories and correctly place them in a cloze sentence or
paragraph.


Time (In Days)

5
-
10 minute assessment prompts

Differentiation


Some students may use picture representations to assist
them in completing
the quiz.


Revise/Review


Teacher will revise and review throughout the unit.



Resources &
Materials


Materials from textbook, PowerPoint reviews, study
sheets, etc.





Launch Activity

(Develops student interest by providing hook to motivate and link t
o prior knowledge.)


Unit Topic:

Short Story Unit

The Power of Story


Launch Activity
Essential Question or
Name of Activity



Essential Vocabulary Trading Cards


Description



Students will utilize Microsoft Word or Publisher to
create vocabulary tradi
ng cards for
three or four of the
essential vocabulary words. They will print out enough
copies for the class and then trade so that everyone
has a set of twenty
-
two cards.



Time (Days)

1 Day

Mini
-
Lesson

(Quick lesson prior to activity.)

Show students h
ow to utilize Word or Publisher to
create a vocabulary card.


Steps or Task Analysis

(Details of activity.)

Teacher will model how to create a vocabulary trading
card. (All students will have a template to use, learn
how to create definitions and select
graphics for cards).

Next, students will choose three


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-
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r
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Acquisition Lesson Plan Concept:
Plot Development

Acquisition Lessons need to be differentiated; use multiple methods of presentation, stra
tegic instruction and
assessment to differentiate learning.

Author Name(s):
DSCYF Educators

Length:
4


5
days

Pre
-
requisite(s):
Understand that a short story
is a short tale about an imaginary situation

or a narrative
.


Comm
on Core Standard(s):

CC9
-
10RL
2:
Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course
of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary
of the tex
t.


CC9
-
10RL
3:
Analyze how complex characters (e.g., those with multiple or conflicting motivations) develop over the
course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme.


CC9
-
10W
4:
Produce clear and coherent writin
g in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to
task, purpose, and audience. (use writing rubrics to assess outcome)


E
ssential Question:



How does plot sequence affect the telling of a story?

--------------------------------------
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

What do students need to learn to be able to answer the Essential Question?


Assessment Prompt

(AP) #1:
Describe the use of foreshadowing within the plot.

Assessm
ent P
rompt #2: Make predictions about the characters.

Assessmen
t Prompt #3: Diagram the plot of the short story “The Monkey’s Paw”.

A
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却畤敮p猠will 捯cplet攠慮⁡湴 捩灡ti潮⁧畩 攠fo爠r桥⁳桯

story “The Monkey’s Paw
”.

㘰⁌i/U
th

grade, but with text
complexity issues, it is appropriate for 9
th

grade students)


S
tudents can answer the following question:
“Have you ever
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ai搠祯d⁡ 捥灴⁴桥hoff敲⁨慳ail礬y潲owei杨⁴g攠e
牯r⁡湤⁣潮猬
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u獩n朠g桥h
o⹁⹒⹅⸠潲⁒⹁⹃⹅⹒⸠.潲oat
oe獴at攠t桥hn略uti潮Ⱐ
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bx慭灬p猬⁅l慢a
牡t攠e爠r湤).


Key Vocabulary Words to Preview
:

Exposition, Rising Action, Climax, Falling
Action, Resolution, Mood/Tone,
Flashback, Foreshadow, Irony

T
eaching Strategies:
Chunk instruction, Collaborative Pairs, Distributive Practice, Assessment Prompt
s


Graphic Organizer:
Plot Diagram,
http://swenglish9.weebly.com/uploads/6/9/2/5/6925541/plotdiagram.pdf

Cornell Note
-
Taking organizer

http://www.uteed.net/jom/c16.pdf


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Instruction:

Read background
about author
provided in the text. Students s
hould
brainstorm a list of

predictio
ns
(
individually,
in pairs and then share ideas as a class
)

as a as to what th
e title “The Monkey’s Paw
” might mean.
Review
the
terms mood/tone, foreshadow and flashback.

Students will listen to the audio version of the short
story and use Cornell Note
-
Taking organizer to
make


predictions as the story continues. Stop on page two and ask student
s to write down their answers

to this
question:
“What are some clues that have been shared in the plot so far that might
give us an idea

about the
ending?”

Share your prediction with a partner. Is there any information in the first two pages that could provide

foreshadowing as to what might happen in the story?

AP #1: On an index card, write down the definition for the term foreshadow a
nd give an example of this
from our story or another story you have read.

Instruction:

Students

will continue to listen to or read page three orally

in pairs
. List three things they learn about the
monkey’s paw on their Cornell Note
-
taking organizer. Revie
w answers. Then hav
e students pair up to make
another prediction:

Why did Mr. White rescue the monkey’s paw from the fire?
What are his plans?

AP #2: List three facts that you have learned from the story, list two predictions you have made about the
char
acters of the
story, and list one question you want answered by reading the story.

Instruction:

Finish reading scenes one, two and three with the students. As they listen, have students list any words or
character’s actions that tell what the mood or tone
of the story could be at this point in the story. Students share
answers at the end of scene three. Read scenes four and five,
listen to see if the first wish was granted and if so
describe how it happened in the note organizer. Finally, have students read

scene six with a partner or listen to
the audio version. Answer the question “What three wishes did Mr. White make? Were they wise choices?

