TOWSON UNIVERSITY College of Education Program in Instructional Technology: School Library Media ISTC 601.101 Dr.____________, Instructor Library Media Administration Office: HH ____ Phone: E-mail:

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TOWSON UNIVERSITY

College of Education

Program in Instructional Technology: School Library Media


ISTC 601.101



Dr.
____________
, Instructor

Library Media Administration


Office: HH ____



Phone:

E
-
mail:






COURSE DESCRIPTION:

This course will focus on school library media policy development, planning, program
implementation and evaluation.

I
NTRODUCTION:

The overarching goal of this course is to lear
n and be able to apply the
roles of
a
school librarian

as described by the American Association of School Librarians

as
:
leader,

instructional partner,
information specialist,
teacher,
and program ad
ministrator. The student
will engage in learn
ing
experie
nces that prepare will prepare them

with fundamental knowledge of school library
program administration in ord
er to fulfill the mission and g
oals of the School Library Media
Program "to ensure that students and staff are effective users of ideas and inform
ation"
(AASL/AECT, 1988).
The national
Standards for the 21st Century Learner

will serve as the
catalyst and unifying course theme providing purpose for school library media specialists to
implement library media programs that provide intellectual and phy
sical access to materials in all
formats and instruction to foster competence and stimulate interest in reading, viewing, and
using information and ideas.
The
National Educational Technology Plan, Transforming
American Education: Learning P
owered by
Technology

underscores
the
Standards for the 21st
Century Learner

and the key work of librarians who administer the school library media
program.


This course is designed to provide an authentic application of completed graduate course work
in critical are
as of service provided by an effective library media program: as outlined in the
Standards for Initial Programs for School Library Media Specialist Preparation

2010

(
S
ASB

&
NCATE)
. These s
tandards are the organizational framework for your graduate online

portfolio.

2



The School Library Media Program Digital Portfolio
:


The School Library Media Program Digital Portfolio Assessment is introduced in ISTC
653 (The Organization of Knowledge), structurally designed in ISTC 541 (Foundations of
Instructional
Technology), and completed in ISTC 789 (Practicum and Portfolio in School
Library Media).

As

candidates near completion of the program, they will write reflection statements
correlating their program work, particularly as the work connects to PK
-
12 studen
ts.


Candidates
are encouraged to write reflections throughout their program of study aligning coursework to the
AASL standards for the Initial Programs for School Library Media Specialist Preparation.

It is not likely possible to complete the portfolio un
til a majority of coursework is
completed.


The portfolio is to be completed as part of (three credits) of the final six credit
program course, ISTC 789 (Practicum and Portfolio in School Library Media).


Candidates
should archive digital and other copies
of their work.



Applicable AASL Standards for the Initial Preparation of School Library Media
Specialists:

1.1 Knowledge of learners and learning

Candidates are knowledgeable of learning styles, stages of human growth and development, and
cultural
influences on learning. Candidates assess learner needs and design instruction that
reflects educational best practice. Candidates support the learning of all students and other
members of the learning community, including those with diverse learning style
s, physical and
intellectual abilities and needs. Candidates base twenty
-
first century skills instruction on student
interests.

1.2 Effective and knowledgeable teacher

Candidates implement the principles of effective teaching and learning that contribute

to an
3


active, inquiry
-
based approach to learning. Candidates make use of a variety of instructional
strategies and assessment tools to design and develop digital
-
age learning experiences and
assessments in partnership with classroom teachers and other edu
cators. Candidates can
document and communicate the impact of collaborative instruction on student achievement.

1.3 Instructional partner

Candidates model, share, and promote effective principles of teaching and learning as
collaborative partners with oth
er educators. Candidates acknowledge the importance of
participating in curriculum development, of engaging in school improvement processes, and of
offering professional development to other educators as it relates to library and information use.

1.4 Inte
gration of twenty
-
first century skills and learning standards

Candidates advocate for twenty
-
first century literacy skills to support the learning needs of the
school community. Candidates demonstrate how to collaborate with other teachers to plan and
impl
ement instruction of the AASL
Standards for the21st
-
Century Learner
and state student
curriculum standards. Candidates employ strategies to integrate multiple literacies with content
curriculum. Candidates integrate the use of emerging technologies as a me
ans for effective and
creative teaching and to support P
-
12 students' conceptual understanding, critical thinking and
creative processes.

