AIM'01 Program - Advanced Intelligent Mechatronics AIM'01

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2001 IEEE/ASME

International Conference on

Advanced Intelligent Mechatronics


AIM '01


8

12 July 2001

Teatro Sociale

Como, Italy


PROGRAM






http://www.AIM01.unina.it




Co
-
sponsored by

IEEE Industrial Electr
onics Society

IEEE Robotics and Automation Society

ASME Dynamic Systems and Control Division







WELCOME


On behalf of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) and the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (A
SME), I am
glad to
host you at the 2001 IEEE/ASME International Conference on Advanced Intelligent Mechatronics (AIM '01). The purpose of this
biennial conference, following the footsteps of the previous two editions in Tokyo, Japan (1997) and Atlanta, Georgia, USA (1
999),
is to
promote activities in various areas of mechatronics by providing a forum for exchange of ideas, presentation of technical ach
ievements, and
discussion of future directions. The theme of the Conference is
Synergy in Mechatronics

The Next Step of Info
rmation Technology.


This year, a record number of 280 papers have been submitted from 32 different countries with an overall breakdown for the th
ree greater
geographical areas of about: 1/2 for Europe and Africa, 1/4 for Asia and Oceania, and 1/4 for Amer
ica. The resulting paper classification is:
206 regular papers, 55 invited
-
session papers, and 19 industry
-
oriented papers (a novelty for this Conference). The technical program
includes the presentation of 4 videos and 224 papers organized into 48 sessi
ons. The review process has been conducted by the 3
Program Co
-
Chairs, the Invited Session Chair and the Industry
-
Oriented Chair, as well as by the Video Session Chair. The process has
been aided by the requirement that all papers and videos be submitted

in electronic form, thereby allowing each contribution to receive 3
independent reviews! Besides thanking all the Chairs and Committee Members, I would like to take this opportunity to acknowl
edge the
tremendous effort invested by the E
-
Media Chair and h
is Co
-
Chair to ensure a prompt and efficient handling of the submission and review
process.


The Proceedings are provided in both printed and CD
-
ROM version, thanks to the work of the Publication Chair. In addition, this Program
booklet contains the abstr
acts of the papers which have been made available on the web
http://www.AIM01.unina.it

prior to the Conference
as well.


The Technical Program begins on Sunday 8 July in the afternoon with a Workshop and a Tutorial promoted by the devoted Chair,
which are
followed by the Video Session. Paper Sessions are held in four parallel tracks from Monday to Wednesday. A strategic choice

has been to
invite four Plenary Speakers all from industry: Bruno Murari, Stephen Hung, Masakazu Ejiri and Jan Van Eijk. Also, an

Exhibition has been
organized by the devoted Chair. The intensive Social Program for the Conference Attendees and their Accompanying Persons inc
ludes: a
boat tour sightseeing along the lake shores, then docking at Villa Olmo for the Welcome Cocktail on M
onday; the Banquet in the historical
halls of Villa Erba in Cernobbio on Tuesday; and the Farewell Wine Tasting at Teatro Sociale on Wednesday. Finally, Thursday

12 July is
dedicated to visit local industries.


A special word of appreciation goes to the G
eneral Co
-
Chair for his precious advise on the management of the Conference, as well as to
the Local Arrangement Chair for his tireless support to the organization of the event.


Last but not least, I wish to thank the professional staff of Centro “A. Volt
a” who have fulfilled their secretarial duties as effectively as
smoothly. Of course, we must remember and express our greatest recognition to all the Authors. Without their valuable contr
ibutions, there
would be no conference at all.


On behalf of the w
hol
e AIM ′01 Team, welcome to Italy: it is my great pleasure to meet you in Como!


Bruno Siciliano

General Chair




VENUE


Como

is on a lake in Lombardia region (Northern Italy), located about 40 Km from Milan in a wealthy industrial area. Only a few m
inut
es
away from the Swiss border, it can be reached by train or car in about 40 minutes from the hub Milan Malpensa 2000 Internatio
nal Airport.
It is also in an ideal position to travel in Europe and reach famous destinations such as Venice, Portofino and Ci
nque Terre (three hours),
Florence and Tuscany (four hours). Attending an opera performance at either of the famous theaters: "La Scala" in Milan and
"Arena" in
Verona (past Lake Garda) is worthy an extension of the journey to Northern Italy. Just half a
n hour from bustling Milan,
Lake Como

is a
jewel
-
like oasis of tranquillity, a magical combination of lush Mediterranean foliage and snowy alpine peaks. It is the third larg
est Italian
lake. It is made up of three branches, joined in a charming central
lake, but separated by different styles and cultures; the Colico's branch
is savage and pure; the Lecco’s branch is a natural jewel and the Como’s one is refined and elegant. The conference is held
in the
fascinating site of
Teatro Sociale
, a neo
-
classica
l building of early 19th century located in the heart of the city next to the cathedral. The
Conference Secretariat is pleased to assist attendees and accompanying persons for local tourist information.




ORGANIZATION


Sponsors and Supporters

Co
-
sponsor
ed by

IEEE Industrial Electronics Society (IES)

IEEE Robotics and Automation Society (RAS)

ASME Dynamic Systems and Control Division (DSCD)

In cooperation with

Institute of Electrical Engineers of Japan (IEEJ)

Institute of Systems, Control, and Information

Engineers (ISCIE)

International Federation of Automatic Control (IFAC)

Japan Society of Mechanical Engineers (JSME)

Japan Society of Precision Engineers (JSPE)

Robotics Society of Japan (RSJ)

Society of Instrument and Control Engineers (SICE)


With the ge
nerous financial support of

STMicroelectronics

Agusta

Balance Systems

FIAR

Gerit

Joinet

Control Techniques Italia

Heidenhain

and

Università degli Studi di Salerno

Politecnico di Milano


Sede di Como


Chairs

GENERAL CHAIR

Bruno Siciliano

Dipartimento di

Ingegneria dell’Informazione e Ingegneria Elettrica

Università degli Studi di Salerno, Italy

Tel: +39 089
-
96
-
4306 Fax: +39 089
-
96
-
4218

bsiciliano@unisa.it


GENERAL CO
-
CHAIR

Shigeki Sugano

Department of Mechanical Engineering

Waseda University, Japan

Tel:

+81 (3) 52863264 Fax: +81 (3) 52720948

sugano@paradise.mech.waseda.ac.jp


PROGRAM CO
-
CHAIR (Europe and Africa)

Jadran Lenarčič

Institut Jožef Stefan

Slovenia

Tel: +386 (61) 177
-
3378 Fax: +386 (61) 219
-
385

jadran.lenarcic@ijs.si


PROGRAM CO
-
CHAIR (Asia and Oceania)

Shigeru Okuma

Department of Electrical Engineering

Nagoya University, Japan

Tel: +81 (52) 789
-
2775
F
ax: +81 (52) 789
-
3140

okuma@okuma.nuee.nagoya
-
u.ac.jp


PROGRAM CO
-
CHAIR (America)

William R. Hamel

Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering & Eng. Science Dept.

University of Tennessee, USA

Tel: +1 (865) 974
-
6588 Fax: +1 (865) 974
-
5274

whamel@utk.edu


INVITED
SESSION CHAIR

Clarence W. de Silva

Department of Mechanical Engineering

University of British Columbia, Canada

Tel: +1 (604) 822
-
6291 Fax: +1 (604) 822
-
2403

desilva@mech.ubc.ca


INDUSTRY
-
ORIENTED & LOCAL ARRANGEMENT CHAIR

Gianantonio Magnani

Dipartimento
di Elettronica e Informazione

Politecnico di Milano, Italy

Tel: +39 02
-
2399
-
3673 Fax: +39 02
-
2399
-
3587

magnani@elet.polimi.it


VIDEO CHAIR

Rajiv V. Dubey

Mechanical Engineering Department

University of South Florida, USA

Tel: +1 (813) 974
-
2280 Fax: +1 (8
13) 974
-
3539

dubey@eng.usf.edu


E
-
MEDIA CHAIR

Claudio Melchiorri

Dipartimento di Elettronica Informatica e Sistemistica

Università degli Studi di Bologna, Italy

Tel: +39 051
-
209
-
3034 Fax: +39 051
-
209
-
3073

cmelchiorri@deis.unibo.it


WORKSHOP AND TUTORIAL

CHAIR

Luigi Glielmo

Facoltà di Ingegneria

Università del Sannio in Benevento, Italy

Tel: +39 0824
-
30581 Fax: +39 0824
-
21866

glielmo@unisannio.it


PUBLICATION CHAIR

Tzyh
-
Jong Tarn

Department of Systems Science and Mathematics

Washington University, USA

T
el: +1 (314) 935
-
6037
Fax: +1 (314) 935
-
6121

tarn@wurobot.wustl.edu


EXHIBITION CHAIR

Gianni Ferretti

Dipartimento di Elettronica e Informazione

Politecnico di Milano, Italy

Tel: +39 02
-
2399
-
3682 Fax: +39 02
-
2399
-
3587

ferretti@elet.polimi.it



Committ
ees

PROGRAM COMMITTEE (Europe and Africa)

Giuseppe Ambrosino (Università di Napoli Federico II, Italy)

Stefano Chiaverini (Università di Cassino, Italy)

Paolo Dario (Scuola S. Anna di Pisa, Italy)

Giuseppe De Maria (Seconda Università di Napoli, Italy)

Ru
ggero Frezza (Università di Padova, Italy)

James Hewit (University of Dundee, UK)

Manfred Hiller (Universität Duisburg, Germany)

Rolf Isermann (Technische Universität Darmstadt, Germany)

Rolf Johansson (Lund Institute of Technology, Sweden)

Okyay Kaynak (B
oðaziçi University, Turkey)

Kostas Kyriakopoulos (NTU Athens, Greece)

Wolfgang Moritz (Mechatronik Laboratorium Paderborn, Germany)

Antonio Piccolo (Università di Salerno, Italy)

François Pierrot (LIRM Montpellier, France)

Norberto Pires (Universidade de C
oimbra, Portugal)

Gianfranco Rizzo (Università di Salerno, Italy)

Paolo Rocco (Politecnico di Milano, Italy)

Riccardo Scattolini (Università di Pavia, Italy)

Gerhard Schweitzer (ETH Zürich, Switzerland)

Henrik Van Brussel (Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, B
elgium)


PROGRAM COMMITTEE (Asia and Oceania)

Marcelo Ang (National University of Singapore, Singapore)

Lilong Cai (Hong Kong Univ. of Science and Technology, PRC)

Hyung
-
Suck Cho (KAIST, Korea)

Li
-
Chen Fu (National Taiwan University, ROC)

Toshio Fukuda (Na
goya University, Japan)

Kazuhiro Hane (Tohoku University, Japan)

Hideki Hashimoto (University of Tokyo, Japan)

Koji Ito (Tokyo Institute of Technology, Japan)

Akitoshi Itoh (Tokyo Denki University, Japan)

Makoto Kaneko (Hiroshima University, Japan)

Dong
-
So
o Kwon (KAIST, Korea)

Jang
-
Myung Lee (Pusan National University, Korea)

Ren Luo (National Chung Cheng University, ROC)

Toshiro Noritsugu (Okayama University, Japan)

Kouhei Ohnishi (Keio University, Japan)

Jong
-
Hyeon Park (Hanyang University, Korea)

Takanor
i Shibata (AIST Intelligent Systems Institute, Japan)

James Trevelyan (University of Western Australia, Australia)

Yang
-
Sheng Xu (Chinese University of Hong Kong, PRC)

Yoshio Yamamoto (University of Tokai, Japan)


PROGRAM COMMITTEE (America)

Wayne Book (Ge
orgia Institute of Technology, USA)

George Chiu (Purdue University, USA)

Tom Collins (Georgia Institute of Technology, USA)

Kevin Craig (Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, USA)

Elizabeth Croft (University of British Columbia, Canada)

Imme Ebert
-
Uphoff (Geor
gia Institute of Technology, USA)

Lin Guo (Maxtor Corporation, USA)

Saeid Habibi (University of Saskatchewan, Canada)

Reid Kress (University of Tennessee, USA)

Tom Kurfess (Georgia Institute of Technology, USA)

Kok
-
Meng Lee (Georgia Institute of Technology
, USA)

Deirdre Meldrum (University of Washington, USA)

Ranjan Mukherjee (Michigan State University, USA)

Ronald Perez (University of Wisconsin Milwaukee, USA)


Rahmat Shoureshi (Colorado School of Mines, USA)

Dawn Tilbury (University of Michigan, USA)

Masa
yoshi Tomizuka (University of California at Berkeley, USA)

Ian Walker (Clemson University, USA)

Ching Ping Wong (Georgia Institute of Technology, USA)

Bin Yao (Purdue University, USA)



INVITED SESSION COMMITTEE

Basilio Bona (Politecnico di Torino, Italy)

Gianni Ferretti (Politecnico di Milano, Italy)

Devendra Garg (Duke University, USA)

Gerd Hirzinger (DLR, Germany)

Tong Heng Lee (National University of Singapore, Singapore)

Mohammad Jamhsidi (University of New Mexico, USA)

Arthur Murphy (Dupont Company, U
SA)

Jonathan Wu (National Research Council, Canada)


INDUSTRY
-
ORIENTED COMMITTEE

Jakob Apkarian (Quanser Consulting, Canada)

Torgny Brogårdh (ABB Robotics, Sweden)

Pietro Buttolo (Ford Motor Company, USA)

Toshitsugu Inoue (Matsushita Electric Company, Japa
n)

Nobuto Matsuhira (Toshiba Corporation, Japan)

Peter Putz (ESTEC European Space Agency, The Netherlands)

Taizo Sakaki (Ricoh Company, Japan)

Tariq Samad (Honeywell Technology Center, USA)

Hemant Sardar (Thompson Ramo Wooldridge, USA)

Lorenzo Sciavicco (U
niversità di Roma Tre, Italy)

Herman Soemers (Philips CIT, The Netherlands)

Maurizio Zuffada (ST Microelectronics, Italy)


VIDEO COMMITTEE

Benedetto Allotta (Scuola S. Anna di Pisa, Italy)

I
-
Ming Chen (Nanyang Technological University, Singapore)

Thenkuru
ssi Kesavadas (SUNY Buffalo, USA)


WORKSHOP AND TUTORIAL COMMITTEE

Luigi Del Re (Universität Linz, Austria)

Hami Kazerooni (University of California at Berkeley, USA)

Kazuhiro Kosuge (Tohoku University, Japan)

Giorgio Rizzoni (Ohio State University, USA)


E
-
MEDIA CO
-
CHAIR

Daniele Arduini (Cinetica, Italy
)


EXHIBITION CO
-
CHAIR

Paolo Rocco (Politecnico di Milano, Italy)


CONFERENCE SECRETARIAT

Centro di Cultura Scientifica "Alessandro Volta"

Villa Olmo, Como, Italy

Fax: +39 031 573395


LOGISTICS AND SERVICES

Chiara Stefanetti

chiara.stefanetti@centrovolta.it


REGISTRATION AND ACCOMMODATION

Nadia Tansini

nadia.tansini@centrovolta.it






PROGRAM LAYOUT


Sunday 8 July 2001

15:00

18:00

Workshop

″PICMicro MCU in Mechatronics: Hands On″,
J. Apkarian

Tutorial

″Mechatronics Realizations in Hybrid Electric Vehicles″, L. Glielmo

18:00

18:40

Video Session

Monday 9 July 2001

08:15

08:30

Opening Ceremony

08:30

09:20

Plenary 1

″Is Micromachining Still a Dream or an Industrial

Reality?″, B. Murari


Track A


Track B

Track C

Track D

M1

09:30

11:10

Manipulator Design

Teleoperation

Motion and Imaging

Transportation Systems

11:10

11:30

Coffee Break

M2

11:30

13:10

Parallel Manipulators

Intelligent Systems I

Fixture and Grasping D
esign

Railway Vehicle Technology


M3

14:30

15:50

Biomechatronics

Intelligent Systems II

Fixture and Part Location

Systems

Automotive Systems I

15:50

16:10

Coffee Break

M4

16:10

17:30

Advances in Robotics Within

RAMSETE Project

Intelligent Process Autom
ation

Sensing

Automotive Systems II


18:00

19:30

Lake Boat Tour

19:30

21:30

Welcome Cocktail @ Villa Olmo

Tuesday 10 July 2001

08:30

09:20

Plenary 2
″An Open System Interconnection Model for Mechatronics″, S. Hung


Track A


Track B

Track C

Track D

T1

09:30

11:10

Robot Analysis and Planning

Neural and Fuzzy Control

Actuators

Manufacturing Systems I

11:10

11:30

Coffee Break

T2

11:30

13:10

Robot Dynam
ics and Control

Vibration Control I

Hydraulic Actuators

Manufacturing Systems II


T3

14:30

16:10

Manipulation and Control

Vibration Control II

Actuator Design

Software Design for Manufacturing

16:10

16:30

Coffee Break

T4

16:30

18:10

Robot Force Control

Control of Mechatronics Systems

Robot Actuation

Mechatronics System Design


19:30

23:30

Banquet @ Villa Erba

Wednesday 11 July 2001

08:30

09:20

Plenary 3

″Robotics and Machine
-
Vision


An Industrial View

″, M. Ejiri


Track A


Track B

Track C

Track D

W1

09:30

11:10

Flexible Manipulators

Walking Machines

Mechatronics Curricula

Discrete Event Systems in

Automated Transportation

11:10

11:30

Coffee Break

W
2

11:30

13:10

Service Robots

Human―Machine Interfaces I

Technology Enhanced Teaching

Data Storage Systems


14:30

15:20

Plenary 4

″The Law of Cooperation in Mechatronics″, J. Van Eijk

W3

15:30

16:50

Robotic Manipulation in Space

Human―Machine Interfaces

II

Mechatronics Applications

Fault Detection

16:50

17:10

Coffee Break

W4

17:10

18:30

Vehicles and Space Exploration

Mobile Robots

Micro Technology

Planning and Navigation

18:30

18:45

Closing Ceremony


19:00

21:00

Farewell Wine Tasting @ Teatro Social
e

Thursday 12 July 2001

09:00

13:00

Industry Tour 1
″STMicroelectronics″ (Semiconductors)

Industry Tour 2
″Agusta″ (Helicopters)





SOCIAL PROGRAM


Monday 9 July 2001

18:00

19:30

Lake Boat Tour

Embarkment across main square (Piazza Cavour) by the conference site (Teatro Sociale). Sightseeing along lak
e shores and docking at
Villa Olmo

19:30

21:30

Welcome Cocktail

Appetizers, cakes, fruit, pasta and wine in the park of Villa Olmo

Tuesday 10 July 2001

19:30

23:30

Banquet

Bus transfer from main square to Villa Erba in Cernobbio. Full
-
course classical It
alian dinner in historical halls

Wednesday 11 July 2001

19:00

21:00

Farewell Wine Tasting

Selection of Italian wines with cheese (parmigiano, pecorino, gorgonzola, etc.) and cured pork (prosciutto, salame, culatello
, etc.) at Teatro
Sociale




TECHNICAL

PROGRAM


Sunday 8 July 2001

15:00

18:00

Workshop (WS) & Tutorial (TU)

18:00

18:40

Video Session (VI)

Monday 9 July 2001

08:30

09:20

Plenary Lecture 1 (PL1)

09:30

13:10 & 14:30

17:30

Paper Sessions (M1 to M4 in 4 parallel tracks A to D)

Tuesday 10 July

2001

08:30

09:20

Plenary Lecture 2 (PL2)

09:30

13:10 & 14:30

18:10

Paper Sessions (T1 to T4 in 4 parallel tracks A to D)

Wednesday 11 July 2001

08:30

09:20

Plenary Lecture 3 (PL3)

14:30

15:20

Plenary Lecture 4 (PL4)

09:30

13:10 & 15:30

18:30

Paper Sessi
ons (W1 to W4 in 4 parallel tracks A to D)

Thursday 12 July 2001

08:30

14:30

Industry Tours (IT)



Sunday 8 July 2001

WS

Workshop

Tutorial

TU

SALA PASTA

15:00―18:00

SALA TURCA

Jacob Apkarian, Canada

ORGANIZER

Luigi Glielmo, Italy

PICMicro MCU in Me
chatronics: Hands On


This workshop focuses on the use of the PICMicro MCU by Microchip Technology in
Mechatronics. The workshop consists of two components: Introduction to the PIC
16F877 and development tools; and Hands
-
on experimentation. Due to the hand
s
-
on
nature of the workshop, attendance is limited to 10 people, equipped with a laptop.
Fundamentals of programming in C (not C++) will be required.

15:00

15:20

Introduction to the PICMicro 16F877

15:20

15:30

Software installation on your laptop

15:30

16:
00

Hands on: Digital I/O

16:00

16:30

Hands on: Serial communications with a PC

16:40

17:00

Hands on: Analog loopback and sampling

17:00

17:30

Hands on: Realtime issues

17:30

18:00

Hands on: Realtime PID control using the PIC

The hands
-
on session shall be r
un in the following manner. Each participant shall
bring their own laptop to which we install a compiler. We shall supply you with the
code for each hands on session. The code shall be explained and discussed. Minor
changes shall be suggested for you to ch
ange in the code in order to gain
understanding. You then compile your program on your PC to see that it is free of
error. You then take the compiled code to the hands
-
on station and download the
code to the PIC and run and observe your program's response.


Mechatronics Realizations in Hybrid Electric Vehicles


Aim of this tutorial is to bring to mechatronics teachers and researchers from
academia a concrete feeling of the current state
-
of
-
art in the automotive field,
particularly on Hybrid Electric Vehicle
s. The participants, world
-
leading automakers
and automotive research centers, will present their recent realizations and discuss
both problems already solved through mechatronics, and future problems which will
need attention by mechatronics researchers.

15:00

15:10

Introduction
,
Luigi Glielmo
, Università del Sannio, Italy

15:10

15:50

HEV Technologies for Passenger Cars


An Overview
,
Ralf Bady
, RLE
International, Germany

Hybrid Electric Vehicles are one promising option to reduce fuel consumption and
emis
sions of future passenger cars. Different technologies have been investigated
within the past 30 years, since 1997 first technologies have been implemented in
production vehicles and have been made available first on the markets in Japan, US
and also now E
urope. Different hybrid technology configurations will be presented and
discussed. The latest vehicle applications will be summarized.

15:50

16:30

INMOVE


Concept of a Charge
-
Sustaining Hybrid Drive Train
,
Christian Renner,
Ralf Bady
, FKA mbH Aachen, Germ
any

The R&D
-
project INMOVE has dealt with the development and realization of a hybrid
drive system. The main objective of the project has been the definition of such a
power train, the research on optimized technology and finally the prototyping of two
dem
onstrators (Citroën Berlingo), in order to design and evaluate an appropriate
hybrid driving strategy. To achieve a good fuel economy with a cost effective solution
a parallel hybrid drive has been developed. The drive train is of the “single shaft”
config
uration, where the electric motor works on the input shaft of the manual
gearbox. The clutch is electronically controlled and automated. The different
components of the drive system are connected by a CAN
-
bus. The overall control, the
drive system manageme
nt and especially the driving strategy are realized by a vehicle
management unit. With finishing the build up of the first prototype end of 1999 and the
second prototype end of 2000, optimization and analysis under real conditions have
been possible. Measu
rements of the fuel economy show comparatively low results
and verify the overall functionality of the subsystems as well as the strategy.

16:40

17:20

Hybrid Electric Vehicle Realization at Fiat
,
Pasquale Campanile
, Centro Ricerche
Fiat, Italy

The concept
of mild hybrid vehicle developed by CRF, named ECODRIVER, is a
parallel configuration consisting of a dual clutch system with a robotised gearbox.
The
objective is to achieve substantial fuel consumption reduction, while keeping
performance and comfort as m
uch as possible equivalent to the ICE powered
reference vehicle.
The objective has been achieved combining a gasoline engine with
an asynchronous electric motor and through the implementation of functions such as
stop&start, electrical power assist during a
cceleration, regenerative
braking.Engineering challenges regarded packaging and weight optimisation of
powertrain and electrical components, but the key factor is the optimal control
strategy. Only through an optimal control is in fact possible to achieve
the best
matching of the two motors for maximum efficiency, unimpaired driveability during up
and down gearshifting, smooth stop & start operations for customer acceptance.

17:20

18:00

Volkswagen Hybrid Electric Vehicles: An Overview about Past, Present an
d
Future Activities and the Influence of Mechatronics on Functionality of Key
Components of the Hybrid Powertrain
, Siegfried Koehle
, Volkswagen AG,
Germany

Volkswagen has been conducting research into hybrid vehicle concepts since the
beginning of the 1970
s. Some examples of built prototypes and the research results
will be introduced. The goal was to combine the advantages of the conventional
combustion engine and the electric motor in terms of fuel consumption and
environmental benefits. These activities
led to the VW Golf Hybrid tested in a 3 year
fleet test in Zurich, Switzerland and to the first series production hybrid vehicle, the
Audi Duo, equipped with a 66 kW TDI engine combined with a 29 kW synchronous
electric motor and a 5 speed semi automatic g
earbox. One of the key components of
a hybrid drive train is an automatic transmission with robotised gear shifting and
clutches which enables the comfortable and effective use of either the combustion
engine or the electric motor or both in addition. The
realization of this function without
Mechatronics today is not imaginable. The vehicle management computer has to
decide about the needed actions within the powertrain and mechanical actuators have
to shift gears, operate clutches etc. Other mechatronic co
mponents include power
steering, brake by wire, air conditioning etc. which do influence car fuel consumption.


Sunday 8 July 2001


VI

Videos


VI

SALA BIANCA

18:00―18:40

CHAIR

Rajiv Dubey, USA

CO
-
CHAIR

Tenkurussi Kesavadas, USA

18:00

18:10

A Ne
w Inverter Drive for Position Control of Brushless Motors

Mi
-
Ching Tsai, Bin
-
Hong Shen
,
National Cheng Kung University, ROC


This video presents a novel approach for the development of brushless motor drives
in which the position feedback elements such as
encoders and Hall sensors are not
required. Therefore, a single drive is able to control different kinds of motors under
the same configuration. This open
-
loop control scheme has a potential to develop a
universal drive that is suitable for different kinds

of motors with various functions such
as micro
-
stepping, position, and speed controls. The sample control applications
presented in this video are the point
-
to point position control of a brushless DC motor,
a Permanent Magnet Synchronous Motor (PMSM), th
e micro
-
stepping control of a
PMSM, and a position control of a linear induction motor.

18:20

18:30

Test of the Hybrid Robot WHEELEG on a Volcanic Environment

Salvatore Guccione, Giovanni Muscato, Università di Catania, Italy


In the video some of the last

experimental results performed on the robot WHEELEG
in laboratory and on a volcanic terrain are shown. The robot WHEELEG is a hybrid
wheeled/legged robot with two front legs and two rear wheels.

18:10

18:20

Realization of Dexterous Hand Task by Using Mul
ti
-
Finger Dual Robot
Hand

Hajime Sugiuchi, Shinichiro Watanabe, Tetsu Morino
, Yokohama National
University, Japan


A multi
-
fingered dual robot hand system is developed to achieve dexterous hand
works in human mimetic approach. Each hand has 4 fingers and
thumb.Each finger
has 4 joints and the last joint is coupled with the next. So, each finger has 3 DOFs.
Thumb also has 4 joints and all joints are active.One extra joint is placed on the
palm.The role of this joint is to imitate the motion of human palm an
d extent the
working area of ring and little fingers. By introducing this palm joint, chopsticks
handling task was realized. Both hands are covered with distributed touch sensor
which has more than 600 measuring points. By using this sensor, the contact fo
rce of
hand surface can be controlled.

18:30

18:40

Therapy of Children Assisted by Mental Commit Robot

Takanori Shibata, Teruaki Mitsui
, AIST
, Kazuyoshi Wada, Takayuki
Kumasaka, Kazumi Tagami
, Tsukuba University,
Kazuo Tanie
, AIST, Japan


We have been deve
loping mental commit robots that provide psychological and
physiological effects to human beings through physical interaction. The appearances
of robots look like real animals such as cat and seal. We applied mental commit
robots to assist therapy of child
ren at a hospital. Video will show how children interact
with the mental commit robots.




Thursday 12 July 2001

IT1

Industry Tour 1

Industry Tour 2

IT2

STMicroelectronics

Agusta

Semiconductors

Helicopters

08:30

14:30

Castelletto Design and Indust
rial Center, Cornaredo (Milan)


STMicroelectronics is a global independent semiconductor company that designs,
develops, manufactures and markets a broad range of semiconductor integrated
circuits ("ICs") and discrete devices used in a wide variety of micr
oelectronic
applications, including telecommunications systems, computer systems, consumer
products, automotive products and industrial automation and control systems. In 2000,
ST's net revenues were US $7,813.2 million and net earnings were US $1,452.1
mi
llion. According to various independent market research data and semiconductor
company reports, including Dataquest's annual preliminary ranking for 2000,
STMicroelectronics is the seventh largest semiconductor company in the world.


The visit is organized

in two parts: The first part is a presentation of about half an hour
of the integrated circuits manufacturing process. The second part is a guided tour
within the manufacturing plants. Visitors will be divided into small groups. Each group
tour will last
about 45 minutes.


The total travelling time is about two hours. Tour includes a lunch break.


08:30

15:30

Cascina Costa Plant and Vergiate Center (Varese)


Agusta is an AgustaWestland company, the new joint company world’s second largest
manufacturer of h
elicopters. The Company designs and manufactures several military
and civilian helicopters, and enjoys the partnership with Bell to design and develop the
Bell/Agusta BA609 tiltrotor, the first civil tiltrotor to be offered on the market.


The first part o
f the tour is at the Cascina Costa plant, near Varese. It includes the
Agusta's Headquarters, facilities for production of gearboxes and other transmission
components and test benches, and the Agusta Electro Avionic Integration Center, with
software house,

simulation systems and integration rigs. The approximate size of the
plant is 875,786 square meters of which 121,342 covered, and there are 1932
employees.


The second part is at the center for operational and functional integration at Vergiate
(Varese),
20 minutes far from Cascina Costa, where the phases of final assembly and
subsequent flight tests of helicopters take place. The organization of this center
purses the objective of managing, from both a technical and production point of view,
the processes

of industrialisation, installation and testing of electro
-
avionic systems.
The Vergiate center features 841 employees and an approximate size of 1,344,472
square meters of which 90,992 covered.


The visit will last about 2 hours in Cascina Costa and 1 and

half in Vergiate. The total
travelling time will be about 2 hours. Tour includes a lunch break.





PL1

Plenary Lecture 1

Plenary Lecture 2


PL2

Monday 9 July 2001

08:30―09:20

Tuesday 9 July 2001


SALA PLATEA


Shigeki Sugano, Japan

HOST

Jadran Lenarčič, Slovenia

Is Micromachining Still a Dream or an Industrial Reality?

Bruno Murari
,
STMicroelectronics, Italy


Micromachining has been a popular subject for rese
arch for many years, but with the
exception of a few specialized devices it has not yet become an industrial reality.
Today, however, the technology has advanced beyond the limits of laboratory
demonstrations and is about to ramp up the scale of industrial

production. This talk
discusses the emerging MEMS technologies that address the problems of industrial
scale application, examining aspects such as developing processes suitable for
multiple applications, new methods of packaging and issues concerning tes
ting and
reliability. Practical examples of products designed for mass production are included
to illustrate key issues in the talk.