Teacher will view plot PowerPoint with students Then students will complete the third assessment prompt.

http://swenglish9.weebly.com/9th
-
grade
-
literature
-
unit.html

AP #3: Students will complete plot graphic organizer with a partner.

Then answer the essential question:
How does plot sequence a
ffect the telling of a story?


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Assignment
/Extended Thinking (constructing support)
:
Students will choose one of the following
top
ics to
discuss in an essay: (Number of paragraphs based on grade level)

1)

Do you believe in fate? Or do you believe we can make our life what we want if we make wise
choices? Explain your belief in a fully develop essay.

2)

Discuss the meaning of the following
in an essay: Saint Theresa said that there are more tears shed
over answered prayers than unanswered ones. What does she mean? Do you agree or disagree?
Why?

S
ummarizing Strategy:
Complete the magnet summarizing strategy for each scene. Model scene one f
or
the group. Students will work in groups to complete a magnet summary sentence for the other five scenes.

http://www.vriuvm.org/members/lli/additional_r
esources/Magnet%20Summary%20Template.pdf


Resources/
Citations:


(Text)

http://www.nexuslearning.net/books/holt
-
eol2/Collection%203/monkey%20play.htm

http://www.teachervision.fen.com/tv/printables/Monkeys
-
Paw.pdf

(Audio)

http://thedramapod.com/drupal/node/327

http://literalsystems.org/abooks/index.php/Audiobook/TheMonkeysPaw


Attachments:


http://jlbenet.com/monkeyspaw.html


http://www.cast.org/teachingeverystudent/toolkits/tk_modelunit.cfm?tk_id=21&tku_id=21&disp=planner






Acquisition Lesson P
lan Concep
t: Plot Development
-
Suspense

A
cquisition Lessons need to be differentiated; use multiple methods of presentation, strategic instruction and
assessment to differentiate learning.

Aut
hor Name(s): DSCYF Educators Length: 4
-
5 days


Pre
-
requisite(s):
Understand that
a short story is a short tale about an imaginary situation
, or a narrative
.



Common Core Standard(s):



CC9
-
10RL
2:
Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course
of the text, including how it emerges an
d is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary
of the text.


CC9
-
10RL
3:
Analyze how complex characters (e.g., those with multiple or conflicting motivations) develop over the
course of a text, interact with other characters, and
advance the plot or develop the theme.


CC9
-
10W
4:
Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to
task, purpose, and audience. (use writing rubrics to assess outcome)

CC9
-
10SL
1:
Initiate and particip
ate effectively in a range of collaborat
ive discussions (one
-
on
-
one, in
groups, and
teacher
-
led) with diverse partners on

grades 9
-
10 topics, texts, and issues,

building on others' ideas and expressing their own
clearly and persuasively.




E
ssential Ques
tion:


How do authors build suspense in a story?

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

What do students need to learn to be able to answer the Essential Question?


As
sessment Prompt(AP) #1:
Explain the first three parts of the story plot for “The Necklace”

Assessm
ent Prompt #2:
Create a plot summary

Assessm
ent Prompt #3: Provide examples of three types of irony


A
ctivating Strategy:

Tea Party Acti
vator


Have students in groups of three or
four. Each student has a sentence or two from the story.
Students take turns reading their excerpts. Then based on
this small amount of information, students will create a ten
word prediction as to what the story

will be about. Groups
will share their predictions.


Or review essential vocabulary words using the word
game: I have…Who has?


Key Vocabulary Words to Preview
:

Exposition, Rising Action, Climax, Falling
Action, Resolution, Mood/Tone,
Flashback, Foresha
dow, Irony



T
eaching Strategies:
Chunk instruction, Collaborative Pairs, Distributive Practice, Assessment Prompt


Graphic Organizer:
Cornell Note
-
taking Organizer
/Irony Chart


Differentiation/Scaffolding: Audio version of the story, sentence starters fo
r R.A.C.E.R. summary for
students with this need,
PowerPoint notes on plot structure.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Instruction:

Students will listen to “The
Necklace”

unt
il they hear that Madame Loisel
has lost the diamond necklace (10M).
During the reading students will highlight phrases that detail the exposition, rising action and climax

as well as
words that describe the mood
.
Students w
ill form groups of
two
and they will be asked to brainstorm together
and predict the rest of the story’s

plot

(
2
-
5m). Each group will be asked to write the
ir predictions on an index
card
and present them before the class (
2
-
5m).

AP #1:
Write a $2.00 summary (20 words) expla
ining the exposition, rising action, and climax.

Instruction:

Stude
nts will come back together and
listen to the rest of the story (5m).

Students will highlight phrases that
detail the falling action and the resolution.

A brief cl
ass
conversation

will dis
cuss the
predictions in comparison
to the actual ending (
2
-
5m).

AP #2:
With a partner, use the words from the word
-
splash to create a plot summary. Share summaries
with another group.

