Glossary for Management problem A discrepancy between an existing and a desired state of affairs organizational change Any alterations in people, structure, or technology

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Feb 21, 2014 (3 years and 6 months ago)

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Glossary for Management

problem

A discrepancy between an existing and a desired state of affairs

organizational
change

Any alterations in people, structure, or technology

organization

A group of people with formally assigned roles who work together to a
chieve the stated
goals of the group.

organizing

Management function that involves the process of determining what tasks are to be done,
who is to do them, how the tasks are to be grouped, who reports to whom, and where
decisions are to be made.

manager

A person who plans, organizes, leads, and controls the work of others so that the
organization achieves its goals.

management

The managers of an organization; or, the study of what managers do.

management
process

Refers to the manager’s four basic functi
ons of planning, organizing, leading, and
controlling.

executives

Managers at the top management level of an organization.

first
-
line manager

Manger at the bottom management level of an organization, also called a supervisor, who
has non
-
supervisors as s
ubordinates.

managerial
competence

The motivation and skills required to gain a management position, including intellectual,
emotional, and interpersonal skills.

career anchor

A dominant concern or value that directs an individual’s career choices and th
at the person
will not give up if a choice must be made.

information
technology

Any computerized processes, practices, or systems that facilitate the processing and
transportation of data or information.

globalization

The extension of a firm’s sales or m
anufacturing to new markets abroad.

licensing

An arrangement whereby a firm (the licensor) grants a foreign firm the right to use
intangible property.

franchising

The granting of a right by a parent company to another firm to do business in a prescribed
manner.

foreign direct
investment

Operations in one country controlled by entities in a foreign country.

strategic alliance

An agreement between potential or actual competitors to achieve common objectives.

joint venture

The participation of two or more

companies in an enterprise such that each party contributes
assets, owns the entity to some degree, and shares risk.

wholly owned
subsidiary

A firm that is owned 100% by a foreign firm.

international
business

Any firm that engages in international trade

or investment; also refers to business activities
that involve the movement of resources, goods, services, and skills across national
boundaries.

international trade

The export or import of goods or services to consumers in another country.

internationa
l
management

The performance of the management process across national boundaries.

multinational
corporation
(MNC)

An internationally integrated company over which equity
-
based control is exercised by a
parent corporation that is owned and managed essenti
ally by the nationals of the country in
which it is domiciled.

mixed economy

An economy in which some sectors are left to private ownership and free market
mechanisms, while others are largely owned and managed by the government.

gross domestic
product

T
he market value of all goods and services that have been bought for final use during a
period of time, and therefore the basic measure of a nation’s economic activity.

exchange rate

The rate at which one country’s currency can be exchanged for another cou
ntry’s currency.

free trade

The unrestricted exchange of goods among participating countries.

economic
integration

The result of two or more nations minimizing trade restrictions to obtain the advantages of
free trade.

free trade area

A type of economic

integration in which all barriers to trade among members are removed.

customs union

A situation in which trade barriers among members are removed and a common trade policy
exists with respect to nonmembers.

common market

A system in which no barriers to

trade exist among member countries, and a common
external trade policy is in force that governs trade with nonmembers; factors of production,
such as labor, capital, and technology, more freely among members.

trade barrier

A governmental influence that i
s usually aimed at reducing the competitiveness of imported
products or services.

values

Basic beliefs about what is important an unimportant, and what one should and should not
do.

technology
transfer

The transfer, often to another country, of systemati
c knowledge for the manufacturing of a
product, for the application a process, or for the rendering of service; it does not extend to
the mere sales or lease of goods.

ethnocentrism

A tendency to view members of one’s own group as the center of the univer
se and to view
other social groups less favorably than one’s own.

polycentric

A management philosophy orientated toward pursuing a limited number of individual
foreign markets.

regiocentric

A management philosophy oriented toward larger areas, including
the global marketplace.

planning

The process of setting goals and courses of action, developing rules and procedures, and
forecasting future outcomes.

normative
judgment

A comparative evaluation stating or implying that something is good or bad, right or

wrong,
or better or worse.

ethics

The study of standards of conduct and moral judgment; also, the standards of right conduct.

morality

A society’s accepted norms of behavior.

organizational
culture

The characteristic set of values and ways of behaving
that employees in an organization
share.

cultural artifacts

The obvious signs and symbols of corporate culture, such as organizational structure,
policies, and dress codes.

patterns of
behavior

In organizational behavior, the ceremonial events, written a
nd spoken comments, and actual
behaviors of an organization’s members that contribute to creating the organizational
culture.

values and beliefs

The guiding standards of an organization, such as“the customer is always right” or “don’t be
bureaucratic,” th
at should be practiced, as distinct from what is practiced.

signs and symbols

Practices and actions that create and sustain a company’s culture.

stories

The repeated tales and anecdotes that contribute to a company’s culture by illustrating and
reinforci
ng important company values.

rites and
ceremonies

Traditional culture
-
building events or activities that symbolize the firm’s values and help
convert employees to these values.

social
responsibility

The extent to which companies should or do channel reso
urces toward improving the quality
of life of one or more segments of society other than the firm’s own stockholders.

corporate
stakeholder

Any person or group that is important to the survival and success of the corporation.

moral minimum

The idea that
corporations should be free to strive for profits so long as they commit no
harm.

corporate social
audit

A rating system used to evaluate a corporation’s performance with regard to meeting its
social obligations.

whistle
-
blowing

The activities of employe
es who try to report organizational wrongdoing.

managing
diversity

Planning and implementing organizational systems and practices to mange people in a way
that maximizes the potential advantages of diversity while minimizing its potential
disadvantage.

d
iverse

Describes a workforce composed of two or more groups, each of which can be identified by
demographic or other characteristics.

stereotyping

Attributing specific behavioral traits individuals on the basis of their apparent membership
in group.

prej
udice

A bias that results from prejudging someone on the basis of the latter’s particular trait or
traits.

discrimination

A behavioral bias toward or against a person based on the group to which the person
belongs.

tokenism

Symbolically appointing a smal
l number of minority

group members to high profile
instead of more aggressively achieving full representation for that group.

gender
-
role
stereotype

Usually, the association of women with certain behaviors and possibly (often lower
-
level)
jobs.

mentoring

A relationship between two people in which the more experienced mentor provides support,
guidance, and counseling to enhance the protégé’s success work and in other areas of life.

decision

A choice made between available alternatives.

decision making

Th
e process of developing and analyzing alternatives and choosing from among them.

problem

A discrepancy between a desirable and an actual situation.

programmed
decision

A decision that is repetitive and routine and can be made by using a definite systemat
ic
procedure.

perception

The unique way each person defines stimuli, depending on the influence of past experiences
and the person's present needs and personality.

heuristic

A rule of thumb or an approximation applied as a shortcut to decision making.

a
nchoring

Unconsciously giving disproportionate weight to the first information you hear.

psychological set

The tendency to rely on a rigid strategy or approach when solving a problem.

bounded
rationality

The boundaries on rational decision making imposed

by one's values, abilities, and limited
capacity for processing information.

satisfice

To stop the decision
-
making process when satisfactory alternatives are found, rather than
reviewing solutions until an optimal alternative is discovered.

process anal
ysis

Solving problems by thinking through the process involved from beginning to end,
imagining, at each step, what actually would happen.