Bruno Murari is the Director of the "Castelletto" Research and Development
laboratories of STMicroelectronics at Cornaredo
, near Milan, Italy. Born in Treviso
(near Venice) in 1936, he graduated in Electrical Technology at the Pacinotti
Technical Institute, Venezia
-
Mestre, in 1955, followed by a two
-
year postgraduate
course in electronics at the Beltrami Institute, Milan. He
joined SGS

now
STMicroelectronics


in 1961, working first in the application laboratory and then in
the linear IC design group. In 1972 he became head of linear IC design and
development at the company's "Castelletto" laboratories on the outskirts of Mila
n, and
in 1981 he also became plant manager for the Castelletto facility, which includes a
pre
-
production wafer fab. Today he is responsible for all of the activities of this center,
which focusses on the development of Smart Power BCD technology + MEMS
te
chnology + advanced design on Power IC's. He has personally designed 10
integrated circuits and has supervised the design of more than 1000 others. A major
contributor to ST's leadership position in high power IC technology, Bruno Murari
holds 60 patents c
oncerning IC design and technology, has published more than 40
papers and contributed to the McGraw
-
Hill book Power Integrated Circuits (1985). He
is also co
-
editor of the book Smart Power: Technologies and Applications, published
in November 1995 by Sprin
ger
-
Verlag. Often he has been invited to present papers on
power technology at conferences in the US, Europe and Japan and participate in
panel discussion on this subject. He has also been Chairman of the European Solid
-
State Circuits Conference in 1991 an
d was a teacher in power IC Design course at the
University of Pisa. In 1993 he was a finalist in the EDN Innovator of the Year award. In
April 1995 he was awarded the European SEMI award for his contribution to power IC
technology. On May 1st 1994 he was
conferred the Maestro del Lavoro honor by the
President of the Italian Republic and in October 1995 he received an honorary degree
from the Ca' Foscari University of Venice for his role in the development of
multidisciplinary IC technologies. Recently he i
s starting a new activity in Castelletto
plant using micromachining for MEMS. Married with two sons, Bruno Murari enjoys
skiing and is an expert in underwater fishing. Equally skilled as a designer of free
-
flight
model aircraft, he has been three times Ita
lian champion in individual model aircraft
flying contests and also world champion in the team category.

An Open System Interconnection Model for Mechatronics

Steven Hung
, Visteon Corporation, USA


The presence of intelligent, electronic control in conjunc
tion with mechanical actuation
has spread far beyond the industrial or commercial setting. Mechatronic systems have
moved well beyond their industrial roots, and, today, mechatronics are very present in
many consumer products. The markets for growth in the

presence of mechatronics
have long presented many potential technology development synergies between
military, industrial, commercial, and consumer product development arenas. The pace
of actual growth in the presence of mechatronics, on the other hand, a
ppears slow in
light of the fact that many enabling technologies have been in use for many years in
various product areas. The automotive system and industrial technology development
arenas serve as an excellent example of a pair of synergistic mechatronic

development areas. Many of the technologies that will enable development of safe,
reliable new automotive mechatronics have been staples of industrial mechatronics for
years. Many automotive implementations of technologies, meanwhile, can perform as
well
as industrial counterparts at orders of magnitude lower cost. Improved exchange
of perspectives can accelerate development of automotive mechatronics and,
concurrently, motivate changes in industrial implementation philosophies that can
substantially lower

industrial mechatronic system costs. Missing, however, is a
topological model, such as the Open System Interconnection (OSI) model of ISO/IEC
7498, which would give developers a common reference basis when discussing
application requirements and when comp
aring the viabilities of transplant technologies
or architectures under consideration. The OSI basic reference model has helped
streamline such discussions in the software and computer network communication
industry: the mechatronics community could well a
fford a similar enabling reference.
This presentation will begin with a discussion of why automotive and industrial
mechatronics, as an exemplary pairing, have evolved in different directions. It will then
proceed through a brief description of how technol
ogy developments are enabling a
convergence of those directions, and, finally, note how an enabler of the Internet
revolution can serve as an example of how to streamline development discussions
and accelerate propagation of mechatronic technologies.


Step
hen T. ("Steve") Hung received the B.S.E.E. degree from the University of
Tennessee in 1983 and the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Illinois in
1985 and 1989, respectively. He interned with the General Electric Company's Electric
Utility Syst
ems Engineering Department, Schenectady, NY, in 1984; was attached to
the self
-
tuning arc
-
welding technology group of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Construction Engineering Research Laboratory, Champaign, IL, from 1985 to 1987;
and worked from 1987 to 1
988 as a consultant to PKResearch, Urbana IL, on Ford
Motor Company's self
-
tuning control development efforts in the areas of road vehicle
active suspension and vehicle speed control. From 1988 to 1992, Dr. Hung served as
an assistant professor in the Depa
rtment of Electrical Engineering at Auburn
University, Auburn, AL. During the summers of 1991 and 1992, he was also an
Interagency Personnel Act (IPA) scientist with the U.S. Navy's Naval Undersea
Warfare Center, Newport, RI. In the fall of 1992, Ford Moto
r Company recruited Dr.
Hung to help lead the successful traction control development effort for the
Benetton/Ford B193B Formula One race car. With a ban on traction control in Formula
One in effect subsequent to the 1993 season, he assisted with developme
nt of a
hardware
-
in
-
the
-
loop system for real
-
time testing of Ford's Formula One powertrain
electronics systems. He then joined Ford's Global Test Operations in 1995, where he
was responsible for development and integration of a low
-
cost/high
-
durability dat
a
acquisition/communication system tailored for unobtrusive, remote monitoring of
customers' vehicle usage. With the successful deployment of the monitoring system,
he moved on in summer 1998 to join Visteon Corporation's Steering System
Engineering strate
gic business unit, where, today, he is responsible for development
of electrohydraulic steering systems and fully
-
electric steering systems for large cars
and light trucks. Dr. Hung's research interests are centered around topics related to
transportation
systems electronics, and include adaptive and self
-
tuning systems,
optimal predictive control techniques, motion control, and specification methodologies
for cost minimization of control system implementations. Dr. Hung is a member of the
IEEE Industrial E
lectronics Society.














PL3

Plenary Lecture 3

Plenary Lecture 4


PL4

08:30―09:20

Wednesday 11 July 2001

14:30―15:20


SALA PLATEA


William Hamel, USA

HOST

Shigeru Okuma, Japan

Robotics and Machine
-
Vision for the Future


An Industrial View


Masakazu Ejiri
, Hitachi Company Ltd., Japan


Recent trends in industrial tec
hnology are to make things small, synergetic, intelligent,
and environmentally friendly. Mechatronics is one research area on these trends, and
its perspective is first introduced. The status of research in robotics and machine
-
vision technologies is then
described as a typical example of mechatronics research.
Expectations for the future of these technologies are also mentioned from the
viewpoint of industry, emphasizing the importance of considering the reliability in
robotics and of studying real
-
time co
lor video processing in machine vision. These
fields are becoming increasingly important for establishing a productive, efficient,
secure, and stress
-
free society through factory, office, and social automation.


Masakazu Ejiri received the B.E. degree in m
echanical engineering and the Dr.Eng.
degree in electrical engineering, both from Osaka University, Osaka, Japan, in 1959
and 1967, respectively. Since 1959, he has been with the Central Research
Laboratory of Hitachi Ltd., Kokubunji, Tokyo, Japan. He spen
t 1967
-
1968 as a Visiting
Professor at the University of Illinois, Chicago and 1977
-
1981 as a Vice President of
HISL Inc. (Hitachi's subsidiary company), California, USA. He has worked primarily in
the area of control engineering, pattern recognition, robo
tics, machine vision, and
artificial intelligence, and authored more than 50 technical papers and five books. One
of his most famous achievements is the development of world
-
first transistor assembly
machines using machine vision technology in 1973. More r
ecent achievements
include the development of new mail
-
sorting machines in 1997. He is presently a
Senior Chief Research Scientist, Corporate Technology, both at the Central Research
Laboratory and the Mechanical Engineering Research Laboratory of Hitachi
Ltd. He is
also a Visiting Professor of the Japan Advanced Institute of Science and Technology,
Hokuriku, and Fukui University. Dr. Ejiri is a Fellow of the IEEE, a Fellow of IAPR
(International Association for Pattern Recognition), and a Fellow of the IEI
CE (Institute
of Electronics, Information and Communication Engineers of Japan). He served as a
Vice President of the IAPR during 1990
-
1992 period, and is currently a member of the
Governing Board of the IAPR. He has been serving as a Vice
-
President of the

Robotics Society of Japan during 1999
-
2001 period, and will serve as the President of
the Robotics Society of Japan, starting from March 2001.

The Law of Cooperation in Mechatronics

Jan Van Eijk
, Philips Centre for Industrial Technology, The Netherlands


The design and development of advanced and intelligent systems requires
contributions from different technical disciplines. When the required cooperation is
successfully achieved a whole range of competitive business options is created.
Unfortunately such
cooperation is not easily obtained. During the past 15 years the
Philips Centre for Industrial Technology developed a strong Mechatronics community.
For this development the Law of Cooperation proved to be very suitable to guide the
process. The basic aspe
cts of this "Law" will be presented in combination with some
of the technical results obtained during our development.


Dr. van Eijk obtained his Masters Degree from the Delft University of Technology in
1975. He was educated as a Mechanical Engineer in th
e field of Instrument Design.
After four years in the service of UNESCO in Pakistan and Sri Lanka he returned to
the University to do research for his doctorate. His thesis, presented in 1985, dealt
with the design and implementation of flexure elements in

precision mechanisms.
From 1984 he started working at the Centre for Industrial Technology of the Philips
Electronics Company. There he was involved in the industrialization of the Compact
Disc player mechanisms. This involved the mechanical design, dynam
ic behavior and
the interaction with feedback control performance. The second development activity
focussed on the motion devices for the ASML wafersteppers and scanners. Here also
the layout of the mechanical system proved to require attention. Other equi
pment he
was involved include electron microscopes, placement equipment for PCB assembly
and other manufacturing equipment. Critical in most of these projects was the
Predictive Modeling of Machine Dynamics and its link with Control Design. As the
leader o
f the Mechatronic Departments in Philips he has worked on the creation of
effective cooperation of specialists from different technical backgrounds. The
Mechatronics capability has now grown to a group of about 200 people in the Philips
CFT in Eindhoven. A

multiple of this number is working in the affiliated development
groups. Most of them have received training from the central groups on Mechatronics.
In the beginning of the year 2000 Dr. van Eijk became a part
-
time professor in the
Faculty for Design, Co
nstruction and Manufacturing of the Delft University for
Technology. He is setting up a group on Advanced Mechatronics that will work on high
precision motion and on the design and assembly of Micro
-
Mechatronic Systems.








M1A

Manipulator Design

Teleop
eration


M1B

SALA PLATEA

09:30―11:10

SALA PASTA

Dragoljub Surdilovic, Germany

CHAIR

Kazuhiro Kosuge, Japan

Giuseppe Fusco, Italy

CO
-
CHAIR

Alberto Rovetta, Italy

Hyper Redundant Manipulator Using Compound Three
-
Bar Linkages

Koichi

Koganezawa
,
Taka
shi

Kinoshita
, Tokai University, Japan


A new mechanism for hyper redundant manipulator (HRM) is presented, which
comprises of serially assembled compound three
-
bar linkages (CTL). The CTL
mechanism has some unique properties. This paper presents the forwa
rd and
inverse kinematics of this mechanism and shows the simulation of the HRM with 12
CTL units. The recursive algorithm of the inverse kinematics that the author
originally developed is employed. It also presents the method and the simulation of
the dyn
amical analysis. Holonomic constraints are sufficiently sustained by the
constraint stabilization method that the author developed. The mechanical structure
of the HRM having some CTL units that is under construction is shown.

09:30―09:50

A Web
-
based Teler
obotic System for Research and Education at
Essex

Lixiang Yu, Pui Wo Tsui, Quan Zhou, Huosheng Hu
, Univ. of Essex, UK


This paper describes steps toward building a web
-
based telerobotic system for both
research and teaching in the Essex University. The sys
tem has standard network
protocol and interactive human
-
machine interface. Using a Web browser, a remote
operator can control and/or program a mobile robot to navigate in our laboratory
while receiving visual feedback and simulated local perceptual map via

the Internet.
The employment of an intuitive user interface enables both researchers and
students to control and program mobile robots and to do some experiments
remotely.

The 'Elephant Trunk' Manipulator, Design and Implementation

M.W. Hannan, I.D. Walk
er
, Clemson University, USA


Over that last several years, research in the area of hyper
-
redundant robots and
those robots based on tentacle/trunk type manipulators has become of great
interest.Though much progress has been obtained in both the areas of ro
bot
construction and robot kinematics, there has been little progress in the
implementation of a kinematic model for motion on a physical robot. In this paper,
we review both our ‘elephant trunk’ robot’s construction and our previously designed
kinematic m
odel. We provide experimental results verifying not only the legitimacy
of our kinematic model, but also the real time implementation of the model on the
physical robot.


09:50―10:10

Internet Based Teleoperation using Wave Variables with Prediction

Saghir Munir, Wayne J. Book
, Georgia Institute of Technology, USA


Wave
-
based teleoperation has been previously attempted over the Internet,
however performance rapidly deteriora
tes with increasing delay. This paper focuses
on the use of a modified Smith predictor, a Kalman filter and an energy regulator to
improve the performance of a wave
-
based teleoperator. This technique is further
extended for use over the Internet, where the

time delay is varying and
unpredictable. It is shown that the resulting system is stable even if there are large
uncertainties in the model of the remote system (used in prediction). Successful
experimental results using this technique for teleoperation i
n a master
-
slave
arrangement over the Internet, where the control signal is streamed between Atlanta
(Georgia) and Tokyo

(Japan), are also given.

The Frenet
-
Serret Manipulator

Hiromi Mochiyama, Shin'ichirou Hiramatsu, Yasuchika Mori
,

National
Defense Acad
emy, Japan


The Frenet
-
Serret manipulators are roboticarms for the whole
-
arm manipulation.
This type of manipulator has the kinematic structure same as Frenet
-
Serret
apparatus of a spatial curve which is a tool for expressing the geometric features of
the
curve in classical differential geometry. We developed a Frenet
-
Serret
manipulator with three joint units each of which has roll
-
pitch two degree
-
of
-

freedom. In this paper, we show the design concept, specification, mechanical
structure and driving mechan
ism of the developed Frenet
-
Serret manipulator. We
also show a recursive regressor form of the dynamics which will be
utilized for
system identification and control of the manipulator.

10:10―10:30

Man
-
Machine Interface using Steering Wheel and Pedals for a
Quadruped Walking Robot

Atsushi Konno, Yusuke Mitsuya, Noriyoshi Kato, Masaru Uchiyama
,
Tohoku University, Japan


For an easier and natural teleoperation of the quadruped walking robot
s, a user
interface is developed with a steering wheel and an assembly of pedals. In order to
change the speed and the direction of the quadruped walking robots according to
the operation of the steering wheel and the pedals, an on
-
line gait transition met
hod
is developed. Using this human
-
machine interface and on
-
line gait transition, the
operator can control the quadruped walking robots almost in the same way as a
driver drives a car. A quadruped walking robot named JROB
-
2 is used in the
experiments. As t
he steering wheel is also

equipped with various control buttons, it
is possible to assign various single command tasks, like “stand up” and …

The Design of High Performance Manipulators

H.M.J.R. Soemers
, Philips Center for Industrial Technology, The
Nethe
rlands


Two case studies are given on the design of high performance manipulators both
performed at the Philps CFT (Centre for Industrial Technology). The first case deals
with a double scara type manipulator the second with a linear motor based gantry
r
obot for SMD placement. Emphasis is laid on a design approach aimed at
achieving outstanding performance in a predictable way. The predictability was
achieved by modelling geared to support design decisions. Also the designs
themselves had a great deal of
predictable properties thanks to the kinematic
principles followed.

10:30
―10:50

Micro Teleoperation with Parallel Manipulator

Noriaki Ando, Masahito Ohta, Kouhei Gonda
, University of Tokyo
, Hideki
Hashimoto
, University of Tokyo & Presto JST, Japan


This paper describes the haptic interface based micromanipulation systems
deve
loper for micro robot fabrication. It is based on fabrications, micro process
handling and micro components inspection. It is based on scaled bilateral tele
-
operation system between different structures. These systems are composed of an
original 6DOF

paral
lel link manipulator to carry out micromanipulation and a haptic
interface with force feedback. These systems aim to make the micromanipulation
more productive constructing a

better human interface through the micro
envoroment force and scale expansion. In

this paper, new micromanipulation
systemsis

proposed and evaluated the analysis is conducted performing
fundamental experiments to

evaluate the precision and

manipulability.

Manipulators with RRRS Legs

Jorge Angeles,

McGill University, Canada,

Guilin Yan
g
,
Gintic Inst. of
Manufacturing Technol.,
I
-
Ming Chen
,
Nanyang Technol. Univ., Singapore


A special class of platform manipulators is the subject of this paper. These
manipulators comprise two platforms connected by three legs, each being
composed of thre
e revolute (R) and one spherical (S) joints, which gives the
manipulator six degrees of freedom. Hence, two actuators are required per leg.
Under the assumption that the two R joints proximal to the fixed platform are
actuated, we derive the differential k
inematic relations between actutor joint rates
and mobile
-
platform twist. This model comprises two Jacobian matrices, the forward
and the inverse
-
kinematics Jacobians. These relations are then applied to the
singularity analysis of the parallel manipulator

developed at

Singapore's Gintic
Institute of Manufacturing Technology and

Nanyang Technological

University.

10:50―11:10

A Generalized Control Approach for Ideal Teleoperation

Chi
-
Cheng Cheng, Jiun
-
Hung Chen
,
National Sun Yat
-
Sen University,
ROC


The maste
r
-
slave manipulator is capable of extending human dexterous skills to the
distant or dangerous environment. In order to maintain its operational efficiency,
working conditions at the slave side need to be honestly transferred to the master
side. This paper

presents a generalized control strategy for the ideal teleoperation of
a master
-
slave manipulator. The proposed control framework fully applies position
and force signals at both the master and the slave ends, and can bring about
transparent property of i
deal teleoperation. Better position tracking performance is
demonstrated by teleoperation experiments on a single
-
link master
-
slave
telemanipulator interacting with environment.








M1C

Motion and Imaging

Transportation Systems


M1D

SALA BIANCA

09:30―
11:10

SALA TURCA

Takanori Shibata, Japan

CHAIR

Manfred Hiller, Germany

Antonello Cutolo, Italy

CO
-
CHAIR

Angela Di Febbraro, Italy

Design and Analysis of an Absolute Non
-
Contact Orientation Sensor
for Wrist Motion Control

Harry Garner,

Georgia Insti
tute of Technology,
Martin Klement
, Lexmark
Inc.,
Kok
-
Meng Lee
,

Georgia Institute of Technology,

USA


In this paper, aspects of the design and analysis of a vision
-
based non
-
contact
absolute orientation sensor with application to wrist
-
like actuator motion

control will
be presented. This work is primarily motivated by the need for the measurement of
the absolute orientation of a

spherical rotor present in wrist
-
like actuators for the
motion control of such systems. Current orientation measurement approaches

increase the complexity of the

mechanical structure through additional contact with
the spherical rotor. To eliminate this additional complexity, a non
-
contact

vision
-
based technique that realizes an absolute

orientation measurement using a
specially desi
gned grid pattern that allows

the absolute orientation

formation …

09:30―09:50

Safeness
-
Enforcing Supervisory Control for Railway Networks

Fabrizio Diana, Alessandro Giua, Carla Seatzu
, Università di Cagliari, Italy


In this paper we deal with the problem
of modeling railway networks with Petri nets
so as to apply the theory of supervisory control for discrete event systems to
automatically design the system controller. We provide a modular representation of
railway networks in terms of stations and tracks
including sensors and semaphores.
We ensure safeness and local liveness imposing both Generalized Mutual Exclusion
Constraints and constraints also involving the firing vector.

Motion Tracking of a Part on a Vibratory Feeder

Winncy Y. Du
,

San José State U
niversity, USA


This paper addresses the motion tracking of a part on a vibrating plate feeder. A fast
boundary extraction routine is first introduced to search a part of interest by
investigating several scan lines. Once the first three boundary points of

the part


forming a seed segment


are located, the boundary tracing and growing process
can be quickly and accurately implemented inside a

sequence of small regions. The
pose vector [x,y,

] that represents the location and orientation of the part is
est
imated based on the part’s boundary information. The motion tracking procedure
consists of the four

phases: 1) predict the next region that the part will appear using
the previous and current pose vectors; 2) extract the part's boundary within

the
predicte
d region using the same boundary
-
extraction routine; 3) update the pose
vector by calculating the new

centroid and orientation; and 4)

feed the new

pose …

09:50
―10:10

Model Predictive Control for Railway Networks

B. De Schutter, T. Van den Boom
,
Delft University of Technology, The
Netherlands


Model predictive control (MPC) is a very popular controller design method in the
process industry. Usually MPC uses linea
r discrete
-
time models. In this paper we
extend MPC to a class of discrete
-
event systems with both hard and soft
synchronization constraints. Typical examples of such systems are railway
networks, subway networks, and other logistic operations. In general
the MPC
control design problem for these systems leads to a nonlinear non
-
convex
optimization problem. We also show that the optimal MPC strategy can be
computed using an extended linear complementarity problem.

Banding Reduction in Electrophotographic Pr
ocess

Cheng
-
Lun Chen, George T.
-
C. Chiu
,

Purdue University, USA


This paper proposed a new process control strategy for reducing banding artifacts in
electrophotographic (EP) processes. EP banding artifact is shown to correlate to the
fluctuation of the or
ganic photoconductive (OPC) drum angular velocity. Improved
regulation of the OPC drum rotational velocity under various process uncertainty
and variations will significantly improve EP process stability and reduce the
appearance of banding. The proposed c
ontrol strategy includes two levels of OPC
drum speed regulation.

The first level utilizes a loop shaping technique to
incorporate a human visual system (HVS) model into the control loop to eliminate
low frequency and non
-
periodic drum velocity fluctuation
. The second level

uses an
internal model based repetitive controller to reduce the effect of periodic velocity
fluctuations. The HVS based loop

shaping design is intended to address …

10:10
―10:30

Control of Transient Phase for Discrete Event Simulation using
Computational Steering

T. Kesavadas, Abhishek Sudhir
,
SUNY Buffalo, USA


Traditional steps in a discrete event manufacturing simulation are to prepare input
variables, select simulation
parameters, run the simulation and review the results
after the execution is completed. In a new approach proposed here, we have utilized
an interactive simulation to obtain improved solutions and instant feedback from the
proposed production system. A Com
putational Steering tool is provided to give the
user increased control of the simulation. This interactive tool gives the user power to
view the simulation results dynamically and to control the simulation in real
-
time. A
case study that uses Computationa
l Steering to reduce the length of the transient
phase in steady
-
state analysis of simulation is presented.

A Robust Machine Vision System Design to Facilitate the Automation
of Surface Appearance Inspections

Johné M. Parker
, University of Kentucky, USA


The performance demands on coated surfaces (e.g., automotive paints) are
considerable. Though the primary purpose of automotive paints is to protect the car
body from corrosion, it has been well established that the appearance of a painted
surface greatly

affects a customer’s perception of that product’s quality. Automotive
manufacturers spend considerable sums on the painting process during
manufacturing and, again, on warranty
-
covered claims of paint
-
related problems.
Therefore, robust methods to both ch
aracterize and monitor surface quality are
critical. Existing quality control methods using expert inspectors are generally
effective in assessing perceived appearance; however, they are often labor

intensive, time
-
consuming and can be subjective. Optical

techniques conducted …
are


10:30―10:50

Traffic Signal Control by Egograms

H. Kobayashi, M. Higuchi, K. Kikuchi
, Science University of Tokyo, Japan


In this paper, we present the traffic signal control method in order to avoid traffic jam
by applying the s
imulator for the interpersonal relation by Egograms. Egograms that
is consisted of 5 categories such as critical parents (CP), nurturing parents (NP),
adult (A), free child (FC) and adapted child (AC), .indicates personality and is used
for counseling by a
nalyzing magnitudes of 5 categories and also for estimating the
interpersonal relation. In this simulator, we prepare the computer agent which has
Egograms obtained by a human subject. We provide food acquisition environment
which is an instinct for surviv
al, and then we arrange 11 actions for the agent that
might be occurred around feeding stations. By analyzing actions selected by plural
agents in simulation, we can diagnose the interpersonal relations. For the traffic
signal control, we consider the traf
fic signal to be an agent and instead of …

A New Omnidirectional Vision Sensor for the Spatial Semantic
Hierarchy

Emanuele Menegatti
, Univ. Padova, Italy,
Mark Wright
, University of
Edinburgh, UK,
Enrico Pagello
,

Univ. Padova & LADSEB, Italy


In this pape
r we propose a new sensor for the Spatial Semantic Hierarchy created
by Benjamin Kuipers. To prove the effectiveness of this new sensor it has been
used as a sole sensor for a robot. The task of the robot is to build a topological map
of an unknown environ
ment using the Spatial Semantic Hierarchy. In the paper we
present the strict link that it is possible to create between the Spatial Semantic
Hierarchy and the omnidirectional images. We propose a set of topological events
that it is possible to identify i
n the sequence of images acquired while the robot
moves. These topological events can be used to pose a discrete set of places that
will be the nodes of the topological map. The results of simulated experiments …

10:50―11:10

Generalization of the Cascade P
rinciple in View of a Structured Form
of Mechatronic Systems

Joachim Lückel, Thorsten Hestermeyer, Xiaobo Liu
-
Henke
, Universität
Paderborn, Germany


With the steady increase in microcontroller performance, mechatronic systems have
become more and more comp
lex. This requires new organizational structures both
in system design and in controller
-
structure. For system design, a practical way of
structuring mechanical systems vertically and horizontally has already been
presented in a number of papers. This stru
cture has to be reflected in the controller
as well. The aim of this paper is to adapt and combine well
-
known controller design
techniques to make up a new and well
-
structured way of controller design tailored to
the organizational structure of mechatronic

design. After a brief overview of the
mechatronic design structure, this new controller design technique will be presented
basis of the cascade structure of SISO controllers and the centralized controllers
with state
-
vector feedback. For an example, the c
ontroller of a new modular railway
system is presented, with special emphasis on the active suspension/tilt system.





M2A

Parallel Manipulators

Intelligent Systems I


M2B

SALA PLATEA

11:30―13:10

SALA PASTA

Jorge Angeles, Canada

CHAIR

Clarence de
Silva, Canada

Rezia Molfino, Italy

CO
-
CHAIR

Michele Aicardi, Italy

Design of a New 2 DOF Parallel Mechanism

Young
-
Hoon Chung, Jae
-
Won Lee
, Yeungnam University, Korea


We propose a new two
-
degree of freedom parallel mechanism in this paper. This
mechan
ism was designed in order to improve the kinematic performace and to
achieve static balance. We use the pantograph mechanisms in order to change the
location of active joints which leads to transformation a direct kinematic singularities
into a non
-
singula
rities. The direct kinematic singular configurations of the proposed
parallel mechanism occur near the workspace boundary such as those of the serial
manipulators which means that we do not any more suffer from the singular
configuration which occurs at th
e inside of workspace. Hence the proposed
mechanism can overcome disadvantage such as the singular configurations existing
in the inside of workspace for a typical parallel mechanisms. Using the property that
position vector of rigid body rotating about a
fixed point is normal to the velocity …

11:30―11:50

Mimesis Embodiment and Proto
-
symbol Acquisition for Humanoids

Tetsunari Inamura
, Japan Science and Technology Corporation,
Yoshihiko
Nakamura, Iwaki Toshima
, University.of Tokyo,

Hideaki Ezaki
, Kawasaki
H
eavy Industries Co., Japan


Mimesis is the primitive skill of imitative learning, one of the methods for recognition
of others' behavior and construction of self behavior. Mimesis is thought an origin of
human intelligence because this function is observed

not only at humans but also at
animals. When the mimesis is adopted as learning method for humanoids,
convenience for designing full body behavior increase because bottom
-
up learning
approaches from robot side and top
-
down teaching approaches from user si
de
involved each other. Therefore, we have developed abehavior acquisition and
understanding system for humanoids based on the mimesis. This system is able to
abstract observed others' behaviors into conceptual symbols, to recognize …

Iterative Model
-
bas
ed Design of the Parallel Robot, TRIPLANAR

J. Lückel, W. Moritz, W. Kuhlbusch, F. Scharfeld, St. Toepper, P. Maißer,
H. Freudenberg, E. Kallenbach, J. Zentner, E. Saffert
, Universität
Paderborn, Germany


The TRIPLANAR is a novel parallel robot with six deg
rees of freedom for highly
precise measurement and process tasks. Its prototype was developed in just 12
months by means of the mechatronic composition. This design methodology
comprises analysis and synthesis of the entire system, including mechanics,
act
uator system, and information processing in the computer before the constructive
design is started. The information processing was designed by means of a simplified
model and tested with a complex model. An experimental modal analysis of the real
system se
rved to identify the parameters of the complex model. In order to increase
the limited motive forces of the TRIPLANAR novel drives, so
-
called …

11:50―12:10

Implementation and Evaluation of a Reactive Multi
-
Robot System

P. Lucidarme, P. Rongier, A. Liégeois
, LIRMM, France


This paper presents the implementation of an experimental setup to study the
behavior of a group of purely reactive mobile robots subject to serious
unrecoverable failures: some of them have lost mobility, others have lost infrared
vision.

To survive, each robot must reach a supply center. The eventually degraded
mission uses complementary capabilities of the two types of robots by letting a blind
robot, meeting by chance an invalid one, carry it. The latter is able to "see" a supply
center

within a wide range. The hardware and software of the experimental devices
are described, using very simple and low
-
cost components. Experiments are run
with the robots in different initial positions. The results are compared to those
obtained by many com
puter simulations and by a Markovian process model, both
are also described.

A New Method for Fully Autonomous Calibration of Parallel
Manipulators Using a Constraint Link

Jeha Ryu, Abdul Rauf
,

Kwangju Inst. of Science and Technology, Korea


Kinematic cal
ibration is a process whereby the actual values of geometric
parameters are estimated so as to minimize the error in absolute positioning. Fully
autonomous methods of calibration are cost effective fast and easy to implement.
This paper presents a new meth
od for fully autonomous calibration that can be
applied to 6 degree
-
of
-
freedom fully parallel manipulators. The proposed method
uses a link of fixed length having spherical joints at both of it ends to restrain the
motion of the end
-
effector over spherical

surface with arbitrary orientations. The
end
-
effector therefore has 5 degrees of freedom. However the measurement data is
collected from 6 actuator sensors. This redundancy of sensory information is utilized
for calibrating the geometric parameters withou
t using any extra sensing device …

12:10
―12:30

Adaptive Relocation of Environment
-
Attached Storage Devices for
Effective Knowledge
-
Sharing among Multiple Robots

Tomohiro Umetani, Yasushi Mae, Kenji Inoue, Tatsuo Arai
, Osaka
University, Japan


We propose a method of effective knowledge
-
sharing am
ong multiple robots by
using storage devices which can be attached into environment. If robots store
knowledge about environment to the devices robot can use the stored knowledge
and redcuce cost for achieving tasks. Since memory size of such storage devic
e is
limited robots cannot store all of required knowledge. Therefore the robots store
knowledge according to its usefulness defined by reducible cost per time. A memory
unit storing useless knowledge is removed from the device and added to the device
that

requires more useful knowledge. Then the robots can store useful knowledge
over the whole environment and the memory units are flexibly relocated …

Kinematics of the Translational 3
-
URC Mechanism

Raffaele Di Gregorio
, Università di Ferrara, Italy


A new
three
-
dof spatial parallel mechanism, named translational 3
-
URC, is
presented. The translational 3
-
URC makes the platform translate with respect to the
base. The new mechanism belongs to a set of mechanisms with topologically equal
architectures, called 3
-
URC, which contains another mechanism behaving as a
spherical parallel wrist. The translational 3
-
URC position and mobility analyses are
addressed and solved in closed form and the singularity conditions are written in
explicit form and interpreted.