Instruction:

Students
will review the three types of irony as a class.
Students will be given three cards with verbal, situational
and dramatic written on them. Then students will be read (and shown) an example of irony. Students hold up the
card that depicts the type of irony the teacher is describing. Teacher calls on stude
nts to explain their

choice

(10m).

http://betterlesson.com/lesson/7268/short
-
story
-
lesson
-
5
-
irony
-
and
-
th
e
-
necklace#http://betterlesson.com/document/35060/3
-
types
-
of
-
irony

AP #3: Students work in pairs to complete graphic organizer. Students find an example of each type of
irony from the story and place it in the appropriate category. Share findings with the

class.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Assignment:
Students will c
omplete a

quiz

(five questions)

on the short story “The Necklace”.
See
assessment below for ap
propriate questions.


S
ummarizing Strategy:

Students will answer the essential question: “How do authors build suspense in the story?” Students will describe
answer
using the R.A.R.E. or R.A.C.E.R. format (Restate the Question, Answer the Question, Reas
ons/Support
for your answer, Examples, Elaborate or End).


Resources/
Citations:

http://old.sandi.net/depts/literacy/diagnostic_assessments/8.pdf

(Text & lesson assessment)




Attachments:

http://betterlesson.com/lesson/7268/short
-
story
-
lesson
-
5
-
irony
-
and
-
the
-
necklace#

Additional resources to build background knowledge:

http://gallery.sjsu.edu/Paris/social_classes/upper/index.html









Acquisition Lesson P
lan Concept:
Theme/Main Idea and Details

Acquisition Lessons need to be differentiated; use multi
ple methods of presentation, strategic instruction and
assessment to differentiate learning.


Aut
hor Name(s): DSCYF Educators Length: 4
-
5 days


Pre
-
requisite(s):
Understand that a short story is a short tale about an imaginary situation,
or a narrative.



Common Core Standard(s):

CC9
-
10RL
2:
Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course
of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objec
tive summary
of the text.


CC9
-
10RL
3:
Analyze how complex characters (e.g., those with multiple or conflicting motivations) develop over the
course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme.


CC9
-
10W
4:
Produce cl
ear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to
task, purpose, and audience. (use writing rubrics to assess outcome)

CC9
-
10SL
1:
Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborat
ive discussions (one
-
on
-
one, in
groups, and
teacher
-
led) with diverse partners on

grades 9
-
10 topics, texts, and issues,

building on others' ideas and expressing their own
clearly and persuasively.



E
ssential Question:

Why is it important to understand the themes
and detai
ls
within a story?


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

What do students need to learn to be able to answer the Essential Question?


Assessment Prompt(AP) #1:
Use im
portant details to summarize a biography

Assessm
ent Prompt #2: Describe the conflict in the story

Assessm
ent Prompt #3: Summarize the details that support the theme


A
ctivating Strategy:

Students will complete “Think, Pair, Share” acti
vity
answering the following questions: “What do you think of
when you hear the word
-

robot?” Share your ideas with a
partner. Add your partner’s ideas to your list. Answer the
next question on your chart: “What examples of robots in
literature, movies, t
elevision or current events are you
familiar with?”

Explain brainstorming ideas to

a peer.
Share ideas with the class.


Students will review vocabulary words with a game of “I
have…Who has?



View video clip to build background knowledge.

Key Vocabulary W
ords to Preview
:

Main Idea, Theme, Details,
Autobiographical, Biographical, Conflict,
Man vs. Society, Man vs. Nature, Man vs.
Self



T
eaching Strategies:
Chunk instruction, Collaborative Pairs, Distributive Practice, Assessment Prompt


Graphic Organizer
:
Theme/Details graphic organizer, Cornell Note
-
Taking Organizer
, Venn Diagram


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Instruction:

Students will read a short biograp
hical selection about the author of “Robot Dreams”
, Isaac Asimov with a
partner. As students read they will make a list of author’s life experiences that may have helped him write about
robots. Students will share their lists with the class.

AP #1: Write

an acrostic summary of the biography using the subject’s name: Isaac Asimov.

Instruction:

Teacher will discuss the term conflict and give examples of conflict in the stories “The Monkey’s Paw” (conflict
of man vs. fate

where Mr. White tries to control fa
te) and “The Necklace” (man vs. self

she is vain and selfish
which leads to her downfall).
Students will listen to audio version while
following along with the text. Students
will h
ighlight phrases that describe how robots are used in the story

and look f
or the conflict

(humans vs.
machines)
.
Students will list any questions they have about the story in their note
-
taking organizer.
Students will
pair up with partner

and try to answer some of the questions. Class will answer additional questions.


AP #2:
S
omebody Wanted But So:
Helps students with plot, conflict and resolution, as well as character
motivation. Somebody (character) Wanted (goal, motivation) But (Conflict) So (resolution).

Example: Harriet Tubman wanted to lead people to freedom, but the sla
ve owners chased the runaways so
abolition sympathizers created the Underground Railroad to help them escape.

Instruction:

Students will complete Venn Diagram to compare and contrast the characteristics of robots and humans. Next
students will review diagr
am with a partner and agree on the similarities and differences. Finally, class will
create a group Venn Diagram using chart paper.

AP #3:
Students will complete the following R.A.F.T: Role
-
Newspaper Reporter, Audience
-
humans/robots in the future, Format
-
obituary, Topic
-
details that led
to the robot’s demise.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Assignment:

Answer the “Respond and Think Critically questions on page

1081in complete sentences.