group

Two or more persons interacting in such a manner that each person influences and is
influenced by each other p
erson, and who may or may not have unanimity of purpose.

cohesiveness

The attraction of the group for its individual members.

norms

The informal rules that groups adopt to regulate and regularize the behavior of group
members.

groupthink

The mode of thi
nking in a cohesive group in which the desire to achieve group consensus
overrides potentially valuable individual points of view of its members.

brainstorming

A creativity
-
stimulating technique in which prior judgments and criticisms are specifically
for
bidden from being expressed and thus inhibiting the free flow of ideas which are
encouraged.

plan

A method for doing or making something and consisting of a goal and a course of action.

planning

The process of setting goals and courses of action, develop
ing rules and procedures, and
forecasting future outcomes.

goal

A specific result to be achieved; the end result of a plan.

objectives

Specific results toward which effort is directed.

descriptive plan

A plan that states in words what is to be achieved
and how.

budget

A financial plan showing financial expectations for a specific period.

graphic plan

Plans that shows graphically or in charts what is to be achieved and how.

strategic plan

A plan that outlines the course of action a firm plans to pursue

in becoming the sort of
enterprise it wants to be, given the firm's external opportunities and threats and its internal
strengths and weaknesses.

tactical plan

A plan that shows how top management's plans are to be carried out at the departmental,
short
-
term level.

functional plan

A tactical short
-
term plan showing how each department of a business will contribute to top
management's plans.

operational plan

A short
-
term plan that shows the detailed daily steps of business operations.

program

A plan tha
t lays out all the steps in proper sequence to a single
-
use, often one
-
time business
project.

standing plan

A plan established to be used repeatedly, as the need arises.

policy

A standing plan that sets broad guidelines for the enterprise.

procedure

A p
lan that specifies how to proceed in specific situations that routinely arise.

rule

A highly specific guide to action.

hierarchy of plans

A set of plans that includes the enterprise
-
wide plan and the derivative plans of subsidiary
units required to help
achieve the enterprise
-
wide plan.

management by
objectives (MBO)

A technique in which supervisor and subordinate jointly set goals for the latter and
periodically assess progress toward those goals.

premise

An assumption made about the future.

forecast

To estimate or calculate in advance or to predict.

quantitative
forecasting

A type of forecasting in which statistical methods are used to examine data and find
underlying patterns and relationships; includes time
-
series methods and causal models.

qualit
ative
forecasting

Predictive techniques that emphasize logical, unbiased human judgment and may include
both technological and judgmental methods.

time series

A set of observations taken at specific times, usually at equal intervals, to identify
fundament
al patterns.

causal methods

Forecasting techniques that develop projections based on the mathematical relationship
between a certain factor and the variables believed to influence or explain that factor.

causal forecasting

Estimating a company factor (su
ch as sales) based on other influencing factors (such as
advertising expenditures or unemployment levels).

jury of executive
opinion

A qualitative forecasting technique in which a panel of executives are given pertinent data
and asked to make independent
sales forecasts, which are then reconciled in an executive
meeting or by the company president.

sales force
estimation

A forecasting technique that gathers and combines the opinions of the sales people on what
they predict sales will be in the forthcoming

period.

marketing
research

The procedures used to develop and analyze current customer
-
related information to help
managers make decisions.

secondary data

Information for analyzing a situation that has already been collected or published.

primary data

Information specifically collected to address a current problem.

competitive
intelligence

Systematic techniques used to obtain and analyze public information about competitors.

strategic
management

The process of identifying and pursuing the organization
's strategic plan by aligning internal
capabilities with the external demands of its environment, and then ensuring that the plan is
being executed properly.

vision

A general statement of an organization's intended direction that evokes emotional feelings

in
its members.

mission statement

Broadly outlines the enterprise's purpose and serves to communicate who the organization
is, what it does, and where it's headed.

strategy

A course of action that explains how an enterprise will move from the business i
t is in now
to the business it wants to be in.

corporate
-
level
strategy

A plan that identifies the portfolio of businesses that comprise a corporation and how they
relate to each other.

competitive
strategy

A strategy that identifies how to build and str
engthen the business's long
-
term competitive
position in the marketplace.

functional
strategy

The overall course or courses of action and basic policies that each department is to follow
in helping the business accomplish its strategic goals.

market
pene
tration

A growth strategy to boost sales of present products by more aggressively permeating the
organization's current markets.

geographic
expansion

A strategic growth alternative of aggressively expanding into new domestic and/or overseas
markets.

prod
uct
development

The strategy of improving products for current markets to maintain or boost growth.

horizontal
integration

Acquiring ownership or control of competitors who are competing in the same or similar
markets with the same or similar products.

v
ertical
integration

A growth strategy in which a company owns or controls its own suppliers and/or distribution
channels.

diversification

A corporate strategy whereby managers try to better utilize their organizational resources by
developing new products

and new markets.

related
diversification

A strategy of expanding into other industries or markets related to a company's current
business lines.

conglomerate
diversification

Diversifying into other products or markets that are not related to a firm's pr
esent businesses.

retrenchment

The reduction of activities or operations to reduce investment.

divestment

Selling or liquidating the individual businesses of a larger company.

virtual
corporation

A temporary network of independent companies linked by in
formation technology.

cost leadership

A competitive strategy by which a company aims to be the low
-
cost leader in its industry.

differentiation
strategy

A competitive strategy aimed at distinguishing a company from its competitors by focusing
on the attr
ibutes of its products or services that consumers perceive as important.

focus strategy

A strategy in which a business selects a narrow market segment and builds its strategy on
serving those in its target market better or more cheaply than its generalist

competitors.

competitive
advantage

The basis for superiority over competitors and thus for hoping to claim certain customers.

strategic business
unit

An organizational entity that contains several related businesses.

autonomous
Separate
decentralized business units, each with its own products, clients, competitors, and
internal units

profit goals.

boundaryless
organization

An organization whose design is not defined by, or limited to, the horizontal, vertical, or
external boundaries imposed by a predef
ined structure.

learning
organization

An organization that has developed the capacity to continuously adapt and change because
all members take an active role in identifying and resolving work
-
related issues.

organizational
knowledge

Knowledge that's cre
ated by collaborative information sharing and social interaction that
lead to organizational members taking appropriate actions.

organizational
effectiveness

A measure of how appropriate organizational goals are and how well an organization is
achieving t
hose goals.

