Elderly Rock Stars Prefer Apache

echinoidqueenServers

Dec 4, 2013 (3 years and 10 months ago)

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Classic Rockers
Aerosmith (www.aerosmith.com) Apache 1.3.27 (RedHat Linux)
The Doors (www.thedoors.com) Apache 1.3.20 (Linux)
Grateful Dead (www.dead.net) Apache 1.3.27 (IRIX)
KISS (www.kissonline.com) Apache 1.3.26 (Linux)
Rolling Stones (www.rollingstones.com) Apache 1.3.24 (Solaris 8)
Steve Miller Band (www.stevemillerband.com) Apache 1.3.17 (Linux)
Kids These Days
Alabama 3 (www.alabama3.co.uk) Microsoft-IIS/5.0 (Windows 2000)
Beck (www.beck.com) Apache 1.3.20 (Linux)
Kid Rock (www.kidrock.com) Microsoft-IIS/5.0 (Windows 2000)
Moby (www.moby.com) Microsoft-IIS/5.0 (Windows 2000)
Staind (www.staind.com) Microsoft-IIS/5.0 (Windows 2000)
50 Cent (www.50cent.com) Microsoft-IIS/5.0 (Windows 2000)
Finally, both Sony
and Microsoft have
declared that the next
generation of consoles
will be “Internet appli-
ances.” You can’t even
begin to fathom the
implications of such a
statement without real-
izing that a powerful
OS and complex host-
ing infrastructure are a
minimal requisite for making this a true
statement. Console games will no longer be
isolated islands of entertainment but appli-
cations with dependencies on a variety of
server and client-side OS services. The addi-
tion of online multiplayer features to con-
sole games alone causes an explosion of new
OS and infrastructure requirements. This is
home turf for Microsoft.
Let’s jump forward to 2005. Sony
launches the PS3 with astounding new
hardware capabilities and a host of online
features and services dependent on a vari-
ety of loosely linked partners and version
1.0 software tools and infrastructure. The
hardware is brilliant as ever but will take
years for the game developers to master.
Microsoft launches the Xbox 2, made
from off-the-shelf components including a
new Intel CPU and an ATI video chip. Its
architecture may not be as powerful or
surprising as the PS3, but the tools are the
same, DirectX is the same, the OS is
robust, the networking infrastructure is
well designed and in place, and it also
exchanges information freely with the PC.
Interestingly, if you assume that the next
Xbox uses an ATI chip because Microsoft
and NVIDIA had a falling out over Xbox
1.0, then you may also assume that the
Xbox 2 could be a powerful set-top box,
PVR, and general-purpose media center.
While Microsoft has 10,000+ developers
working on the Windows OS, tools, and
media technologies that will filter down to
Xbox, Sony must invent this all anew just
for the PS3. Meanwhile, Microsoft Game
Studios have been making DirectX9.0+
games for more than three years;
Microsoft will have a comprehensive line-
up of titles optimized for its own next-
generation console.
It can be assumed
that Microsoft will
leverage its strength
on the PC to add
value to the Xbox 2
by creating more
applications and ser-
vices that link the
two. Sony may be
able to leverage their
leadership in con-
sumer electronics by
making the PS3 integrate better with the
cameras, music players, and other con-
sumer devices. Sony may also leverage
their leadership in introducing blue laser
DVD technology to give the PS3 a valu-
able media capability that would be diffi-
cult for Xbox2 to match.
Oddly, the company that may be in the
best position to balance the competitive
equation in the next generation of console
wars is AOL/Time-Warner. AOL and Sony
need each other. AOL has staked its future
on broadband content and services. Sony
and AOL are both media giants and have
access to vast bodies of media content.
They have the clout to set set-top box and
media standards. AOL is the only software
company left standing that has the Internet
experience and infrastructure to support a
major “Internet appliance” with all the
billing, security, account management,
hosting and communication needs implied.
Finally, neither company wants to see a
world where Microsoft owns the living
room as well as the office.
It seems likely to me that the killer
applications for broadband will ulti-
mately not be found in the office but in
the living room. Set-top boxes with all
their promise have never evolved to be
more than anemic computing devices.
Game consoles hold the only promise
for truly bringing computing power and
interactivity to television. I believe that
the next generation console battle will
be about who controls how all enter-
tainment content reaches your home.
Next month I’ll be focusing on the
Napsterization of all media.
You may seek a response at
TheSaint@cpumag.com.
. . . Xbox 2 could
be a powerful
set-top box, PVR,
and general-
purpose media
center.
Elderly Rock Stars Prefer Apache
I
n the spirit of rock-n-roll, we took a haphazardly unscientific survey of
current rock star Web sites to see what servers were running backstage.
With help from Netcraft (www.netcraft.com), the classic rockers we looked
at preferred Apache, while the mods went Microsoft.