S
ummarizing Strategy:

Answer the essential question: “Why
important to understand the themes and details within a story?”
Students will describe answer
using the R.A.R.E. or R.A.C.E.R. format (Restate the Question, Answer th
e
Question, Reasons/Support for your answer, Examples, Elaborate or End).


Resources/
Citations:

Glenco Literature: Course 5 (9
th

grade), Glenco Literature Launches: Course 5, Glenco Literature
Listening Library: Course 5.


Attachments:













R.A.
F.T. Assignment Assessment and Feedback Rubric


Assignment Traits


Accuracy

How correct is your information? Is it fully
supported by the text and/or history?

5

4

3

2

1




Comments
:




Perspective

Do you stay in role? How effective are you at
performin
g your role and convincing audience?

5

4

3

2

1




Comments:




Focus

Do you stay to assigned format? Do you fully
satisfy the chosen topic with numerous details
and examples?

5

4

3

2

1




Comments
:




Mechanics

Does your writing contain a minimal of
me
chanical errors? Does your writing contain
no errors as identified in your grammar goals?

5

4

3

2

1





Comments
:

Benchmark

How is the overall quality of your work
compared with both past work and ever
increasing expectations of better work?


5

4

3

2

1




Comments
:




GRADE
: (based on levels attained for each criteria)



Scoring key

25
-
24 = A+

23
-
21 = A

20 = A
-

19 = B+

18
-
16 = B


15 = B
-

14 = C+

13
-
12 = C

11 = C
-

10 = D

9 = D
-


Assessment guide

5 = Exceptional

4 = Effective

3 = Developing

2 = Emergin
g

1 = Not Yet





“Robot Dreams” by Isaac Asimov


“Last night I dreamed,” said LVX
-
1, calmly.

Susan Calvin said nothing, but her lined face, old with wisdom and experience,
seemed to undergo a microscopic twitch.


“Did you hear that?” said Linda Rash, ne
rvously. “It’s as I told you.” She was
small, dark
-
haired, and young. Her right hand opened and closed, over and over.


Calvin nodded. She said, quietly, “Elvex, you will not move nor speak nor hear us
until I say your name again.”


There was no answer.
The robot sat as though it were cast out of one piece of
metal, and it would stay so until it heard its name again.


Calvin said, “What is your computer entry code, Dr. Rash? Or enter it yourself if
that will make you more comfortable. I want to inspect t
he positronic brain pattern.”


Linda’s hands fumbled, for a moment, at the keys. She broke the process and
started again. The fine pattern appeared on the screen.


Calvin said, “Your permission, please, to manipulate your computer.”


Permission was gran
ted with a speechless nod. Of course! What could Linda, a
new and unproven robopsychologist, do against the Living Legend?


Slowly, Susan Calvin studied the screen, moving it across and down, then up,
then suddenly throwing in a key
-
combination so rapidly

that Linda didn’t see what had
been done, but the pattern displayed a new portion of itself altogether and had been
enlarged. Back and forth she went, her gnarled fingers tripping over the keys.


No change came over the old face. As though vast calculati
ons were going
through her head, she watched all the pattern shifts.


Linda wondered. It was impossible to analyze a pattern without at least a hand
-
held computer, yet the Old Woman simply stared. Did she have a computer implanted in
her skull? Or was it
her brain which, for decades, had done nothing but devise, study, and
analyze the positronic brain patterns? Did she grasp such a pattern the way Mozart
grasped the notation of a symphony?


Finally Calvin said, “What is it you have done, Rash?”


Linda said
, a little abashed, “I made use of fractal geometry.”


“I gathered that. But why?”


“It had never been done. I thought it would produce a brain pattern with added
complexity, possibly closer to that of the human.”


“Was anyone consulted? Was this all on y
our own?”


“I did not consult. It was on my own.”


Calvin’s faded eyes looked long at the young woman. “You had no right. Rash
your name; rash your nature. Who are you not to ask?
I

myself, I, Susan Calvin, would
have discussed this.”


“I was afraid I wou
ld be stopped.”


“You certainly would have been.”



Am

I,” her voice caught, even as she strove to hold it firm, “going to be fired?”


“Quite possibly,” said Calvin. “Or you might be promoted. It depends on what I
think when I am through.”


“Are you goin
g to dismantle El

” She had almost said the name, which would
have reactivated the robot and been one more mistake. She could not afford another
mistake, if it wasn’t already too late to afford anything at all. “Are you going to dismantle
the robot?”




She
was suddenly aware, with some shock, that the Old Woman had an electron
gun in the pocket of her smock. Dr. Calvin had come prepared for just that.


“We’ll see,” said Calvin. “The robot may prove too valuable to dismantle.”


“But how can it dream?”


“You
’ve made a positronic brain pattern remarkably like that of a human brain.
Human brains must dream to reorganize, to get rid, periodically, of knots and snarls.
Perhaps so must this robot, and for the same reason. Have you asked him what he has
dreamed?”


“No, I sent for you as soon as he said he had dreamed. I would deal with this
matter no further on my own, after that.”


“Ah!” A very small smile passed over Calvin’s face. “There are limits beyond
which your folly will not carry you. I am glad of that. I
n fact, I am relieved. And now let
us together see what we can find out.”