2.1 Literature

Candidates are familiar with a wide range of children’s, young adult, and professional literature
in m
ultiple formats and languages to support reading for information, reading for pleasure, and
reading for lifelong learning.

2.2 Reading promotion

Candidates use a variety of strategies to promote leisure reading and model personal enjoyment
of reading in o
rder to promote habits of creative expression and lifelong reading.

2.3 Respect for diversity

Candidates demonstrate the ability to develop a collection of reading and information materials
in print and digital formats that support the diverse development
al, cultural, social, and linguistic
needs of P
-
12 students and their communities.

2.4 Literacy strategies

Candidates collaborate with classroom teachers to reinforce a wide variety of reading
instructional strategies to ensure P
-
12 students are able to
create meaning from text.

3.1 Efficient and ethical information
-
seeking behavior

Candidates identify and provide support for diverse student information needs. Candidates model
multiple strategies for students, other teachers, and administrators to locate
, evaluate, and
ethically use information for specific purposes. Candidates collaborate with students, other
teachers, and administrators to efficiently access, interpret, and communicate information.

3.2 Access to information

Candidates support flexible,

open access for library services. Candidates demonstrate their
ability to develop solutions for addressing physical, social and intellectual barriers to equitable
access to resources and services. Candidates facilitate access to information in print, non
-
print,
and digital formats. Candidates model and communicate the legal and ethical codes of the
profession.

3.3 Information technology

Candidates demonstrate their ability to design and adapt relevant learning experiences that
engage students in authentic

learning through the use of digital tools and resources. Candidates
model and facilitate the effective use of current and emerging digital tools to locate, analyze,
4


evaluate, and use information resources to support research, learning, creating, and
commu
nicating in a digital society.

3.4 Research and knowledge creation

Candidates use evidence
-
based, action research to collect data. Candidates interpret and use data
to create and share new knowledge to improve practice in school libraries.

4.1. Networkin
g with the library community

Candidates demonstrate the ability to establish connections with other libraries and to strengthen
cooperation among library colleagues for resource sharing, networking, and facilitating access to
information. Candidates partic
ipate and collaborate as members of a social and intellectual
network of learners.

4.2 Professional development

Candidates model a strong commitment to the profession by participating in professional growth
and leadership opportunities through membership
in library associations, attendance at
professional conferences, reading professional publications, and exploring Internet resources.
Candidates plan for ongoing professional growth.

4.4 Advocacy

Candidates identify stakeholders within and outside the
school community who impact the
school library program. Candidates develop a plan to advocate for school library and information
programs, resources, and services.

5.1 Collections

Candidates evaluate and select print, non
-
print, and digital resources usin
g professional selection
tools and evaluation criteria to develop and manage a quality collection designed to meet the
diverse curricular, personal, and professional needs of students, teachers, and administrators.
Candidates organize school library collec
tions according to current library cataloging and
classification principles and standards.

5.2 Professional Ethics

Candidates practice the ethical principles of their profession, advocate for intellectual freedom
and privacy, and promote and model digital

citizenship and responsibility. Candidates educate
the school community on the ethical use of information and ideas.

5.3 Personnel, Funding, and Facilities

Candidates apply best practices related to planning, budgeting, and evaluating human,
information,

and physical resources. Candidates organize library facilities to enhance the use of
information resources and services and to ensure equitable access to all resources for all users.
Candidates develop, implement, and evaluate policies and procedures that

support teaching and
learning in school libraries.

5.4 Strategic Planning and Assessment

Candidates communicate and collaborate with students, teachers, administrators, and community
members to develop a library program that aligns resources, services,
and standards with the
school's mission. Candidates make effective use of data and information to assess how the library
program addresses the needs of their diverse communities.


InTASC Standards


5


Standard #3: Learning Environments


The teacher works
with others to create environments that support individual and collaborative
learning, and that encourage positive social interaction, active engagement in learning, and self
motivation.