12:30―
12:50

Collision Detection of Manipulator Based on Adaptive Control Law

Taishi Matsumoto, Kazuhiro Kosuge
, Tohoku University, Japan


In this paper,we propose a collision detection method of a manipulator based on the
nonlinear adaptive control law proposed
by Slotine and Li. The collision of a
manipulator with its environment is detected by the difference bet een the actual
input torques to the manipulator and the reference input torques calculated based on
the manipulator dynamics.An adaptive control scheme

is employed for the
manipulator control and the parameter estimation of the manipulator.The reference
input torques are calculated using the estimated manipulator parameters. The
proposed collision detection scheme is applied to an industrial manipulator
and the
experimental results illustrate the validity of the proposed scheme.

An Experimental Validation of CaPaMan as Earthquake Simulator

Chiara Lanni, Fabio Pugliese, Marco Ceccarelli
, Univ
ersità di

Cassino, Italy


In this paper we have reported results

of successful experiences using CaPaMan
(Cassino Parallel Manipulator) as an earthquake simulator. The paper describes the
experimental set up for a sensored mobile plate so that we have verified the
numerical simulations with practical experiments. Repro
ducing accelerometer
diagrams of really happened earthquakes has proved the practical feasibility.
Experimental results have been reported in this paper to show the interest for this
application of CaPaMan.

12:50―13:10

Visual Servoing to Fish and Catching Using Global/Local GA Search

Mamoru Minami, Hidekazu Suzuki, Julien Agbanhan, Toshiyuki Asakura
,
Fukui University, Japan


This paper presents a vision related technique for a manipulator real
-
time visual
ser
voing. The method utilizes the global search feature of a genetic algorithm (GA)
and a local search technique of the GA and also the unprocessed gray
-
scale image
called here as raw
-
image in order to perform recognition of a known target object
being imaged
. Also in GA process the computation of the fitness function is based
on the configuration of an object model designated as surface
-
strips model. The
raw
-
image is used since it is more tolerant of contrast variations from an input image
to the next one and

moreover does not require any filtering processing time. The
global GA is utilized together with the local GA in order to recognize the target
shape and detect the position and orientation simultaneously and to increase …



M2C

Fixture and Grasping Design

Railway Vehicle Technology


M2D

SALA BIANCA

11:30
―13:10

SALA TURCA

Edward De Meter, USA

CHAIR

Antonio Piccolo, Italy

Maria Chiara Carrozza, Italy

CO
-
CHAIR

Torsten Bertram, Germany

Effect of Fixture Design Variables on Fixture
-
Workpiece
Conformability and Static Stability

Jose F. Hurtado, Shreyes
N. Melkote
, Georgia Inst. of Technology, USA


A parametric study of the effect of fixture design variables on fixture
-
workpiece
conformability and static stability is presented. Conformability is defined as the
geometric similarity between the workpiece su
rface and the smallest polyhedron fit
over all contacts. Two conformability metrics are introduced to account for global
and local conformability. The design variables of interest are: the number and
position of fixture elements, fixture element length, cl
amping intensity, fixture
element orientation, static coefficient of friction, fixture element tip radius and the
direction of the fixture principal stiffnesses. Both force
-
controlled and displacement
-
controlled fixtures are considered. The static stabilit
y was found to increase with the
static coefficient of friction and with the fixture element tip radius. Clamping …

11:30―11:50

Train Speed and Position Evaluation using Wheel Velocity
Measurements

Monica Malvezzi, Paolo Toni
, Università di Firenze
, Benedetto Allotta,
Valentina Colla
, Scuola Superiore Sant’Anna, Italy


A novel security system named SCMT, to be installed

on trains circulating in Italian
railways is currently being developed. One of the components of SCMT is a module
for estimating train speed and positions between two subsequent viapoints
equipped with balises which communicate to the train the distance t
o next target(s)
and velocity requirement(s) at target(s). The module uses two wheels equipped with
incremental encoder
-
type sensors. In this paper we describe an algorithm for
position and velocity estimation capable of compensating for poor wheel
-
rail
ad
hesion conditions due to rain, fog, ice, leaves, and so on, where conventional
odometry algorithms fail. The system was designed and trained using a wide set …

The Development of an Internet
-
Enabled Semi
-
Automated Fixture
Design System

A. Senthil Kumar, S
.H. Bok, R. Kiran Kumar, A.Y.C. Nee
, National
University of Singapore, Singapore


Design of a fixture is a complex and an intuitive process. An efficient fixture design
system is essential to cut costs and to reduce lead
-
time. This paper addresses the
deve
lopment of a simple Internet
-
enabled semi
-
automated Fixture Design system
(SFD), to demonstrate that true 3D fixture design can be carried out over the
Internet. The whole system has been developed in Java and Java3D to ensure that
the benefits of Java tec
hnology are obtained for Internet viability considerations
such as portability and good client
-
server computing performance. The system is
currently implemented based on a simple 3
-
tier thin client
-
fat server architecture
using Java’s Remote Method Invocat
ion (RMI). Design communications are …

11:50―12:10

Mechatronic Strategies for Controlling Railway Wheelsets with
Independently Rotating Wheels

Roger Goodall
, Loughborough Univ.,
T.X. Mei
, Univ. of Leeds, UK


This paper presents the development of an active

control strategy for the
independently rotating wheelset of railway vehicles. The proposed control scheme is
intuitively formulated with a simple control structure and adaptive to vehicle speed. It
does not require basic guidance measurements (e.g. wheel
-
rail deflection and angle
of attack) that are expensive and impractical to implement. Speed sensors are used
to measure the relative rotational speed of the two wheels on a same axle and
optional sensors may be used to measure the wheelset yaw velocity rel
ative to the
vehicle body. A two
-
axle vehicle is used in the study. Both curving performance and
passenger ride comfort of the actively controlled vehicle are compared with that of a
typical passive vehicle and an optimal control scheme.

O
ptimal Fixture Layout Design in a Discrete Domain

Diana Pelinescu, Michael Yu Wang
,

University of Maryland, USA


This paper addresses a major issue in fixture layout design: to evaluate the
acceptable fixture designs based on several quality criteria and t
o select an optimal
fixture appropriate with practical demands. The performance objectives considered
are related to the fundamental requirements of kinematic localization and total
fixturing (form
-
closure) and are defined as the workpiece localization acc
uracy and
the norm and distribution of the locator contact forces. An efficient interchange
algorithm is uaed in a multiple
-
criteria optimization process for different practical
cases, leading toproper trade
-
off strategies for performing fixture synthesis.

12:10―12:30

Active Control of Railway Vehicles to Avoid Hunting Instability

S. Bruni, F. Resta
, Politecnico di Milano, Italy


The paper deals with the application of active control to increase the operating
speed of high speed trains by avoiding the occur
rence of hunting instability. To this
end, an innovative controlled electro
-
mechanic damper was designed to substitute
traditional yaw dampers currently in use. The main components of this system are a
brushless motor, with gear and spindle, used to apply
a longitudinal force between
the carbody and the bogie of the vehicle, and a velocity transducer used to measure
the yaw vibrations of the bogie. The electric motor is controlled in order to apply a
force to the bogie opposite to its yawing velocity, there
by maximising the amount of
energy dissipation. In order to compare the performances of this new device to
those of traditional oil dampers, a prototype was built and tested in a laboratory test
rig reproducing the yawing behavior of an unstable bogie. A m
athematical model …

Design Algorithm for Automated Dynamic Grasping of Live Birds

Kok
-
Meng Lee, Xuecheng Yin
, Georgia Institute of Technology, USA


This paper presents a method for designing a dynamic grasper for handling natural
objects (such as live bir
ds) for subsequent processing. The dynamic grasper uses
flexible fingers to accommodate a limited range of varying sizes, shapes, and some
motion due to the live object's natural reaction to mechanical grasping. As compared
to fingers with multiple active
joints, flexible fingers have many potential advantages,
because they are lightweight and they have no relative individual moving parts in
each of the fingers. The advantages of flexible fingers are seldom exploited for
grasping, however, because of compli
cated analysis involved in their design. For
this reason, we present an analytical method for designing a dynamic grasper for
handling natural objects on a moving conveyor.

12:30―12:50

Experimental Campaign on a Servo
-
Actuated Pantograph

B. Allotta
, Scuola

Sant’Anna,
M. Papi
, Trenitalia SpA,
L. Pugi, P. Toni
,
Università di Firenze,
A.G. Violi
, Trenitalia SpA, Italy


Many interesting technical problems arise from the development of high speed trains
current collection is one of the more important. The dynami
c behaviour of
pantograph
-
catenary system make the electrical contact between the catenary and
the contact
-
shoe unreliable. An insufficient quality of Current Collection causes a lot
of negative consequences such as: insufficient current pick up excessive
wear of
contact shoes and wires power and control electronics malfunction high EMI. Many
Researchers have investigated the problem of optimum current pick up and many
different solutions have been proposed in the past years. Since 1993 the
Researchers of U
niversity of Florence have proposed the idea of a servo
-
actuated
pantograph. The purpose of these studies was the development of a system …

A Quantitative Measure for Multi
-
fingered Grasps

Xiangyang Zhu
, Southeast University,
Han Ding, Hanxiong Li
, City
University of Hong Kong, PRC


By using the concept of gauge function, a pseudo metric is defined in the wrench
space. On this basis, we present a quality index for multi
-
fingered grasp, which
measures the maximum magnitude of the wrench that can be resiste
d by the grasp
in the worst case. The proposed measure can be formulated as a set of linear
programming problem, hence can be calculated efficiently. An optimal grasp
synthesis algorithm, which can be used to compute the optimal grasp configuration,
is als
o proposed. Moreover, we present an approach for calculating all grasp
configurations that verify quantitative constraint for polygonal objects.

12:50―13:10

Actively Controlled Pantograph: an Application

F. Resta
, Politecnico di Milano,
A. Collina, F. Foss
ati
, Univ. Catania, Italy


In the present paper an active control for high speed train pantograph is proposed in
order to improve power collection at high speed (i.e. V>220km/h) allowing the
speedup of the existing lines. The control is based on an availab
le commercial
actuator, and its feasibility and effectiveness have been investigated by means of
numerical simulation. At this purpose, the dynamics of the actuator (a permanent
DC motor) has been included in a detailed pantograph
-
catenary interaction mode
l.
the actuators can be placed a) on the articulated frame, or b) in correspondence of
the collector head suspension. It has also been suggested to apply the control force
directly to the collector head, from the locomotive roof, in order to make a
comprom
ise between the two configurations a) and b), previously mentioned. The
first configuration has the advantage that there're no strict limitation to …



M3A

Biomechatronics

Intelligent Systems II


M3B

SALA PLATEA

14:30―15:50

SALA PASTA

Deirdre Meldrum, USA

CHAIR

George Wang, Canada

Benedetto Allotta, Italy

CO
-
CHAIR

Jonathan Wu, Canada

The Development of a Novel Biomechatronic Hand


Ongoing
Research and Preliminary Results

M.C. Carrozza, S. Micera, B. Massa
, M. Zecca, R. Lazzarini, N. Canelli, P.
Dario
, Scuola Superiore Sant’Anna, Italy


An “ideal” upper limb prosthesis should be perceived as part of the natural body by
the amputee and should replicate sensory
-
motor capabilities of the amputated limb.
Howeve
r, such an ideal “cybernetic” prosthesis is still far from reality: current
prosthetic hands are simple grippers with one or two degrees of freedom, which
barely restore the capability of the thumb
-
index pinch. This paper describes the
design and fabricati
on of a novel prosthetic hand based on a “biomechatronic” and
cybernetic approach. Our approach is aimed at providing “natural” sensory
-
motor
coordination to the amputee, by integrating biomimetic mechanisms, sensors,
actuators and control, and by interfac
ing the hand with the peripheral nervous …

14
:30―14:50

On Using a Support Vector Machine in Learning Feed
-
Forward
Control

Bas J. De Kruif, Theo J. A. de Vries
, Univ. of Twente, The Netherlands


For mechatronic motion systems, the performance increases significantly if, besides
feedback control, also
feed
-
forward control is used. This feed
-
forward part should
contain the (stable part of the) inverse of the plant. This inverse is difiIcult to obtain if
non
-
linear dynamics are present. To overcome this problem, Learning Feed
-
Forward Control can be applie
d. The properties of the learning mechanism are of
importance in this setting. In this paper, a support vector machine is proposed as
the learning mechanism. It is shown that this mechanism has several advantages
over other learning techniques when applied

to Learning Feed
-

Forward Control.
The method is tested with simulations.

Biomechanical Considerations on the Design of a Humanoid
Shoulder Girdle

N. Klopčar, J. Lenarčič
, Institut "Jožef Stefan", Slovenia


The paper presents a comparison between the ran
ges of motion in the human
shoulder complex and in the humanoid robotic shoulder complex developed as a
parallel mechanism. The Elite Motion Analyser was used to obtain the three
dimensional trajectories of markers attached to the selected anatomical point
s on
the shoulder girdle. The measurements show an asymmetry of the extreme
positions in the shoulder girdle and the difference when the arms are stretched
downward and when the arms execute an inclination in the plane of the girdle's
motion. The mechanism

has to be inclined upward and forward for about 10°. The
obtained results of the working cone of the arm show that the central axis is inclined
about 60° forward in the horizontal plane and 15° upward in the frontal plane.

14:50―15:10

A Complex Mechatroni
c System: from Design to Application

Nicola Tomatis
, EPFL,

Roberto Brega
, ETHZ,

Kai Arras, Björn Jensen,
Benoit Moreau, Jan Persson, Roland Siegwart
, EPFL, Switzerland


Progress in mobile robotics requires the researchers to access and improve all
modules
that compose the robot, from low
-
level mechanical components to high
-
level reasoning systems. This paper presents the development process of the
robots built at the Autonomous Systems Lab, EPFL Lausanne, Switzerland. Starting
from the mechanical and electr
ical design up to the application, we show the
challenges that needed to be faced as well as the solutions that have been devised.
The description covers aspects like the operating system and framework, because
of its role in the overall safety and dependa
bility of the whole software system, the
research as a precondition for innovative products, and the man
-
machine machine
interface, which is indispensable for conveying information to the user …

Influence of Geometry on the Kinematic Performances of a Hu
manoid
Shoulder
-
Girdle Mechanism with Clearance in the Joints

V. Parenti
-
Castelli, S. Venanzi
, Università di Bologna, Italy,
J. Lenarčič
,

Institut "Jožef Stefan", Slovenia


In mechanisms with joints affected by clearance the influence of the geometric
para
meters on the mechanism kinematic performances can be relevant although
difficult to predict. The effect of joint clearance is dependent also on the geometry of
the pairing elements. This paper focuses on a mechanism of a humanoid shoulder
girdle with clea
rance in the joints and analyzes the influence of geometric
parameters on the accuracy of the output link (of the mechanism). The analysis
shows that an optimal kinematic design of the mechanism can be achieved with
respect to given values of manufacturing

tolerances. In addition the influence of
each individual clearance
-
affected pair on the output link accuracy is evaluated …

15:10―15:30

A Framework for Mobile
-
Service Based Co
-
ordination of Embedded
Web Agents in Intelligent Buildings

Zhi
-
Gang Deng, Huos
heng Hu
, University of Essex, UK


Embedded agents can be used as building blocks or components in the construction
of an Intelligent Building (IB). However it remains a great challenge on how to
implement this idea in a distributed networking environment.
In this paper, we
present a co
-
ordination framework for web
-
enabled embedded agents to optimize
the dynamic allocation of resources and the mobility of services in an intelligent
building environment to achieve real
-
time performance. This co
-
ordination
fra
mework is mobile
-
service based and composed of two parts: a triangle
-
link
algorithm and a double
-
layer protocol. A case study is presented to show its
implementation.

Mobile Manipulation of Humanoid Robots

A Method of Adjusting
Leg Motion for Improvemen
t of Arm's Manipulability


Haruyuki Yoshida, Kenji Inoue, Tatsuo Arai, Yasushi Mae
, Osaka
University, Japan


A control method of mobile manipulation for a humanoid robot mobile manipulation
means the integrated motion centered arm's manipulation is propose
d. This method
makes the arms carry out the manipulation and the legs assist manipulation by
adjusting its motion in order to keep arm's manipulability high. Firstly the arm tips
always follow their desired position under the condition with external force
by
impedance control. Secondly the shoulder is controlled so that manipulability and
stability can be improved. Moreover we define three functions; they are an average
of manipulability measure and an average and a minimum of stability margin in a
locomoti
on cycle. We utilize their values in a locomotion cycle rather than the …

15:30―15:50

Applying Intelligent Space to Warehouse


The First Step of
Intelligent Space Project


Joo
-
Ho Lee, Noriaki Ando
, University of Tokyo
, Teruhisa Yakushi,
Katsunori Nakajim
a, Tohru Kagoshima
, Toshiba,
Hideki Hashimoto
,
University of Tokyo & Presto JST, Japan


We propose a method of guiding mobile robots in networked space in this paper.
Distributed sensor devices with processors are located around the networked space
to watc
h human and robots. We have proposed such kind of space, and we call it
Intelligent Space. In the Intelligent Space, robots as well as human are supported
informatively and physically. Distributed sensor devices guide mobile robots in the
Intelligent Space

and navigation with high adaptability is realized. The experimental
results including localization and guidance are shown.








M3C

Fixture and Part Location Systems

Automotive Systems I


M3D

SALA BIANCA

14:30―15:50

SALA TURCA

Kok
-
Meng Lee, USA

CHA
IR

Luigi Glielmo, Italy

Herman Soemers, Germany

CO
-
CHAIR

Maria Pia Fanti, Italy

On the Development of a Fully Automated Universal Fixturing System
for a Machine Tool

Elmer C. Lee, Sanjay E. Sarma
, MIT, USA


Reference Free Encapsulation Fixturing is a
powerful fixturing technique. Geared
towards transforming a machine tool into a rapid prototyping device, this fixturing
technique can potentially deliver a fully automated universal fixturing system. This
research is aim towards studying and developing th
e infrastructure that will make
automated encapsulation fixturing a reality. Descriptions of the machines and
process refinements are discussed in this paper. Also, a case study is presented to
illustrate the cost and time benefits this fixturing system ca
n offer while also showing
its limitations.

1
4:30―14:50

Integrated Mechatronics Solution to Maximise Tractability and
Efficiency of Wheeled Vehicles

I.J.
Spark, M. Yousef Ibrahim
, Monash University, Australia


The objective of this work is to apply Mechatronics to increase the stability,
tractability

and efficiency of wheeled vehicles operating on steep slopes. The
essential feature of this work is that both of the two basic methods of steering a
vehicle are used so that they both tend to produce the same centre of curvature for
the path of the vehicl
e. This deliberate redundancy means that the inevitable failure
of one steering system is prevented by both systems acting in unison. This "Steer
and drive by wire" system was made feasible due the smart on
-
board wheel angles
and wheel speed control system

presented in this paper.

Modeling and Simulations of Optimal Drilling Through Elastically
Deforming Workpieces

K. Wardak
, Systems Engineering Group Inc.,
U. Tasch, P.G.
Charalambides
, University of Maryland Baltimore County, USA


Fixture design for machi
ning processes has been the focus of much research in
recent years. In the search for optimal fixture layouts computer
-
aided design and
Finite Element analysis have been used. In material removal processes major
deviations of part dimensions are attributed

to workpiece distortions and
deformations. These distortions and deformations are due to cutting forces and
clamping loads. Furthermore literature states that approximately 40% of all parts
rejected are due to dimensional inaccuracies. These inaccuracies
are directly
related to poor fixturing design. The utilization of optimization techniques in fixture
design has been reported yet cost functions the dimensional inaccuracies of …

14:50―15:10

Adaptive Car Buffer


The Concept, Design Tools and Perspectives

Tomasz Bielecki, Jan Holnicki
-
Szulc
, Polish Academy of Sciences, Poland,
Luis Jezequel
, Ecole Centrale de Lyon, France


The general concept of design of adaptive structures (equip
ped with controllable
energy dissipaters, so called structural fuses) is presented and the corresponding,
gradient based numerical design tools are described. This concept is applied to
design of deployable adaptive car buffer. Numerical simulation of the
effect of its
adaptation to various crash scenarios is demonstrated. High effectiveness of active
impact energy absorption by adaptive structures demonstrates potential of this
adaptive crashworthiness applications.

An Evaluation of the Linear Clamp Pre
-
L
oad Model with Respect to
Milling Operations

Edward C. De Meter, Shabbir Choudhuri, Subramanian Vallapuzha
,
Pennsylvania State University,
Raghunath P. Khetan
, Delphi Automotive
Systems, USA


This paper briefly summarizes the formulation and execution of t
he Linear, Clamp
Pre
-
Load (LCPL) model. This model is used to compute the minimum clamp pre
-
loads necessary to keep a workpiece from slipping within a fixturing during
machining. This model takes into account all sources of compliance in the fixture
-
workpi
ece system as well as gravity and the system of forces exerted during
machining. This paper also describes a series of milling experiments that were used
to characterize the accuracy of the LCPL model.

15:10―15:30

Analysis and Control of Vehicle Dynamics U
nder Crosswind
Conditions

Oliver Hanke, Torsten Bertram, Manfred Hiller
,
Gerhard
-
Mercator
-
Universität Duisburg, Germany


In more recent vehicle tests the cars crosswind sensitivity is often determined. In
this paper models of a Ford Explorer Sport and an A
udi A4 Quattro are tested for
crosswind sensitivity with the help of FASIM_C++ (a vehicle dynamics simulation
tool, developed in the Mechatronics Laboratory in Duisburg). Further the systematic
design of a control unit for the Ford Explorer is described. T
he intention is to reduce
the lateral offset of the vehicle due to the crosswind in order to reduce the number of
vehicle accidents.

Optimal Placement of Fixture Clamps

Rodrigo A. Marin, Placid M. Ferreira
, University of Illinois at
Urbana―Champaign, USA


This paper addresses the problem of synthesizing optimal clamping schemes on
three
-
dimensional parts with planar and cylindrical faces with and without friction.
Given a workpart with a pre
-
defined deterministic 3
-
2
-
1 location scheme a set of
polygonal co
nvex regions on its faces are defined as areas of admissible clamp
positions. A known set of one or more external disturbing wrenches are also given.
The frictionless case is considered first and a new linear program is formulated that
minimizes the maximu
m clamping force. A transformation of the solution is
presented that permits the extraction of the optimal positions of the clamps as well.
Friction is introduced next and a linear program is presented that minimizes the
maximum normal clamping force. We e
xtend the frictionless formulation to …

15:30―15:50

Some Aspects of Road Sweeping Vehicle Automation

Gareth Peel, Maarten Michielen, Graham Parker
, University of Surrey, UK


Road sweeping vehicles that are commonly seen on the roads today, have been
empirically developed over the years. As a res
ult the operation of such machines has
not undergone systems engineering development with respect to automating the
sweeping performance so as to reduce the workload of the driver. This paper reports
on work being undertaken to enhance the performance and
safety of road sweeping
vehicles. A forward looking debris detection system is being developed alongside
research into brushes and the brushing process. This work is necessary to fully
understand and automate the sweeping process. Vision processing techniq
ues have
been used to identify various road surfaces and debris. A two step approach is
adopted to reduce the load on the processor, but still extract all the necessary
information. Continuous flow of data is provided by laser striping, building up …















M4A

Advances in Robotics Within RAMSETE Project

Intelligent Process Automation


M4B

SALA PLATEA

16:10―17:30

SALA PASTA

Giovanni Ulivi, Italy

CHAIR

Masayoshi Tomizuka, USA

Paolo Valigi, Italy

CO
-
CHAIR

Gianni Ferretti, Italy

An Impedance Control Strategy for Cooperative Manipulation

Fabrizio Caccavale, Luigi Villani
, Università di Napoli Federi
co II, Italy


In this paper an impedance control strategy is devised for a system of manipulators
tightly grasping a common rigid object. In order to avoid internal loading at the
object a six
-
DOF impedance behaviour is imposed at each end
-
effector. Moreov
er
impedance control is also adopted to achieve a compliant behavior of the object
when interaction with the external environment occurs. The overall control scheme
is derived according to an inverse dynamics strategy with adoption of an inner
motion loop
for each manipulator providing robustness to unmodeled dynamics and
disturbances.

16:10―16:30

Intelligent 3
-
D Sensing in Automated Manufacturing Processes

Q.M. Jonathan Wu, M.F. Ricky Lee
, Nationalo Research Council
, Clarence
W. de Silva
, University of Bri
tish Columbia, Canada


This paper focuses on the design of an intelligent, three
-
dimensional (3
-
D) sensing
system for the purpose of applying artificial intelligence methodologies to achieve
product quality assurance in automated manufacturing processes. A
n efficient 3
-
D
object
-
oriented knowledge base and reasoning algorithm is developed. The
knowledge base will include knowledge concerning the (1). products, (2).
manufacturing processes, and (3). inspection methods. The knowledge base of
products contains
properties of the products for design and manufacture through
CAD/CAM. The knowledge base of manufacturing and inspection includes various
manufacturing techniques, criteria for detection and diagnosis of defects, and
standards and limitations on various d
ecision
-
making actions related to the …

Open System Real Time Architecture and Software Design for Robot
Control

B. Bona, M. Indri, N. Smaldone
, Politecnico di Torino, Italy


Robotics equipments used in research studies or industrial prototyping often re
quire
reconfiguration of some HW/SW architectures and algorithms for new experiments
and trials. Such requirements highlight the interest in new open control system
architectures interacting with suitable applications for software development in order
to r
educe and simplify the project cycle. The goal of this paper is to show an
application based on one of these systems
-

OpenDSP
-

which allows an easy
reconfiguration of a DSP
-
based hardware for different applications (e.g. different
manipulators or the inc
lusion of additional transducers). An interesting feature of the
Developed system is given by its full integration with Matlab environment. OpenDSP
has been developed by Mechatronics Laboratory of Politecnico di Torino and …

16:30―16:50

Development of an I
ntelligent Control System for Wood Drying
Processes

Xiaochun George Wang, Wei Liu, Lizhu Gu, Colin Jian Sun, Caikang Elton
Gu
, Innovation Center,
Clarence W. de Silva
, University of British
Columbia, Canada


This paper presents the development of the intel
ligent adaptive control system of an
industrial lumber drying process. The research project mainly focuses on
automating the wood drying process through developing and implementing a
closed
-
loop intelligent and adaptive controller with intelligent capabili
ty based on the
moisture content of wood. The lumber drying process is complex due to many
factors including distributed process dynamics, nonlinearities, drying property
variation among wood pieces, and the coupling effects of temperature, relative
humidi
ty and moisture content. The developed control system involves the …

Closed Loop Control of 3D Underactuated Vehicles via Velocity Field
Tracking

M. Aicardi, G. Casalino
, Università di Genova, Italy,
G. Indiveri
,
GMD
―AiS, Germany


A novel strategy to design time invariant motion controllers for underactuated mobile
systems is applied to the position and attitude control of an underactuated 3D
vehicle. The idea consists in defining a velocity vector field such that an
ideal, fully
actuated system would exponentially achieve the control objective by simply
following such field. Then a steering law for the given underactuated system is
designed such that it is exponentially stabilized parallel to the above mentioned
veloc
ity vector field. For the particular problem here addressed, due to the use of
polar like coordinates, this method yields a discontinuous control law. Both the
design process and the resulting solution have a most clear physical …

16:5
0―17:10

Application of Vibration Sensing in Monitoring and Control of
Machine Health

K.Z. Tang, K.K. Tan
, National University of Singapore,
C.W. de Silva
,
University of British Columbia, Canada,
T.H. Lee, K.C. Tan, C.Y. Soh
,
National University of Singapor
e, Singapore


In this paper, an application for monitoring and control of machine health using
vibration sensing is developed. This vibration analyzer is able to continuously
monitor and compare the actual vibration pattern against a vibration signature,
b
ased on a fuzzy fusion technique. More importantly, this intelligent knowledge
-
based real
-
time analyzer is able to detect excessive vibration conditions much
sooner than a resulting fault could be detected by an operator. Subsequently,
appropriate actions
can be taken, say to provide a warning or automatic corrective
action. This approach may be implemented independently of the control system …

Steering Marine Vehicles: a Drag Coefficient Modulation Approach

M. Aicardi, G. Casalino
, Università di Genova,

Italy,
G. Indiveri
,
GMD
―AiS, Germany


An underwater planar vehicle, actuated by rear thrusters and equipped with
longitudinal control surfaces which allow the drag coeficient modulation in the sway
direction, is considered in a dynamic setting. The maneuvring controls for the
ve
hicle, in order to reach the required final position and attitude are devised by
exploiting both the rear thrusters actuation and the capability ofiered by the admitted
presence of the longitudinal, modulable, control surfaces.

17:10―17:30

Neurocomputing A
pproach for Real Time Optimisation Modelling of
an Industrial Process

K. Mohd. Yusof, F. Karray, P.L. Douglas
, University of Waterloo, Canada


This paper presents the development and comparison of artificial neural network
(ANN) models for real time optimi
zation (RTO). Initial investigations were focused
on a methanol
-
water flash system, which was simple, yet realistic in representing
the nonlinearity of multivariable chemical processes. Following this, ANN models
were then developed for a crude oil distill
ation column, which was a more complex
industrial process. The ANN models were developed with different combinations of
input and output variables to determine the effects of different variable
combinations. Radial basis function network models were tested

and were taken as
the base case. Hierarchically structured neural network (HSNN) models and simple
serial and hybrid network
-
model configurations were also developed and …















M4C

Sensing

Automotive Systems II


M4D

SALA BIANCA

16:10―17:30

SALA TURCA

Hideki Hashimoto, Japan

CHAIR

Roger Goodall, UK

Johné Parker, USA

CO
-
CHAIR

Hiroshi Kobayashi, Japan

Multi
-
Echo Technique for Feature Detection and Identification using
Simple Sonar Configurations

Fernando Moita, Urbano Nunes
,

Coimbra Polytechnic Institute, Portugal


This work presents the study and development of sonar sensor configurations and
processing methods with capability to detect and identify planes, edges and corners.
The systems presented can be easily applied to se
ttled robots or new platforms to
improve the quality and quantity of ultrasonic data. No special configurations as
arrays or cells of sensors are used in this work, only standard configurations that
can be found and applied in a great number of mobile robo
ts. New multi
-
echo
functionalities are introduced and combined with EERUF, providing a new ME
-
EERUF (Multi
-
Echo Error Eliminating Rapid Ultrasonic Firing) method that
simultaneously increases the sonar acquisition rate and provides inter
-
sensor
measurement
s, necessary to implement feature detection and identification …

16:1
0―16:30

Dynamic Modeling and Control of a Car Transmission System

R. Zanasi
, Università di Modena e Reggio Emilia,
A. Visconti
, Ferrari SpA,
G. Sandoni, R. Morselli
,
Università di Modena e Reggio Emilia
, Italy


In the paper the dynamic model of a car trans
mission system is taken into account
and a simple control strategy for controlling the transmitted torque is presented. All
the main components of the transmission system (the engine the clutch the gear
-
box the differential etc.) have been modeled in detai
ls by using the graphical
modeling technique named Power
-
Oriented Graph. A particular attention has been
paid to the model of the clutch system because of its importance in the modulation
of the transmitted torque. A simple control strategy for controlling

the torque
transmitted during the start of the car is also presented. Simulation results show the
usefulness of the model and the effectiveness of the presented control strategy.