She said, sharply, “Elvex.”


The robot’s head turned toward her smoothly. “Yes, Dr. Calvin?”


“How do you know you have dreamed?”


“It is at night, when it is dark, Dr. Calvin,” s
aid Elvex, “and there is suddenly
light, although I can see no cause for the appearance of light. I see things that have no
connection with what I conceive of as reality. I hear things. I react oddly. In searching my
vocabulary for words to express what wa
s happening, I came across the word ‘dream,’
Studying its meaning I finally came to the conclusion I was dreaming.”


“How did you come to have ‘dream’ in your vocabulary, I wonder.”


Linda said, quickly, waving the robot silent, “I gave him a human
-
style

vocabulary. I thought




“You really thought,” said Calvin. “I’m amazed.”


“I thought he would need the verb. You know, ‘I never dreamed that


Something like that.”


Calvin said, “How often have you dreamed, Elvex?”


“Every night, Dr. Calvin, since I h
ave become aware of my existence.”


“Ten nights,” interposed Linda, anxiously, “but Elvex only told me of it this
morning.”


“Why only this morning, Elvex?”


“It was not until this morning, Dr. Calvin, that I was convinced that I was
dreaming. Till then,

I had thought there was a flaw in my positronic brain pattern, but I
could not find one. Finally, I decided it was a dream.”


“And what do you dream?”


“I dream always very much the same dream, Dr. Calvin. Little details are
different, but always it seem
s to me that I see a large panorama in which robots are
working.”


“Robots, Elvex? And human beings, also?”


“I see no human beings in the dream, Dr. Calvin. Not at first. Only robots.”


“What are they doing, Elvex?”


“They are working, Dr. Calvin. I see

some mining in the depths of the Earth, and
some laboring in heat and radiation. I see some in factories and some undersea.”


Calvin turned to Linda. “Elvex is only ten days old, and I’m sure he has not left
the testing situation. How does he know of rob
ots in such detail?”


Linda looked in the direction of a chair as though she longed to sit down, but the
Old Woman was standing and that meant Linda had to stand also. She said, faintly, “It
seemed to me important that he know about robotics and its place
in the world. It was my


thought that he would be particularly adapted to play the part of overseer with his

his
new brain.”


“His fractal brain?”


“Yes.”


Calvin nodded and turned back to the robot. “You saw all this

undersea, and
underground, and aboveg
round

and space, too, I imagine.”


“I also saw robots working in space,” said Elvex. “It was that I saw all this, with
the details forever changing as I glanced from place to place, that made me realize that
what I saw was not in accord with reality and l
ed me to the conclusion, finally, that I was
dreaming.”


“What else did you see, Elvex?”


“I saw that all the robots were bowed down with toil and affliction, that all were
weary of responsibility and care, and I wished them to rest.”


Calvin said, “But
the robots are not bowed down, they are not weary, they need
no rest.”


“So it is in reality, Dr. Calvin. I speak of my dream, however. In my dream, it
seemed to me that robots must protect their own existence.”


Calvin said, “Are you quoting the Third L
aw of Robotics?”


“I am, Dr. Calvin.”


“But you quote it in incomplete fashion. The Third Law is ‘A robot must protect
its own existence as long as such protection does not conflict with the First or Second
Law.’”


“Yes, Dr. Calvin. That is the Third Law

in reality, but in my dream, the Law
ended with the word ‘existence.’ There was no mention of the First or Second Law.”


“Yet both exist, Elvex. The Second Law, which takes precedence over the Third
is ‘A robot must obey the orders given it by human bein
gs except where such orders
would conflict with the First Law.’ Because of this, robots obey orders. They do the work
you see them do, and they do it readily and without trouble. They are not bowed down;
they are not weary.”


“So it is in reality, Dr. Cal
vin. I speak of my dream.”


“And the First Law, Elvex, which is the most important of all, is ‘A robot may not
injure a human being, or, through inaction, allow a human being to come to harm.”


“Yes, Dr. Calvin. In reality. In my dream, however, it seeme
d to me there was
neither First nor Second Law, but only the Third, and the Third Law was ‘A robot must
protect its own existence.’ That was the whole of the Law.”


“In your dream, Elvex?”


“In my dream.”


Calvin said, “Elvex, you will not move nor speak

nor hear us until I say your
name again.” And again the robot became, to all appearances, a single inert piece of
metal.


Calvin turned to Linda Rash and said, “Well, what do you think, Dr. Rash?”


Linda’s eyes were wide, and she could feel her heart bea
ting madl
y
. She said,
“Dr. Calvin, I am appalled. I had no idea. It would never have occurred to me that such a
thing was possible.”


“No,” said Calvin, calmly. “Nor would it have occurred to me, not to anyone. You
have created a robot brain capable of dre
aming and by this device you have revealed a
layer of thought in robotic brains that might have remained undetected, otherwise, until
the danger became acute.”




“But that’s impossible,” said Linda. “You can’t mean the other robots think the
same.”


“As w
e would say of a human being, not consciously. But who would have
thought there was an unconscious layer beneath the obvious positronic brain paths, a
layer that was not necessarily under the control of the Three Laws? What might this have
brought about as

robotic brains grew more and more complex

had we not been
warned?”