SWOT analysis

A strategic planing tool for analyzing a company's strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and
threats

external
environment

The set of forces with which an organization interacts.

environmental
scanning

A strategic control method

aimed at identifying previously unidentified or undetected
critical events that could influence the company's strategy.

benchmarking

A process through which a company learns how to become the best in one or more areas by
analyzing and comparing the pract
ices of other companies that excel in those areas.

question mark

In strategic planning, a business in a high
-
growth industry, but with low relative market
share.

cash cow

A business with a high relative market share in a low
-
growth industry such that min
imal
investments can and need be made to continue to withdraw relatively high quantities of cash.

dog

A business in a low
-
growth, unattractive industry that also has low relative market share and
thus should usually be divested.

scenario

A hypothetical s
equence of events constructed for the purpose of focusing attention on
causal processes and decision points.

leverage

To gain a competitive edge by concentrating a company's resources on key strategic goals or
competencies.

core competencies

The collecti
ve learning in an organization, especially the knowledge of how to coordinate
diverse design and production skills and integrate multiple streams of technologies.

organization chart

A chart that illustrates the organizationwide division of work by chartin
g who is accountable
to whom and who is in charge of what department.

chain of command

The path a directive and/or answer or request should take through each level of an
organization; also called a scalar chain or the line of authority.

unity of command

The management principle that each person should report to only one manager.

informal
organization

The informal contacts, communications, and habitual ways of doing things that employees
develop.

departmentalizatio
n

The process through which an organizat
ion's activities are grouped together and assigned to
managers; the organizationwide division of work.

functional
departmentalizatio
n

A form of organization that groups a company's activities around essential functions such as
manufacturing, sales, or fin
ance.

simple structure

An organizational design with low departmentalization, wide spans of control, centralized
authority, and little formalization.

functional
structure

An organizational design that groups similar or related occupational specialties to
gether.

divisional
structure

An organizational structure made up of separate, semiautonomous units or divisions.

team
-
based
structure

An organizational structure in which the entire organization is made up of work groups or
teams.

divisionalization
(pro
duct
departmentalizatio
n)

A form of organization in which the firm's major departments are organized so that each can
manage all or most of the activities needed to develop, manufacture, and sell a particular
product or product line.

customer
departmental
izatio
n

Similar to divisional organization except that generally self
-
contained departments are
organized to serve the needs of specific groups of customers.

marketing
-
channel
departmentalizatio
An arrangement in which departments of an organization focu
s on particular marketing
channels, such as drugstores or grocery stores.

n

marketing channel

The means through which a manufacturer distributes its products to its ultimate customers.

matrix
organization

An organization in which one or more forms of depar
tmentalization are imposed on top of
an existing one.

matrix structure

An organizational structure that assigns specialists from different functional departments to
work on one or more projects.

project structure

An organizational structure in which empl
oyees continuously work on projects.

coordination

The process of achieving unity of action among interdependent activities.

mutual adjustment

Achieving coordination through personal interactions and communicated responses to a
situation.

authority

The r
ight to take action, to make decisions, and to direct the work of others.

line manager

A manager authorized to issue orders to subordinates down the chain of command.

staff manager

A manager without the authority to give orders down the chain of command
(except in his or
her own department); generally can only assist and advise line managers in specialized areas
such as human resources management.

functional
authority

Narrowly limited power to issue orders down the chain of command in a specific function
al
area such as personnel testing.

line

staff conflict

Disagreements between a line manager and the staff manager who is giving him or her
advice.

delegation

The act of passing down authority from supervisor to subordinate.

empowerment

The act of giving

employees the authority, tools, and information they need to do their jobs
with greater autonomy and confidence.

centralization

The degree to which decision making is concentrated at a single point in the organization.

decentralization

The degree to whi
ch lower
-
level employees provide input or actually make decisions.

formalization

The degree to which jobs within the organization are standardized and the extent to which
employee behavior is guided by rules and procedures.

decentralized
organization

An
organization in which department heads have authority for most decisions in their
divisions, while the company's headquarters office focuses on controlling essential
companywide matters.

span of control

The number of subordinates reporting directly to a s
upervisor.

mechanistic
organization

An organizational structure characterized by close adherence to the established chain of
command, highly specialized jobs, and vertical communications.

organic
organization

An organizational structure characterized by
flexible lines of authority, less specialized jobs,
and decentralized decisions.

downsizing

Dramatically reducing the size of a company's workforce.

team

A group of people committed to a common purpose, set of performance goals, and approach
for which th
ey hold themselves mutually accountable.

organizational
network

A system of interconnected or cooperating individuals.

formal
organizational
network

A formally assigned, permanent group of managers or other employees drawn from across a
company's functio
ns, geo
-
graphic areas, and hierarchical levels to take the initiative in
finding and solving problems.

informal
organizational
network

Cooperating individuals who are interconnected only informally to share information and
help solve each other's problems
.

electronic
networking

Networking through the use of collaborative computing software like Lotus Notes.

electronic bulletin
board

An example of e
-
mail

based communications that allow one or more group members to file
messages on various topics to be pic
ked up by other group members via telecommunications
links.

hyperarchy

An organization structure based on electronic networks using the Internet, intranets, and
similar links.

boundaryless
organization

An organization in which the widespread use of teams
, networks, and similar structural
mechanisms means that the boundaries separating organizational functions and hierarchical
levels are reduced and more permeable.

authority
boundary

The boundary represented by differences in organizational level or statu
s across which
communications may be distorted or constrained due to the status difference.

task boundary

The perceived limited actions of a specific organizational position.

political boundary

The special interests or agendas within an organization that

may oppose each other.

identity boundary

The boundary caused by identifying with those groups with which one has shared
experiences and with which one believes one shares fundamental values.

horizontal
corporation

A structure that is organized around cu
stomer
-
oriented processes performed by multi
-
disciplinary cross
-
functional teams rather than formal functional departments.

federal
organization

An organization in which power is distributed between a central unit and a number of
constituent units, but th
e central unit's authority is intentionally limited.

cellular
organization

An organization composed of small, individual, more
-
or
-
less autonomous and self
-
reliant
firms.

staffing

Actually filling a firm's open positions; also, the personnel process that
includes six steps:
job analysis, personnel planning; recruiting, interviewing, testing and selection, and training
and development.

job analysis

The procedure used to determine the duties of particular jobs and the kinds of people (in
terms of skills and

experience) who should be hired for them.

job description

A document that identifies a particular job, provides a brief job summary, and lists specific
responsibilities and duties of the job.

job specification

The human qualifications in terms of traits
, skills, and experiences required to accomplish a
job.

job analysis
questionnaire

A form used by managers to determine the duties and functions of a job through a series of
questions that employees answer.

personnel
planning

The process of determining t
he organization's future personnel needs, as well as the methods
to be used to fill those needs.

personnel
replacement chart

Company records showing present performance and promotability of inside candidates for
the most important positions.

position
rep
lacement card

A card prepared for each position in a company to show possible replacement candidates
and their qualifications.

recruiting

Attracting a pool of viable job applicants.

job posting

Publicizing an open job to employees (often by literally pos
ting it on bulletin boards) and
listing its attributes, like qualifications, supervisor, working schedule, and pay rate.

contingent worker

A temporary worker hired by an employer to fill short
-
term needs; not a permanent, full
-
time, or part
-
time employee.

executive
recruiter

An agency retained by employers to seek out top management talent.

application form

A form that requests information such as education, work history, and hobbies from a job
candidate as a means of quickly collecting verifiable histor
ical data.

management
assessment center

A development and/or selection device wherein management candidates spend two or three
days performing realistic management tasks under the observation of appraisers.

orientation

The process of providing new employ
ees with basic information about the employer, such as
company policies, working hours, or parking arrangements.

training program

The process of providing new employees with information they need to do their jobs
satisfactorily.

on
-
the
-
job
training (OJT)

Training in which a person learns a job while he or she is working at it.

appraisal

A manager's evaluation of and feedback on an employee's work performance.