Standard #9: Professional Learning and Ethical Practice


The teacher

engages in ongoing professional learning and uses evidence to continually evaluate
his/her practice, particularly the effects of his/her choices and actions on others (learners,
families, other professionals, and the community), and adapts practice to mee
t the needs of each
learner.

Standard #10: Leadership and Collaboration


The teacher seeks appropriate leadership roles and opportunities to take responsibility for student
learning, to collaborate with learners, families, colleagues, other school profess
ionals, and
community members to ensure learner growth, and to advance the profession.


COURSE OBJECTIVES:



Apply knowledge of the vision, mission and goals of s
chool
l
ibrary
m
edia
p
rograms
(SLMP)

in the context of the overarching district level mission and goals, current
trends in teaching and learning, and school improvement and reform;


ALA/AASL Standards 2010
(
Approval Board
SASB
& NCATE)
:

3

Information and
Knowledge



3.2 Access to Information;

3.3 Information Technology;
4

Advocacy &
Leaders
hip


4.1 Networking with the Library Community; 4.3 Leadership; 4.4
Advocacy;

5

Program Management



5.2 Professional Ethics; 5.4 Strategic Planning &
Assessment
)

(
InTASC
3)



Develop strategies to effec
tively administer and advocate
for a SLMP and apply
these strategies to all project
-
based assignments;


ALA/AASL Standards 2010
(
Approval Board
S
ASB

& NCATE)
: 4
Advocacy and
Leadership



4.3 Leadership; 4.4 Advocacy;
5



Program Management and
Administration



5.1 Collections; 5.2 Professional Ethics; 5.3


Personnel, Funding and
Facilities; 5.4 Strategic Planning and Assessment


(
InTASC
10)



Demonstrate knowledge of technology, tools and digital information resources in all
project
-
based assig
nments and apply this knowledge as a school technology leader;


ALA/AASL

Standards 2010

(
Approval Board SASB & NCATE):

1
Teaching and
Learning



1.1 Knowledge of Learners and Learning; 1.2 Effective and Knowledgeable
Teachers; 1.3 Instructional Partners; 1.4 Integration of 21
st
-
Century Skills and Learning
Standards;
2

Literacy and Reading



2.1 Literacy; 2.3 Respect for Diversity;

3

6


Information
and Knowledge



3.2 Access to Information; 3.3 Information Technology;
4
Advocacy and Leadership



4.2 Professional Development; 4.3 Leadership;

5

Program
Management and Administration


5.1 Collections




Demonstrate a high level of knowledge of
professional literature, tools, and
resources in order to complete project
-
based assignments;


ALA/AASL 2010 (Approval Board SASB & NCATE)
:

1
Teaching and Learning



1.2
Effective and Knowledgeable Teacher;
2

Literacy and Reading



2.1 Literature; 2.3
Respect for Diversity;

3

Information and Knowledge



3.3 Information Technology;
4
Advocacy and Leadership



4.2 Professional Development; 4.3 Leadership;

5

Program
Management and Administration


5.1 Collections

(InTASC 9)



Develop

skills for developing effective relationship
s

and collaboration
s

with
professional contacts, library users and community members


ALA/AASL Standards 2010
(
Approval Board SASB & NCATE
):
1.
Teaching and
Learning



1.3 Instructional Partner; 1.4 Integration of 21
st
-
Century Skills and Learning
Standards;

2

Literacy and Reading



2.2 Reading Promotion; 2.3 Respect for Diversity;
2.4 Literacy Strategies;

3

Information Knowledge



3.1 Efficient and Ethical
Information
-
seeking Behavior; 3.3 Information Technology; 3.4 Research and
Knowledge Creation;
4

Advocacy and Leadership



4.1 Networking with the Library
Community; 4.2 Professional Development; 4.3 Leadership; 4.4 Advocacy;
5

Program
Management and Administration



5.2 Professional Ethics;
5.3
5.4 Strategic Planning and
Assessment.

(
InTASC

10)

COURSE METHODOLOGY:

Team Work
-

Students will engage in teamwork on specific assignments determined by the
instructor.

Class Lecture

-

Instructor will provide interactive
discussions on specific course topics and
share online information resources that support the concepts.

