Clinical Informatics

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Oct 4, 2013 (3 years and 11 months ago)

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CS584: Introduction to
Biomedical Informatics

Ashish Sharma

Department of Biomedical Informatics

Aug 25, 2011

Class Logistics


Schedule


Tue, Thurs: 1


2:15pm


Office Hours


By appointment only


Schedule by Email: ashish.sharma@emory.edu


Grading


Class participation

30%


2 Term papers

40%


Assignments


30%

Introductions

Name:

Major:

Background:

Research Interests:

Quiz: What is Biomedical Informatics


Bioinformatics

and Computational Biology


Clinical and Healthcare Informatics


Healthcare IT


Applied Computer Science

Quiz: What is Biomedical Informatics


Bioinformatics

and Computational Biology


Clinical and Healthcare Informatics


Healthcare IT


Applied Computer Science




Overview

BMI is a heterogeneous field that brings together clinicians,
researchers from both life sciences and physical sciences, and
engineers

BMI training allows you to become better consumers of
information gathered in:


Hospitals and Healthcare Practice


Biological and Clinical Research




while advancing computer science and other cross
-
cutting
disciplines.

You don’t necessarily “train” in BMI, as much as get experience
in applying informatics techniques in biomedical and/or clinical
domains

BMI & Technological Advances


1890
:

Herman Hollerith. Punch Cards data
processing for US Census leading to mature public
health
and epidemiological surveys (1920


1940s)


1950


60s:

Decision support & Hospital Information
Systems (
solve pressing information management problems
)..
E.g. MEDINET


1970s:

Minicomputers that could be collocated
with physicians or point
-
of
-
care


more
manageable goals

Application of Informatics

1854 Cholera
epidemic in London

John Snow & the
cholera map

Bioinformatics: Google Maps for
Phylogenetics

Supramap
: Dan
Janies
, Ohio
State
University.
http://
supramap.osu.edu
/

Clinical Informatics

Ben
Shneiderman
, U.
of Maryland, HCIL Lab. http://
www.cs.umd.edu
/
hcil
/lifelines2/

Biomedical Informatics in Perspective


Biomedical Informatics Methods,
Techniques, and Theories

Applied
Informatics

Clinical or
Biomedical
Domain of
Interest

Contributes to….

Helps motivate

and drive …

Computer

Science

Helps drive …

Contribute to...

Decision

Science

Cognitive

Science

Information

Sciences

Management

Sciences

Other

Component

Sciences

© AMIA 2011

© AMIA 2011

www.amia.org

Interdisciplinary Nature of

Biomedical Informatics

Biomedical

Informatics

Cognitive Science

& Decision Making

Management

Sciences

Clinical

Sciences

Basic Biomedical

Sciences

Epidemiology

And Statistics

Bioengineering

Computer
Science
(hardware)

Computer
Science
(software)

Primary BMI Domains of Interest


Bioinformatics:

Store, analyze and mine biomedical and
genomic data. Integrate multiple data modalities to
advance our understanding of biological processes.


Clinical Informatics:

Application of informatics for clinical
care. e.g. Effective use of hospital records to improve
quality


Imaging Informatics:
Quantitative and reproducible
interpretation, storage and structured representation.


Public Health Informatics:

Usually limited to development
of interoperable systems for adverse reaction registries,
biosurveillance

etc.


Consumer Health Informatics:

Patient focused informatics,
health literacy, communication sciences etc.

Overview

BMI is a heterogeneous field that brings together clinicians,
researchers from both life sciences and physical sciences, and
engineers

BMI training allows you to become better consumers of
information gathered in:


Hospitals and Healthcare Practice


Biological and Clinical Research




while advancing computer science and other cross
-
cutting
disciplines.

You don’t necessarily “train” in BMI, as much as get experience
in applying informatics techniques in biomedical and/or clinical
domains

© AMIA 2011

www.amia.org

Biomedical Informatics

Biomedical informatics

(BMI) is the
interdisciplinary field that studies
and pursues the effective uses of
biomedical data, information, and
knowledge for scientific inquiry,
problem solving, and decision
making, motivated by efforts to
improve human health.