360
-
degree
feedback

A performance evaluation method that involves collecting performance inform
ation on an
employee all around that person

for instance, from subordinates, supervisors, peers, and
internal and external customers.

employee
compensation

All forms of pay or rewards that go to employees and arise from their employment.

fixed salary

Com
pensation based on an agreed rate for a set period of time.

hourly wage

Compensation based on a set hourly pay rate for work performed.

financial incentive

Any financial reward that is contingent on a worker's performance, such as commissions or
piecewor
k.

employee benefits

Supplements to wages or pay that employees get as a result of their working for an
organization.

unemployment
insurance

Legally mandated insurance that is paid by state agencies to workers who are terminated
through no fault of their

own; the funds come from a tax on the employer's payroll.

workers'
compensation

A legally mandated benefit that pays income and medical benefits to work
-
related accident
victims or their dependents, regardless of fault.

discipline without
A m
ultistage displinary technique that uses oral reminders of the violated rule; then written
punishment

reminders; followed by mandatory one
-
day leaves; and finally, if the behavior is not
corrected, dismissal.

affirmative action

Alegislated requirement that employers

make an extra effort to hire and promote those in a
protected (women or minority) group.

leadership

Leadership is one person influencing another to willingly work toward a predetermined
objective.

trait theory

Trait theory in leadership, is the theory t
hat leaders have basic identifiable traits or
characteristics that contribute to their success as leaders.

employee
-
oriented leader

Employee
-
oriented leader is a leader who focuses on the needs of employees and
emphasizes building good interpersonal relat
ionships.

job
-
centered
leader

Job
-
centered leader is a leader who focuses on production and on a job's technical aspects.


close supervision

Close supervision is a leadership style involving close, hands
-
on monitoring of subordinates
and their work.

lai
ssez
-
faire
leader

Laissez
-
faire leader is a leader who takes a hands
-
off approach toward supervising
subordinates.

general leader

General leader is a leader who takes a middle
-
ground approach between close supervision
and laissez
-
faire leadership.

transa
ctional
behaviors

Transactional behaviors are leadership actions that focus on accomplishing the tasks at hand
and on maintaining good working relationships by exchanging promises of rewards for
performance.

transformational
leadership

Transformational le
adership is the leadership process that involves influencing major
changes in the attitudes and assumptions of organization members and building commitment
for the organization's mission, objectives, and strategies.

framing

Framing, in decision
-
making, is

the idea that the way a problem is presented can influence
decisions.

leader
-
member
exchange (LMX)
theory

Leader
-
member exchange (LMX) theory is the theory that leaders may use different
leadership styles with different members of the same workgroup, bas
ed in part on perceived
similarities and differences with the leader.

total quality
management
(TQM)

An organizationwide management system that focuses all functions of the business on
maximizing customer satisfaction at continually lower real costs.

mot
ivation

The intensity of a person's desire to engage in some activity.

motivational
dispositions or
needs

Motives that lie dormant until the proper conditions arise to bring them forth or make them
active.

aroused motive

A motive that expresses itself in

behavior.

equity theory

J. S. Adams's theory that people have a need for, and therefore value and seek, fairness in
employer

employee relationships.

expectancy

In motivation, the probability that a person's efforts will lead to performance.

instrumenta
lity

The perceived correlation between successful performance and obtaining the reward.

valence

In motivation, the perceived value a person ascribes to the reward for certain efforts.

operant behavior

Behavior that appears to operate on or have an influe
nce on the subject's environment.

contingent reward

A reward that is contingent or dependent on performance of a particular behavior.

behavior
modification

The technique of changing or modifying behavior through the use of contingent rewards or
punishmen
ts.

positive
reinforcement

The act of rewarding desired behavior; or the actual rewards, such as praise or bonuses,
given each time the desired behavior occurs.

extinction

The behavioral modification technique of withholding positive reinforcement so tha
t over
time the undesired behavior disappears.

negative
reinforcement

reinforcing the desirable behavior by removing something undesirable from the situation.

punishment

A behavioral modification option that applies penalties for the undesired behavior t
o reduce
the possibility that it will recur.

pay for
performance

Any compensation method based on merit or performance rather than across
-
the
-
board non
-
output
-
based pay.

variable pay plan

A compensation plan that may reduce or increase some portion of th
e individual employee's
pay, depending on whether the company meets its financial goals.

gainsharing plan

An incentive plan that engages many or all employees in a common effort to achieve a
company's productivity objectives and in which they share in the

gains.

merit raise

a salary increase

usually permanent

based on individual performance.

spot award

A financial reward given to an employee as soon as landable performance is observed.

job design

The number and nature of specific tasks or activities in
a job.

job enlargement

An increase in the number of similar tasks assigned to a job.

job rotation

The systematic movement of a worker from job to job to improve job satisfaction and reduce
boredom.

job enrichment

The inclusion of opportunities for achie
vement and other motivators in a job by making the
job itself more challenging.

empowering
employees

Authorizing and enabling employees to do their jobs with greater autonomy.

lifelong learning

The organizational program of providing continuing education

and training to employees
throughout their careers.

communication

The exchange of information and the transmission of meaning.

communication
channel

The vehicle that carries the message in the communication process.

feedback

The receiver's response to
the message that was actually received in the communication
process.

interpersonal
communication

Communication that occurs between two individuals.

organizational
communication

Communication that occurs among several individuals or groups.

semantics

The

meaning of words.

nonverbal
communication

The nonspoken aspects of communication, such as a person's manner of speaking, facial
expressions, or body posture, that express meaning to others.

formal
communication

Messages that are recognized as official b
y the organization, such as orders from superiors
to subordinates, sales reports, and status reports.

informal
communication

Communication not officially sanctioned by the organization, such as rumors heard through
the grapevine.

telecommunicatio
ns

The e
lectronic transmission of data, text, graphics, voice (audio), or image (video) over any
distance.

decision support
system

An information system that assists management in semistructured or unstructured decision
making by combining data, analytical models
, and user
-
friendly software.

collaborative
writing system

A computerized support system that lets group members work simultaneously on a single
document from a number of interconnected or network computers.

group scheduling
system

A computerized support

system that allows each group member to put his or her daily
schedule into a shared database so that each can identify the most suitable times to schedule
meetings or to attend currently scheduled meetings.

workflow
automation
system

An e
-
mail type of sy
stem that automates the flow of paperwork from person to person.

telecommuting

The substitution of telecommunications and computers for the commute to a central office.

employee
involvement
program

Any formal program that lets employees participate in fo
rmulating important work decisions
or in supervising all or part of their own work activities.

group
cohesiveness

The degree of interpersonal attractiveness within a group, dependent on factors like
proximity, attraction among the individual group members
, group size, intergroup
competition, and agreement about goals.

suggestion team

A team formed to work in the short term on a given issue such as increasing productivity.

problem
-
solving
team

Team formed to identify and solve work
-
related problems.

semi
-
autonomous
team

A team that has considerable input into managing the activities in their own work area but
are still headed by a supervisor.

self
-
managing
team

A highly trained team of employees including 6 to 18 people on average, who are fully
responsi
ble for turning out a well
-
defined segment of finished work. Also called a self
-
directed work team.

quality circle

A team of 6 to 12 employees that meets about once per week on company time to solve
problems affecting its work area.

venture team

A small
team of people who operate as a semi
-
autonomous unit to create and develop a new
idea.

transnational team

A work team composed of multinational members whose activities span many countries.

strategic change

A change in a firm's strategy, mission, or visi
on.

business
reengineering

The radical redesign of business processes to cut waste, to improve cost, quality, and
service; and to maximize the benefits of information technology, generally by questioning
how and why things are being done as they are.