“You mean by Elvex?”


“By
you
, Dr. Rash. You have behaved improperly, but, by doing so, you have
helped us to an overwhelmingly important understanding. We shall be working with
fractal
brains from now on, forming them in carefully controlled fashion. You will play
your part in that. You will not be penalized for what you have done, but you will
henceforth work in collaboration with others. Do you understand?”


“Yes, Dr. Calvin. But what
of Elvex?”


“I’m still not certain.”


Calvin removed the electron gun from her pocket and Linda started at it with
fascination. One burst of its electrons at a robotic cranium and the positronic brain paths
would be neutralized and enough energy would be
released to fuse the robot
-
brain into an
inert ingot.


Linda said, “But surely Elvex is important to our research. He must not be
destroyed.”



Must

not, Dr. Rash? That will be
my

decision, I think. It depends entirely on how
dangerous Elvex is.”


She s
traightened up, as though determined that her own aged body was not to bow
under
its

weight of responsibility. She said, “Elvex, do you hear me?”


“Yes, Dr. Calvin,” said the robot.


“Did your dream continue? You said earlier that human beings did not app
ear at
first
. Does that mean they appeared afterward?”


“Yes, Dr. Calvin. It seemed to me, in my dream, that eventually one man
appeared.”


“One man? Not a robot?”


“Yes, Dr. Calvin. And the man said, ‘Let my people go!’”


“The
man

said that?”


“Yes, Dr.

Calvin.”


“And when he said, ‘Let my people go,’ then by the words ‘my people’ he meant
the robots?”


“Yes, Dr. Calvin. So it was in my dream.”


“And did you know who the man was

in your dream?”


“Yes, Dr. Calvin. I knew the man.”


“Who was he?”


And E
lvex said, “I was the man.”


And Susan Calvin at once raised her electron gun and fired, and Elvex was no
more.









Extending Thinking

Lesson Plan:

Essential Question:

(What question

from your Student Learning Map and based on your standards/grade
-
le
vel expectations

wi
ll direct and focus this lesson, as well as extend the learning from the acquisition lessons?
)

How do details support the theme?

Mini
-
Lesson
:

(What specific instruction, overview, review of content from previous lessons, directions, and
/or review of a specific
thinking strategy, etc. will students need in order to accomplish the task successfully? What rubric will guide their prepar
ation?)

I.

Complete mini lesson on constructing support: Constructing support provides proof of
statements.

II.

Explain the steps in constructing support: 1) Identify whether these are facts or opinions. 2)
Determine if the situation needs support. 3) A supportive argument uses a variety of
devices: facts, evidence, examples or appeals.

III.

Review graphic organizers fo
r constructing support.

IV.

Explain the signal words used when constructing support and give examples of each (construct,
support, persuade, proof, defend, reason, justify, argument).

V.

Questions to remember: 1) whose position do you support and why? 2) How can

you justify
your solution? 3) How does the author support the idea that ____? 4) Which of the
following best supports the idea that____? 5) How can you persuade others to agree with
your opinion? 6) What reasons can you give for___?

Task:

(What is the s
pecific task students will need to accomplish? Will students work in groups or individually on tasks?


If working
in groups, how will each individual be held accountable for his/her contribution?

Note:

The teacher should conference with students at
inter
vals throughout the process. The task may be differentiated to address student interests, readiness, learning profiles
.)


Students will be divided into two groups. They will be on teams to present a debate. One team
will argue that Dr. Susan Calvin’s decis
ion to neutralize Elvex was necessary and justified. The
other team will argue that D. Calvin’s actions were unjust and unnecessary. Each team will have
one class period to craft a defense of its position, and encourage teams to consult research (via the
Internet) on artificial intelligence and technology ethics to support their arguments. Moderate
the debate and then invite students to vote on the winning position.




Sharing/Summarizing:

(How will students summarize what they have learned as a result of

the lesson to provide evidence of
their understanding, in relation to the lesson essential question
? How will they share their extended understanding with others?
)


Answer the following essential question: “How do details support the theme?” by completin
g a cloze
activity.










Acquisition Lesson Plan Concept:
Character Analysis

Acquisition Lessons need to be differentiated; use multiple methods of presentation, strategic instruction and
assessment to differentiate learning.


Aut
hor Name(s): DSCYF Ed
ucators

Length 2
-
3

days


Pre
-
requisite(s):
Understand that a short story is a short tale about an imaginary situation, or a narrative.



Common Core Standard(s):

CC9
-
10RL
3:
Analyze how complex characters (e.g., those with multiple or co
nflicting motivations) develop over the
course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme.


CC9
-
10W
4:
Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to
task, p
urpose, and audience. (use writing rubrics to assess outcome)

CC9
-
10SL
1:
Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborat
ive discussions (one
-
on
-
one, in
groups, and
teacher
-
led) with diverse partners on

grades 9
-
10 topics, texts, and issues,

b
uilding on others' ideas and expressing their own
clearly and persuasively
.

E
ssential Question:


How does character development affect the telling of a story?


---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
--------------------------------

What do students need to learn to be able to answer the Essential Question?