Measurement of Force Sensory Information for the Automation of
Ultra
-
Precis
ion Assembly Tasks

Yoshio Yamamoto, Tadashi Hashimoto
, Tokai University,
Takahiro Okubo,
Toyotsugu Itoh
, Konica Corporation, Japan


Automation of assembly tasks has previously been tackled by many researchers.
They mostly focused on the geometric constrain
ts related to a considered task e.g.
relative configuration change between the peg and the hole in peg insertion task.
This approach however seems valid only when the dimensional tolerance is fairly
large so that it allows to change the relative configurat
ion of the two mating parts in
an obvious fashion. This paper investigates how highly precise assembly tasks can
be automated. Tolerance considered in the present study is in the range of 3 to 9
μm. We focus on force sensory information involved in high
-
precision peg
-
in
-
a
-
hole
task of a polygon mirror unit because a position
-
based analysis under such …

16:30―16:50

Modeling of a Novel Fan Clutch Pneumatic Actuation System

Philip Kroeker
,
Vansco El
ectronics Ltd.,
Saeid Habibi, Richard Burton
,
University of Saskatchewan
, Canada


A variable speed fan clutch system has been developed to help improve engine
temperature regulation efficiency in heavy
-
duty commercial vehicles. This system is
currently in
a prototype phase and a detailed physical model of the actuation system
is required for control system design and design trade
-
off analysis. This paper
proposes the use of model identification techniques to estimate a minimal model
structure. Parametric mo
dels of the fan clutch pneumatic system are developed and
the system dynamic behavior examined. The fan clutch pneumatic system is
composed of three subsystems. Model structure estimates for these sub
-
systems
are realized using system identification techni
ques. The physical and parametric
models are validated by comparing simulation and test results. A comparison …

Fiber Optic Sensing System for Smart Materials and Structures

Andrea Cusano, Giovanni Breglio, Michele Giordano, Antonio Calabrò,
Luigi Nicola
is, Antonello Cutolo
, Università di Napoli Federico II, Italy


In this work, a fiber optic multiparameter sensing system is presented. It could be
used for process and structural health monitoring in concrete structures.
Reflectometric technique has been i
mplemented for refractive index measurements
by using as transducer the fiber end/host interface. Results on the capability of the
developed sensor to monitor the curing process of thermoset based composites are
presented. The integration with Fiber Bragg
Gratings (FBGs) with the aim to perform
temperature and strain measurements has been discussed. Two low cost intensity
based demodulation techniques for FBGs interrogation have been developed and
tested. Preliminary experimental results are shown.

16:50―17
:10

The Tyre
-
Soil Effects on the Manoeuvrability of a City
-
Car

Rinaldo C. Michelini, Rezia M. Molfino
, Univ. Genova, Italy
, Raffaele
Ghigliazza
, Princeton Univ., USA,
Massimo Callegari
, Univ. Ancona, Italy


Eco
-
compatibility aims at drastic changes of peop
le transportation means and, to
grant proper mobility levels, the electrically
-
powered city
-
car concept provides
effective solutions. This quite obviously leads to distributed actuation, with
separately driven wheels and inconsistencies appear unless redun
dancy and
tyre/road interaction are properly mastered. The paper deals with the dynamics of
such kind of vehicle moving from the behaviour of driven wheels (with compliant tyre
and varying soil interactions); then a twin powered axle or train are investiga
ted, as
basic reference to describe the dynamics of a four wheels platform, driven by
redundant actuation on varying friction soils. On these premises, a city car
manoeuvre stability can be stated for low speed tasks over urban roads. Results …

Laser
-
Base
d Guidance of Multiple Mobile Robots

Igor E. Paromtchik, Hajime Asama
, RIKEN, Japan


This paper describes our research work towards the development of an optical
guidance system for multiple mobile robots in an indoor environment. The guidance
system opera
tes with an environmental model, communicates with mobile robots
and indicates their target positions by means of a light projection from a laser
pointer onto the ground. Processing the image data from a CCD color camera
mounted on the mobile robot allows
it to detect the laser light beacon on the ground
and estimate its relative coordinates. The robot’s control system ensures the
accurate motion of the robot to the indicated target position. The guidance system
subsequently indicates target positions corre
sponding to a desired route for a
specified mobile robot in the fleet. The concept of the optical guidance system, its
implementation and experimental results are discussed.

17:1
0―17:30

Optimisation of Energy Flow Management in Hybrid Electric Vehicles
via Genetic Algorithms

Antonio Piccolo, Lucio Ippolito, Vincenzo Galdi, Alfredo Vaccaro
,
Università di Salerno, Italy


Hybrid electric vehicles powertrain, combining electric motor
with an auxiliary power
unit, can offer a sensible improvement of the overall vehicle environmental impact
achieving at the same time a rational energy employment. This valuable features
can be magnified designing a suitable energy flow management unit who
se main
task is to split the instantaneous vehicle power demand between the internal
combustion engine and the electric motor ensuring that the power sources are
operated at high efficiency operating points and the related vehicle emissions are
minimised.
In the present paper after a preliminary analysis on the strategy adopted
an original methodology for the tuning of the characteristic parameters …















T1A

Robot Analysis and Planning

Neural and Fuzzy Control


T1B

SALA PLATEA

09:30―11:10

SALA
PASTA

Constantinos Mavroidis, USA

CHAIR

Ranjan Mukherjee, USA

Massimo Callegari, Italy

CO
-
CHAIR

Atsushi Konno, Japan

A New Algorithm for a Minimum Infinity
-
norm Solution and Its
Application to Trajectory Planning of Kinematically Redundant
Manipula
tors

Insoo Ha
, Samsung Electronics,
Jihong Lee
, Chungnam National
University, Korea


In this paper, we propose a new algorithm for finding a minimum infinity
-
norm
solution of consistent linear equations. The proposed algorithm includes the
advantages of pr
evious works such as computational efficiency of Cadzow’s
algorithm and geometric interpretation of Shim’s algorithm, and overcomes the
disadvantages of them such as incompleteness of Cadzow’s algorithm and
computational inefficiency of Shim’s algorithm. A
lso, for redundant robot trajectory
planning based on minimum infinity
-
norm solution, an efficient approach avoiding
discontinuity in trajectory is proposed by resolving the non
-
uniqueness problem …

09:30―09:50

Thrust Force Control of Drilling System Using Neural Network

Shigeyasu Kawaji
, Kumamoto University,
Masaki Arao
, Omron
Corporation,
Yuehui Chen
, Kumamoto University, Japan


Thrust force and cutting torque are important outputs in the control of

drilling
systems.In this paper, a method for estimating and control the thrust force in the
drilling process is proposed.Firstly,a neural network model of thrust force is on
-
line
constructed. Secondly,based on the neuro model of thrust force,a simulated n
euro
controller is developed by using online trained recursive least square
algorithm.Finally,the trained controller is applied to the drill machine to force the
thrust force of the drilling system follow the reference thrust froce signal.The
experimental
results demonstrate the e .ectiveness of the proposed method.

Real
-
Time End
-
Effector Path Following for Robot Manipulators
Subject to Velocity, Acceleration, and Jerk Joint Limits

Gianluca Antonelli, Stefano Chiaverini, Giuseppe Fusco
, Università di
Cassi
no, Italy


In this paper an inverse kinematics algorithm for robot manipulators is developed
which takes into account joint velocity acceleration and jerk limits while ensuring
tracking of the assigned end
-
effector path. The desired end
-
effector trajectory

is
supposed to be assigned on
-
line and the algorithm is suitable for real
-
time
implementation on non
-
redundant robot arms. Numerical simulation results are
reported to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed technique.

09:50―10:10

A Fourier Series B
ased Iterative Learning Control for Nonlinear
Uncertain Systems

Wubi Qin, Lilong Cai
, Hong Kong Univ. of Science and Technology, PRC


In this paper a Fourier series based learning controller for the tracking control of
nonlinear uncertain systems is propos
ed. The Fourier series based learning
controller consists of a PD part and a learning part. The learning part generates feed
forward term based on the Fourier series approximation of the PD output. By
introducing a system Input
-
Output (I/O) mapping matrix
the coupling effects of the
PD output harmonics in the Fourier space are considered in our algorithm instead of
treating them individually. Trajectory tracking experiments conducted on a belt
driven Positioning table indicated that the proposed method was
more effective than
the same type of controller without the I/O matrix.

Velocity Workspace Analysis for Multi
-
legged Walking Robots

Jihong Lee, Insik Kim
,
Chungnam National University
,
Bong
-
Hwan Jeon
,

KRISO, Korea


In this paper the analysis of manipulabi
lity of multi
-
legged robotic systems under
hard
-
foot
-
condition is made. Given bounds on the capabilities of joint actuators of
each legs the purpose of this study is to derive the bounds for body moving velocity
achievable by the system. The velocity works
pace of robot system is represented as
a polytope which is derived from the joint velocity limits through Jacobian matrices
of each robot. This concept of manipulability for multiple cooperating robots is
transformed into moving velocity analysis of multi
-
legged walking robots through so
-
called reaction velocity. To validate the proposed concept application examples are
presented including continuous walking gaits as well as several different stationary
posture of legged walking robots.

10:10―10:30

Applicat
ion of Flat Image Recognition Technique for Automation of
Micro Device Production

Tatyana N. Baidyk
, UNAM, Mexico


The main idea of the suggested method is connected with using the machine vision
systems for micro devices production. It is proposed to redu
ce the three
-
dimensional machine vision tasks to two
-
dimensional (flat) tasks of optical
recognition. There are developed the contour processing algorithms (for example,
thinning, thickening etc.) There are neural classifiers to solve the recognition task
s.

Local Path Modifications of Heavy Load Manipulators

Eva Dyllong, Artur Komainda
, Gerhard
-
Mercator
-
Universität Duisburg,
Germany


The field testing of heavy load manipulators in a varying environment requires use
of efficient methods for collision detec
tion and for fast modification of the given path
of the end
-
effector. Motion control of the Tool Center Point (TCP) of a heavy load
manipulator can be realized with a virtual elastic band in the workspace of the TCP.
In this paper we present an efficient m
ethod to modify the virtual elastic band which
enables it to react in real
-
time to local changes in the environment. The method is
based on the B
-
Spline technique. The advantage of this new method is that the path
of the TCP is only changed near the moving

obstacles and points which are reached
by the TCP remain unchanged. A feature which is important to real
-
time
applications. A local modification of the virtual elastic band the influence of …

10:30
―10:50

Innovative Biorobotic System for the Diagnosis of Neuro
-
motor
Conditions: Methodology and Results

A. Rovetta, M. Bisogni
, Politecnico di Milano,
A. Cucè
, STMicroelectronics,
R. Pegoraro
, Politecnico di Milano, Italy


This paper concerns a biorobot
ic system based on fuzzy logic to diagnose and
monitor the neuro
-
psycho
-
physical conditions of an individual . The system, called
Daphne, is characterized by a small dimension design; user
-
friendly hardware and
software mean that even non
-
experts will be a
ble to use this device. Furthermore,
thanks to its design concept, the system can be used not only for medical
applications, but also in the fields of daily health
-
care and sport. Daphne is a
portable system, involving multiple parameters such as reaction
time, speed,
strength and tremor which are processed by means of fuzzy logic; additionally, the
device is characterized by a voice detection system.

Statics and Singularity Loci of the 3
-
UPU Wrist

Raffaele Di Gregorio
,

Università di Ferrara, Italy


The st
atic analysis of a parallel wrist known as 3
-
UPU wrist is presented and the 3
-
UPU wrist singularity conditions are interpreted from the statics’ point of view. An
equation (singularity equation) that enables to find all the 3
-
UPU wrist singular
configurati
ons is written in explicit form. Moreover, the use of the Rodrigues
parameters to parameterize the 3
-
UPU wrist platform orientation allows the
singularity equation to become a fourth degree polynomial equation in three
unknowns. Finally a numerical example

is presented.

10:50―11:10

A Radial Basis Function Networks Approach for the Tracking
Problem of Mobile Robots

A. D'Amico, G. Ippoliti, S. Longhi
, Università di Ancona, Italy


The paper proposes a Radial Basis Function Networks (RBFN) approach to the
solution of the trac
king problem for mobile robots. RBFN
-
based controllers are
investigated in order to introduce some degree of robustness in the control system
and to avoid the main disadvantage of Multilayer Neural Networks (MNN) to be
highly nonlinear in the parameters. T
he training of the nets and the control
performances analysis have been done in a real experimental setup. The proposed
solutions are implemented on a PC
-
based control architecture for the real
-
time
control of the LabMate mobile base and are compared with
MNN
-
based control
schemes. The experimental results are satisfactory in terms of tracking errors and
computational efforts.








T1C

Actuators

Manufacturing Systems I


T1D

SALA BIANCA

09:30―11:10

SALA TURCA

Giorgio Figliolini, Italy

CHAIR

Devendra G
arg, USA

Ciro Natale, Italy

CO
-
CHAIR

Shreyes Melkote, USA

Improved Setpoint Adjustment for Ultrasonic Motors

Thomas Schulte, Norbert Fröhleke
,

Universität Paderborn, Germany


Speed control strategies for piezoelectric drives have been presented by sev
eral
authors. Beside various control strategies based on adaptive structures like MIAS,
MRAS, neural nets or Fuzzy control, a completely model based control system using
an inner bending wave control and an outer speed control including a torque
calculator

for linearization has been presented. This paper deals with investigations
and improvements of this torque calculator. The setpoint adjustment is focused to
utilize the degrees of freedom for the bending wave values, which represents an
additional potenti
al for optimization of the performance of the drive system.
Theoretical and experimental results confirm the advances.


09:30―09:50

Sensing & Control of Conform(TM) Extrusion Gap Between Wheel
and Tooling Plates

Kafeel A. Khawaja
, Holton Machinery Ltd,
Lakmal Seneviratne
, King’s
College London, UK


The results of an investigation into the automation of the Conform TM Extrus
ion
process using mechatronic solutions are presented in this paper. Conform Extrusion
is a very versatile manufacturing process, enabling the production of a wide variety
of high quality products in continuous lengths. During Conform TM Extrusion, it is
v
ery important to maintain an appropriate gap between the wheel and tooling, in
order to achieve product quality. An active gap sensing and control system for
improving Conform Extrusion product quality is presented. The gap is measured
using an air gauge s
ystem and controlled using a hydraulic actuation system. A
feedback controller is employed to attain the required gap, specified by the user ...

Dynamic Modeling of Hysteresis in Piezoceramics

R. Ben Mrad, H. Hu
, University of Toronto, Canada


A model fo
r hysteresis in piezoceramic actuators when they are subject to dynamic
voltage excitations is developed. The model uses measurements of the first order
reversal curves and the rate of change of the input voltage signal. The model is
shown through experime
nts to offer high accuracy under voltage excitations at
frequencies up to 800 Hz.

09:50―10:10

Formal Analysis of Existing Control Sooftware in Cyclic Closed
Production Line

Lado Lenart
,
Institut "Jožef Stefan", Slovenia


The existing software in control of

alcaline batteries industrial production line of flow
-
-
shop type was critically analyzed from the viewpoint of modern control theory of
dynamic event systems (DES). The installed software itself was coded in ladder
logic in PLC controllers. Two guidelines

were followed in this analysis first the
minimax algebra solution for timing supervision and construction of exception
language and second the formal way for organizing the DES supervisor supremal
control language. The results of analysis are reported.

A

Novel 3
-
Phase Programmable Voltage Waveform Current Source
Inverter for AC Drives

Vincenzo Delli Colli, Roberto Di Stefano, Fabrizio Marignetti, Maurizio
Scarano
,

Università di Cassino, Italy


The paper introduces a novel approach to the voltage controlle
d current source
inverter (CSI) .The switching strategy is based on the current space vector
modulation. Numerical simulations point out that the voltage feedback allows to
reduce dramatically the voltage ripple in comparison with a traditional VSI.

10:10
―10:30

Model
-
Aided Stability Control on Machine Tools

Michael F. Zäh
, Ludwigsburg, Germany


Chatter often prevents installed drive power from being exploited to the full in the
application of machine tools. This type of dynamic instability is usually cause
d by
the compliance of the machine frame and of the drive systems. This paper proposes
a dynamic process model using a closed loop structure to simulate the operating
behavior of the machine, which is characterized by the chatter
-
free workable depth
of cut
. The results of this simulation can be employed for stability
-
constrained
adaptive control by connecting a personal computer to a machine tool.1 Abstract:
Chatter often prevents installed drive power from being exploited to the full in the
application of
machine tools. This type of dynamic instability is usually caused by
the compliance of the machine frame and of the drive systems. This paper proposes
a dynamic process model using a closed loop structure to simulate the …

An Intelligent Linear Actuator a
nd Its Control System

Yves Boulenger, Erich Krämer, Hong Liu, Nikolaus Seitz, Gerd Hirzinger
,
DLR, Germany


This paper presents a very compact multisensory linear actuator and its control
system. The key element of this linear actuator system is the DLR pa
tented
planetary roller spindle drive(PRSD)
®
. With a volume of 50×50×104mm
(length×width×height) it can output more than 100kg force and achieve a
displacement of 50mm with a resolution of 2µm. A compact microcontroller based
stand
-
alone system enables the

actuator only need 3 cables for RS232 and 5
cables for RS422 serial communication with any commercial PC in addition to 2
cables for power supply.

10:30―10:50

Remote Monitoring and Inspection of Robotic Manufacturing Cells

J. Norberto Pires
, University of Coimbra, Portugal


This paper is presented in a system integrator perspective by a university
researcher and professor. That means that we focus on

operational problems felt by
system integrators, presenting a tool for system monitoring and inspection, taking
our own experience from application work with industrial companies. In the paper a
monitoring and inspecting tool for manufacturing setups is p
resented and explored.
This work was first developed for monitoring robotic manufacturing cells. The
objective was to be able to define a set of system events that could be fired to users
attention when they actually happen. For that purpose there was the
need for some
kind of warning mechanism, and a program or server responsible for monitoring the
installation and firing the requested events. It was decided to use electronic mail
protocols (SMTP and POP3 services were included in the application) to …

Ad
aptive Robust Repetitive Control of a Class of Nonlinear Systems
in Normal Form with Applications to Motion Control of Linear Motors

Li Xu, Bin Yao
,

Purdue University, USA


In this paper the idea of adaptive robust control (ARC) is integrated with a repeti
tive
control algorithm to construct a performance oriented control law for a class of
nonlinear systems in the presence of both repeatable and non
-
repeatable uncertain
nonlinearities. All the uncertainties are assumed to be bounded by certain known
boundin
g functions. The repetitive control algorithm is used to learn and
approximate the unknown repeatable nonlinearities but with physically intuitive
discontinuous projection modifications ensuring that all the function estimates are
within the known bounds.
Robust terms are constructed to attenuate the effect of
various uncertainties including non
-
repeatable uncertainties effectively for a
guaranteed transient performance and a guaranteed final tracking accuracy in …

10:50―11:10

A Multi
-
Axis SLA Prototype App
aratus

Chad A. Moore, Thomas R. Kurfess
, Georgia Institute of Technology, USA


One of the most common Rapid Prototyping (RP) technologies, the
stereolithography apparatus (SLA) fabricates 3
-
dimensional parts using a layer
-
based, additive fabrication proces
ses by tracing part cross
-
sections on the top
surface of a vat of liquid photopolymer. Up to now, usage of the SLA process has
been limited to piece parts. We are interested in building fully functional prototypes
containing various types of hardware while

greatly increases the complexity of parts
being produced. To accomplish this, we are investigating methods for building
around embedded components, where these components are motors, circuit
boards, bushings, etc. While it is possible to fabricate such as
semblies using
conventional SLA technology, we believe that much greater functionality and
flexibility can be achieved if the architecture of typical SLA machines is modified …



T2A

Robot Dynamics and Control

Vibration Control I


T2B

SALA PLATEA

11:30―13:10

SALA PASTA

Gerd Hirzinger, Germany

CHAIR

Giuseppe De Maria, Italy

Vincenzo Parenti Castelli, Italy

CO
-
CHAIR

Lilong Cai, PRC

Dynamic Models for the Re
-
Engineering of a High
-
Speed Cartesian
Robot

Massimo Callegari, Ferdinando Cannella, Se
rgio Monti, Claudio Santolini
,
Università di Ancona,
Paolo Pagnanelli
, Campetella Robotics Center, Italy


High
-
speed robotics is growing fast as a new research and application field with
more and more demanding requirements actually posed to robots' builde
rs;
sometimes the design of brand new mechanical architectures is needed (e.g.
lightweight parallel machines) but if possible re
-
engineering of existing models will
provide more economical solutions. This is presently the case of the CO2 High
Speed Cartesi
an robot produced by Campetella Robotic Center that is already
characterised by good dynamic performances but has been chosen by the producer
for a re
-
engineering that should allow it to meet even more advanced targets. First
experimental tests showed that

some important interventions were needed for …

11:30―11:50

Vibration Control of Rotating Machinery Using Active Tilting
-
Pad
Bearings

Rodrigo Nicoletti
, UNICAMP, Brasil,
Ilmar Ferreira Santos
, DTU, Denmark


An active hybrid tilting
-
pad bearing together with the rotor and the hydraulic system
is modeled
and simulated. The main objective of the active device is the reduction of
vibration amplitude in rotating machinery. The active action is based on injecting
pressurized oil into the bearing gap through orifices machined in the pads.
Numerical results show

an effective vibration reduction in unbalance and frequency
response analyses by applying a PI controller. The active system managed to
eliminate instability phenomena (whirl) which appeared at high Sommerfeld number
operational conditions.

Dynamics Base
d Control of Mechanical Systems

Koichi Osuka
, Kyoto University, Japan


In designing a control law for mechanical systems there are at least two methods.
One is so called 'Model Based Control Approach(MBC)' and the other is so called
'Dynamics Based Control

Approach(DBC) '. Basically the author claim that the
control system designed based on DBC is robust against modelling error behaves
naturally and becomes friendly for human. In case of DBC of manipulator the fact
that manipulator has a property of passivi
ty is well known as a very important
feature. In case of legged robot passive dynamic walking is important. In this paper
at first we show the property of passivity of manipulator is robust in some sense.
Next we introduce a design method of controller for

a legged robot based on
passive dynamic walking sense. Through these topics we would like to say that the
DBC is important for controlling mechanical systems.

11:50―12:10

A Linear Coupling Controller for Plate Vibration

B. Liu
, Menasco Aerospace Ltd
., F. Golnaraghi, G.R. Heppler
, University
of Waterloo, Canada


A means of designing linear coupling controllers (LCCs) for multi
-
degree of freedom
systems is develop
ed. An LCC is applied to a thin plate partially clamped on one
edge and free on all other edges. The LCC developed here is compared to an LCC
designed using the energy monitoring algorithm and to a quadratic non
-
linear
controller. The comparison of the fre
quency responses for an uncontrolled plate and
for the three different controlled cases shows that the design algorithm presented
here provides control over a wider frequency range.

Robust Control of Robots by Using a Linear Observer

Marco A. Arteaga
, UNA
M, Mexico


Most robust control schemes for rigid robots assume velocities measurements to be
available. Although it is possible to measure velocities by using tachometers this
increases costs and the signals delivered may be contaminated with noise. Since
the use of encoders allows to read joint position pretty accurately sometimes it is
desirable to estimate joint velocities through an observer. This paper presents a
robust scheme designed in conjunction with a linear observer. Uniform ultimate
boundedness

for the tracking and observation errors are guaranteed.

12:10―12:30

An Approach to Vibration Control by Stereo Vision System in Mobile
Manipulator

Goh Hitaka, Toshiyuki Murakami, Kouhei Ohnishi
, Keio University, Japan


A mobile manipulator is composed of
the vehicle and manipulator part to expand the
workspace area. In case of the rough terrain however the tip motion of the mobile
manipulator oscillates. To obtain the stable motion by the manipulator it is
necessary to suppress the oscillation. To address
the above issue this paper
describes a novel strategy to estimate the oscillation of the mobile manipulator by
the stereo camera mounted on the vehicle. To recognize the oscillation of the
mobile manipulator a landmark point fixed in the workspace coordina
te is utilized.
Then the landmark point is detected by the stereo camera. From the motion of the
landmark points on the image plane of the camera the motion of the mobile
manipulator can be estimated. Here to describe the vibration of the mobile …

Adaptiv
e Friction Compensation for Industrial Robot
Control

Antonio Visioli, Riccardo Adamini, Giovanni Legnani
, Università di Brescia,
Italy


In this paper we deal with the friction compensation in the model
-
based trajectory
tracking control of an industrial rob
ot manipulator. First it is shown that the variations
of the friction term might significantly affect the control performances during the
robot operations. Then a simple adaptive scheme is proposed to solve the problem
allowing to keep the trajectory track
ing errors at a constant low level. Experimental
results obtained in a typical industrial environment show the effectiveness of the
method and how it is comparable with known neural
-
network
-
based techniques.

12:30―12:50

Constraints Identification for Vibration Control of Time
-
Varying
Boundary Conditions Systems

B. Allotta
, Scuola Sant’Anna,
F. Angioli,
M. Rinchi
, Univ. Firenze, Italy


The focus of this paper is on modal identification and updating techniques f
or a
mechanical system characterized by time
-
varying boundary conditions. In these
systems it is very difficult to develop effective robust controllers in reason of the
large variations of the dynamic model parameters. In most mechanical systems,
such as N
C machines, model parametric variations are due to changes in the
position of a physical constraint. This fact determines continuous changes in system
dynamics (system natural frequencies and vibration modes) while we may assume
that constraint properties
(such as stiffness and damping coefficients) remain
unaltered. Nevertheless constraint properties can't be determined analytically so it is
essential to perform experimental tests. Assuming that a FEM model of the …

Advanced Model
-
Based Robot Control in R
eis ROBOTstarV

Manfred Dresselhaus
, Reis Robotics,
Andreas Kuczynski
, ATB
Institute for
Applied Systems Technology

Bremen, Germany


In a research project that was funded by the Ger
-
man Federal Government
Department of Research an advanced robot control met
hod was conceived and
realised, in which a dynamic robot model is integrated in the joint control of the robot
Reis RV6. By this model
-
based control method the path deviations are substantially
reduced. This leads to a decrease of actuator input values and

thus to lower loads
at the actuators and to an improved control behaviour of the robot. As a result, both
significant improvements in the path accuracy at high path dynamics and
substantially reduced loads of motors and gears have been achieved. The new
c
ontrol method gives an important contribution to higher quality and productivity and
also to higher service lives in many application cases.

12:50―13:10

Mechatronics Design of Vibration Rejection of the Feed Supporting
System for the Square Kilometer Array

Y.X.
Su, B.Y. Duan, Q. Wei
, Xidian University,
R.D. Nan, B. Peng
, Chinese
Academy of Sciences, PRC


The modified optomechatronics design of the feed supporting system for next
generation large radio telescope
-
Square Kilometer Array (SKA) consisting of two

parallel manipulators Stewart fine tuning platform is connected to the parallel cable
manipulator with the so called cabin structure. Because the cabin structure is driven
by six large span cables large vibration will induced resulting from the reaction
f
orces of Stewart fine tuning platform. A mechatronics design strategy is proposed
to achieve the vibration rejection and the basic idea is to use the damping force of
electrorheological damper to counteract the reaction force of Stewart fine tuning
platfor
m. The reaction forces acted on the cabin structure is derived …



T2C

Hydraulic Actuators

Manufacturing Systems II


T2D

SALA BIANCA

11:30
―13:10

SALA TURCA

Bin Yao, USA

CHAIR

Yousef Ibrahim, Australia

Roberto Oboe, Italy

CO
-
CHAIR

Carlo Cloet, USA

Computational and Experimental Investigation on Solenoid Valve
Dynamics

Viktor Szente, János Vad
, Budapest University of Technology and
Eco
nomics, Hungary


A generally applicable, synthetic simulation model and computational tool has been
elaborated for dynamic simulation of solenoid valves (SVs) applied as control
elements in fast
-
response pneumatic fluid power systems. The SV of case study
has been modeled as a system consisting of coupled magneto
-
dynamic and
mechanical subsystems. At the present state of investigation, fluid dynamic effects
are not considered in the model. The appropriateness of the model has been
verified by experimental d
ata. The simulation model resolves the valve body motion
and the solenoid current at a high accuracy. It has been pointed out in the concerted
numerical and experimental studies that the valve body performs repetitive …

11:30―11:50

Coordinated Robots in a
Flexible Manufacturing Work Cell

Devendra P. Garg, Clayton D. Poppe
, Duke University, USA


Flexible manufacturing work cells provide excellent opportunities for enhancing both
efficiency andproductivity in an automated manufacturing environment. Such cells

typically integrate robots, a wide varietyof machinetools, material handling
equipment, packaging devices,sensors, actuators, controllers, and similar other
hardware. The coordinated control of robots in flexible manufacturing work cells
presents a partic
ularly challenging problem since ithas to respond to a need for
adaptability for product changeand minimization of on
-
line setup time and costs. The
major emphasis of this paper is on machine toolsand related hardware operating in
flexible manufacturing wo
rk cells. It includes a discussion of motivation for flexible
automation, past problems and recent advances, and guidelines forwork cell design.
Problems associated with complicated automated …

Integrated Direct/Indirect Adaptive Robust Motion Control of
Single
-
Rod Hydraulic Actuators with Time
-
Varying Unknown Inertia

Fanping Bu, Bin Yao
, Purdue University, USA


This paper studies the precision motion control of single
-
rod hydraulic actuators with
accurate parameter estimations. An integrated direct/indire
ct adaptive robust
controller (DIARC) is proposed to take into account the inherent nonlinearity,
parametric uncertainties and uncertain nonlinearities associated with the hydraulic
systems. Compared with existing direct ARC controller designs, the propose
d
DIARC controller not only achieves a better output tracking performance, but also
provides better parameter estimations, which can be used for other purposes such
as the higher level trajectory planning and the system and component health
monitoring. The
se stronger theoretical results are made possible through the use of
the new design philosophy of separating parameter estimation dynamics from the …

11:50―12:10

Study on High Precision Winding of Toroidal Coil and Automation of
Its Process

Takashi Kawamura, Masayasu Shimaru, Masaru Nakazawa
, Shinshu
University,
Masakatsu Sasahara, Kiyoto Kobayashi, Takayuki Kojima
,
Hermonic Drive Systems Inc., Japan


T
his paper deals with high precision coil winding machine for toroidal cores. This
winding machine has new winding mechanism which consists of new shape winding
ring and wire save ring proposed in this study. The mechanism gives the machine
ability of tensi
on control. Kink prevention equipment is designed to avoid kinks while
winding. These improvements make high precision winding possible. This machine
is better than machines currently in use specially for small size core and automation
of its process.