unf
reezing

A step in psychologist Kurt Lewin's model of change that involves reducing the forces for
the status quo, usually by presenting a provocative problem or event to get people to
recognize the need for change and to search for new solutions.

moving

A

step in psychologist Kurt Lewin's model of change aimed at using techniques and actually
altering the behaviors, values, and attitudes of the individuals in an organization.

refreezing

A step in psychologist Kurt Lewin's model of change aimed at preventi
ng a return to old
ways of doing things by instituting new systems and procedures that reinforce the new
organizational changes.

change advocate

A leader who champions organizational change, often by cajoling, inspiring, and negotiating
it.

charismatic
l
eadership

Guidance from leaders who possess envisioning, energizing, and enabling qualities that
mobilize and sustain activity within an organization.

instrumental
leadership

The managerial role of building and clarifying organizational changes so that em
ployees can
accomplish their new tasks.

missionary
leadership

A leadership style characterized by influencing an organization to move toward a vision by
winning the commitment of others who then aid in the process.

organizational
development
(OD)

An appr
oach to organizational change in which the employees themselves formulate the
change that's required and implement it, usually with the aid of a trained consultant.

action research

The process of collecting data from employees about a system in need of ch
ange, and then
feeding that data back to the employees so that they can analyze it, identify problems,
develop solutions, and take action themselves.

human process
interventions

Organizational change techniques aimed at enabling employees to develop a bet
ter
understanding of their own and others' behaviors for the purpose of improving that behavior
such that the organization benefits.

sensitivity
training

Also called laboratory or t
-
group training, the basic aim of this organizational development
techniqu
e is to increase participants' insight into their own behavior and that of others by
encouraging an open expression of feelings in a trainer
-
guided group.

team building

The process of improving the effectiveness of a team through action research or other
techniques.

confrontation

Meeting an organizational meeting aimed at clarifying and revealing intergroup
misperceptions, tensions, and problems so that they can be resolved.

survey research

The process of collecting data from attitude surveys filled out
by employees of an
organization, then feeding the data back to workgroups to provide a basis for problem
analysis and action planning.

formal structure
change program

An intervention technique in which employees collect information on existing formal
orga
nizational structures and analyze it for the purpose of redesigning and implementing
new organizational structures.

strategic
intervention

An organization development application aimed at effecting a suitable fit among a firm's
strategy, structure, cultur
e, and external environment.

integrated
strategic
management

An organizational development program to create or change a company's strategy by
analyzing the current strategy, choosing a desired strategy, designing a strategic change
plan, and implementing

the new plan.

role conflict

A situation in which an employee has conflicting orders, such that compliance with one
would make it difficult or impossible to comply with the other.

interpersonal
conflict

A conflict occurring between individuals or between

individuals and groups.

intergroup
organizational
conflict

A disagreement between organizational units such as production and sales departments or
between line and staff units.

avoidance

Moving away from or refusing to discuss a conflict issue.

smoothi
ng over

In conflict management, diminishing or avoiding a conflict issue.

accommodation

Giving in to the opponent in an attempt to end a conflict.

competition

An approach to conflict management and negotiating that presumes a win

lose situation.

comprom
ise

Settling a conflict through mutual concessions.

collaboration

A conflict
-
management style in which both sides work together to achieve agreement.

employee theft

Any unauthorized taking of company property by employees for their personal use.

control

Task of ensuring that activities are getting the desired results.

feedforward
control

A type of control that focuses on preventing anticipated problems since it takes place in
advance of the actual work activity.

concurrent control

A type of control tha
t takes place while a work activity is in progress.

feedback control

A type of control that takes place after a work activity is done

steering control

Control that predicts results and takes corrective action before the operation or project is
completed.

yes/no control

A control system in which work may not proceed to the next step until it passes an
intermediate checkpoint step.

postaction control

Any control tool in which the project or operation being controlled is completed first, and
then results a
re measured and compared to the standard.

traditional control
methods

Control procedures that are based on maintaining control generally through external means,
by setting standards, comparing the actual results to the standard, and then taking corrective

action, and including diagnostic, boundary, and interactive control systems.

market control

An approach to control that emphasizes the use of external market mechanisms to establish
the standards used in the control system.

bureaucratic
control

An appro
ach to control that emphasizes organizational authority and relies on administrative
rules, regulations, procedures, and policies.

clan control

An approach to control in which employee behavior is regulated by the shared values,
norms, traditions, rituals
, beliefs, and other aspects of the organization's culture.

control process

A three
-
step process including measuring actual performance, comparing actual
performance against a standard, and taking managerial action to correct deviations or
inadequate stan
dards.

management by
walking around
(MBWA)

A term used to describe when a manager is out in the work area, interacting directly with
employees, and exchanging information about what's going on.

commitment
-
based control
methods

A category of control tools

that rely on the employees' self
-
control and commitment to doing
things right to make sure things stay in control.

diagnostic control
system

A control method, such as a budget, which ensures that standards are being met and that
variances are diagnosed a
nd explained.

boundary control
system

Policy, such as a code of conduct, that establishes rules and identifies the actions and pitfalls
that employees must avoid.

interactive control
system

Control method that involves direct, face
-
to
-
face interaction wi
th employees so as to
monitor rapidly changing information and respond proactively to changing conditions.

principle of
exception

Sometimes called management by exception, this rule holds that employees should be left to
pursue the standards set by manage
ment, and only significant deviations from the standard
should be brought to a manager's attention.

range of variation

The acceptable parameters of variance between actual performance and the standard.

basic corrective
action

Corrective action that looks

at how and why performance deviated and then proceeds to
correct the source of deviation.

immediate
corrective action

Corrective action that corrects problems at once to get performance back on track.

budget

A financial plan showing financial expectatio
ns for a specific period.

sales budget

Shows the number of units to be shipped in each period (usually per month) or in general the
sales activity to be achieved and the sales revenue expected from the sales.

operating budget

Shows the expected sales and
/or expenses for each of the company's departments for the
planning period in question.

production and
materials budget

Shows what the company plans to spend for materials, labor, and administration in order to
fulfill the requirements of the sales budget
.

income statement

Shows expected sales, expected expenses, and expected income or profit for the year.

cash budget

Shows, for each month, the amount of cash the company can expect to receive and the
amount it can expect to disperse.

balance sheet

Is a
projected statement of the financial position of the firm.

economic value
A financial tool for measuring corporate and divisional performance calculated by taking
added (EVA)

after
-
tax operating profit minus the total annual cost of capital.

market value

added (MVA)

A financial tool that measures the stock market's estimate of the value of a firm's past and
expected investment projects.

variance

The difference between budgeted and actual amounts.

audit

A systematic process of objectively obtaining and e
valuating evidence regarding important
aspects of the firm's performance, judging the accuracy and validity of the data, and
communicating the results to interested users.

financial ratio

An arithmetic comparison of one financial measure to another, gener
ally used to monitor
and control financial performance.

responsibility

The obligation to perform any assigned duties.

performance

The end result of an activity.

organizational
performance

The accumulated end results of all the organization's work proces
ses and activities.

productivity

The overall output of goods or services produced divided by the inputs needed to generate
that output.

value

The performance characteristics, features and attributes, and any other aspects of goods and
services for which
customers are willing to give up resources.

value chain

The entire series of organizational work activities that add value at each step beginning with
the processing of raw materials and ending with finished product in the hands of end users.

value chain

management

The process of managing the entire sequence of integrated activities and information about
product flows along the entire value chain.