© AMIA 2011

www.amia.org

Biomedical Informatics:

Corollaries to the Definition

1.
BMI develops, studies and applies
theories, methods and processes

for
the generation, storage, retrieval, use,
and sharing of biomedical data,
information, and knowledge.

2.
BMI builds on
computing,
communication and information
sciences

and technologies and their
application in biomedicine.

© AMIA 2011

www.amia.org

Biomedical Informatics:

Corollaries to the Definition

3.
BMI investigates and supports reasoning, modeling,
simulation, experimentation and translation across
the
spectrum from molecules to populations
,
dealing with a variety of biological systems,
bridging basic and clinical research and practice,
and the healthcare enterprise.

4.
BMI, recognizing that people are the ultimate users
of biomedical information, draws upon the
social
and behavioral sciences

to inform the design and
evaluation of technical solutions and the evolution
of complex economic, ethical, social, educational,
and organizational systems.

Biomedical Informatics in Perspective

Basic Research

Applied Research

And Practice

Biomedical Informatics Methods,
Techniques, and Theories

Bioinformatics

Clinical

Informatics

Imaging
Informatics

Public Health
Informatics

© AMIA 2011

Biomedical Informatics in Perspective

Basic Research

Applied Research

And Practice

Biomedical Informatics Methods,
Techniques, and Theories

Imaging
Informatics

Clinical
Informatics

Bioinformatics

Public Health
Informatics

Molecular and

Cellular

Processes

Tissues and

Organs

Individuals

(Patients)

Populations

And Society

Health Informatics

© AMIA 2011

Biomedical Informatics in Perspective

Basic Research

Applied Research

And Practice

Biomedical Informatics Methods,
Techniques, and Theories

Imaging
Informatics

Clinical
Informatics

Bioinformatics

Public Health
Informatics

Molecular and

Cellular

Processes

Tissues and

Organs

Individuals

(Patients)

Populations

And Society

Continuum with

䙵空F


䉯畮摡物敳

Biomolecular

Imaging

Pharmaco
-

genomics

Consumer
Health

© AMIA 2011

BMI and HIT

Biomedical Informatics

Training, Research and

Development


Academia


Research Institutes


Corporate Research Labs

Clinical Systems Companies

Academic Medical Centers

Hospitals, Health

Systems, Practices,

Healthcare Industry

Biomedical Research

Community

PEOPLE

IDEAS

SOFTWARE

METHODS

© AMIA 2011

BMI and HIT

Biomedical Informatics

Training, Research and

Development


Academia


Research Institutes


Corporate Research Labs

Clinical Systems Companies

Academic Medical Centers

Hospitals, Health

Systems, Practices,

Healthcare Industry

Synergies

© AMIA 2011

Outline to Class

Part 1: Technological Foundations

Data management and storage; Standards; Analysis; Security

Part 2: Imaging and Biomedical Informatics

Image Management and Standards; Digital Radiology
Workflow; Image Processing; Quantitative Imaging; CAD;
Digital Pathology

Part 3: Biomedical Informatics in Healthcare Practice

Clinical Informatics; Clinical Systems; EMR; NLP

Part 4: Bioinformatics (if time permits)


Expectations


At the end of the semester you
won’t:


Become better programmers


Learn to fix PACS, RIS, EMRs etc.


However you will:


Learn and appreciate the technological and
informational complexities of biomedical research
and clinical practice


Understand the broad concepts of biomedical
informatics


Start future work in the application of informatics in
specific domains (imaging, clinical, public health)

Textbook

Biomedical
Informatics Computer
Applications in Health Care
and
Biomedicine

Edward H.
Shortliffe

James J.
Cimino


Access online (via Emory VPN)

http
://www.springerlink.com/content/p66612
/


Chapter readings are required and
posted
on Emory Blackboard
.



Assignment


Review Chapter 1