Dyn
amic Model of a Pneumatic Proportional Pressure Valve

Massimo Sorli
, Politecnico di Torino,
Giorgio Figliolini
, Università di
Cassino,
Stefano Pastorelli
,

Politecnico di Torino, Italy


A dynamic non linear model of a commercial proportional pressure valve,

type
Lucifer Honeywell EPP3 J
-
21
-
U
-
100
-
10, is formulated in order to simulate its
behavior in time
-
domain under several operating conditions. The mechatronic
design of the valve and its static and dynamic characteristics are analyzed carefully.
Then, the
modeling of the valve is carried out by taking into account its main internal
devices, which are integrated all together inside the valve in order to allow the
pressure control through an input electric signal. Finally, some diagrams given by a
computer si
mulation confirm the validity of the proposed dynamic non linear model
for this type of proportional valve.

12:10―12:30

Selection of Linear Motors for High
-
Speed Packaging Machines

F. Lotti
, Università di Bologna,
M. Salmon
, MS Automation,
G. Vassura, A.
Zucchelli
, Università di Bologna, Italy


Specific design issues for automatic packaging machines are discusse
d, concerning
the possible application of electric linear motors, the expected benefits and the main
drawbacks. A purposely
-
defined software tool for the selection of these motors is
then illustrated. This tool leads the designer to a systematic definition

of all the
parameters related to the application on high speed packaging machines and allows
a step
-
by
-
step choice of the proper actuator, by means of a database where the
motors available on the market have been classified and parameterized. Two
applicat
ion cases are then presented and discussed, related to a lifting device in a
wrapping machine for home paper
-
products and to a mobile hot
-
melt glue dispenser
in a box
-
forming machine.

Motion Synchronization for Multi
-
Cylinder Electro
-
Hydraulic System

Hong

Sun, George T.C. Chiu
, Purdue University, USA


This paper presents a nonlinear control algorithm to address the motion
synchronization problem for a 2
-
cylinder electro
-
hydraulic (EH) system. A 2
-
step
design approach is applied such that it utilized linear

MIMO robust control technique
to design an outer loop motion synchronization controller. A nonlinear SISO
perturbation observer based pressure/force controller is designed for each of the lift
cylinder as the inner loop controller to handle the nonlineari
ties associated with the
EH actuators. Experimental results on a 2
-
cylinder system are presented to verify
the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

12:30―12:50

SICOMAT: A system for SImulation and COntrol analysis of Machine
Tools

M. Gautier, M.T. Pham, W. Khalil, Ph.
Lemoine
, IRCCyN,
Ph. Poignet
,
LIRMM, France


This paper presents a software package for the simulation and the control analysis of
mach
ine tool axes. This package which is called SICOMAT (SImulation and COntrol
analysis of MAchine Tools) provides a large variety of toolboxes to analyze the
behavior and the control of the machine. The software takes into account several
elements such as th
e flexibility of bodies the interaction between several axes the
effect of numerical control and the availability to reduce models.

Reducing Stick
-
Slip Friction in Hydraulic Actuators

William S. Owen, Elizabeth A. Croft
, University of British Columbia
, Ja
mes
R. McFarlane
, International Submarine Engineering Ltd., Canada


Stick
-
slip friction in hydraulic actuators is a problem for accuracy and repeatability.
Friction compensation has been approached through various control techniques.
This work presents an
alternative solution, namely, friction avoidance. By rotating
the piston and rod the Stribeck region of the friction
-
velocity curve is avoided and
the axial friction opposing the piston movement is linearized, making control more
accurate and robust. Simul
ation results are presented to validate this approach and
identify the operating limits for the rotational velocity.

12:50―13:10

A Structured Framework for the Modeling and Control of Modular
Machining Centers

Luca Ferrarini
, Politecnico di Milano,
Giusepp
e Fogliazza
, MCM SpA, Italy


In the paper, the problem of defining a structured methodology for the modeling and
design of the control system for machining centers is addressed. In particular, it is
shown how object
-
oriented modeling technique can be usefu
lly exploited for the
definition of two basic reference models, one for the plant to be controlled and one
the control functions. The proposed framework includes proper hierarchical
composition, formal representations, and compliance with international con
trol
standards, which are useful in the perspective of design. The paper shows the
application of such concepts to an industrial large machining center for prismatic
workpieces.



T3A

Manipulation and Control

Vibration Control II


T3B

SALA PLATEA

14:30―1
6:10

SALA PASTA

Sauro Longhi, Italy

CHAIR

Paolo Rocco, Italy

Koichi Koganezawa, Japan

CO
-
CHAIR

Marco Antonio Arteaga, Mexico

Flexible Rope Manipulation by Dual Manipulator System Using Vision
Sensor

Takayuki Matsuno, Toshio Fukuda, Fumihito Arai
, N
agoya University,
Japan


We propose a method of the parameter identification of flexible object. We proposed
the method to recognize the shape of the rope by using model of the flexible object
and visual information. However in this method accurate recogni
tion and
compensation using the visual information are not possible when the flexural rigidity
of model is greatly different from that of the actual rope. Here we propose the
identification method of the rigidity coefficient of object with experiment resul
ts.

14:30―14:50

Synchronous Disturbance Compensation in Active Magnetic
Bearings using Bias Current Excitation

Joga D. Setiawan, Ranjan Mukherjee
, Michigan State University
, Eric H.
Maslen
, University of Virginia, USA


This paper proposes a new approach for si
multaneous compensation of two
synchronous periodic disturbances in active magnetic bearings; sensor runout and
mass unbalance. Using Lyapunov's method, a novel adaptive algorithm is
developed to uniquely determine the harmonic components of both disturban
ces
and guarantee asymptotic stability of the rotor geometric center about the origin. By
varying magnetic stiffness through excitation of the bias currents, the system
achieves a persistently exciting condition that ensures exponential convergence of
esti
mated parameters to the true values. The algorithm is superior to existing
techniques since the identfication process can be performed without changing …

Adaptive Control and Impedance Control for Dual Robotic Arms
Manipulating a Common Heavy Load

A. Nagc
haudhuri, University of Maryland Eastern Shore, D.P. Garg
, Duke
University, USA


Impedance control provides a convenient framework for designing control
algorithms for robotic applications that involve interaction with the environment.
Passive impedance co
ntrol was utilized in the early days of robotic applications,
when the peg
-
in
-
hole type of tasks were performed using remote center compliance.
Active impedance control using digital measurements of contact forces for deburring
and assembly operations have

been attempted using single robots. The uncertainty
associated with the robot dynamics and the contact tasks have often necessitated
the use of adaptive algorithms. This paper investigates the use of adaptive control
and impedance control for a difficult
contact task involving multiple robots …

14:50―15:10

Tracking Performance of an H


Position Controller for Current
-
Fed
Induction Motors Under Mechanical Loads Variations

Giuseppe Fusco
, Università di Cassino, Italy


This paper describes a systematic proced
ure to design a position tracking H


controller for current
-
fed induction motors actuating mechanical loads which ensures
robustness with respect to load torque disturbances. This feature is very important
in many industrial applications; in fact during no
rmal operating conditions if
variations of the mechanical load driven by the induction motor appear the tracking
performance achievable by the controller can degrade. These variations are seen by
the H


controller as if they were load torque disturbances.
Due to the good
disturbance rejection capability exhibited by the robust controller a satisfactory
dynamic performance is achieved. A numerical simulation study in which an
induction motor drives a one
-
link robot manipulator shows the tracking …

Proposal
of Open
-
Network
-
Interface for Industrial Robots (ORiN) and
its Experimental Evaluation

Makoto Mizukawa
,
Shibaura Institute of Technology,
Toshihiko Koyama,
Toshihiro Inukai
, Denso Corp.,
Akio Noda
,
Mitsubishi Electric Corporation
,
Naoyoshi Kanamaru
,
Nippo
n Telegraph and Telephone Corp
.,

Yasuhiko
Noguchi
,
Yaskawa Electric Corp.
,
Nobuyuki Otera
,

Kobe Steel Ltd., Japan


Since 1999, the Japan Robot Association (JARA) has been conducting the
standardization activities (ORiN: Open Robot Interface for the Network
) in which
main subject is the network interface for the robot controller. In the 1999
international robot exhibition, our activities and results were opened and
demonstrated to the public. In this demonstration, industrial robots from 13
Japanese domestic

robot manufacturers, that had different specifications and
structures, were connected each other with communication network using ORiN …
applications for production

15:10―15:30

Experimental Evaluation of Evolutionary Predictive Input Shaping
Applied to a

Flexible Structure

Mario Luca Fravolini, Antonio Ficola, Michele La Cava
, Univ. Perugia, Italy


This work reports the results of an experimental study which has been carried out to
evaluate the applicability of nonlinear Model Predictive Control for the r
eduction of
vibrations in flexible structures. Reference was made to a clamped flexible beam on
the tip of which a controlled pendulum is attached. The control strategy consists of
two stages: in the first one a PD controller is employed to ensure the accu
rate
tracking of the pendulum position with respect to a reference shaped signal; in the
second one the shaped trajectory is generated by a model based predictive
controller. For the online nonlinear constrained optimization a new Evolutionary
Algorithm is

proposed. The results of some experiments are reported comparing the
performance of a pure feedforward scheme with others that employ either …

Internet
-
Based Remote Sensing and Manipulation in Micro
Environment

Carmen K.M. Fung, Wen J. Li
, Chinese Univer
sity of Hong Kong, PRC,
Imad Elhajj, Ning Xi
, Michigan State University, USA


Recent developments in the Internet have significantly increased the human
capability to reach and obtain information from remote locations. In parallel, the
advent of micro sens
ors and actuators makes it possible for humans to sense and
act in a microenvironment. Combined, the Internet and MEMS will produce a new
technology for humans to sense and act in remote micro
-
environments, allowing the
potential development of micro teleo
peration and micro automation technologies.
These new technologies have potential impact on several fields, including remote
micro
-
automation and biomedical engineering. In this paper, we will present our
ongoing development of polyvinylidence fluoride (PV
DF) sensors that can be …

15:30―15:50

Second Order Sliding Manifold Approach for Vibration Reduction via
Output Feedback: Experimental Results

Alberto Cavallo
, Università del Sannio,
Ciro Natale, Giuseppe De Maria
,
Seconda Università di Napoli, Italy


In this paper a second order s
liding manifold control approach is adopted as a
technique to effectively reduce the vibrations of a flexible beam. A novel theoretical
result for a MIMO output feedback control law is presented to show how the singular
perturbation theory can be used to t
ackle the problem of active vibration control. The
theory is supported both by simulations and by the results of a number of
experiments performed on a brass beam with piezoelectric patches attached on it
and used in self
-
sensing configuration in order to
have a collocated control system.

Sensitivity to Parametric Uncertainty in Robot Impact

Carlos Carreras
, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Spain,
Ian D. Walker
,
Clemson University, USA


In this paper, we introduce a novel interval
-
based methodology for e
valuating the
sensitivity of robot manipulator impacts to variations in manipulator and
environmental constraints. The approach is intuitive and straightforward, and
simpler to perform than traditional methods. It is illustrated using an example of a
three

link manipulator.

15:50―16:10

Experiments on Robust Vibration Suppression in Mechatronic
Systems Using IIR Digital Filters

D. Economou
, National Tech. Univ. Athens, Greece,
C. Mavroidis
, Rutgers
University, USA,
I. Antoniadis
,
National Tech. Univ. Athens
,

Greece


In this paper, a method for suppressing residual vibrations in flexible mechatronic
systems is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. The proposed method is
based on the preconditioning of the arbitrary inputs to the system using Infinite
Impul
se Response (IIR) digital filters. To ensure robust behavior, the filter stop band
is selected to cover all possible variations of the system dynamic parameters. It is
shown that some of the IIR filters are capable of suppressing vibrations when they
are p
roperly designed.



T3C

Actuator Design

Software Design for Manufacturing


T3D

SALA BIANCA

14:30―15:50

SALA TURCA

Kenneth Waldron, USA

CHAIR

George Chiu, USA

Gianantonio Magnani, Italy

CO
-
CHAIR

Fakhreddine Karray, Canada

Pleated Pneumatic Artific
ial Muscles: Actuators for Automation and
Robotics

Frank Daerden, Dirk Lefeber, Björn Verrelst, Ronald Van Ham
, Vrije
Universiteit Brussel, Belgium


This contribution reports on a type of pneumatic artificial muscles (PAMs) that was
recently developed at t
he Vrije Universiteit Brussel department of Mechanical
Engineering. Its distinguishing feature is its pleated design. Due to this it has a very
high contraction force and an equally high travel. The weight of these pleated PAMs
is very low: a muscle of onl
y 60 gr can pull up to 3500 N and contract by an amount of
42%. Furthermore dry friction and associated hysteresis typical of many other designs
is avoided by the folding
-
unfolding action. This significantly simplifies position

Control using these actuator
s. Although the force
-
displacement characteristics of
our actuator are non
-
linear they can be effectively controlled using basic linear PI …

1
4:30―14:50

Creating Reusable, Hardware Independent Motion Control
Applications via IEC 61131
-
3 and PLCopen Motion Control Profile

Eelco van der Wal
, PLCopen, The Netherlands


Motion integration issues have emerged to the forefront, along with maintainabili
ty
and connectivity to automation solutions. For this standards are needed. PLCopen
has generated such a standard. A standard in programming language, to harmonize
the access of motion control functionality across platforms. In this way, the
generated appl
ication program is much more hardware independent, and re
-
usable
across platforms. The provided standard, the PLCopen Motion Control Profile, is
based on IEC 61131
-
3 Function Blocks. With the standardization of the interfaces
and the functionality, and imp
lementation on multiple platforms, it provides a
programming standard that is widely supported by the industry. The stated goals of
this standardization are simplicity, efficiency, consistency, universality, flexibility …

Modelling and Compensation of Hy
steresis for Magnetostrictive
Actuators

C. Natale, F. Velardi
, Seconda Università di Napoli,
C. Visone
, Università
del Sannio, Italy


The paper proposes the compensation of the hysteretic behaviour of an actuator
constituted by a Terfenol
-
D magnetostrictiv
e material to enhance the performance of
a typical control scheme for vibration suppression. Hysteresis is modelled by the
application of the classical Preisach model whose dentification procedure is
performed by the adoption of fuzzy approximators. This a
llows to reconstruct
analytically either Everett integrals and the Preisach distribution function without any
special smoothing of the measured data thanks to the filtering capabilities of the
fuzzy interpolators. Moreover the idea of compensator for opera
tors with memory is
also described in detail and the concept of pseudo
-
compensator is introduced …

14:50―15:10

PLC Software Modularity and Co
-
operative Development

Flavio Bonfatti
, Università di Modena e Reggio Emilia,
Gianni Gadda
,
DemoCenter,
Paola Danie
la Monari
,
Università di
Modena e Reggio
Emilia, Italy


The paper introduces a software design method to pursue modularity of PLC
-
based
system control code. Modularity is a critical condition to support co
-
operative
development of complex systems, where co
mponents supplied by a number of
subcontractors are integrated to realize the envisaged plant. The method proposes
a disciplined use of the SFC, FBD and ST languages of the IEC 61131
-
3 standard.

Vibration Condition Monitoring of Rotors on AMB Fed by Induc
tion
Motors

Nicola Amati, Eugenio Brusa
, Politecnico di Torino, Italy


The presence of induction driver motors in rotors on AMB can affect significantly the
vibration monitoring operation because of the effect of the so
-
called unbalanced
magnetic pull (u.m
.p.) on the rotor whirling cage. A sort of beat appears in monitored
radial displacements caused by the interaction between the unbalance response of
the rotor and the u.m.p. depending on the slip occurring in the induction motor. This
effect is herewith p
reliminary analysed in the range of spin speeds where the rotor
behaves as a rigid body. The equations of motion of the system include the negative
stiffness provided by the motor in presence of non uniform air gap and are written
under the assumptions of
linearized forces for the AMB and rotor axis
-
symmetry.
Some experiments have been performed to validate the …

15:10―15:30

Continuous Testing as a Strategy of Improving the PLC Software
Development Cycles

Ulrich Kramer
,
Bielefeld University of Applied Sciences
, Germany


An appropriate simulation environment for testing real
-
time software applications,
especially PL
C (PLC: Programmable Logic Controller) programs, is demanded in
recent time for many reasons. One of the them might be found in the altered
conditions of cooperation (teamwork, teleworking, etc.) under which PLC software
projects have to be carried out. Mo
st areas of automation engineering lack for
largely formalizable procedures, in particular within the specification and testing
phase, and almost no tools are available for the development of real
-
time software.
The consequence is that PLC programs are usu
ally not developed before the facility
to be controlled is installed, and putting it into operation is often the only test. The
results are unacceptable waste of time during the installation phase, …

Identification with Blended Multi
-
Model Approach in the

Frequency
Domain: an Application to a Servo Pneumatic Actuator

H. Schulte, H. Hahn
, Universität Kassel, Germany


By means of an real world application a system identification method was
investigated for nonlinear systems from input
-
output measurements. Th
is approach
based on an blended multiple model structure which describes the global behaviour
of the system over the whole operating range. At different operating points twenty
local linear black
-
box models were identified in the frequency domain from a fi
nite
number of measurements of the input and output signals. A comparative study was
made of a grey
-
box model which have been derived using physical laws and
measurements of several process states to estimate unknown parameters.

15:30―15:50

Object―Oriented Approach to PLC Software Design for a
Manufacture Machinery Using IEC 61131
-
3 Norm Languages

Marcello Bonfè, Cesare Fantuzzi
, Università di Ferrara, Italy


This paper presents an application of object


oriented methodology to t
he
development of Programmable Logic Controller (PLC)programs. PLC is widely used
as computer controller of manufacturing machinery, principally because its
ro
bustness and programming simplicity. During the last years, IEC 61131
-
3 norm
has been introduced
aiming to provide standard languages and structure to the
development environments of PLC programmes, that are instead strictly bound up
to now to proprietary languages. Following IEC 61131
-
3 prescription, is it also
possible to develop well structured, ob
ject

oriented control software, which was
hardly possible with the former vendor

speci .c low

level languages. This paper
describes an application of the novel standard IEC 61131
-
3 to the development …

Dynamically Compensated Cams for Rigid Cam
-
Follower S
ystems
with Fluctuating Cam Speed and Dominating Inertial Forces

B. Demeulenaere, J. De Schutter
, KU Leuven, Belgium


Traditionally cam
-
follower systems are designed by assuming a constant camshaft
speed. Nevertheless all cam
-
follower systems especially hi
gh
-
speed systems exhibit
some camshaft speed fluctuation (despite the presence of a flywheel) which causes
the follower motions to be inaccurate. This paper therefore proposes a novel design
procedure that explicitly takes into account the camshaft speed v
ariation. The
design procedure assumes that (i) the cam
-
follower system is conservative and (ii)
all forces are inertial. The design procedure is based on a single design choice i.e.
the range of camshaft speed variation and yields (i) cams that compensate

for the
inertial dynamics for any period of motion and (ii) a camshaft flywheel whose (small)
inertia is independent of the period of motion. A design example shows …

15:50―16:10

Development of a Distribution VR
-
Based Complex Graphics Design
System

Wen
-
Ts
ai Sung, Shih
-
Ching Ou
, National Central University Taiwan, ROC


This study attempts to apply the principle of Distributed Virtual Environments (DVE)
and virtual reality (VR) technologies to Complex Graphics Design System (CGDS)
by integrating network comp
uter graphics and VR into a web
-
based learning
environment. VR system especially multi
-
user systems can benefit from and often
require a distributed realization. This study develops a multi
-
user sculpture graphics
system for learning and design. These feat
ures of the CGDS system are real
-
time
dynamic flexible and portables. This investigation describes an empirical study that
investigated the effect of Complex Graphics Design. The system using the OpenGL
is due to the important feature that the system can r
un at different operate system
such as Windows 2000 98 NT Linux Mac…etc. It is necessary to learn and …



T4A

Robot Force Control

Control of Mechatronics Systems


T4B

SALA PLATEA

16:3
0―18:10

SALA PASTA

Torgny Brogårdh, Sweden

CHAIR

Jacob Apkarian, Canada

I
-
Ming Chen, Singapore

CO
-
CHAIR

Ning Xi, USA

A Realization of Compliant Motion by a Decentralized Control in
Redundant Manipulator

Hideaki Hattori, Kouhei Ohnishi
, Keio Univers
ity, Japan


This paper presents a realization of compliant motion by a decentralized control in
redundant manipulator. Manipulator is divided into several subsystem and each
subsystem has virtual impedance in partial workspace. Each system performs
autonom
ously by using virtual impedance and the information transmitted from tip
side subsystem. The control system becomes independent from the degree of
freedom(DOF) of total system. Furthermore to realize the adaptation against
environment the compliant motion

of subsystem is introduced. When external force
applied to subsystem the reaction torques are estimated by reaction torque
estimation observers. The external force is calculated by using the estimated
reaction torques. Using the estimated external force c
ompliance motion of …

16:30―16:50

Loop Shaping Issues in Hard Disk Drive Servo System Design

Alessandro Beghi, Roberto Oboe, Paolo Capretta
, Università di Padova,
Francesco Chrappan Soldavini
, STMicroelectronics, Italy


In this paper, the design of Hard Disk Drive (HDD) servo s
ystems based on
statespace techniques is considered. In particular, we analyze the performances of
discretetime controllers obtained by means of LQG optimal control theory. The key
control design issue we address is related to the need of achieving suffici
ently high
close
-
loop bandwidth while granting adequate disturbance rejection in the loop gain
crossover frequency region. It turns out that the shaping of the sensitivity function is
a critical issue, in particular when Run Outs compensation schemes are i
ntroduced
(e.g., repetitive control schemes). The effectiveness of discrete
-
time loop transfer
recovery techniques (LTR) in achieving a satisfactory loop shaping design starting
from an LQG regulator is discussed. The proposed control algorithms are …

A M
ulti
-
fingered Hand Control Structure with On
-
line Grasping Force
Optimization

Constant Remond, Véronique Perdereau, Michel Drouin
,
Université Pierre
et Marie Curie, France


Grasp stability in a multi
-
fingered hand requires an appropriate force distribution

between fingers taking into account contact conditions. The optimal solution with
either recursive or non linear programming methods usually involves many
computations and is very often not suitable for on
-
line implementation. This paper
describes the tra
nsformation of this constrained problem into an unconstrained one
so that the optimization algorithm finds the optimal solution within a few iterations.
Force determination is then included in a hybrid position/force controller to prove the
effectiveness o
f such a solution for updating force references during the grasped
object motion.

16:50―17:10

On
-
line Identification of Hysteresis Functions with Nonlocal Memory

V. Lampaert, J. Swevers
, KU Leuven, Belgium


This paper shows that the on
-
line identification
of hysteresis functions with nonlocal
memory boils down to a well understood recursive least squares estimation problem
if the hysteresis function is modeled as a weighted superposition of extended linear
stop operators with fixed parameters. Simulation re
sults show that this technique
can be applied to model hysteresis functions in static as well as dynamic systems.
In addition this technique has been successfully applied to model the hysteresis
behaviour of a piezoelectric actuator. In future work the ada
ptive compensation of
the friction force for micro
-
displacements will be experimentally validated.

Combined Vision/Force Control at Corners in Planar Robotic Contour
Following

Johan Baeten, Joris De Schutter
, KU Leuven, Belgium


The accuracy and execution

speed of a force controlled contour following task is
limited if the shape of the workpiece is unknown. This is even more true when the
workpiece contour contains corners. This paper shows how a combined vision/force
control approach at corners in planar
contour following results in a more accurate
and faster executed task. The vision system is used to measure on
-
line the contour
and to watch out for corners. The edge is correctly located by incorporating the
compliance of the tool/camera set
-
up in the con
tour measurement. A simple corner
detection algorithm is presented. Once a corner is detected, the finite state
controller is activated to take the corner in the best conditions. Experimental results
are presented to validate the approach.

17:10―17:30

Control of the Secondary Mirror Unit for the SOFIA Telescope

Joseph Moerschell
, HEVS,
Emmanuel Onillon
, CSEM, Switzerland


SOFIA is a 2.5
-
m telescope to be carried on a special Boeing 747 for astronomic
observations at altitudes of about 15'000

m. The paper describes the main features
of the secondary mirror unit. The SOFIA secondary mirror needs active control for
alignment along five degrees of freedom as well as for very fast chopping with a
frequency up to 20 Hz. The SOFIA secondary mirror c
hopping mechanism and
control system will be described in the following. A state space model derived from
the mechanical and electrical equations of the system will then be introduced. This
model will be used for the design of a state space controller base
d on a pole
placement algorithm, to make the system behave as a fourth order Bessel filter. To
avoid overshoots due to current and voltage limitation, a variable speed limitation,
which is function of the position error, will be added to the controller.

Environment
-
Contacting Task by Position
-
Controlled Manipulator
using Free
-
Joint Structure

Yasumichi Aiyama
, University of Tsukuba, Japan


In general environment
-
contacting manipulation task such as assembly requires a
force
-
controlled manipulator. In this
paper a method is introduced to achieve
environment
-
contacting task with a position
-
controlled manipulator. Additional
mechanism with some free
-
joint mechanism on wrist of a manipulator reduces
excessive inner force. We show conditions to reduce excessive
inner force and to
keep high rigidity of object. An experiment of graspless manipulation with free
-
joint
mechanism is shown as an example of this research.

17:30―17:50

Robustness Evaluation of New Practical Control for PTP Positioning
Systems

Wahyudi, K. Sato, A. Shimokohbe
, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Japan


This paper presents robustness evaluation of the new practical control for point
-
to
-
point (PTP) po
sitioning systems. The proposed controller consists of a nominal
characteristic trajectory as an intended motion trajectory and PI elements which are
used to restrict the plant motion along the trajectory. The nominal characteristic
trajectory is determine
d with measured open
-
loop responses of the plant and is also
used to determine the PI coefficients. So the proposed controller does not require
an exact model of the plant and its parameters and is easily applicable to practical
systems. The robustness of
the proposed controller is evaluated and compared
experimentally with conventional PID controllers using an experimental rotary
positioning system. It is proved that the proposed controller is better than the …

Grinding Force Models in Finishing Processes

Yin
-
Tien Wang, Yann
-
Jyi Jan
,
Tamkang University Taiwan, ROC


Force models and control for a robot
-
assisted surface finishing system are
presented in this paper. These models are based on two different concepts, the
theory of a linear observation and Grey
theory. Integrated with an automated
surface finishing system, these force models are designed as force observers to
sense the grinding contact force based on the driving current and output position of
the motor. In order to test the function of the force
models, a robot
-
assisted finishing
system is constructed and tested on a Tatung A530 robot. Also, we utilize Taguchi's
method for experimental design to determine an ideal grinding condition. Four
grinding conditions are chosen, namely, path pattern, grind
ing contact pressure, tool
diameter, and feed rate. Tendencies of these factors can be found from the
experiments. The experimental results show that the robot
-
assisted finishing …

17:50―18:10

GA
-
Based Evolutionary Design of Robust Compensator for
Mechatro
nic Systems

Makoto Iwasaki, Kazuaki Itoh, Nobuyuki Matsui
, Nagoya Institute of
Technology, Japan


This paper presents an evolutionary algorithm for the robust motion controller
design in mechatronic systems using a Genetic Algorithm. The motion control
sys
tem is composed of a robust 2
-
Degrees
-
Of
-
Freedom compensator based on the
coprime factorization description. Conventional controller design approaches to the
optimization for the compensator free parameters essentially require complicated
numerical procedu
res under the given control specifications. In this research a
simple and practical algorithm for the compensator design for mechatronic systems
has been proposed. Using the optimization ability of the Genetic Algorithm the
proposed algorithm is able to au
tonomously tune the optimal combination of the …



T4C

Robot Actuation

Mechatronics System Design


T4D

SALA BIANCA

16:30―18:10

SALA TURCA

Hami Kazerooni, USA

CHAIR

Thomas Kurfess, USA

Giovanni Legnani, Italy

CO
-
CHAIR

Yoshio Yamamoto, Japan

Control Problems in Underactuated Manipulators

Alessandro De Luca, Stefano Iannitti, Raffaella Mattone, Giuseppe Oriolo
,
Un
iversità di Roma "La Sapienza", Italy


We discuss some recent control techniques for underactuated manipulators,a
special instance of mechanical systems having fewer input commands than degrees
of freedom.This class includes robots with passive joints,elas
tic joints,or .exible
links.Structural system properties are investigated showing that robots with passive
joints are the most di .cult to control.With reference to these,solutions are proposed
for the typical problems of trajectory planning and tracking,a
nd of set
-
point
regulation.The relevance of nonlinear control techniques such as dynamic feedback
linearization and iterative state steering is clari .ed through illustrative examples.

16:30―16:50

Conceptual Design of Mechatronic Systems Supported by Semi
-
formal Specification

Jürgen Gausemeier, Martin Flath, Stefan Möhringer
,
Heinz Nixdorf
Institute,
Germany


Mechatronics
-

the synergetic integration of different engineering domains can
create new products and stimulate innovative solutions. In order to yie
ld this
potential experts from different engineering domains need a common method to
specify results during the early stage of product conceptualisation. This method
could create the base for cross
-
domain communication and efficient cooperation. In
this wa
y the potential of mechatronics can be realized. The article presents an
integrated method for the conceptual design of mechatronic products. It comprises a
new semi
-
formal specification language for the modelling of functions. This
language is closely rel
ated to the semi
-
formal modelling of principle solutions …

Stabilization and Output Tracking for Underactuated Mechanical
Systems with Inequality State Constraints

Herbert G. Tanner, Kostas J. Kyriakopoulos
, National Technical University
of Athens, Greece


The paper presents a method to determine the feasibility of stabilization to an
equilibrium manifold or exact ouput tracking for underactuated mechanical systems
that are subject to inequality state constraints. Even for minimum phase systems
internal dy
namics may evolve in an unacceptable way and has to be confined within
certain limits. Such restrictions arise in deformable object manipulation tasks. It is
shown that the problem of output tracking under inequality state constraints is
equivalent to oupu
t tracking with bounded input. The paper provides sufficient
conditions for exact ouput tracking and stabilization to an equilibrium manifold that
guarantee that internal dynamics is bounded with adjustable bounds.

16:50―17:10

Alternatives in Precise Load
Motion Control of Two
-
Mass
Servomechanisms

Gianni Ferretti, Gianantonio Magnani, Paolo Rocco
, Polit. Milano, Italy


Load motion control in high precision elastic servo systems is addressed in this
paper. It is assumed that only the motor position measureme
nt is available to close
control loops. Four controllers are compared: a conventional PID; a state space plus
feedforward controller with integral action on the motor position measure; a second
state space plus feedforward controller with integral action o
n the estimate of the
load position; a pole assignment controller designed based on input
-
output models.
The essential elements for the design of the controllers are given. Detailed
simulation analysis is used to compare the controllers from several points

of view
(setpoint tracking, robustness, disturbance rejection, friction induced limit cycles).
Experiments performed on a prototype servo will be discussed as well.