Six Sigma

A quality standard that establishes a goal of no more than 3.4 defects per million parts or
proced
ures.

intellectual
property

Proprietary company information that's critical to its efficient and effective functioning and
competitiveness.

asset management

The process of acquiring, managing, renewing, and disposing of assets as needed, and of
designing

business models to exploit the value from these assets.

financial
responsibility
centers

individuals or groups who are assigned the responsibility for a particular set of financial
outputs and/or inputs.

profit centers

Responsibility centers whose manag
ers are held accountable for profit.

revenue centers

Responsibility centers whose managers are held accountable for generating revenues, which
is a financial measure of output.

corporate
scorecard

A management tool, usually a computerized model, that tra
ces a multitude of performance
measures simultaneously and shows their interaction.

enterprise
resource planning
system

A companywide integrated computer system that gives managers real
-
time instantaneous
information regarding the costs and status of ever
y activity and project in the business.

behavioral
displacement

A reaction to being controlled in which employees concentrate too narrowly on the
company's control standards and thereby miss the company's more important objectives.

gamesmanship

Managemen
t actions that try to improve the manager's apparent performance in terms of the
control system without producing any economic benefits for the company.

commitment

The relative strength of an individual's identification with and involvement in an
organiza
tion.

operations
management

The process of managing the resources that are needed to produce an organization's goods
and services.

input

A resource required for the manufacture of a product or service.

conversion system

Any production system that conver
ts inputs (material and human resources) into outputs
(products or services); sometimes called the production process or technology.

output

A direct outcome (actual product or service) or indirect outcome (tax, wage, salary) of a
production system.

inter
mittent
production

A system in which production is performed on a start
-
and
-
stop basis, such as for the
manufacture of made
-
to
-
order products.

continuous
production

A production process, such as those used by chemical plants or refineries, that runs for a

very long period without the start
-
and
-
stop behavior associated with intermittent production.

facility layout

The configuration of all the machines, employee work stations, storage areas, internal walls,
and so forth that constitute the facility used to
create a firm's product or service.

process layout

A production system design in which similar machines or functions are grouped together.

fixed
-
position
A production system arrangement in which the product being built or produced stays at one
layout

loc
ation and the machines and tools required to build the product are brought to that location
as needed, as for the building of ships or other bulky products.

cellular
manufacturing

Usually a combination of process and product layouts, in which machines and

personnel are
grouped into cells containing all the tools and operations required to produce a particular
product or family of products.

operations or
production
planning

The process of deciding what products to produce and where, when, and how to produc
e
them.

Gantt chart

A production scheduling chart (named after management pioneer Henry Gantt) that plots
time on a horizontal scale and generally shows, for each order, the start and stop times of
each operation.

network planning
and control
methods

Way
s of planning and controlling projects by graphically representing the projects' steps and
the timing and links between these steps.

events

The specific accomplishments in a project, represented by circles in a PERT chart.

activities

The time
-
consuming a
spects of a project, represented by arrows in a PERT chart.

critical path

The sequence of events in a project that in total requires the most time to complete.

inventory
management

The process of ensuring that the firm has adequate inventories of all par
ts and supplies
needed, within the constraint of minimizing total inventory costs.

ordering, or setup,
costs

The costs, usually fixed, of placing an order or setting up machines for a production run.

acquisition costs

The total costs of all units bought
to fill an order, usually varying with the size of the order.

inventory
-
holding
costs

All the costs associated with carrying parts or materials in inventory.

stockout costs

The costs associated with running out of raw materials, parts, or finished
-
goods
inventory.

economic order
quantity (EOQ)

An inventory management system based on a simple formula that is used to determine the
most economic quantity to order so that the total of inventory and set
-
up costs is minimized.

quality

The extent to which a pr
oduct or service is able to meet customer needs and expectations.

ISO 9000

The quality standards of the European Union.

total quality
management
(TQM)

An organizationwide management system that focuses all functions of the business on
maximizing customer

satisfaction at continually lower real costs.

Malcolm Baldrige
Award

A prize created in 1987 by the U.S. Department of Commerce to recognize outstanding
achievement in quality control management.

acceptance
sampling

A method of monitoring product qualit
y that requires the inspection of only a small portion
of the produced items.

designing for
manufacturability

Designing products with ease of manufacturing and quality in mind.

concurrent
engineering

Designing products in multidisciplinary teams so that
all departments involved in the
product's success contribute to its design.

world
-
class
company

An organization that can compete successfully based on quality and productivity in an
intensely competitive global environment.

world
-
class
manufacturer

An or
ganization that uses modern production techniques and management systems to boost
manufacturing productivity, quality, and flexibility in an environment of international
competition.

just
-
in
-
time (JIT)

A production control method used to attain minimum in
ventory levels by ensuring delivery
of materials and assemblies just when they are to be used; also refers to a philosophy of
manufacturing that aims to optimize production processes by continuously reducing waste.

lean
manufacturing

A management philosop
hy that assumes that any manufacturing process that does not add
value to the product for the customer is wasteful; also called value
-
added manufacturing.

value
-
added
manufacturing

A management approach that emphasizes the idea that any manufacturing proc
ess that does
not add value to the product for the customer is wasteful; also called lean manufacturing.

computer
-
aided
design (CAD)

A computerized process for designing new products, modifying existing ones, or simulating
conditions that may affect the d
esigns.

computer
-
integrated
manufacturing
(CIM)

The total integration of all production
-
related business activities through the use of computer
systems, usually including automation and automatic guided vehicles.

automation

The automatic operation of a s
ystem, process, or machine.

flexible
manufacturing
system (FMS)

The organization of groups of production machines that are connected by automated
materials
-
handling and transfer machines, and integrated into a computer system for the
purpose of combining
the benefits of made
-
to
-
order flexibility and mass
-
production
efficiency.

computer
-
integrated
manufacturing
(CIM)

The total integration of all production
-
related business activities through the use of computer
systems, usually including automation and aut
omatic guided vehicles.

service
management

A total organizationwide approach that makes quality of service the business's number one
driving force.

moment of truth

The instant when the customer comes in contact with any aspect of a business, and based on

that contact forms an opinion about the quality of your service or product.

cycle of service

Includes all the moments of truth experienced by a typical customer, from first to last.

customer report
card

Lists the service attributes for which customers a
re looking, as well as the relative weights
of priorities of each attribute and how the customers score your company on each of them.

service strategy

The company's plan for achieving superior service.

information

Data presented in a form that is meaning
ful to the recipient.

data mining

Using special computer software to analyze vast amounts of customer data stored in a
company's data bank to obtain information the firm can use to be more competitive.

knowledge
management

The task of developing and expl
oiting an organization's tangible and intangible resources.

information
system

A set of people, data, and procedures that work together to retrieve, process, store, and
disseminate information to support decision making and control.

executive support
sys
tem

An information system designed to help top
-
level executives acquire, manipulate, and use
the information they need to maintain the company's overall effectiveness.

management
information
system

An information system that provides decision support for
managers by producing
standardized, summarized reports on a regular basis.

transaction
processing system

An information system that provides detailed information about short
-
term, daily activities.

network

A group of interconnected computers, workstation
s, or computer devices such as printers
and data storage systems.

local area network
(LAN)

A communications network that spans a limited distance, such as a building or several
adjacent buildings, using the company's own telecommunications links.

wide ar
ea network
(WAN)

A network that serves microcomputers over large geographic areas, spanning distances from
a few miles to around the globe, and that may use common carrier networks or private
telecommunications systems.

distributed
processing

Computerized

networks that use small local computers to collect, store, and process
information that is sent periodically to headquarters for analysis and review.

project

A one
-
time
-
only set of activities that has a definite beginning and ending point in time.

proje
ct
management

The task of getting a project's activities done on time, within budget, and according to
specifications.