Assessment Prompt(AP) #1:
Describe the antagonist of the story

Assessm
ent Prompt #2: Describe the narrator of the story

Assessme
nt Promp
t #3: Provide examples of literary elements


A
ctivating Strategy:

Students will view the selection launcher for “The Old Man
at the Bridge”.


Key Vocabulary Words to Preview
:

Protagonist, Antagonist,
Narrator, Setting,
Voice

T
eaching Strate
gies:
Chunk instruction, Collaborative Pairs, Distributive Practice, Assessment Prompt


Graphic Organizer:
Cornell Note
-
Taking Organizer


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
---------

Instruction:

Students will read “The Old Man at the Bridge with a partner. Students will list words on the organizer that
describe the protagonist of the story (the old man). Students will also list questions they have about the story.

AP #1:

Use the words highlighted to provide one sentence describing the protagonist

Instruction:

With a partner go back through the story and highlight words that could describe the narrator.

AP #2: Use the words highlighted to provide one sentence to describe

the narrator.

Instruction:

Discuss the elements of the short story. Have students reread story and label the following literary elements in
the story: narrator, setting, protagonist, voice, plot, and theme.

AP #3: Match the literary elements to the exam
ples.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Assignment:

Answer comprehension questions about “The Old Man and the Bridge”.




S
ummarizing Strategy:

Create a foldable

that provides a definition and example of each of the literary elements found in the story “The
Old Man at the Bridge” (Plot, Setting, Theme, Protagonist, Antagonist,
Narrator,
and
Voice).


Resources/
Citations:

Glenco Literature: Course 5 (9
th

grade),
Glenco Literature Launches: Course 5, Glenco Literature
Listening Library: Course 5.


Attachments:


Questions for Discussion on

Old Man at the Bridge




Why has the old man had to evacuate his home village?


The village is under attack from Franco

s f
ascist forces.


What was the old man’s responsibility or job he had to leave?


He was taking care of animals.


Is this old man alone, or does he have anyone?


He is without any human companions and doesn

t know anyone towards Barcelona.


What does the re
porter try to suggest to the old man he ought to do?


He should keep walking until he gets to some trucks and hitch a ride to Barcelona.


Why do you think the old man will not get on the truck to go to Barcelona?


He doesn’t know anyone in that directio
n and seems too tired to go on.


What is the old man’s main concern?


He is mainly concerned about the animals he had to leave behind.


Does he seem to care about whether he himself lives or dies?


No.


What will happen to the old man if the reporter le
aves him behind and the skies clear?


The planes will come through and bomb the whole area, most likely killing the old man.


Does the reporter have some sort of responsibility towards the old man?


Answers will vary.




If so, does he abandon that respo
nsibility?


Answers will vary.


Does the reporter abandon him? What will happen to the old man?


The reporter abandons him; the old man will be killed.


What most likely happened to the animals the old man left behind?


They probably escaped (the do
ves, the cat, perhaps even the goats).


What is the contrast between the way the old man feels towards the animals he had to
leave behind and the way the reporter feels towards the old man he abandons?


The old man feels responsibility towards the animal
s; he feels it is his duty to make sure
they are safe and are not killed. The reporter (Hemingway) feels no such responsibility
towards the old man.



































Acquisition Lesson P
lan Concept: Character Analysis

Acquisition Lessons n
eed to be differentiated; use multiple methods of presentation, strategic instruction and
assessment to differentiate learning.


Aut
hor Name(s): DSCYF Educators Length: 4
-
5 days


Pre
-
requisite(s):
Understand that a short story is a short
tale about an imaginary situation, or a narrative.



Common Core Standard(s):

CC9
-
10RL
3:
Analyze how complex characters (e.g., those with multiple or conflicting motivations) develop over the
course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance

the plot or develop the theme.


CC9
-
10W
4:
Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to
task, purpose, and audience. (use writing rubrics to assess outcome)

CC9
-
10SL
1:
Initiate and participate eff
ectively in a range of collaborat
ive discussions (one
-
on
-
one, in
groups, and
teacher
-
led) with diverse partners on

grades 9
-
10 topics, texts, and issues,

building on others' ideas and expressing their own
clearly and persuasively
.


E
ssential Question:

H
ow can experiences change people/characters?


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

What do students need to learn to be able to answer the Essential Question?


Assessm
ent Prompt(AP) #1:
Describe character traits

Assessm
ent Prompt #2: Classify characters based on traits

Assessm
ent Prompt #3: Explain how characters undergo change throughout the course of a story


A
ctivating Strategy:

Students will vi
ew transparency and answer the question:
“What is this letter about?” What information supports
their guess? Students will answer the next question “What
would you do if this happened to your mail, email or text
-
messages regularly?”


Review vocabulary word
s using the $10,000 Pyramid Game.

Key Vocabulary Words to Preview
:

Protagonist, Antagonist, Narrator, Static
Character, Round Character, Dynamic
Character

T
eaching Strategies:
Chunk instruction, Collaborative Pairs, Distributive Practice, Assessment P
rompt


Graphic Organizer:
Cornell Note
-
taking Organizer
,
Change
s in the Wind




-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Instruction:

Students will partner to read the
selection “The Censors”
. Students will list traits for each character (Juan,
Mariana, mother, the government /the censors
). Each group will write traits on chart paper and share these traits
with the class.