Project
-
Based
-

Students will be required to complete
authentic
projects aligned with course
content in order to apply new learning and demonstrate unde
rstanding of concepts.
Projects are the primary means of assessment used by the instructor; therefore, no
midterm or final
exams
will be given.

Field Experiences

-

Students will visit school library media center
s of identified

mentor
s

or
selected librarian
s.

Group Activities
-

Students will work in groups to explore, discuss and share con
cepts
presented in class discussion
s and assignments
.

7


Group Presentations
-

Students will be provided appropriate in
-
class time to plan and present
projects.

ATTENDANCE:

Students are expected to attend all class sessions, be on time, and be ready for class participation.
ONE unexcused absence will result in the loss of 50% of the class participation grade. EACH
ONE excused absence will result in t
he loss of 5 points. In th
e event of

an emergency

or illness,
students

are expected to call
, text

or e
-
mail the instructor PRI
OR to class session. It is the
student’s
responsibility to make arrangements for a classmate to pick up any handouts distributed
at a missed session. Studen
ts who arrive late or leave early will not receive full credit for
classroom attendance and participation.

REQUIREMENTS:

Apply technology and information literacy competencies in all aspects of this course. Web 2.0
tools are integrated into this course. S
tudents are required to use blogs, wikis, podcasts, and other
Web
-
based tools to gather information, to interact, and to collaborate. Students are responsible
for having the necessary Internet access and software required to use these tools. Utilizing Web
2.0 tools is critical for teacher
-
librarians who serve as technology stewards and may be
technology tools integration leaders in their schools.

Prepare for class discussion by keeping up
-
to
-
date with required assignments,

team work
responsibilities,

profes
sional reading, and online discussions.

Organize and maintain your Graduate Online Portfolio.
Align course assignments with the
NCATE Standards, as per Towson University requirements. At the conclusion of this
course, you should have documentation that
includes the following:


1.

School library vision and mission and rationale based on national, state, and
local policies
and regulations.


2.

Recommendations for School Improvement Plan that focus on strategies that the library
media program provides

to ad
dress school improvement.

3.

Library Policies:

Student, faculty, and parent.

4.

Library Services: Computer services, media production, classroom collections, book
talks, storytelling,

regular events, special events.

5.

Marketing and Advocacy: Action pla
n for the library program, examples of promotion of
library materials and services, curriculum planning and support, collaboration strategies
.

6.

Library Staffing: Provide a rationale and job

description for each position.

8


7.

Library Procedures: Selection,

acquisitions, cataloguing, circulation, inventory

Complete assignments as specified.

All completed assignments are to be posted or embedded on
BlackBoard, PBWorks or Wikispaces and follow the file naming conventions as follows:

Last name(s)_
assignment, e.g., Curtis_Grimes_marketing.


Up to 10 points will be deducted for assignments turned in later than due date.

Work collaboratively and cooperatively within a team. Team assignments must reflect
contributions by ALL team members.

Make present
ations and projects accessible via a wiki

or Blackboard
.

Participate in class and online discussions. Your participation in the online component will be
monitored.

Make arrangements with colleague to access information and handouts distributed at any mis
sed
class.

Follow the university's guidelines in regard to completion of course requirements. Students who
violate university standards will not receive course credit. Any instance of cheating on an
assignment or an assessment will result in a grade of zer
o for that particular assignment.
Any instance of plagiarism will result in a grade of zero for that particular assignment.

EVALUATION: Performance is based upon completion of the following:

ASSIGNMENTS: GRADING PROCEDURE

Assignments:

Point Value

# 1 Professional Reading & Online Discussions




77 points

# 2 National, State and Local Documents


24 points


# 3 Vision, Mission, And School Improvement Plan (SLMC Planning)


44 points


# 4 Leadership: Advocating and Marketing the Library Media Program


52 points

# 5 Field Study


24 points

# 6 Local School Library Policies and P
rocedures 24 points

9


# 7 Collection Development


Print and Digital 24 points

# 8 Collaborative Instructional Planning

24 points

# 9 Virtual Library Site (See Wiki/Website Rubric) 90 points

# 10 Capstone: School Library Media Facilities

70 points


# 11 Faculty Professional Development (Optional)



TOTAL POINTS

453


Final Grading:

A

95


100%

A
-


90


94%

B+

86


89%

B

80


85%

C

75


79
%

F

Below 75
%


TENTATIVE SCHEDULE




Date

Instructional Activity

Assignment
s Due

Week
1


Course Orientation



Explore the
PBWorks
Wiki

Week
2

Independent

and co
llaborative work (20 minutes at beginning of class
)


Answer questions about assignments

and share features/resources of
course wiki, e.g., Tools, folders, cale
ndar

National/State/

Local Documents

Resources and Significance


Locate
documents

10


Week
3

Web 2.0 Tools Exploration
-

course wiki workout and Web 2.0 site at
http://bcpslibraryinformationservices.pbworks.com

or on other identified
websites

Productions

Week
4

Independent

and

collaborative work (20 minutes at beginning of class
)



Student Sharing of National and State Docs

Assignment
#2
-

National
and State
Documentat
ion

Week
5

Discussion regarding online articles and questions.


Print rubric.


Vision Statements
-

Significance and Resources and Use of Web 2.0 tools to
communicate the vision and mission (Animoto)
-

Sign up for "educator"
version today


Week
6

Independent

and

collaborative work (20 minutes at beginning of class
)



Student Sharing of Vision and Mission

Leadership and Advocacy



Leadership for School Improvement

-

add the Library Media Curriculum
1
-
5 alignment to support implementation of the
ORM; incorporate the
roles of the LMS and align to SIP and use national, state, and local
documentation as support; your role

as staff developer with regard to
digital content and technology;

lead discussion and examination of link
between school libraries

and student achievement (add the

chart from
Mansfield University and School Libraries

Work
)
; examination of MSDE
state

student performance data.



Assignment
#3 (a)
-

Vision and
Mission

Week
7

Independent

and collaborative work (
20 minutes
)



Student Sha
ring of Vision and Mission

Leadership and Advocacy



Leadership for School Improvement

-

add the Library Media Curriculum 1
-
5 alignment to
support implementation of the ORM; incorporate the roles of the LMS and align to SIP and use
Assignment
# 3(b)
School
Improveme
nt Plan

11


national, state, and
local documentation as support; your role

as staff developer with regard to
digital content and technology;

lead discussion and examination of link between school libraries
and student achievement (add the

chart from Mansfield University and School Librari
es

Work;
examination of MSDE state

student performance data.



Digital Content and Management

(databases

and Safari Creation Station)

To prepare stu
dents for Assignment #4, see Della Curtis’

explanation column to the
Mansfield's School Library Impact Stud
y chart and uploaded chart to Google docs

(
Google
Docs link for colla
borative w
ork:

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1_ftwcywjIY9vLTMXDlmWN1F47vAK7Hu2Ghorjt2j
xdk/edit?hl=en&authkey=COLgmIEI
) so students explain why these factors impact student
achievement; chart is public and can be edited by anyone who has the link.

While at Google, we

want to show them how to create an iGoogle page and embed the reader so
that they can follow the RSS feeds of leaders in Library World.


Flipchart of circles
-

inner

circle (who we are) outer circle (who we can
influence)
-

Use ActivExpression to summari
ze SIP

Week
8

Advocacy
-

What is it
-

local and district.


Assignment
#4
-

Leadership
and
Advocacy


Week
9

Collection Management and TitleWave Tool


In
-
class work session with TitleWave



Assignment
#6
-

Field

Study


Week
10


In
-
class work session on media

marketing message


Assignment
#4


Marketing

Week
11

Building and Assessing Library Collections

Assignment
#7
-

Collection
Developme
nt


Week
Instruction, Collaboration and Instruction

Assignment
12


12

#8
-

Collaborativ
e
Instruction


Week
13

V
irtual Library Sites

Assignment
# 9

Virtual
Library
Sites

Week
14

Professional Discussion of Professional Readings

Assignment
# 1

Week
15

FINAL CLASS PRESENTATIONS

FINAL CLASS DEBRIEFING

Assignment
#10
-

Capstone


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