Massively Parallel Actuation

Po
-
hua Yang
, Ohio State Univ.,
Kenneth J. Waldron
, Stanford
Univ., USA


The objective of the work described in this paper is the examination of the design
and control opportunities presented by systems with large numbers of small, two
-
state actuators acting in parallel. An array of two
-
state actuators, i.e. a bundl
e of
binary actuators, can be regarded as a simplified model of biological muscle. In
recent years, the development of MEMS (Micro
-
Electromechanical Systems) has
shown a great potential for building mechanical elements in a very small scale.
However, there

are some other issues for integrating a parallel array system that
cannot be solved by advances of material research alone. From the mechanical
designer’s point of view, large numbers of active elements have to be deployed at
appropriate locations in the
system. For control purposes, if a binary system is
intended, the mathematical model can be very different from that of ….

1
7:10―17:30

Modeling, Design and Control of a Portable Washing Machine during
the Spinning Cycle

Evangelos Papadopoulos, Iakovos Papadimitriou
, National Technical
University of Athens, Greece


This paper presents a simplified three
-
dimensional dynamic model

of a horizontal
-
axis portable washing machine. This model is used to predict the verge of walking
instability during the spinning cycle. Next, two novel methods of stabilization are
presented. The design
-
based method reduces the instability and is cost ef
fective.
The control
-
based method eliminates instability and vibrations and is associated
with active balancing. Both methods satisfy the current trend towards portable,
lightweight full
-
feature washing machines.

SCID


A Non
-
actuated Robot for Walls Expl
oration

Domenico Longo, Giovanni Muscato
, Università di Catania, Italy


In this paper a control methodology applied to a passive mechanical system is
described. The SCID (Sliding Climbing Inspection Device) has been designed to
slide down over a ferromagne
tic vertical surface, using two electromagnets; the on
-
board electronics and the control algorithm used, allow the system to control its
velocity and trajectory. The system has been experimentally tested and a simplified
mathematical model has been compute
d.

17:30―17:50

A Personal Robot for Mechatronic Application Programmers

The
Role of Automatic Storage Reclamation and Programming Languages
in the Lifetime of a Safe Mechatronic System

Roberto Brega, Felix H. Wullschleger
, ETHZ, Switzerland


A software sys
tem can be called a safe
-
system with respect to dynamic
memory,when it supports only strong
-
typing and it doesn’t allow for the manual
disposal of dynamic memory.The first aspect guarantees that untyped,potentially
dangerous operations are caught by the co
mpiler or by run
-
time checks.The second
issue is solved by the utilisation of an automatic memory reclamation scheme,i.e.a
garbage collector. In this paper we present the implementation of these strategies in
the real
-
time operating system XO/2,and how the
y have contributed to the
realisation of the Mobile Mail Distribution System MoPS,developed at the Institute of
Robotics of the ETH Zürich,Switzerland.

Novel Smart Connector for Modular Robotics

Mircea Badescu, Constantinos Mavroidis
, Rutgers University,
USA


This paper presents the concept, design, analytical modeling and experimental
prototype for a new "smart connector", which provides electrical and mechanical
connection between components of a system, specifically robotic modules. The
connector includ
es plug and receptacle components. The plug has a central pin
surrounded by a plurality of lamellae. The lamellae have an end connected to the
base and a free end. A Shape Memory Alloy (SMA) actuator is positioned about the
lamellae of the plug for control
ling the movement of the free end of the lamellae.
The receptacle has a pin housing corresponding to the central pin of the plug.
Additionally, the receptacle includes a plurality of lamellae for mating with the plug
lamellae. Like the plug, the receptacle

includes an SMA actuator for controlling
movement of the receptacle lamellae. The plug lamellae and the receptacle …

17:50―18:10

Design Requirements and Reference Trajectory Generation for a
Copier Paperpath

Carlo Cloet, Masayoshi Tomizuka, Roberto Horowi
tz
, UC Berkeley, USA


This paper presents a new approach to introducing closed loop control in a copier
paperpath in order to achieve robust high
-
speed media handling. The basic idea
exploits periodicity in the relative position of correctly fed sheets and

their
corresponding images. It is shown that the periodic behavior allows to design
polynomial position reference trajectories for sheets as a function of their initial
position error. Only longitudinal position errors are considered. By measuring sheet
p
ositions and using closed loop control to track the reference trajectories position
errors can be successfully removed. In addition to the reference trajectories the
paper also offers a design strategy that minimizes the required paperpath length
while sat
isfying given bounds on sheet velocities and accelerations. Two …



W1A

Flexible Manipulators

Walking Machines


W1B

SALA PLATEA

09:30―11:10

SALA PASTA

Jurek Sasiadek, Canada

CHAIR

Michael McCarthy, USA

Luigi Villani, Italy

CO
-
CHAIR

Raffaele Di Gregorio, Italy

Rest
-
to
-
Rest Motion of a One
-
link Flexible Arm

Alessandro De Luca, Giandomenico Di Giovanni
, Università di Roma "La
Sapienza", Italy


We present a solution to the problem of finding the torque command that provides
rest
-
to
-
rest motion in a given time for a one
-
link flexible arm. The basic idea is to
design an auxiliary output such that the associated transfer function h
as no zeros.
Planning a smooth interpolating trajectory for this output imposes a unique rest
-
to
-
rest motion to the whole arm with automatically bounded link deformation. The
nominal torque is then obtained by inverse dynamics computation in the time
domai
n. The method is presented for a linear model based on the Euler
-
Bernoulli
beam description of the flexible link with dynamic boundary conditions. This
approach lends itself to nonlinear extensions and feedback solutions.

09:30―09:50

Dynamically Stable Tra
jectory Synthesis for a Biped Robot during the
Single
-
Support Phase

S. Marchese, G. Muscato
, Università di Catania, Italy,
G.S. Virk
, University
of Portsmouth, UK


The aim of this paper is to develop an algorithm to generate dynamically stable
walking traj
ectories for a biped robot during the single
-
support phase, which can be
used as reference trajectories for control. The biped is modeled as an
anthropomorphic planar mechanical system of 7 links connected by 6 actuated
rotoidal joints. We want the biped r
obot to move with a human
-
like behavior. In order
to achieve this goal the kinematics and dynamics aspects have been treated
separately. To obtain a human
-
like motion the biped has been regarded as a
redundant manipulator, under the assumption that the sup
porting foot was fixed to
the floor. In particular, the concept of task priority in relation to the inverse …

Rest
-
to
-
Rest Motion of a Two
-
link Robot with a Flexible Forearm

Alessandro De Luca, Giandomenico Di Giovanni
, Università di Roma "La
Sapienza", I
taly


We consider the problem of finding the torque commands that provide rest
-
to
-
rest
motion in a given time for the FLEXARM a two
-
link planar manipulator with a flexible
forearm and nonlinear dynamics. The basic idea is to design a set of two outputs
wit
h respect to which the system has no zero dynamics. Planning smooth
interpolating trajectories for these outputs imposes a unique rest
-
to
-
rest motion to
the whole robot with bounded link deformations. The nominal rest
-
to
-
rest torque is
obtained by standard

inverse dynamics computation. In the multi
-
input nonlinear
case this approach requires in general the use of a dynamic linearizing extension.
Numerical results are presented and possible extensions discussed.

09:50―10:10

Locomotion of LAURON III in Rough
Terrain

Bernd Gaßmann, Kay
-
Ulrich Scholl, Karsten Berns
,
Forschungszentrum
Informatik, Germany


In particular the advantages of legged compared to wheeled locomotion arise in
unstructured, uneven and rough terrain. Based on the sensor system the behaviour
control of LAURONIII for walking in rough terrain is presented in this paper. To cope
with terrain irregularities local behaviours like collision reaction and searching for
ground are realised by an adaptation of the basic leg trajectories. Several global
behaviours like the control of the body height and the centre of gravity influence the
trajectories of all legs simultaneously.

End
-
Point Control of a Flexible
-
Link via Optimal Dynamic Inversion

Aurelio Piazzi
, Università di Parma,
Antonio Visioli
,

Univer
sità di Brescia,
Italy


In this paper we propose a new method for the end
-
point control of a single flexible
link. As a distinguished feature the methodology relies on an exact stable dynamic
inversion analytically performed on a family of output functions
. In this context the
choice of ``transition polynomials'' as output functions permits to optimize the motion
time subject to limits on the velocity and acceleration of the motor. Furthermore the
technique is robust to unmodelled dynamics. Simulation resul
ts show the
effectiveness of the approach.

10:10―10:30

Biomimetic and Smart Technology Principles of Humanoid Design

Darwin G. Caldwell, N. Tsagarakis, P. Artrit, J. Canderle, S. Davis, G.A.
Medrano
-
Cerda
, University of Salford, UK


Humanoid and bipedal robots are complex mechatronic systems requir
ing
developments in mechanical/kinematic design, sensory systems, Artificial
Intelligence, computing, control, communications and actuation/power systems. This
complexity makes their onstruction a substantial challenge for workers in many
branches of scien
ce and engineering and has prompted research inspired by the
success of biological creations. Traditionally such mechanism design has avoided
the use of flexible materials and structures because of the difficulties associated
with operation and control. Ho
wever, it is clear that the light flexible structures and
designs common in nature, might offer many advantages if they could be used
effectively. This paper will initially study the actuation requirements for a …

Adaptive Open
-
Loop Control Method for a

Hydraulically Driven
Flexible Manipulator

Janne Kovanen, Heikki Handroos
, Lappeenranta University of Technology,
Finland


A novel method applicable for the open
-
loop control of hydraulic driven flexible
manipulators is presented. By using a new kind of ad
aptive control function instead
of the traditional open
-
loop control strategies the dynamic behaviour of such
systems can be significantly improved. The adaptive control function is developed
for the open
-
loop control of a log crane equipped with an electr
ically controlled
proportional directional valves and digital control system. The proposed method
utilizes the existing hydraulic components and control hardware of commercially
used log crane. In addition to this, the cylinder position and pressure transd
ucers
are used. The dynamics of manipulator can be determined by studying the …

10:30―10:50

Biomimetic Small Walking Machine

N. Kagawa, H. Kazerooni
, University of California at Berkeley, USA


The goal is to design and construct a biologically inspired, sm
all, robust, and fast
walking machine. This paper explains how two important observations from
cockroaches can be employed as design guidelines to design and build small
walking machines. The first observation is the fact that cockroaches use very little
f
eedback and control results from the properties of their parts and their
morphological arrangement. This observation leads to our hypothesis that a robust
and simple electromechanical walking machine should have implicit feedback
control only within its ha
rdware. The second observation is that the optimal walking
frequency of a cockroach is close to the natural frequency of the cockroach. This
observation leads us to hypothesize that the walking frequency of an
electromechanical cockroach also needs to be t
he natural frequency of the …

Gradient
-
Descent Based Trajectory Planning for Regulation of a Two
-
Link Flexible Robotic Arm

Gülay Öke, Yorgo İstefanopulos
,
Boðaziçi University, Turkey


In the control of flexible manipulators most work in the literature concentrates on the
suppresion of link deformations. In this study the aim is not to suppress the
deflections but to calculate
joint angles to minimize the tip position error. A gradient
descent method is utilized off
-
line for the trajectory planning of a two
-
link flexible
manipulator under gravity. Fuzzy logic control with gravity compensation is applied
for the position control
of the manipulator where the reference inputs are the values
of the joint angles as determined by the trajectory planning procedure. Simulations
have been carried out to show the performance of both the trajectory planning
method and of the fuzzy controlle
r in a regulation problem. Results are illustrated
both in the joint space and in the operational space.

10:50―11:10

An Integrated Approach for Locomotion and Visual Control of a
Service Hexapod via CNNs

P. Arena
, Università di Catania,
M. Branciforte, R.
Caponetto
,
STMicroelectronics,
A. Rizzo, G. Peschiera
,
Università di Messina, Italy


In this paper Cellular Neural Networks (CNN’s) are widely used, both for imaging
processing (classical application) and for generation of locomotion patterns. In
particula
r, a hexapod walking robot is presented. The locomotion patterns are
generated by a RD
-
CNN and a visual serving approach exploiting an external
camera is adopted to control the trajectory.




W1C

Mechatronics Curricula

DES’s in Automated Transportation


W1
D

SALA BIANCA

09:30―11:10

SALA TURCA

Wayne Book, USA

CHAIR

Bart De Schutter, The Netherlands

Paolo Dario, Italy

CO
-
CHAIR

Luca Ferrarini, Italy

The Role of Mechanical Design in Mechatronics Education

John F. Gardner
,

Boise State University, USA


A

survey of Mechatronics course offerings around the United States shows a rich
variety of approaches to this topic. Indeed, it appears that a majority of Mechanical
Engineering programs across the country offer some formal offering in this area and
it seem
s clear that the vast majority of Mechatronics courses are offered through
Mechanical Engineering departments. With the traditional emphasis on design skill
in mechanical engineering, it would seem obvious that mechatronics courses would
feature a major de
sign component. Surprisingly, very few existing mechatronics
courses (at least those reported in the literature) feature a strong emphasis on
mechanical design. That’s is not to say that the creative process of design is not
featured in Mechatronics course
s, because it clearly is. It seems equally clear,
however, that that accepted definition of mechatronics (“…the synergistic …

09:30―09:50

Modeling and Specification of Discrete Event Systems using
Combined Process Algebra and Petri Nets

Petter Falkman, Bengt Lennartson, Michael Tittus
, Chalmers University of
Technology, Sweden


A modeling framework for general routing and resourc
e booking problems is
presented. The task is to specify desired routes for individual objects (products data
packets vehicles) which are to be served by a number of shared resources
(machines computers communication links). Based on simple booking models f
or
the resources and routing specifications for the objects a controller that
synchronizes the objects utilization of the available resources is automatically
generated. A high level language is presented in order to simplify the specification of
desired r
outes. This modeling language combines Petri nets and process algebra.
Process operators are introduced for specification of alternative and …

Mechatronics and Early Mechanical Design

Thomas R. Kurfess
,
Georgia Institute of Technology, USA


The issue tar
geted in this paper is the development of a set of studio projects for a
sophomore level course that integrate mechanical and electrical systems. The paper
discusses the types of projects that can be run and how they are used to foster
mechanical and elect
ronic design. For example issues such as sensor specification
are critical and teach the students how important and sometimes difficult «specing
out» a design can be. From an electronics perspective a simple and an inexpensive
micro
-
controller (the BASIC S
tamp) is used. A variety of pre
-
designed modules are
supplied to the students as well as code snippets to run these devices. The most
interesting part of the paper is the design challenges that are afforded to the
student. These challenges are in the form
of mechanical system design and
implementation in our small scale machine shop located in the studio …

09:50―10:10

Deadlock Avoidance in Automated Guided Vehicle Systems

Maria Pia Fanti, Biagio Turchiano
, Politecnico di Bari, Italy


Automated Guided Vehicl
e Systems (AGVSs) are the most flexible means to
transport pieces among workstations of an Automated Manufacturing System
(AMS). The control of such systems must be in charge of avoiding collisions and
deadlock conditions. The paper formulates a control sc
heme to face this problem. In
particular, some algorithms are proposed to control in real time path assignments to
the vehicles and their moves from zone to zone in the system. A final discussion
compares the proposed approach to other methods offered by t
he recent literature.

Postgraduate and Undergraduate Mechatronics' Courses at the
University of Wollongong

C.D. Cook, F. Naghdy, F. DeBoer
, University of Wollongong, Australia


This paper outlines the University’s involvement with Industry based manufactu
ring
projects, and how this has lead to the recent establishment of postgraduate and
undergraduate Mechatronics degrees. The nature of the industrial projects will be
described with examples of specific problems, test equipment and experimental rigs
given.

This work will be used to explain the reasons for the design of the
mechatronics courses at Wollongong. A new teaching methodology particularly
suitable for mechatronc’s education is also discussed.

10:10―10:30

Modelling Automated Material Handling in Int
ermodal Terminals

Cristiana Degano, Angela Di Febbraro
, Politecnico di Torino, Italy


A model of an intermodal terminal in which freight only arrives and departs stored into

containers is presented in this paper. The container terminal is thought of as div
ided
into areas each one associated with a kind of container handling operation. The
complexity of the system to represent is further increased by the fact that the
material transportation system inside the terminal is (at least) partially automated.
For s
uch a transportation system made up of different kinds of (unmanned) vehicles
a Petri
-
net model is proposed with the objective of regulating its faulty behaviours.
An example relevant to a case study is reported to show a practical application of
the propo
sed model.

Development of Mechatronics Tertiary Education in Six Different Thai
Universities

M.
Yousef Ibrahim
, Monash University, Australia


This paper presents the experience gained from Mechatronics course development
in both Australia and Thailand. It

also presents the educational philosophy adopted
to produce a new breed of engineers. The educational philosophy was based on
engaging industry in course development and subjects delivery. This was to meet
the new Millennium's demands for more intelligent

products. This paper outlines the
mechanism adopted to achieve the course objectives through close industrial
collaboration.

10:30―10:50

Modeling of AS/RS via Coloured Petri Nets

F. Basile, C. Carbone, P. Chiacchio
, Università di Napoli Federico II


In this paper a colored timed Petri net approach to automated storage/retrieval
systems (AS/RSs) modeling is presented. The AS/RS c
onsidered here consists in a
number of rack structures with cranes and shuttles used to transfer pallets from
main buffer stations to rack locations. The model is designed so that it can be used
not only for off
-
line evaluation of a given management strate
gy based on simulation
but also for on
-
line system monitoring and dynamic dispatching control. The plant
model has been decomposed in six modules which communicates via fusion places.
Token colors has been properly defined in order to include information w
hich
completely characterize the pallet and the mission in which it is involved so as to
take into account the communication with a higher level mission dispatcher. In
addition this fact allow us to render completely local any decision about …

A New Appro
ach to Mechatronics Systems Design Using Hardware in
the Loop Simulation

Devdas Shetty
, Univ. of Hartford,
Richard A. Kolk
, United Technologies
Corp.,
Jun Kondo, Claudio Campana
,

Univ. of Hartford, USA


This paper presents an approach to mechatronics syste
m design course, which is
primarily based on a combination of mechanical, electrical and software elements
along with the design and construction of an intelligent mechatronics technology
demonstrator. Topics covered in this course are principles of transd
ucers and
sensors and how to interface them with an external process in a computer
environment. Methods of system modeling, real time interfacing and rapid
prototyping are addressed. Computer interfacing work includes signal conversation,
interface compone
nts, and real time application of computer systems to problems in
manufacturing. The goals of this paper are to describe (1) the University of …

10:50―11:10

Machine Layout Problem in FMS Design

Imen Chaieb, Ouajdi Korbaa, Jean
-
Claude Gentina
, Ecole Central
e de
Lille, France


This paper deals with the transport system design in automated FMS. We describe
the different phases for the design of such a system and explain more in details the
step consisting in laying out machines in a manufacturing cell. The mac
hine layout
problem was treated under several assumptions in the literature, and our
contribution consists in introducing flexibility in the production system illustrated by
the consideration of transformation resources existing in many exemplars. The
posi
tioning of machines is evaluated by the criterion of the minimization of
transportation tasks duration, and formulated as a mixed quadratic problem resolved
by a mathematical solver (CPLEX).



W2A

Service Robots

Human―Machine Interfaces I


W2B

SALA PLATE
A

11:30―13:10

SALA PASTA

Alessandro De Luca, Italy

CHAIR

Akitoshi Itoh, Japan

Peter Putz, The Netherlands

CO
-
CHAIR

Darwin Caldwell, UK

CleaningAssistant


A Service Robot Designed for Cleaning Tasks

Fabrizio Marrone, Matthias Strobel
, FAW Ulm, Germ
any


A new service robot designed for cleaning tasks in home environments is
introduced. Robot systems will work directly with people in these areas thus placing
a central importance on making interactions between people and machines as
natural as possible
. The main focus of this paper is twofold: First an introduction to
the system's design and to an intuitive programming approach which allows the
robot to be easily used by non
-
experts is given. The approach is based on human
gesture recognition and contex
t sensitive interpretation. Second in order to
transform full coverage paths planned in workspace to paths in the robot's
configuration space a closed form solution of the robot's inverse kinematics

11:30―11:50

Dynamic Modeling of Primary Commands for a Ca
r Simulator

A. Frisoli, C.A. Avizzano, M. Bergamasco
, Scuola Superiore Sant’Anna
, S.
Data, C. Santi
, Centro Ricerche Fiat, Italy


Simplified dynamic analytical models of primary commands of a car i.e. steer wheel
and gearshift are identified and developed
in the paper. The dynamic models are
used to design the control law of force feedback devices which will be integrated in
a car simulator. The model simulation results match satisfactorily with the
experimental available data. An experimental partial asses
sment of control law for
the gearshift simulation has been performed with a commercially available force
-
feedback joystick. The gearshift simulation control is implemented with an hybrid
model based on a state machine. The results are presented and discuss
ed.

A Robotic System for Total Knee Replacement

Andrea Malvisi, Maurilio Marcacci, Sandra Martelli
, Istituti Ospedalieri
Rizzoli,
Gianni Campion, Paolo Fiorini
, Università di Verona, Italy


This paper describes a new robot developed specifically for invas
ive orthopedic
surgery. The design has been a cooperative development among physicians and
engineers to achieve the necessary functionality. Target surgery is total knee
replacement and the procedure is integrated with computerized data acquisition and
pat
h planning for off
-
line pre
-
operative planning, and with on
-
line intra
-
operative
real
-
time controls for adjustments during surgery. The paper describes the main
features of the robotic system in terms of me chanical, programming and functional
characterist
ics. The rationale of the design decisions is presented and current
experimental plans are discussed.

11:50―12:10

Modeling of Drivers' Longitudinal Behavior

Johan Bengtsson, Rolf Johansson
, Lund Institute of Technology
, Agneta
Sjögren
,
Volvo Technological
Development Corporation, Sweden


In the last years, many vehicle manufacturers have introduced advance driver
support in some of their automobiles. One of those new features is Adaptive Cruise
Control (ACC), which extends the conventional cruise control sy
stem to control of
relative speed and distance to other vehicles. In order to design an ACC controller it
is suitable to have a model on drivers’ behavior. Our approach to find dynamical
models of the drivers’ behavior was to use system identification. Bas
ic data analysis
was made by means of system identification methodology, and several models of
drivers’ longitudinal behavior are proposed, including both linear regression models
and subspace based models. Detection when a driver is changing his behavior
in
various situations to a deviant behavior is useful. To that purpose a GARCH …

Mental Commit Robot and its Application to Therapy of Children

Takanori Shibata, Teruaki Mitsui
, AIST,
Kazuyoshi Wada
, Tsukuba Univ.,
Akihiro Touda
, Sankyo Aluminum Industry

Co
.,Takayuki Kumasaka,
Kazumi Tagami
, Tsukuba Univ.,
Kazuo Tanie
,

AIST, Japan


This paper describes research on mental commit robot that seeks a different
direction that is not so rigidly dependent on such objective measures as accuracy
speed and cost. Th
e main goal of this research is to explore a new area in robotics
with an emphasis on human
-
robot interaction. In the previous research we
categorized robots into four categories in terms of appearance. Then we introduced
a cat robot and a seal robot and e
valuated them by interviewing many people. The
results showed that physical interaction improved subjective evaluation. Moreover a
priori knowledge of a subject has much influence into subjective interpretation and
evaluation of robot. In this paper 785 su
bjects evaluated the seal robot and the …

12:10
―12:30

A Novel Interactive Robot Soccer System

Dong
-
Soo Kwon, Jun
-
Ho Oh, YoonKeun Kwak, Ju
-
Jang Lee, Jung
-
Hoon
Hwang, Hyung
-
Rock Kim, Jin
-
Woo Lee,
Suk
-
Kwan Hong, Sun
-
Gi Hong
,
KAIST, Korea


A new robot soccer system has been proposed to increase the interac
tion between
the operator and the robot soccer system. The multiple robots are commanded by a
teleoperation function. When a robot is commanded with a joystick other robots are
running by the preprogrammed cooperating strategies. To develop the interactive

robot soccer system robust position/orientation sensing techniques have been
developed. In order to make the teleoperation of the soccer robots more intuitive it is
proposed to use a joystick control w.r.t. ground
-
based coordinates. To allow
wireless and
isolated teleoperation for each playground an infrared communication
system has been adopted. To minimize maintenance a continuous power supply …

Development and Structuring of Mechatronic Systems, Exemplified
by the Modular Vehicle X
-
mobile

M. Zanella,
T. Koch, F. Scharfeld
, Universität Paderborn, Germany


This paper presents an approach to a function
-
oriented structuring of mechatronics
systems, exemplified by means of an autonomous vehicle, the X
-
mobile, including
an active wheel suspension. This vehic
le is a fine example of the design
methodology of mechatronic systems conceived at the MLaP (Mechatronics
Laboratory Paderborn). The design methodology centers around a holistic,
interdisciplinary consideration of all system components involved. The develo
pment
of the X
-
mobile, from early stages to the simulation to the implementation, is also
described. Furthermore, this paper includes more detailed technical information.

12:30―12:50

VGT Turbocharger Controlled by Means of an Adaptive Control
Technique

L. Dambrosio, G. Pascazio, S. De Robertis, B. Fortunato
, Politecnico di
Bari, Italy


This paper provides an adaptive technique for the control of a variable geometry
turbine
in a turbocharged compression ignition engine. The adaptive control is based
on a one
-
step
-
ahead technique and a least square parameter estimator algorithm. In
order to test the performance of the proposed control technique a numerical model of
the engine
has been used which employs a zero
-
dimensional approach. The paper
will show that the one
-
step
-
ahead technique is able to improve dramatically the
control performance with respect to that provided by a commonly applied PID control
technique.

X
-
Ray Guided
Robotic Radiosurgery for Solid Tumors

R.M.C. Bodduluri
, Accuracy Inc.,
J.M. McCarthy
, UC Irvine, USA


This paper presents an verview of the x
-
ray guided robotic radiosurgery system that
has been developed for the ablation of solid tumors. A robot mounted l
inear
accelerator is directed through a sequences of positions and orientations designed
to deliver high radiation dosages at specific locations.Patient movement during
treatment is identified by stereo x
-
ray measurements and the robotic system adjusts
the

linear accelerator prior to the delivery of radiation at each location.The result is
precise delivery with rigid registration of the tumor relative to the treatment system.

12:50―13:10

A Service Robot for Peopled Environments


Finding Lined People
by Ste
reo Vision and Standing in Line


Y. Nakauchi
, National Defense Academy, Japan,
R. Simmons
, Carnegie
Mellon University, USA


Recent research results on mobile robot navigation systems make it promising to
utilize them in service fields. But in order to uti
lize the robot in a peopled
environment, it should recognize and respond to people's social behaviors. In this
paper, we describe a social robot that stands in line as people do. Our system uses
the concept of personal space for modeling a line of people a
nd we have
experimentally measured the actual size of the personal space when people form
lines. The system employs stereo vision to recognize lines of people. We
demonstrate our ideas with a mobile robot navigation system that can purchase a
cup of coffee
, even if people are waiting in line for service.



W2C

Technology Enhanced Teaching

Data Storage Systems


W2D

SALA BIANCA

11:30
―13:10

SALA TURCA

John Gardner, USA

CHAIR

Maurizio Zuffada, Italy

Cesare Fantuzzi, Italy

CO
-
CHAIR

Winncy Du, USA

Graduate Mechatronics Education in the Department of Mechanical
Engineering at the University of Utah

Sanford Meek, Robert Roemer, Mark

Minor
, University of Utah, USA


The Department of Mechanical Engineering at the University of Utah has been a
leader in the development and delivery ofmechatronics education. Firstly we have
developed a basic course that is arequired class for all mechani
cal engineering
students. Secondly we offeran undergraduate Certificate of Mechatronics which
provides a recognitionfor the student of more advanced work in the area. We are
now implementing a graduate certificate program. There are two motivations for a
g
raduate certificate program. First it is intended to be an outreach to working
engineers who do not have the time or need for a full graduate degree. Second it is
part of several graduate certificates that in combination can become the major part
of a Mast
er's Degree. The anticipated result of this approach will be an increase …

11:30―11:50

High
-
Bandwidth Servo Control Designs for Magnetic Disk Drives

Masahito Kobayashi, Shinsuke Nakagawa, Takenori Atsumi, Takashi
Yamaguchi
, Hitachi Ltd., Japan


In order to attain high track density a head must accurately follow position
informati
on recorded on a disk. To achieve high accuracy head positioning disk
drives require increased servo bandwidth. However servo bandwidth is restricted by
the main resonance frequency of an actuator and by the sampling frequency. In this
paper we discuss sev
eral servo technologies for high TPI. First we present the limit
of the servo bandwidth of digital loop
-
shaping servo methods to the mechanical
resonance at which the main resonance frequency of a VCM actuator is 5 kHz and
the sampling time is 30 us. We sh
ow that the 1.5 kHz servo bandwidth can be
attained by using a phase stabilized compensation method. It is also shown that by
using the main resonance pole zero compensation method drawn from H
-
infinity …

Mechatronics Training on Source Separation Analys
is Using a
Gyroscopic Motion of a LEGO’s Robot

Caroline Deltheil, Didier Leandri, Eric Moreau
, ISITV, France,
Yousef
Ibrahim
, Monash University, Australia


This paper demonstrates the educational effectiveness through Mechatronics
experimental setup using
recently
-
made robot by LEGO. The paper also explains
the experimental setup and the Mechatronics educational experience gained by
both students and academic staff. Project
-
based learning of this exercise proved to
be a successful vehicle to motivate studen
ts and achieve the desired educational
objectives.

11:50―12:10

Dynamic Model of a Multiple Disk and Spindle Assembly

Gianni Ferretti
, Politecnico di Milano,
Alberto Furlan
, STMicroelectronics,
GianAntonio Magnani
, Politecnico di Milano,
Giuseppe Maiocchi
,
STMIcroelectronics,
Paolo Rocco
, Politecnico di Mil
ano, Italy


A simplified dynamic model of a multiple disk and spindle assembly is discussed in
this paper. The model is particularly focused at describing the coupling between
spindle and disk motion, therefore it is suitable for the design of a spindle m
otion
control aimed at minimizing the vibrations of the disks. The model has been
validated by comparison of the resonance frequencies obtained by simulation with
experimental results, available in the literature

Remotely Operated Experiment for Mechatron
ics: Monitoring of DCS
on the Internet

K.K.
Tan, T.H. Lee, C.Y. Soh
,

National University of Singapore, Singapore


This paper presents the development of an internet
-
based system to allow
monitoring of important process variables from a distributed control
system (DCS).
The system is formulated as an add
-
on to an undergraduate experiment on the
development of a desktop DCS. This paper describes the hardware and software
design considerations which facilitate the users to access the process variables on
the D
CS, remotely and effectively, using only a commonly available web browser.

12:10―12:30

Track
-
following and Seek/settle Control Schemes for High Density
Disk Drives with Dual
-
stage Actuators

Lin Guo, JyeKai Chang, Xiaoping Hu
, Maxtor Corporation, USA


Advan
ced track following and seek/settle schemes for high density hard disk drives
with dual
-
stage actuators are presented. A decoupled master
-
slave loop structure
has been designed for a dual loop system with suspension based piezoelectric
micro
-
actuators. Exp
eriments show significant performance improvements of the
dual
-
actuator system over the conventional single loop servo system. A new settle
scheme for dual
-
stage servo system is also designed using a dual
-
loop initial value
compensation (DIVC) scheme. Expe
rimental results shown dramatic improvement
of settle time using this new scheme.