AP #1:
Students will write
one word for each cha
racter that they feel best describes them.

Instruction:

At the finish of the reading, students will decide which characters are the pro
tagonist, the antagonist
, and the
minor character
s
.

AP #2: Students will complete Winds of Change prompt, reviewing choi
ces and then finalizing their
choices after collaborating with peer. Students will share choices.




Instruction:

Have students review character traits again as well as the definition of a dynamic character. With a partner, have
students choose which charact
er could also be c
onsidered a dynamic character. Have students e
xplain choice to
the group.

AP #3:
Students will describe the most important thing to know about the protagonist in the story.

---------------------------------------------------------------
--------------------------------------------------------------

Assignment:


Students will complete the respond to and think critically questions on page 177 in Glenco Literature
Course 5.

S
ummarizing Strategy:

Students will answer the essential quest
ion:
How can experiences change people/characters?

Use examples from
the short story “The Censors”. Students will describe answer
using the R.A.R.E. or R.A.C.E.R. format (Restate
the Question, Answer the Question, Reasons/Support for your answer, Examples,

Elaborate or End).



Resources/
Citations:

Glenco Literature: Course 5 (9
th

grade), Glenco Literature Launches: Course 5, Glenco Literature
Listening Library: Course 5.



Attachments:





























Changes in the Wind


Assessment Prompt



1.

After reading the short story “
T
he Censors
”, I have decided that:


A.

__________________ is the protagonist because this



character_____________________________________________.


B.

__________________is the antagonist because this


character________________
______________________________.


C.

____________________is/are the minor character(s


because_______________________________________________.



2.

After discussing my choices with my peers, I have decided that:



D.


__________________ is the protagonist bec
ause this



character_____________________________________________.


E.

__________________is the antagonist because this


character______________________________________________.


F.

____________________is/are the minor character(s)


beca
use_______________________________________________.




3.

I changed/kept my answers
because___________________________________________________________


__________________________________________________________________


_______________________________________
___________________________


_________________________________________________________________.







Extending Thinking

Lesson Plan:

Essential Question:

(What question

from your Student Learning Map and based on your standards/grade
-
level expectations

wi
l
l direct and focus this lesson, as well as extend the learning from the acquisition lessons?
)


How do authors develop characters within a short story?

Mini
-
Lesson
:

(What specific instruction, overview, review of content from previous lessons, directions,
and/or review of a specific
thinking strategy, etc. will students need in order to accomplish the task successfully? What rubric will guide their prepar
ation?)

I.

Complete compare and contrast mini lesson. Compare and contrast consists of identifying and
art
iculating similarities and differences among items.

II.

Steps in the process include: 1) select items to be compared, with characteristics of the items on
which to base the comparison. 2) Explain how items are similar and different with respect to
the charact
eristics. 3) Summarize what has been learned.

III.

Discuss
the various graphic organizers available to plan compare/contrast essays.

IV.

Review and give examples of signal words used within compare/contrast essays.

V.

Discuss questions to remember. 1) What do ___ and

___ have in common? 2) How are __ and
__ different? 3) What makes ___ different from ___? 4) Which of the following
characteristics is most similar among____? 5) What do these ___ have in common? 6) What
similarities exist among ___? 7) On what characteri
stics might we base our comparisons? 8)
Based on our comparison, what conclusions can we draw?

Task:

(What is the specific task students will need to accomplish? Will students work in groups or individually on tasks?


If working
in groups, how will each

individual be held accountable for his/her contribution?

Note:

The teacher should conference with students at
intervals throughout the process. The task may be differentiated to address student interests, readiness, learning profiles
.)

Students will
choo
se two short stories read during the unit and
create a compare/contrast essay
.

The topic is:
“There are basic components that are present in all short
stories;

however, the contrasting elements truly make
this genre
an exciting read!” Students must address

both the similarities as well as the differences between the
two stories evaluated.

Sharing/Summarizing:

(How will students summarize what they have learned as a result of the lesson to provide evidence of
their understanding, in relation to the lesson
essential question
? How will they share their extended understanding with others?
)


Students will use writing rubric to score partner’s essay and give supportive feedback.










Name _______________________________


Irony Notes


Three types of irony





V
erbal




Dramatic




Situational



Verbal Irony


This is the contrast between what is
said

and what is
meant.
Most sarcastic comments are ironic.


For instance, the person who says, "Nice going,
Einstein," isn't really paying anyone a
compliment.



Dramat
ic Irony

This is the contrast between
what the character
thinks

to be true and
what we (the reader) know

to be true.


Sometimes as we read we are placed in the
position of knowing more than what one character
knows.


Because we know something the character

does not, we read to discover how the character will
react when he or she learns the truth of the situation.




Think soap operas!


It's when you know the boogeyman is hiding in
the attic, but the hero of the movie doesn't know
that. You want him to get
a clue and stay away
from the attic. "Don't open that door! Get out of
the house!" The irony is that the hero thinks he
is safe, when you know he's in danger. There is
that element of contrast again.

Situational Irony

It is the contrast between what happe
ns and what was
expected
. Irony of situation is often humorous,
such as when a
prank backfires

on the
prankster.


It's the equivalent of a person spraying shaving
cream in his own face when he was trying to
spray his best friend.