Types of Managers

Organization Level

Position

Functional Title

Top managers

(Have managers as subordinates)

Executives

President

V
ice president, production

Vice president, sales

Vice president, HR

Chief financial officer

Middle managers

(Have managers as subordinates)

Managers or directors

Production manager

Sales director

HR manager

Finance manager

First
-
line managers

(Ha
ve nonmanagers as subordinates)

Supervisors

Production supervisor

Regional sales manager

Assistant HR manager

Chief bookkeeper


Fundamental Changes Facing Managers: A series of forces

globalized competition, technology revolution, new
competitors, and

changing tastes

are creating outcomes that include more uncertainty, more choices, and more
complexity. The result is that the organizational winners of today and tomorrow will have to be responsive,
smaller, flatter, and oriented toward adding value thro
ugh people.



Characteristics of More Successful International Managers.

Scale

Sco
re


Sample Item


Sensitive to cultural
differences


When working with people from other cultures, works hard to understand
their perspectives.

Business knowledge


Has a

solid understanding of our products and services.

Courage to take a stand


Is willing to take a stand on issues.

Brings out the best in
people


Has a special talent for dealing with people.

Acts with integrity


Can be depended on to tell the trut
h, regardless of circumstances.

Is insightful


Is good at identifying the most important part of a complex problem or issue.

Is committed to success


Clearly demonstrates commitment to seeing the organization succeed.

Takes risks


Takes personal a
s well as business risks.

Uses feedback


Has changed as a result of feedback.

Is culturally adventurous


Enjoys the challenge of working in countries other than his or her own.

Seeks opportunities to learn


Takes advantage of opportunities to do n
ew things.

Is open to criticism


Appears brittle

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Management
Function

Typical Decisions

Planning

What are the organization's long
-
term objectives?

What strategies will best achieve these objectives?

What
should the organization's short
-
term objectives be?

How difficult should individual goals be?

How difficult should individual goals be?

Organizing

How many subordinates should report directly to me?

How much centralization should there be in the organiza
tion?

How should jobs be designed?

When should the organization implement a different structure?

Leading

How do I handle employees who appear to be low in motivation? What is the most effective
leadership style in a given situation?

How will a specific c
hange affect worker productivity?

When is the right time to stimulate conflict?

Controlling

What activities in the organization need to be controlled? How should these activities be
controlled?

When is a performance deviation significant?

What type of ma
nagement information system should the organization have?



Decisions Business Team Managers Make

Manager

Decisions

Accounting Manager

What accounting firm should we use?

Who should process our payroll?

Should we give this customer credit?

Finance Ma
nager

What bank should we use?

Should we sell bonds or stocks?

Should we buy back some of our company's stock?

Human Resource
Manager

Where should we recruit for employees?

Should we set up a testing program?

Should I advise settling the equal employment
complaint?

Production Manager

Which supplier should we use?

Should we build the new plant?

Should we buy the new machine?

Sales Manager

Which sales rep should we use in this district?

Should we start this advertising campaign?

Should we lower prices in

response to our competitor's doing so?


Comparing Programmed and Nonprogrammed Decisions


Programmed

Nonprogrammed

Type of Decision

Programmable; routine;

generic; computational

Nonprogrammable;

unique; innovative

Nature of Decision

Procedural; predi
ctable;

well
-
defined information and decision criteria

Novel; unstructured;

incomplete channels of

information; unkown

criteria

Decision
-
Making Strategy

Reliance on rules and

computation

Reliance on principles;

judgment; creative

problem
-
solving processe
s

Decision
-
Making
Technique

Management science;

capital budgeting;

computerized solutions;

rules

Judgment; intuition,

creativity


Contingency Approach to Organizing

Characteristics

Type of Organization

Mechanistic

Organic

Type of Environment

Stable

Innovative

Comparable to

Classical organization

Behavioral organization emphasis on self
-
control

Adherence to Chain of
Command

Close

Flexible

chain of command often bypassed

Type of Departmentalization

Functional

Divisional

How Specialized Are Jobs?

Sp
ecialized

Unspecialized

jobs change daily, with situation

Degree of Decentralization

Decision making
centralized

Decision making decentralized

Span of Control

Narrow

Wide

Type of Coordination

Hierarchy and rules

Committees, liaisons, and special integra
tors


The Motivational Underpinnings of 10 Motivation Methods


Motivation Methods

Foundations

of Behavior and Motivation

Pay
for
Perf
orm
-

ance


Me
rit
Rai
ses


Spo
t
Re
war
ds


Sk
ill
-

Ba
se
d
Pa
y


Rec
og
-

niti
on
Aw
ards


Job
Red
esig
n


Emp
ower
Empl
oyees


Go
al
Sett
ing


Positi
ve
Reinf
orce
-

ment


Lifelo
ng
Lear
ning


Self
-
Concept:

People seek to fulfill their potential.




x

x

x

x



x

Self
-
Efficacy:

People differ in their estimates of how they'll
perform on a task: self
-
efficacy influences effort.




x



x



x

Maslow's Needs Hierarchy:

High
-
level needs are never
totally satisfied and aren't aroused until lower
-
level needsx
are satisfied.


x

x


x

x

x



x

Alderfer:

All needs may be active, to some degree, at the
same time.


x

x


x

x

x



x

McClelland's
Ach, Pow, Aff:

Needs for achievement,
power, and affiliation are especially important in the work
setting.




x

x

x

x




Herzberg's Dual Factor:

Extrinsic factors prevent
dissatisfaction; intrinsic factors motivate workers.






x

x



x

Vroom's Expectan
cy Approach:

Motivation is a function of
expectancy that effort leads to performance, performance
leads to reward, and reward is valued.

x

x

x


x



x



Locke's Goal Setting:

People are motivated to achieve
goals they consciously set.







x

x



Adams's

Equity Theory:

People are motivated to maintain
balance between their perceived inputs and outputs.


x

x


x






Reinforcement:

People will continue behavior that is
rewarded and cease behavior that is punished.

x

x

x


x




x



Six Methods for Dealing w
ith Resistance to Change

Metho
d

Commonly Used in Situations

Advantages

Drawbacks

Educat
ion +
comm
unicati
on

Where there is a lack of information or
inaccurate information and analysis.

Once persuaded, people will often help
with the implementation of the
change.

Can be very time
-
consuming if lots of
people are involved.

Partici
pation
+
involv
ement

Where the initiators do not have all the
information they need to design the
change, and where others have
considerable power to resist.

People who participate
will be
committed to implementing change, and
any relevant information they have will
be integrated into the change plan.

Can be very time
-
consuming if
participators design
an inappropriate
change.

Facilit
ation +
suppor
t

Where people are resisting because

of
fear and anxiety.