Internet Access to a Fluid Power Mechatronics Laboratory

Wayne J. Book, Matthew D. Rouse, Kyle Koeppen
, Georgia Institute of
Technology, USA


System dynamics is a course tha
t needs physical experiments to realistically
represent behaviors of mechatronic systems to students. This paper describes how
experiments in fluid power for motion control can be provided over the internet. A
hydraulic system was chosen because this impor
tant example is absent from hands
on experiments in traditional laboratories. Internet access allows the equipment to
be fully utilized without the expense, hazards or scheduling conflicts otherwise
encountered. The system and its software are described an
d representative results
from experiments are shown.

12:30―12:50

Use of MEMS Based Accelerometers in Hard Disk Drives

Roberto Oboe
,
Università di Padova, Italy


In this paper we describe the use of MEMS based accelerometers for the
compensation of the effects of self
-
induced and external vibrations in commer
cial
Hard Disk Drives (HDDs). Using a formal analysis on the HDD mechanics, the
effects of a generic roto
-
translation of the HDD on the head position are evaluated.
It is also shown that such effects can be compensated by using a feed forward
compensation
which makes use of a weighted sum of the signals provided by a pair
of linear and one rotational accelerometer, properly placed on the HDD's body. As
for the rotational acceleration, this has been obtained by using a recently developed
MEMS
-
based, low cost

rotational accelerometer. Experimental results presented
here show that a 20 dB reduction on a commercial HDD can be achieved with a
simple, variable gain feedforward compensator. Effective reduction is achieved …

An Integrated Studio Approach to Teachi
ng Basic Electronics to First
Year Mechatronics Degree Students

Robin Sarah Bradbeer
, City University of Hong Kong, PRC


The introduction of studio teaching at City University of Hong Kong allowed for a
comparative study of the benefits of this form of tea
ching. A four
-
year longitudinal
study was carried out using the Introductory Electronics courses designed for First
Year Mechatronic Engineering degree students. A similar group in the same
department studying Manufacturing Engineering was used as a contro
l. It has been
shown during preliminary analysis of the data that students using the teaching
studio approach acquire a deeper understanding of the subject as well as achieving
better grades than those students using the more traditional approaches.

12:50―13:10

Simulator for Single Stage and Dual Stage Hard Disk Drives

Roberto Oboe, Alessandro Beghi, Paolo Capretta
, Università di Padova,
Francesco Chrappan Soldavini
, STMicroelectronics, Italy


In this paper we describe a simulator for the evaluation o
f the performance of
different control algorithms and strategies, applied to Hard Disk Drives (HDD) with
Single Stage (SSA) and Dual Stage Actuators (DSA). In order to perform realistic
simulations, each part of the HDD must be described with high level of

detail. As for
the mechanics, the usual inertia plus resonance model of the Voice Coil Motor
(VCM) has been enriched with non
-
linear friction modeling and, in case of DSA, with
the dynamic coupling between primary and secondary actuator. The non
-
linear
fr
iction model has been tuned on experimental data, using an experimental system
presented in the paper. As for the electronics, the VCM driver model is included and
quantizations in Position Error Signal (PES) measurement and computation …



W3A

Robotic Man
ipulation in Space

Human
―Machine Interfaces II


W3B

SALA PLATEA

15:30―16:50

SALA PASTA

Steven Dubowsky, USA

CHAIR

Tzyh
-
Jong Tarn, USA

Véronique Perdereau, France

CO
-
CHAIR

Dong
-
Soo Kwon, Korea

Space Robotics


Driver for a New Mechatronic Generation of Light
-
Weight Armas

and Multifingered Hands

G. Hirzinger, J. Butterfa
β
, M. Grebenstein, M. Hähnle, I. Schäfer, N.
Sporer
, DLR, Germany


Based on the longterm goal «robonauts for space» the paper describes recent
design and development efforts in DLR`s robotics lab towards a
new generation of
«mechatronic» ultra
-
light weight robots with articulated hands. The design of fully
sensorized joints with complete state feedback and the underlying mechanisms are
outlined. The second light
-
weight arm generation is available now; in the

same way
the second generation a most highly integrated 4 finger
-
hand is near completion.
Thus it is hoped that big steps towards a new generation of space as well as service
and personal robots have been achieved.

15
:30―15:50

Obstacle Avoidance Methods for a Passive Haptic Display

Davin K. Swanson, Wayne J. Book
, Georgia Institute of Technology, USA


An existing two degree
-
of
-
freedom passive haptic display is used to perform
obstacle avoidance tasks. Two types of cont
rollers are examined. One attempts to
control the velocity direction of the display's handle in order to guide the user around
obstacles. The other controller selectively kinematically constrains the device to a
single degree of freedom. The inherent passi
vity constraint of the haptic display
imposes performance limitations on the two controllers.

Fuzzy and Optimal Control of Two
-
Link Flexible Manipulator

Anthony Green, Jurek Z. Sasiadek
, Carleton University, Canada


A Linear quadratic Gaussian (LQG) strat
egy control a two
-
link flexible robot
manipulator tracking a two
-
dimensional square trajectory 12.6m x 12.6m. Slew
angles together with Gaussian white process and white or non
-
white measurement
noise are fed into an LQG regulator (Kalman filter). The FLC s
trategy incorporates
two fuzzy controllers substituted for the LQR state
-
space dynamics equations.
Trajectories were obtained for the LQG strategy with Gaussian white and non
-
white
measurement noise. The trajectory obtained for white measurement noise clos
ely
approaches a perfect square while those obtained for non
-
white measurement noise
deviate. The trajectory obtained with the FLC strategy is similar to that for LQG with
white measurement noise. Fuzzy control is found to provide robustness in operation
a
nd be constructed with less mathematical complexity than LQG. The deviation …

15
:50―16:10

A Motion Base with 6 Degrees of Freedom by Parallel Cable Drive
Architecture

Satoshi Tadokoro, Rie Murata, Toshiyuki Matsushima
, Kobe University,
Yoshio Murao, Hideaki Kohkawa
, Taiyo Ltd., Japan,
Manfred Hiller
,
Gerhard
-
Mercator
-
Universität Duisb
urg, Germany


This paper proposes a new type of motion base for virtual sensation of acceleration.
Its architecture is the parallel cable
-
driven mechanism. It expresses outstanding
advantages in comparison with conventional Stewart plarform architecture
es
pecially on duration of virtual acceleration sensation. Optimal mechanism design
is performed from the viewpoint of kinematics. Simulation results show that the
WARP mechanism consisting of 3
-
3
-
2 cable configuration is one of the best designs
as a motion b
ase. The prototype developed has the maximum motion range of
translation +
-
0.45m x +
-
0.4m x 1.1m and of rotation +
-
45 deg in roll angle …

Position/Force Control of an Arm/Gripper System for Space
Manipulation

L. Biagiotti, C. Melchiorri, G. Vassura
, Unive
rsità di Bologna, Italy


In advanced robotics applications,as those foreseen in space,some degree of
dexterity and autonomy is necessary in order execute tasks in unstructured
environments.For this purpose besides the kinematic con .guration of the device
other basic issues are the sensorial equipment and proper control trategies. This
paper present an experimental activity for the validation of a robotic gripper for
space applications. In particular the project foresees the compatibility of the gripper
wit
h the EUROPA arm,developed by ASI and Tecnospazio. Main key points of the
gripper design are the wide working pace compared with its physical dimensions
and the capability to deal with free
-
flying objects in no
-
gravity conditions.This
capability i achieved

by using proximity and force/torque ensor and by properly …

16:10―16:30

Adaptive Image Servo Controller for Robot
-
assisted Diagnostic
Ultrasound

P.
Abolmaesumi, M.R. Sirouspour, S.E. Salcudean, W.H. Zhu
, University
of British Columbia, Canada


A robot
-
ass
isted system for medical diagnostic ultrasound has been developed by
the authors. An ultrasound image servo controller has already been proposed and
implemented in [1, 2] to automatically compensate, through robot motions,
unwanted motions in the plane of
the ultrasound beam. This paper presents an
adaptive image servo controller to enhance the performance of the ultrasound
image servo controller. To increase safety, the control is shared between the
operator and the image controller. The stability and accu
racy of the system is
illustrated through different experiments.

Synthesis of Impedance Control for Complex Co
-
operating Robot
Assembly Task

Dragoljub Surdilovic
, IPK, Germany
, Francesco Grassini, Maurizio De
Bartolomei
, Tecnospazio SpA, Italy


This paper

describes the algorithms for the synthesis of the impedance control in
industrial robots at servo and higher motion planning and programming control
levels. These algorithms are realized in the SPARCO control system, providing a
powerful impedance control

framework for executing various contact tasks with
industrial robots. For new contact tasks, the SPARCO provides the possibility to
adjust the impedance control gain to the specific robot and control task
(environment), as well as to combine elemental com
mands and high
-
level contact
control actions in order to program a new robot application. The paper describes an
automatic procedure for the reliable robust impedance control design ensuring …

16
:30―16:50

Force Detectable Surface Covers for Humanoid Robots

Hiroyasu Iwata, Hayato Hoshino, Toshio Morita, Shigeki Sugano
, Waseda
University, Japan


In this paper, we herein describe force detectable surface covers for humanoid
robots to realize naturall
y physical interaction with humans. The covers can detect
various tactile and force information, such as accurate external force vector and
contact positions, from a widely range of the robot body surface. First, a basic
surface cover structure composed of

a force
-
torque sensor and several touch
sensors is proposed. Next, we present a design method to implement such a cover
structure onto dual arms of an actual humanoid robot. Finally, from basic
experiments for verifying the characteristics of the proposed

force
-
detectable surface
cover systems, it was confirmed that high measurement accuracy of a contact
position and force vector is accomplished. In addition, from an application …








W3C

Mechatronics Applications

Fault Detection


W3D

SALA BIANCA

15:
30―16:50

SALA TURCA

Roland Siegwart, Switzerland

CHAIR

Rolf Joahnasson, Sweden

Jean
-
Claude Gentina, France

CO
-
CHAIR

Francesco Basile, Italy

Automated, Integrated Modules for Fluid Handling, Thermal Cycling
and Purification of DNA Samples for High T
hroughput Sequencing
and Analysis

Deirdre R. Meldrum
, University of Washington,
William H. Pence, Stephen
E. Moody, David L. Cunningham
, Orca Photonic Systems,
Mark Holl
,
University of Washington,
Peter J. Wiktor
, Engineering Arts
, Mohan Saini,

Matthew P.
Moore, Ling
-
Sheng Jang, Molly Kidd, Charles Fisher, Andrew
Cookson
, University of Washington, USA


Over the past 5 years the Genomation Laboratory at the University of Washington
has developed an automated fluid handling system called "Acapella" to prepare

microliter reactions for genome analysis. Reactions such as restriction enzyme
digests, polymerase chain reactions (PCRs), and sequencing reactions are …

15:30―15:50

Coulomb and Viscous Friction Fault Detection with Application to a
Pneumatic Actuator

W.B
. Dunbar, R.A. de Callafon, J.B. Kosmatka
, UC San Diego, USA


Generally fault detection is the process of monitoring a physical dynamic system
accompanied by confirmation and assessment of any degradation of system
performance. These systems are modelled a
nd terms that are representative of a
specific fault are identified and monitored for detection. In this paper a fault
detection algorithm is developed to isolate and detect friction changes in a high
precision positioning mechanism. The designed fault det
ection algorithm addresses
dynamic model estimation dynamic filtering and recursive parameter estimation
techniques to monitor on
-
line friction changes. The procedure is illustrated on a high
precision servo pneumatic cylinder that drives a translational a
ir bearing apparatus
designed to permit the addition of friction. Side loading of the cylinder rod …

Control of Bioconvection and Its Mechanical Application

Akitoshi Itoh, Hideki Toida
, Tokyo Denki University, Japan


High
-
density culture medium of protozo
a autonomously generates bioconvection
because of its property of negative gravitaxis and of its density heavier than the
culture medium. Many species of protozoa also have the property of negative
galvanotaxis. Therefore, this study aims to control bio
-
co
nvection by applying the
electrical field and to apply bioconvection for the energy source or the mechanical
power source. In this study, downward flow of bio
-
convection was controlled by the
negative electrode allay installed on the top plate. The results

show that the position
of the downward flow can be controlled by this system. As an example of the
mechanical application, small seesaw was continuously driven by the controlled
downward flow.

15:50―16:10

Fault Detection for Wheeled Mobile Robots with Par
ametric
Uncertainty

W.E. Dixon
, Oak Ridge National Laboratory,
I.D. Walker, D.M. Dawson
,
Clemson University, USA


In this paper we develop a new method for Wheeled Mobile Robot (WMR) fault
detection. Specifically we develop kinematic and dynamic models of
the WMR in the
presence of faults such as a change in the wheel radius (e.g. deformation broken
spoke flat tire) or general kinematic disturbances that model slipping or skidding
faults. Utilizing the WMR models we employ a torque filtering technique to de
velop a
prediction error based fault detection residual. The structure of the prediction error
allows for fault detection despite parametric uncertainty in the WMR model.

In
-
Pipe Inch
-
Worm Pneumatic Flexible Robot

A. Manuello Bertetto, M. Ruggiu
, Universi
tà di Cagliari, Italy


A pneumatic flexible robot prototype for pipes inspection was built. A dynamic model
which takes into account the flexibility, damping and friction was developed.
Numerous experiments were carried out in order to characterize the rob
ot and in
order to provide the input for the numerical model. The model was validated by
comparing the experimental and numerical robot gait in time. The robot motion for
different pipes network geometry is presented.

16:10―16:30

Minimal Resource Allocatin
g Networks for Aircraft SFDIA

Mario L. Fravolini
, Università di Perugia, Italy
, Giampiero Campa, Marcello
Napolitano
, West Virginia University, USA,
Yongkyu Song
,
Hankuk
Aviation University
, Korea


This paper presents an on
-
line learning approach for the p
roblem of sensor failure
detection, identification and accommodation (SFDIA) for aircraft systems using
Neural Networks (NNs). The SFDIA scheme exploits the analytical redundancy of
the system to provide sensor validation capability to a measurement device

by
employing learning NNs as on
-
line non
-
linear approximators. In the context of online
learning some issues are of critical importance as learning speed, number of
parameters to be updated, and stability of the learning algorithm. To address these
proble
ms a Minimal Resource Allocating Network (MRAN) is proposed featuring a
fully tuned Radial Basis Functions (RBF). The purpose of this study is to evaluate …

A Time
-
Delayed Dynamic Inversion Scheme for Mechatronic Control
of Hydraulic Systems

Klaus Six, T
y A. Lasky, Bahram Ravani
, University of California at Davis,
USA


A method is presented for robust control of hydraulic systems. Hydraulic systems
with high
-
fidelity electronic control are considered as a special class of mechatronic
systems where mechani
cal motion is achieved using hydraulic actuation. In this
paper such systems are referred to as hydrotronic systems. A control system is
presented for such systems consisting of hybrid position/force control where the
outer
-
loop position control is based o
n Time
-
Delay Control for robust and simplified
dynamic inversion for a nonlinear system. Simulation results are presented that
show advantages of the new method as compared to other methods reported in the
literature.

16:30―16:50

Fault Diagnosis for Nonlin
ear Mechanic Systems

Vladimir V. Filaretov, Alexey N. Zhirabok, Sergey A. Usoltsev
, Far Eastern
State Technical University, Russia


The problem of observer
-
based fault diagnosis in mechatronic systems is studied.
To solve this problem, the following approa
ch is suggested: replacing the initial
nonlinear system by certain linear logic
-
dynamic system, obtaining the bank of linear
logic
-
dynamic observers, and transforming these observes into the nonlinear ones.















W4A

Vehicles and Space Exploration

Mobile Robots


W4B

SALA PLATEA

17:10―18:30

SALA PASTA

Claudio Melchiorri, Italy

CHAIR

Tim Salcudean, Canada

Evangelos Papadopoulos, Greece

CO
-
CHAIR

Giovanni Muscato, Italy

Advanced Mechatronics in ESA's Space Robotics Developments

G. Visentin, M.

Van Winnendael, P. Putz
, European Space Technology
Center, The Netherlands


Space robots are driven by requirements for high performance and versatility under
extreme constraints of low mass, low energy consumption, and few interaction
possibilities with
supervising humans. This necessitates high degrees of
miniaturisation and autonomy. The paper gives an overview of advanced
mechatronic solutions for novel space robot systems in a variety of applications:
small robot arms for operation on a Space Station
or on planets; various concepts of
mobility on the Moon, Mars, or Mercury; penetrating or drilling systems for
subsurface investigations; micro satellites circling a Space Station and flying robots
exploring extreme topologies on Mars.

17:10―17:30

Optimal
Flow Control for AUV Networks

Joseph T. Napoli, T.J. Tarn
, Washington University in Saint Louis, USA


This paper presents a procedure for constructing controllers that limit and route
information flow in Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV) networks. Partic
ular
attention is paid to the objectives of maximizing throughput and bandwidth efficiency
while minimizing power consumption. Both a finite and infinite time horizon problem
are formulated and solved for unique, piecewise continuous optimal controllers. I
n
the infinite time case, a receding horizon system is adopted and a stability result for
it is presented.

Development of a Multiagent Robotic System With Application to
Space Exploration

E.J.P. Earon, T.D. Barfoot, G.M.T. D'Eleuterio
, University of Toron
to,
Canada


A concept network of autonomous mobile robots intended to carry out tasks related
to planetary space exploration is described. Many aspects of the system have been
fashioned to make the transition from simulation to hardware as seamless as
poss
ible. Representative space exploration tasks are outlined followed by brief
descriptions of the hardware and control. One specific task deploying an array of
sensors for network science is used as an example. Technical challenges and
preliminary experiment
al results are discussed. The benefits of using a simulator
and hardware to develop controllers are found to be complementary.

17
:30―17:50

Detection of Stair Dimensions for the Path Planning of a Bipedal
Robot

Amos Albert, Michael Suppa, Wilfried Gerth, Univ. Hannover, Germany


This paper deals with the detection of the characteristics of stairs i.e. the number of
steps the step hei
ght and the step width for online path planning of a bipedal robot.
For the construction of a multi purpose mobile platform for service robot applications
with special respect to the human environment a biped seems to be more
advantageous than a wheel base
d robot. In the framework of our studies the bipedal
robot BARt
-
UH has been built and walking as well as the climbing of stairs have
been realized. The environment of the robot is assumed to be structured consisting
of flat surfaces and stairs but not know
n in advance. Therefore a state transition
algorithm for intelligent path planning of the robot is suggested. Further a stereo
vision module with a line laser is considered in order to detect the stair …

Lightweight Hyper
-
redundant Binary Elements for Pla
netary
Exploration Robots

Vivek A. Sujan, Matthew D. Lichter, Steven Dubowsky
, MIT, USA


This paper presents the design of a new lightweight, hyper
-
redundant, deployable
Binary Robotic Articulated Intelligent Device (BRAID), for space robotic systems.
The
BRAID element is intended to meet the challenges of future space robotic
systems that need to perform more complex tasks than are currently feasible. It is
lightweight, has a high degree of freedom and a large workspace. The device is
based on embedded mus
cle type binary actuators and flexure linkages. Such a
system may be used for a wide range of tasks, and requires minimal control
computation and power resources.

17
:50―18:10

Modeling of Mobile Manipulators on Irregular Terrain and Evaluation
of Disturbance Torques

Masatoshi Hatano
, Toyama University,
Mamoru Minami
, Fukui University,
Tsuyoshi Ohsumi, Haruki Obara
, Toyama University, Japan


In the present research we p
ropose a model of a dynamic mobile manipulator
traveling on irregular terrain and evaluate disturbance torques caused by irregular
terrain. Terrain irregularities exist even in structures such as the man
-
made floors of
factories and buildings. When a mobil
e manipulator's hand is required to operate
precisely while traveling on irregular terrain it is subject to disturbance torques
caused by traveling across such terrain. Therefore a compensation method of
decreasing control errors caused by disturbances due

to terrain must be considered.
In this paper a model of a dynamic mobile manipulator traveling on irregular terrain
is formulated with traveling states and constraint conditions …

Model Predictive Control of an Autonomous Vehicle

B. Kim, D. Necsulescu
, U
niversity of Ottawa,
J. Sasiadek
, Carleton
University, Canada


This paper presents model predictive control of an autonomous vehicle. Simulation
and experimental results have been shown and compared with input
-
output
linearization method. The results obtai
ned show that the MPC is an efficient method
that allows for accurate control and navigation of an autonomous vehicle. Model
based predictive control is tested in simulations for motion on an inclined plane. This
is done to prepare future work regarding th
e avoidance of the violation of the
smoothness condition for exact linearization, while at the same time by modifying
the input commands the geometric path planning results are conserved. The
approach is presented for the wheel
-
ground slippage and tip
-
over

avoidance of the
three
-
wheeled vehicle for inclined plane motion. A complete three
-
dimensional …

18:10―18:30

Robot Motion Control in Dynamic Environments

I.V. Miroshnik, K.A. Sergeev
, State Institute of Fine Mechanics and Optics,
Russia


The paper concern
s trajectory problems for stationery, platform
-
mounted or mobile
robots interacting with moving external objects. A new task oriented model of spatial
motion in mobile environments is obtained and nonlinear control lawas based on
geometric methodologies of

the theory of nonlinear and MIMO systems are
designed.















W4C

Micro Technology

Planning and Navigation


W4D

SALA BIANCA

17:10―18:30

SALA TURCA

Bahram Ravani, USA

CHAIR

Ian Walker, USA

Gabriele Vassura, Italy

CO
-
CHAIR

Norberto Pires, Portugal

Object Conveyance System ″Magic Carpet″ Consisting of 64 Linear
Actuators


Object Position Feedback Control with Object Posit
ion
Estimation


Hichirousai Oyobe, Yoichi Hori
, University of Tokyo, Japan


A novel object transfer system named Magic Carpet composed of linear actuator
array and driven by autonomous decentralized type control algorithm is proposed.
An object is manipul
ated by a large number of contact points with many actuators
which differs from conventional systems like belt conveyor. In this paper the control
algorithm for such distributed manipulation is proposed. Due to recent development
of micromachine technology

distributed manipulation becomes more important. This
system has a big advantage in its fault tolerance because it has a lot of actuators
with poor performance to move a large heavy object. However it has a serious
wiring problem to be solved and homogene
ous structure should be introduced …

17:1
0―17:30

Building an Environment Map Using a Sweeping System Based on a
Single Ultrasonic Sensor

Nouara Achour, Redouane Toumi
, Algiers Univ. of Technology, Algeria


In this paper, we present an efficient and cheap approach to build a sonar based
mapping fo
r autonomous mobile robot in indoor environments. The system uses one
ultrasonic sensor (Emitter and receiver are separated) mounted on a motorization
constituted by two motors allowing a horizontal and vertical scanning. The reading is
modelled as probabi
lity profiles projected on a two
-
dimensional map. These
readings provide information’s concerning empty and occupied areas in the sensor
cone. The world is modelled as a grid of cells. Using raster
-
based approach to
computer graphic, we determine the cells

of the area occupied by the sensor cone.
The map can be used to plan paths and for landmark recognition. Results from
actual runs are presented at the end.

Coarse/Fine Motion Control of a Teleoperated Autonomous
Piezoelectric Nanopositioner Operating und
er a Microscope

Antoine Ferreira, Jean
-
Guy Fontaine
, ENSIB, France


A small “intelligent” autonomous multidegree of freedom mobile nanopositioner is
presented. It is controlled and operated remotely through a graphical user interface
for coarse and fine po
sitioning under a microscope. The motion principle of the
mobile piezoelectric platform actuated by ultrasonic piezo
-
legs is presented. Its on
-
board control architecture comprises power, motion controllers, sensors and IR
communication interface. In order
to operate under the field of view of a microscope,
a motion strategy based on on
-
board controllers and remote semi
-
automatic
operation has been adopted in order to provide coarse and fine positioning. The
closed
-
loop position schemes are theoretically con
sidered and their results are
demonstrated and evaluated in practice. Evaluations of experimental …

17:30―17:50

The Agoraphilic Algorithm: A New Optimistic Approach for Mobile
Robot Navigation

M.
Yousef Ibrahim, L. McFetridge
, Monash
University, Australia


This paper presents a summary of research which is recently conducted at Monash
University
-

Gippsland Campus. The objective of this research project is to develop
a new efficient methodology for mobile robot navigation. The new optimistic
algorithm is ba
sed on free space attraction rather than looking for obstacles to
avoid. It utilizes a single attractive force generated by the surrounding local free
-
space as opposed to the classical APF whereby attractive and repulsive forces are
employed. Adaptive Fuzz
y Logic is then utilized to limit the `free
-
space' force so as
to promote the movement toward the goal. To demonstrate the algorithms ability
several simulations plus some preliminary experimental results are presented.

Study on Turning Motion of Micro Ro
bot Driven by Cyclic Force

Kiyoshi Ioi
, Kinki University, Japan


This paper deals with the turning motion mechanism of a brush
-
type micro robot
using cyclic centrifugal forces. Many wheeled robots usually turn along the
tangential velocity generated by the
ir rolling wheels. The micro robot studied here
has a turning property different from usual wheeled mobile robots. To realize the
micro mobile robot, the mechanism accompanied with many brush legs has been
often applied so far. However, the turning motion
mechanics has not been clarified.
This paper clarifies the mechanics. First, We derive a two
-
dimensional rolling model
of the brush
-
type robot driven by cyclic centrifugal forces, and indicate the existence
of the lateral force acting toward the robot by t
he computer simulation and the
simple mathematical analysis. Next, to confirm the turning motion mechanics
caused by the lateral force, we obtain many experimental results of the circular …

17:50―18:10

New Concept of Visibility Tetrahedra for Fast Robot Mo
tion Planning

Miguel Hernando, Ernesto Gambao
, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid,
Spain


Currently new applications of robots outside the known and fixed environment of a
factory will increase the need for these planners. In this situations it will be
nece
ssary to cope with very variable and complex environments and with the direct
human interaction. A new approach for n degrees of freedom robot motion planning
based on the concept of the Visibility Tetrahedra and the use of Genetic Algorithms
combined with

local search methods is presented in this paper. The proposed
approach has been successfully tested over several selected experiments obtaining
fast planning even for complex situations.

In
-
contact Dynamics of Atomic Force Microscopes

Osamah M. El Rifai,

Kamal Youcef
-
Toumi
, MIT, USA


This paper demonstrates and explains the great impact scan parameters and
cantilever properties have on the dynamics of atomic force microscopes (AFM) and
hence its performance. Results show that when operating in Air and in
-
contact with
hard samples modal damping is a strong function of contact force set
-
point and
amplitude of disturbance i.e. sample surface topography. Small amplitudes and
large set
-
points result in lower damping. In addition a large contact force can result

in damage to the sample and increase friction force between probe and sample.
Further cantilevers with long probes result in pole
-
zero flipping possibly due to the
compliance of the probe being comparable to that of the cantilever. These large
changes in
the dynamics of the AFM impose a challenge on its feedback system. It
requires a controller that provides robust performance to ensure high
-
fidelity of …

18:10―18:30

An Outdoor Navigation System Using GPS and Inertial Platform

S. Panzieri
, Università di Ro
ma Tre,
F. Pascucci
, Università di Roma "La
Sapienza",
G. Ulivi
,
Università di Roma Tre,
Italy


The use of Global Positioning System (GPS) in outdoor localization is a quite
common solution in large environments where no other references are available and
positioning requirements are not so pressing. Of course fine motion without the use
of an expensive differential device is not an easy task even now that available
precision has been greatly improved as the military encoding has been removed. In
this paper

we present a localization algorithm based on Kalman filtering that tries to
fuse information coming from an inexpensive single GPS with inertial and
sometimes uncertain map based data. The algorithm is able to produce an
estimated configuration for the ro
bot that can be successfully fed back in a
navigation system leading to a motion whose precision is only related to current …
information quality.














AUTHORS INDEX


A


Abolmaesumi, P.

................................
.....


W3B

Achour, N.

................................
...............


W4D

Adamini, R.

................................
..............


T2A

Agbanhan
, J.

................................
...........


M2B

Aicardi, M.

................................
...............


M4A,M4A

Aiyama, Y.

................................
...............


T4A

Albert, A.

................................
.................


W4B

Allotta, B.

................................
.................


M2D,M2D,T2B

Amati, N.

................................
.................


T3C

Ando, N.

................................
..................


M1B,M3B

Angeles, J.

................................
..............


M1A

Angioli, F.

................................
................


T2B

Antonelli, G.

................................
.............


T1A

Antoniadis, I.

................................
...........


T3B

Arai, F.

................................
.....................


T3A

Arai, T.

................................
.....................


M2B
,M3A

Arao, M.

................................
...................


T1B

Arena, P.

................................
.................


W
1B

Arras, K.

................................
..................


M3B

Arteaga, M.A.

................................
..........


T2A

Artrit, P.

................................
...................


W1B

Asakura, T.

................................
..............


M2B

Asama, H.

................................
...............


M4C

Atsumi, T.

................................
................


W2D

Avizzano, C.A.

................................
.........


W2B


B


Badescu, M.

................................
............


T4C

Baeten, J.

................................
................


T4A

Baidyk, T.N.

................................
.............


T1B

Barfoot, T.D.

................................
............


W4A

Basile, F.

................................
.................


W1D

Beghi, A.

................................
..................


T4B,W2D

Bengtsson, J.


................................
..........


W2B

Bergamasco, M.

................................
......


W2B

Berns, K.

................................
.................


W1B

Bertram, T.

................................
..............


M3D

Biagiotti, L.

................................
..............


W3A

Bielecki, T.

................................
...............


M3D

Bisogni, M.

................................
..............


T1B

Bodduluri, R.M.C.

................................
....


W2A

Bok, S.H.

................................
.................


M2C

Bona, B.

................................
..................


M4A

Bonfatti, F.

................................
...............


T3D

Bonfè, M.

................................
.................


T3D

Book, W.J.

................................
...............


M1B,W2C,W3B

Boulenger, Y.

................................
..........


T1C

Br
adbeer, R.S.

................................
........


W2C

Branciforte, M.

................................
.........


W1B

Brega, R.

................................
.................


M3B,T4D

Breglio, G.


................................
...............


M4C

Bruni, S.

................................
..................


M2D

Brusa, E.

................................
.................


T3C

Bu, F.

................................
.......................


T2C

Burton, R.

................................
................


M4D

Butterfa
β
, J
.

................................
.............


W3A



C


Caccavale, F.

................................
..........


M4A

Cai, L.

................................
......................


T1B

Calabrò, A.

................................
..............


M4C

Caldwell, D.G.

................................
.........


W1B

Callegari, M.

................................
............


M4D,T2A

Campa, G.

................................
...............


W3D

Campana, C.

................................
...........


W1C

Campion, G.

................................
............


W2A

Canderle J.

................................
..............


W1B

Canelli, N.

................................
................


M3A

Cannella, F.

................................
.............


T2A

Caponetto, R.

................................
..........


W1B

Capretta, P.

................................
.............


T4B,W2D

Carbone, C.

................................
.............


W1D

Carreras, C.

................................
.............


T3A

Carrozza, M.C.

................................
........