No other approach works as well with
employee adjustment problems.

Can be time
-
consuming and
expensive, yet still
fail.

Negoti
ation +
agreem
ent

Where someone or some group will
clearly lose out in a change, and where
that group has c
onsiderable power to
resist.

Sometimes it is a relatively easy way to
avoid major resistance.

Can be too
expensive in many
cases if it prompts
others to negotiate.

Manip
ulation
+ co
-
optatio
n

Where other tactics will not work or
are too expensive.

It can b
e a relatively quick and
inexpensive solution to resistance
problems.

Can lead to future
problems if people
feel manipulated.

Coerci
on

Where speed is essential, and the
change initiators possess considerable
power.

It is speedy and can overcome any kind
o
f resistance.

Can be risky if it
leaves people angry
at the initiators.


Mechanisms for Embedding and Reinforcing Organizational Culture

Primary Embedding Mechanisms

1.

What leaders pay attention to, measure, and control

2.

Leader reactions to critica
l incidents and organizational crises

3.

Deliberate role modeling, teaching, and coaching

4.

Criteria for allocation of rewards and status

5.

Criteria for recruitment, selection, promotion, retirement, and excommunication

Secondary Articulation and Rei
nforcement Mechanisms

1.

Organization design and structure

2.

Organizational systems and procedures

3.

Design of physical space, facades, buildings

Source
: Reprinted with permission from E. H. Schein, "Organizational Culture and Leadership." Copyright

©
1985 Jossey
-
Bass, Inc. A subsidiary of John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All rights reserved.


Examples of OD Interventions and the Organizational Levels They Affect




Primary Organizational Level Affected

Interventions

Individual

Group

Organization

Human
Process




T
-
groups

x

x


Process consultation


x


Third
-
party intervention

x

x


Team building


x


Organizational confrontation meeting


x

x

Intergroup relations


x

x

Technostructural




Formal structural change



x

Differentiation and integration



x

Cooperative union
-
management projects

x

x

x

Quality circles

x

x


Total quality management


x

x

Work design

x

x


Human Resource Management




Goal setting

x

x


Performance appraisal

x

x


Reward systems

x

x

x

Career planning and development

x



Managing workforce diversity

x



Employee wellness

x



Strategic




Integrated strategic management



x

Culture change



x

Strategic change



x

Self
-
designing organizations


x

x



Conflict
-
Resolution Modes

Component

Definition

Forcing

Contending

the adversary do what you say in a direct way

Confronting

Demanding attention to the conflict issue

Process controlling

Dominating the conflict
-
resolution process to one's own advantage

Problem solving

Reconciling the parties' basic interests

Comprom
ising

Settling through mutual concessions

Accommodating

Giving in to the opponent

Avoiding

Moving away from the conflict issue

Source
: Evert Van De Vliert, Martin C. Euwema, and Sipke E. Huismans, "Managing Conflict with a
Subordinate or a Superior: Eff
ectiveness of Conglomerated Behavior,"
Journal of Applied Psychology
, April
1995, pp. 271

81. Copyright © 1995 by the American Psychological Association. Reprinted by permission.


Components of Some Typical Production Systems

Producti
on

System

Primary

I
nputs

Purpose of

Conversion

Subsystem

Outputs

1. Pet
food
factory

Grain, water, fish meal, personnel,
tools, machines, paper bags, cans,
buildings, utilities

Converts raw materials into
finished goods

Pet food products

2. Public
accountin
g firm

Supplie
s, personnel, information,
computers, buildings, office
furniture, machines, utilities

Attracts customers, compiles
data, supplies management
information, computes taxes

Management information,
tax services, and audited
financial statements

3.
College
or
universit
y

Students, books, supplies, personnel,
buildings, utilities

Transmits information and
develops skills and knowledge

Educated persons



Techniq
ue

Description

Application

Quantit
ative



Time
series
analysis

Fits a trend line to a mathematical
equation and projects
into the future by means of this equation

Predicting next quarter's sales on the basis
of four years of previous sales data

Regressi
on
models

Predicts one variable on the basis of known or assumed
other variables

Seeking factors that

will predict a certain
level of sales (for example, price,
advertising expenditures)

Econom
etric
models

Uses a set of regression equations to simulate segments
of the economy

Predicting change in car sales as a result of
changes in tax laws

Econom
ic
ind
icator
s

Uses one or more economic indicators to predict a future
state of the economy

Using change in GNP to predict
discretionary income

Substitut
ion
effect

Uses a mathematical formula to predict how, when, and
under what circumstances a new product or t
echnology
will replace an existing one

Predicting the effect of DVD players on the
sale of VHS players

Qualitat
ive



Jury of
opinion

Combines and averages the opinions of experts

Polling the company's human resource
managers to predict next year's colleg
e
recruitment needs

Salesfor
ce
composi
tion

Combines estimates from field sales personnel of
customers' expected purchases

Predicting next year's sales of industrial
lasers

Custome
r
evaluati
on

Combines estimates from established purchases

Surveying major
car dealers by a car
manufacturer to determine types and
quantities of products desired

Forecasting Techniques


Unit

Production

Mass

Production

Process

Production


Structural characteristics

Low vertical

differentiation



Moderate vertical

different
iation



High vertical

differentiation



Low horizontal

differentiation



High horizontal

differentiation



Low horizontal

differentiation



Low formalization



High formalization



Low formalization



Most effective structure



Organic



Mechanistic



Organic



Exhibit 10.6 Woodward's Findings on Technology, Structure, and Effectiveness

Feedforward

Concurrent

Feedback

Careful prehiring screening.


Establish specific policies
defining theft and fraud and
discipline procedures.


Involve employees in w
riting
policies.


Educate and train employees
about the policies.


Have professionals review your
internal security controls.

Treat employees with respect
and dignity.


Openly communicate the costs
of stealing.


Let employees know on a
regular basis about
their
successes in preventing theft
and fraud.


Use video surveillance
equipment if conditions
warrant.


Install "lock
-
out" options on
computers, telephones, and e
-
mail.

Make sure empl
oyees know
when theft or fraud has
occurred

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Use corporate hot lines for
reporting incidences.


Set a good example.

Control Measures for Deterring or Reducing Employee Theft or Fraud



Objective

Ratio

Calculation

Meaning


Liquidity

Current ratio

Current assets /

Tests the organization's



Current liabilities

ability to meet short
-

term obligatio
ns




Acid test

Current assets less inventories/

Tests liquidity more



Current liabilities

accurately when

inventories turn over

slowly or are difficult to

sell



Leverage

Debt to assets

Total debt /

The higher the ratio, the



Total assets

more lever
aged the

organization




Times interest

Profits before interest and taxes/

Measures how far profits


earned

Total interest charges

can decline before the

organization is unable

to meet its interest

expenses



Activity

Inventory turnover

Sales /

The high
er the ratio, the



Inventory

more efficiently

inventory assets are

being used




Total asset turnover

Sales /

The fewer assets used to



Total assets

achieve a given level of

sales, the more

efficiently management

is using the

organizaiton's total

asse
ts



Profitability

Profit margin


Net profit after taxes/

Identifies the profits that


on sales

Total sales

various products are

generating




Return on

Net profit after taxes/

Measures the efficiency of


investment

Total assets

assets to generate

prof
its

Popular Financial Ratios