M3A

Casalino, G.

................................
.............


M4A,M4A

Cavallo, A.

................................
...............


T3B

Ceccarelli, M.

................................
...........


M2A

Chaieb, I.

................................
.................


W1D

Chang, J.

................................
.................


W2D

Charalambides, P.G.

...............................


M3C

Chen, C.L..

................................
..............


M1C

Chen, I
-
M.

................................
................


M1A

Chen, J.H.

................................
...............


M1B

Chen, Y.

................................
..................


T1B

Ch
eng, C.C.

................................
.............


M1B

Chiacchio, P.

................................
...........


W1D

Chiaverini, S.

................................
...........


T1A

Chiu, G.T.
-
C.

................................
...........


M1C,T2C

Choudhuri, S.

................................
..........


M3C

Chrappan Soldavini, F.

............................


T4B,W2D

Chung,Y.
-
H.

................................
.............


M2A

Cloet, C.

................................
..................


T4D

Colla, V.

................................
...................


M2D

Collina, A.

................................
................


M2D

Cook, C.D.

................................
...............


W1C

Cookson, A.

................................
.............


W3C

Croft, E.A.

................................
................


T2C

C
ucè, A.

................................
...................


T1B

Cunningham, D.L.

................................
..


W3C

Cusano, A.

................................
...............


M4C

Cutolo, A.

................................
.................


M4C


D


Daerden, F.

................................
.............


T3C

Dambrosio, L.

................................
..........


W2B

D’Amico, A.

................................
..............


T1B

Dario, P.

................................
..................


M3A

Data, S.

................................
...................


1070

Davis, S.

................................
..................


W2B

Dawson, D.M.

................................
..........


W3D

De Bartolomei, M.

................................
....


W3A

DeBoer, F.

................................
...............


W1C

de Callafon, R.A
.

................................
.....


W3D

Degano, C.

................................
..............


W1D

De Kruif, B.J.

................................
...........


M3B




D’Eleuterio, G.M.T.

................................
..


W4A

Delli Colli, V.

................................
............


T1C

Deltheil, C.

................................
...............


W2C

De Luca, A.

................................
.............


T4C,W1A,W1A

De Maria, G.

................................
............


T3B

De Meter, E.C.

................................
........


M3C

Demeulenaere, B.

................................
...


T3C

Deng Z.
-
G.

................................
..............


M3B

De Robertis, S.

................................
........


W2B

De Schutte
r, B.

................................
........


M1D

De Schutter, J.

................................
........


T3C,T4A

de Silva, C.W.

................................
.........


M4B,M4B,M4B

De Vries T.J.A.

................................
........


M3B

Diana, F.

................................
..................


M1D

Di Febbraro, A.

................................
........


W1D

Di Giovanni, G.

................................
........


W1A,W1A

Di Gregorio R.

................................
.........


M2A,T1A

Ding, H.

................................
...................


M2C

Di Stefano, R.

................................
..........


T1C

Dixon, W.E.

................................
.............


W3D

Douglas, P.L.

................................
...........


M4B

Dres
selhaus, M.

................................
......


T2A

Drouin, M.

................................
................


T4A

Du, W.

................................
.....................


M1C

Duan, B.Y.

................................
...............


T2B

Dubowsky, S.

................................
..........


W4A

Dunbar, W.B.

................................
...........


W3D

Dyllong, E.

................................
...............


T1A


E


Earon, E.J.P.

................................
...........


W4A

Economou, D.

................................
.........


T3B

Ejiri, M.

................................
....................


PL1

Elhajj, I.

................................
...................


T3A

El Rifai, O.M.

................................
...........


W4C

Ezaki, H.


................................
..................


M2B


F


Falkman, P.

................................
.............


W1D

Fanti, M.P.

................................
...............


W1D

Fantuzzi, C.

................................
.............


T3D

Ferrarini, L.

................................
..............


T2D

Ferreira, A.

................................
..............


W4C

Ferreira, P.M.

................................
..........


M3C

Ferreira Santos, I.

................................
...


T2B

Ferretti, G.

................................
...............


T4D,W2D

Ficola, A.

................................
.................


T3B

Figliolini, G.

................................
.............


T2C

Filaretov, V.V.

................................
..........


W3D

Fiorini, P.

................................
.................


W2A

Fisher, C.

................................
.................


W3C

Flath, M.

................................
..................


T4D

Fogliazza, G.

................................
...........


T2D

Fontaine, J.
-
G.

................................
........


W4C

Fortunato, B.

................................
...........


W2B

Fossati, F.


................................
...............


M2D

Fravolini, M.L.

................................
..........


T3B,W3D

Freudenberg, H.


................................
......


M2A

Frisoli, A.

................................
.................


W2B

Fröhleke, N.

................................
.............


T1C

Fukuda, T.

................................
...............


T3A

Fung, C.K.M.

................................
...........


T3A



Furlan, A.

................................
.................


W2D

Fusco, G.

................................
.................


T1A,T3B


G


Gadda, G.

................................
................


T3D

Galdi, V.

................................
...................


M4D

Gambao, E.

................................
.............


W4D

Gardner, J.F.

................................
...........


W1C

Garg, D.P.

................................
...............


T2D,T3A

Garner, H.

................................
................


M1C

Gaßmann, B.

................................
...........


W1B

Gausemeier, J.

................................
........


T4D

Gautier, M.

................................
...............


T2D

Gentina, J.
-
C.

................................
..........


W1D

Gerth, W.

................................
.................


W4B

Ghigliazza, R.

................................
..........


M4D

Giordano, M.

................................
............


M4C

Giua, A.

................................
...................


M1D

Golnaraghi,

F.

................................
..........


T2B

Gonda, K.

................................
................


M1B

Goodall, R.

................................
..............


M2D

Grassini, F.

................................
..............


W3A

Grebenstein, M.

................................
.......


W3A

Green, A.

................................
.................


W3A

Gu, C.E.

................................
...................


M4B

Gu, L.

................................
.......................


M4B

Guccione, S.

................................
............


VI

Guo, L.

................................
.....................


W2D


H


Ha, I.

................................
........................


T1A

Habibi, S.

................................
.................


M4D

Hahn, H.

................................
..................


T3C

Hähnle, M.

................................
...............


W3A

Handroos, H.

................................
...........


W1A

Hanke, O.

................................
................


M3D

Hannan, M.W.


................................
.........


M1A

Hashimoto, H.

................................
..........


M1B,M3B

Hashimoto, T.

................................
..........


M4C

Hatano, M.

................................
...............


W4B

Hattori, H.

................................
................


T4A

Heppler, G.R.

................................
..........


T2B

Hernando, M.

................................
...........


W4D

Hestermeyer, T.


................................
.......


M1D

Higuchi, M.


................................
..............


M1D

Hiller, M.

................................
..................


M3D,W3B

Hiramatsu, S.


................................
...........


M1A

Hirzinger, G.

................................
............


T1C,W3A

Hitaka,
G.

................................
................


T2B

Holl, M.

................................
....................


W3C

Holnicki
-
Szulc, J.

................................
.....


M3D

Hong, S.
-
G.

................................
.............


W2B

Hong, S.
-
K.

................................
..............


W2B

Hori, Y.

................................
....................


W4C

Horowitz, R.

................................
.............


T4D

Hoshino, H.

................................
..............


W3B

Hu, Hong

................................
.................


T1C

Hu, Huosheng

................................
.........


M1B,M3B

Hu, X.

................................
......................


W2D

Hung, S.

................................
..................


PL2

Hurtado, J.F.

................................
............


M2C

Hwang, J.
-
H.

................................
............


W2B




I


Iannit
ti, S.

................................
................


T4C

Ibrahim, M.Y.

................................
...........


M3D,W1C,W2C,W4D

Inamura, T.

................................
..............


M2B

Indiveri, G.

................................
...............


M4A,M4A

Indri, M.

................................
...................


M4A

Inoue, K.

................................
..................


M2B,M3A

Inukai, T.

................................
.................


T3A

Ioi, K.

................................
.......................


W4C

Ippoliti, G.

................................
................


T1B

Ippolito, L.

................................
................


M4D

İstefanopulos, Y.

................................
.....


W1A

Itoh, A.

................................
.....................


W3C

Itoh, K.

................................
.....................


T4B

Itoh, T.

................................
.....................


M4C

Iwasaki, M.

................................
..............


T4B

Iwata, H.

................................
..................


W3B


J


Jan, Y.
-
J.

................................
.................


T4A

Jang, L.S.

................................
................


W3C

Jensen, B.

................................
...............


M3B

Jeon, B.
-
H.

................................
..............


T1A

Jezequel, L.

................................
.............


M3D

Johansson, R.

................................
.........


W2B


K


Kagawa, N.

................................
..............


W1B

Kagoshima, T.

................................
.........


M3B

Kalle
nbach, E.


................................
.........


M2A

Kanamaru, N.

................................
..........


T3A

Karray, F.

................................
................


M4B

Kato, N.


................................
...................


M1B

Kawaji, S.

................................
................


T1B

Kawamura, T.

................................
..........


T2D

Kazerooni, H.

................................
.........


W1B

Kesavadas, T.


................................
.........


M1D

Khalil, W.

................................
.................


T2D

Khawaja, K.A.

................................
..........


T1D

Khetan, R.P.

................................
............


M3C

Kidd, M.


................................
...................


W3C

Kikuchi, K.


................................
...............


M1D

Kim, B.

................................
.....................


W4A

Kim, H.
-
R.

................................
................


W2B

Kim, I.

................................
......................


T1A

Kinoshita, T.


................................
............


M1A

Klement, M.


................................
.............


M1C

Klopčar, N.


................................
..............


M3A

Kobayashi, H.

................................
..........


M1D

Kobayashi, K.

................................
..........


T2D

Kobayashi, M.

................................
.........


W2D

Koch, T.

................................
...................


W2A

Koeppen, K.

................................
............


W2C

Koganezawa, K.

................................
......


M1A

Kohkawa, H.

................................
............


W3B

Kojima, T.

................................
................


T2D

Kolk, R.A.

................................
................


W1C

Komainda, A.

................................
...........


T1A

Kondo, J.

................................
.................


W1C

Konno, A.

................................
................


M1B

Korbaa, O.

................................
...............


W1D



Ko
smatka, J.B.

................................
........


W3D

Kosuge, K.

................................
...............


M2B

Kovanen, J.

................................
.............


W1A

Koyama, T.

................................
..............


T3A

Kramer, U.

................................
...............


T3D

Krämer, E.

................................
...............


T1C

Kroeker, P.

................................
..............


M4D

Kuczynski, A.

................................
...........


T2A

Kuhlbusch, W.

................................
.........


M2A

Kumar, A.S.

................................
.............


M2C

Kumar, R.K.

................................
.............


M2C

Kumasaka, T.

................................
..........


VI,W2A

Kurfess, T.R.

................................
...........


T1D,W1C

Kwak, Y.

................................
..................


W2B

Kwon, D.
-
S.

................................
.............


W2B

Kyriakopoulos, K.

................................
....


T4C


L


La Cava, M.

................................
.............


T3B

Lampaert, V.

................................
............


T4B

Lanni, C.

................................
..................


M2A

Lasky, T.A.

................................
..............


W3C

Lazzarini, R.

................................
............


M3A

Leandri, D.

................................
...............


W2C

Lee, E.C.

................................
.................


M3C

Lee, J.

................................
......................


T1A,T1A

Lee, J.
-
H.

................................
.................


M3B

Lee, J.
-
J.

................................
..................


W2B

Lee, Jae
-
Won

................................
..........


M2A

Lee, Jin
-
W
oo

................................
...........


W2B

Lee, K.
-
M.

................................
................


M1C,M2C

Lee, M.F.R.

................................
..............


M4B

Lee, T.H.

................................
..................


M4B,W2C

Lefeber, D.

................................
...............


T3C

Legnani, G.

................................
..............


T2A

Lemoine, Ph.

................................
...........


T2D

Lenarčič
, J.

................................
..............


M3A,M3A

Lenart, L.

................................
.................


T1D

Lennartson, B.

................................
.........


W1D

Li,
H.

................................
........................


M2C

Li, W.J.

................................
....................


T3A

Lichter, M.D.

................................
............


W4A

Liégeois
, A.

................................
..............


M2B

Liu,
B.

................................
......................


T2B

Liu, H.

................................
......................


T1C

Liu, W.

................................
.....................


M4B

Liu
-
Henke, X.

................................
...........


M1D

Longhi, S.

................................
................


T1B

Longo, D.

................................
.................


T4C

Lotti, F.

................................
....................


T2D

Lucidarme, P.

................................
..........


M2B

Lückel, J.

................................
.................


M1D,M2A


M


Mae, Y.


................................
....................


M2B,M3A

Magnani, G.

................................
.............


T4D,W2D

Maiocchi, G.

................................
............


W2D

Maißer, P.


................................
................


M2A

Malvezzi, M.


................................
............


M2D

Malvisi, A
.

................................
................


W2A

Manuello Bertetto, A.

...............................


W3C

Marcacci, M.

................................
............


W2A




Marchese, S.

................................
...........


W1B

Marignetti, F.

................................
...........


T1C

Marin, R.A.

................................
..............


M3C

Marrone, F.

................................
..............


W2A

Martelli, S.

................................
...............


W2A

Maslen, E.H.

................................
............


T3B

Massa, B.


................................
................


M3A

Matsui, N.

................................
................


T4B

Matsumoto, T.


................................
.........


M2B

Matsuno, T.

................................
.............


T3A

Matsushima,
T.

................................
........


W3B

Mattone, R.

................................
..............


T4C

Mavroidis, C.

................................
...........


T3B,T4C

McCarthy, J.M.

................................
........


W2A

McFarlane, J.R.

................................
.......


T2C

McFetridge, L.

................................
.........


W4D

Medrano
-
Cerda, G.A.

..............................


W1B

Meek, S.

................................
..................


W2C

Mei, T.X.


................................
..................


M2D

Melchiorri, C.

................................
...........


W3A

Meldrum, D.R.

................................
.........


W3C

Melkote, S.N.


................................
...........


M2C

Menegatti, E.


................................
...........


M1C

Mic
era, S.


................................
................


M3A

Michelini, R.C.

................................
.........


M4D

Michielen, M.

................................
...........


M3D

Minami, M.


................................
...............


M2B,W4B

Minor, M.

................................
.................


W2C

Miroshnik, I.V.

................................
..........


W4B

Mitsui, T.

................................
..................


VI,W2A

Mitsuya, Y.


................................
..............


M1B

Mizukawa, M.

................................
..........


T3A

Mochiyama, H.


................................
........


M1A

Moerschell, J.

................................
..........


T4B

Möhringer
, S.

................................
...........


T4D

Moita, F.

................................
..................


M4C

Molfino,

R.M.

................................
...........


M4D

Monari, P.D.

................................
............


T3D

Monti, S.

................................
..................


T2A

Moody, S.E.

................................
.............


W3C

Moore, C.A.

................................
.............


T1D

Moore, M.P.

................................
.............


W3C

Moreau, B.

................................
...............


M3B

Moreau, E.

................................
...............


W2C

Mori, Y.

................................
....................


M1A

Morino, T.

................................
................


VI

Morita, T.

................................
.................


W3B

Moritz, W.

................................
................


M2A

Morselli, R.

................................
..............


M4D

Mrad, R.B.

................................
...............


T1C

Mukherjee, R.

................................
..........


T3B

Munir, S.

................................
..................


M1B

Murakami, T.

................................
...........


T2B

Murao, Y.

................................
.................


W3B

Murari B.

................................
..................


PL1

Murata, R.

................................
...............


W3B

Muscato, G.

................................
.............


VI,T4C,W1B


N


Nagchaudhuri, A.

................................
....


T3A

Naghdy, F.

................................
...............


W1C

Nakagawa, S.

................................
..........


W2D

Nakajima, K.

................................
............


M3B



Nakamura, Y.

................................
..........


M2B

Nakauchi, Y.

................................
............


W2B

Nakazawa, M.

................................
..........


T2D

Nan, R
.D.

................................
.................


T2B

Napoli, J.T.

................................
..............


W4B

Napolitano, M.

................................
.........


W3D

Natale, C.

................................
................


T3B,T3C

Necsulescu, D.

................................
........


W4A

Nee, A.Y.C.

................................
.............


M2C

Nicolais, L.

................................
...............


M4C

Nicoletti, R.

................................
..............


T2B

Noda, A.

................................
..................


T3A

Noguchi, Y.

................................
..............


T3A

Nunes, U.

................................
................


M4C


O


Obara, H.

................................
.................


W4B

Oboe, R.

................................
..................


T4B,W2D,W2D

Oh, J.
-
H.

................................
..................


W2B

Ohnishi, K.

................................
...............


T2B,T4A

Ohsumi, T.

................................
...............


W4B

Ohta, M.

................................
...................


M1B

Öke, G.

................................
....................


W1A

Okubo, T.

................................
.................


M4C

Onillon, E.

................................
................


T4B

Oriolo, G.

................................
.................


T4C

Osuka, K.

................................
.................


T2A

Otera, N.

................................
..................


T3A

Ou, S.
-
C.

................................
.................


T3D

Owen, W.S.

................................
.............


T2C

Oyobe, H.

................................
................


W4C


P


Pagello, E.

................................
...............


M1C

Pagnanelli, P.

................................
..........


T2A

Panzieri, S.


................................
..............


W4D

Papadimitriou, I.

................................
......


T4D

Papadopoulos, E.

................................
....


T4D

Papi, M.

................................
...................


M2D

Parenti
-
Castelli, V.

................................
...


M3A

Parker, G.

................................
................


M3D

Parker, J.M.

................................
.............


M1C

Paromtchik, I.E.

................................
.......


M4C

Pascazio, G.

................................
............


W2B

Pascucci, F.

................................
.............


W4D

Pastorelli, S.

................................
............


T2C

Peel, G.

................................
...................


M3D

Pegoraro, R.

................................
............


T1B

Pelinesc
u, D.

................................
...........


M2C

Pence, W.H.

................................
............


W3C

Peng, B.

................................
...................


T2B

Perdereau, V.

................................
..........


T4A

Persson, J.

................................
..............


M3B

Peschiera, G.

................................
...........


W1B

Pham, M.T.

................................
..............


T2D

Piazzi, A.

................................
.................


W1A

Piccolo, A.

................................
...............


M4D

Pires, J.N.

................................
................


T1D

Poignet, Ph.

................................
.............


T2D

Poppe, C.D.

................................
.............


T2D

Pugi, L.

................................
....................


M2D

Pugliese, F.

................................
.............


M2A

Putz, P.

................................
....................


W
4A



Q


Qin, W.

................................
....................


T1B


R


Rauf, A.

................................
...................


M2A

Ravani, B.

................................
................


W3C

Remond, C.

................................
.............


T4A

Resta, F.

................................
..................


M2D,M2D

Rinchi, M.

................................
................


T2B

Rizzo, A.

................................
..................


W1B

Rocco, P.

................................
.................


T4D,W2D

Roemer, R.

................................
..............


W2C

Rongier, P.

................................
..............


M2B

Rouse, M.D.

................................
............


W2C

Rovetta, A.

................................
..............


T1B

Ruggiu, M.

................................
...............


W3C

Ryu, J.

................................
.....................


M2A


S


S
affert, E.

................................
................


M2A

Saini, M.

................................
..................


W3C

Salcudean, S.E.

................................
......


W3B

Salmon, M.

................................
..............


T2D

Sandoni, G.

................................
.............


M4D

Santi, C.

................................
..................


W2B

Santolini, C.

................................
.............


T2A

Sarma, S.E.

................................
.............


M3C

Sasahara, M.

................................
...........


T2D

Sasiadek, J.Z.

................................
.........


W3A,W4A

Sato, K.

................................
...................


T4B

Scarano, M.

................................
.............


T1C

Schäfer
, I.

................................
................


W3A

Scharfeld, F.

................................
............


M
2A,W2A

Scholl, K.
-
U.

................................
............


W1B

Schulte, H.

................................
...............


T3C

Schulte, T.

................................
...............


T1C

Seatzu, C.

................................
...............


M1D

Seitz, N.

................................
...................


T1C

Seneviratne, L.

................................
........


T1D

Sergeev, K.A.

................................
..........


W4B

Setiawan, J.D.

................................
.........


T3B

Shen, B.
-
H.

................................
..............


VI

Shetty, D.

................................
................


W1C

Shibata, T.

................................
...............


VI,W2A

Shimaru, M.

................................
.............


T2D

Shimokohbe, A.

................................
.......


T4B

Sie
gwart, R.

................................
.............


M3B

Simmons, R.

................................
............


W2B

Sirouspour,
M.R.

................................
.....


W3B

Six, K.

................................
......................


W3C

Sjögren, A.

................................
..............


W2B

Smaldone, N.

................................
..........


M4A

Soemers, H.M.J.R.

................................
..


M1A

Soh, C.Y.

................................
.................


M4B,W2C

Song, Y.

................................
..................


W3D

Sorli, M.

................................
...................


T2C

Spark, I.J.

................................
................


M3D

Sporer, N.

................................
................


W3A

Strobel, M.

................................
...............


W2A

Su, Y.X.

................................
...................


T2B

Sudhi
r, A.

................................
................


M1D



Sugano, S.

................................
...............


W3B

Sugiuchi, H.

................................
............


VI

Sujan, V.A.

................................
..............


W4A

Sun, C.J.

................................
..................


M4B

Sun, H.

................................
....................


T2C

Sung, W.
-
T.

................................
.............


T3D

Suppa, M.

................................
................


W4B

Surdilovic, D.

................................
...........


W3A

Suzuki, H.

................................
................


M2B

Swanson, D.K.

................................
.........


W3B

Swevers, J.

................................
..............


T4B

Szente, V.

................................
................


T2C


T


Tadokoro, S.

................................
............


W3B

Tagami,
K.

................................
...............


VI,W2A

Tan, K.C.

................................
.................


M4B

Tan, K.K.

................................
.................


M4B,W2C

Tang, K.Z.

................................
................


M4B

Tanie, K.

................................
..................


VI,W2A

Tanner, H.G.

................................
............


T4C

Tarn, T.J.

................................
.................


W4B

Tasch, U.

................................
.................


M3C

Tittus, M.

................................
..................


W1D

Toepper, S.

................................
..............


M2A

Toida, H.

................................
..................


W3C

Tomatis, N.

................................
..............


M3B

Tomizuka, M.

................................
...........


T4D

Toni, P.

................................
....................


M2D,M2D

Toshima, I.

................................
...............


M2B

Touda, A.

................................
.................


W2A

Toumi, R.

................................
.................


W4D

Tsagarakis, N.

................................
.........


W1B

Tsai, M.
-
C.

................................
...............


VI

Tsui, P.W
.

................................
................


M1B

Turchiano, B.

................................
...........


W1D


U


Uchiyama, M.

................................
..........


M1B

Ulivi, G.

................................
....................


W4D

Umetani
, T.

................................
..............


M2B

Usoltsev, S.A.

................................
..........


W3D


V


Vaccaro, A.

................................
..............


M4D

Vad, J.

................................
.....................


T2C

Vallapuzha, S.

................................
.........


M3C

Van den B
oom, T.

................................
...


M1D

van der Wal, E.

................................
........


T3D

Van Eijk, J.

................................
..............


PL4

Van Ham, R.

................................
............


T3C

Van Winnendael, M.

................................


W4A

Vassura, G.

................................
.............


T2D,W3A

Velardi, F.

................................
................


T3C

Venanzi, S.

................................
..............


M3A

Verrelst, B.

................................
...............


T3C

Villani, L.

................................
..................


M4A

Violi, A.G.

................................
................


M2D

Virk, G.S.

................................
.................


W1B

Visconti, A.

................................
..............


M4D

Visentin
, G.

................................
..............


W4A




Visioli, A.

................................
.................


T2A,W1A

Visone, C.

................................
................


T3C


W


Wada, K.

................................
.................


VI
,W2A

Wahyudi

................................
..................


T4B

Waldron, K.J.

................................
...........


T4C

Walker, I.D.

................................
.............


M1A
,T3A,W3D

Wang, M.Y.

................................
.............


M2C

Wang, X.G.

................................
..............


M4B

Wang, Y.
-
T.

................................
.............


T4A

Wardak, K.

................................
..............


M3C

Watanabe, S.

................................
..........


VI

Wei, Q.

................................
....................


T2B

Wiktor, P.J.

................................
..............


W3C

Wright, M.

................................
................


M1C

Wu, Q.M.J.

................................
..............


M4B

Wullschleger, F.H.

................................
...


T4D


X


Xi, N.

................................
.......................


T3A

Xu, L.

................................
.......................


T1C




Y


Yakushi, T.

................................
..............


M3B

Yamaguchi, T.

................................
.........


W2D

Yamamoto, Y.

................................
..........


M4C

Yang, G.

................................
..................


M1A

Yang, P.

................................
...................


T4C

Yao, B.

................................
.....................


T1C,T2C

Yin, X.

................................
......................


M2C

Yoshida, H.

................................
..............


M3A

Youcef
-
Toumi, K.

................................
.....


W4C

Yu, L.

................................
.......................


M1B

Yusof, K.M.

................................
..............


M4B


Z


Zäh, M.F.

................................
.................


T1D

Zanasi, R.

................................
................


M4D

Zanella, M.

................................
...............


W2A

Zecca, M.

................................
.................


M3A

Zentner, J.

................................
...............


M2A

Zhirabok, A.N.

................................
.........


W3D

Zhou, Q.

................................
..................


M1B

Zhu, W.H.

................................
................


W3B

Zhu, X.

................................
.....................


M2C

Zucchelli, A.

................................
.............


T2D





CHAIRS INDEX


A


Aicardi, M.

................................
................................
.............


M2B

Allotta,

B.

................................
................................
...............


M3A

Angeles, J.

................................
................................
............


M2A

Apkarian, J.

................................
................................
...........


T4B

Arteaga, M.A.

................................
................................
........


T3B


B


Basile, F.

................................
................................
...............


W3D

Bertram, T.

................................
................................
............


M2D

Book, W.

................................
................................
................


W1C

Brogårdh, T.

................................
................................
..........


T4A


C


Cai, L.

................................
................................
....................


T2B

Caldwell, D.

................................
................................
...........


W2B

Callegari, M.

................................
................................
..........


T1A

Carrozza, M.C.

................................
................................
......


M2C

Chen, I
-
M.

................................
................................
.............


T4A

Chiu, G.

................................
................................
.................


T3D

Cloet,

C.

................................
................................
................


T2D

Cutolo, A.

................................
................................
..............


M1C




D


Dario, P.

................................
................................
................


W1C

De Luca, A.

................................
................................
............


W2A

De Maria, G.

................................
................................
..........


T2B

De Meter, E.

................................
................................
..........


M2C

De Schutter, B.

................................
................................
......


W1D

de Silva, C.

................................
................................
............


M2B

Di Febbraro, A.

................................
................................
......


M1D

Di Gregorio, R.

................................
................................
......


W1B

Du, W.

................................
................................
...................


W2D

Dubey, R.

................................
................................
..............


VI

Dubowsky, S.

................................
................................
........


W3A


F


Fanti, M.P.

................................
................................
.............


M
3D

Fantuzzi, C.

................................
................................
...........


W2C

Ferrarini, L.

................................
................................
............


W1D

Ferretti, G.

................................
................................
.............


M4B

Figliolini, G.

................................
................................
............


T1C

Fusco, G.

................................
................................
...............


M1A


G


Gardner, J.

................................
................................
............


W2C

Garg, D.

................................
................................
.................


T1D

Gentina, J.
-
C.

................................
................................
........


W3C

Glielmo, L.

................................
................................
.............


M3D

Goodall, R.

................................
................................
............


M4D





H


Hamel, W.

................................
................................
.............


PL3

Hashimoto, H.

................................
................................
.......


M4C

Hiller, M.

................................
................................
................


M1D

Hir
zinger, G.

................................
................................
..........


T2A


I


Ibrahim, Y.

................................
................................
.............


T2D

Itoh, A.

................................
................................
...................


W2B


J


Johansson, R.

................................
................................
.......


W3D


K


Karray, F.

................................
................................
..............


T3D

Kazerooni, H.

................................
................................
........


T4C

Kesavadas, T.

................................
................................
.......


VI

Kobayashi, H.

................................
................................
........


M4D

Koganezawa, K.

................................
................................
....


T3A

Konno, A.

................................
................................
..............


T1B

Kosuge, K.

................................
................................
.............


M1B

Kurfess, T.

................................
................................
.............


T4D

Kwon, D.
-
S.

................................
................................
...........


W3B


L


Lee,

K.
-
M.

................................
................................
..............


M3C

Legnani, G.

................................
................................
............


T4C

Lenar
čič, J.

................................
................................
............


PL2

Longhi, S.

................................
................................
..............


T3A


M


Magnani, G.

................................
................................
...........


T3C

Mavroidis, C.

................................
................................
.........


T1A

McCarthy, M.

................................
................................
.........


W1B

Melchiorri, C.

................................
................................
.........


W4A

Meldrum, D.

................................
................................
...........


M3A

Melkote, S.

................................
................................
............


T1D

Molfino, R.

................................
................................
.............


M2A

Mukherjee, R.

................................
................................
........


T1B

Muscato, G.

................................
................................
...........


W4B


N


Natale, C.

................................
................................
..............


T1C


O


Oboe, R.

................................
................................
................


T2C

Okuma, S.

................................
................................
.............


PL4


P


Papadopoulos, E.

................................
................................
..


W4A



Parenti Castelli, V.

................................
................................
.


T2A

Parker, J.

................................
................................
...............


M4C

Perdereau, V.

................................
................................
........


W3A

Piccolo, A.

................................
................................
.............


M2D

Pires, N.

................................
................................
.................


W4D

Putz, P.

................................
................................
..................


W2A


R


Ravani, B.

................................
................................
..............


W4C

Rocco, P.

................................
................................
...............


T3B

Rovetta, A.

................................
................................
.............


M1B


S


Salcudean, T.

................................
................................
......


W4B

Sasiadek, J.

................................
................................
.........


W1A

Shibata, T.


................................
................................
...........


M1C

Siegwart, R.

................................
................................
.........


W3C

Soemers, H.

................................
................................
........


M3C

Sugano, S.

................................
................................
...........


PL1

Surdilovic, D.

................................
................................
.......


M1A


T


Tarn, T.
-
J.

................................
................................
..............


W3B

Tomizuka, M..

................................
................................
........


M4B


U


Ulivi, G.

................................
................................
..................


M4A


V


Valigi, P.

................................
................................
................


M4A

Vassura, G.

................................
................................
...........


W4C

Villani, L.

................................
................................
................


W1A


W


Waldron, K.

................................
................................
............


T3C

Walker, I.

................................
................................
...............


W4D

Wang, G.

................................
................................
...............


M3B

W
u, J.

................................
................................
....................


M3B


X


Xi, N.

................................
................................
......................


T4B


Y


Yamamoto, Y.

................................
................................
........


T4D

Yao, B.

................................
................................
...................


T2C


Z


Zuffada, M.

................................
................................
............


W2D









AIM '01

c/o Professor Bruno Siciliano

Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell’Informazione e Ingegneria Elettrica

Università degli Studi di Salerno

Via Ponte Don Melil
lo, 84084 Fisciano (SA), Italy

Tel: +39 089
-
96
-
4306 Fax: +39 089
-
96
-
4218

bsiciliano@unisa.it