ABET Self-Study Report

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ABET

Self
-
Study Report


for the


Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering
(B
.
S
.
C
.
E
.
) Degree Program


at


The University of Memphis

Herff College of Engineering

Memphis, TN 38152







July 1, 2009






CONFIDENTIAL

The information supplied in this Self
-
Study Report is for the confidential use of ABET and
its authorized agents, and will not be disclosed without authorization of the institution co
n-
cerned, except for summary data not
identif
iable to a specific institution.



CONTENTS





C
ONTENTS

CONTENTS

ii

BACKGROUND INFORMATION

1

Degree Title

................................
................................
................................
...................

1

Program Mode

................................
................................
................................
..............

1

Contact Informat
ion

................................
................................
................................
.......

1

Program History

................................
................................
................................
............

1

Options

2

Organizational
Structure

................................
................................
...............................

2

Program Delivery Modes

................................
................................
..............................

2

Shortcomings Documented in the Final Report from the Previous Evaluation and the
Actions Taken to Address Them

................................
................................
......

3

Program Concerns

................................
................................
...........................

3

CRITERION 1. STUDENTS

7

Student Admissions

................................
................................
................................
......

7

Evaluating

Student Performance

................................
................................
..................

7

Advising Students

................................
................................
................................
.........

8

Transfer Students and Transfer Courses

................................
................................
.....

9

Graduation Requirements

................................
................................
.............................

9

Enroll
ment and Graduation Trends

................................
................................
...............

9

CRITERION 2. PROGRAM EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES

15

Consistency among Department, College, and University Mission Statements

.........

15

Program Educational Objectives

................................
................................
.................

15

Program Constituencies

................................
................................
..............................

16

Process for Establishing Program Educational Objectives

................................
.........

16

Program Educational Objectives


2003 Report
................................
............

18

Program Educational Objectives
-

2006

................................
........................

18

Current Program Educational Objectives

................................
......................

21

CRITERION 3. PROGRAM OUTCOMES

23

Program Outcomes Processes

................................
................................
...................

23

Program Outcomes for 2003 EAC of ABET accreditation visit:

.....................

25

Current Program Outcomes (POs)

................................
................................
.............

26

Relationship of Program Outcomes to Program Educational Objectiv
es

...................

27

Relationship of Courses in the Curriculum to the Program Outcomes

.......................

27

Documentation

................................
................................
................................
............

29

Achievement of Program Outcomes

................................
................................
...........

29

Assessment Processes

................................
................................
..................

29

Assessment of Outcomes

................................
................................
...........................

35

(a)

An ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and

engineering

................................
................................
.......................

36

(b)

An ability to design and conduct experiments and to analyze and
interpret data in two or more of the following areas:

environmental engineering, geotechnical engineering,

hydraulics, and materials

................................
................................
..

41

CONTENTS



楩i

(c)

An ability to design a civil engineering system, component, or

process to meet specified performance, cost, time, safety

and quality needs, and objectives

................................
.....................

47

(d)

An ability to function on multi
-
disciplinary teams

................................
..

56

(e)

An ability to identify, formulate, and solve civil engineering problems

..

58

(f)

An understanding

of professional and ethical responsibility

.................

65

(g)

An ability to convey technical material through oral presentations

and
written papers and reports

................................
.........................

68

(h)

The broad education necessary to understand the impact of
engineering solutions in a global and

societal context

.....................

71

(i)

A recognition of the need for professional licensure and a

recognition of the need for and an ability
to engage in life
-
long
learning

................................
................................
.............................

74

(j)

Knowledge of contemporary issues

................................
.......................

75

(k)

An ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering

tools necessary for engineering practice.

................................
.........

82

(l)

An ability to apply knowledge to develop engineering solutions in a
minimum of four of the following areas: environmental engineering,
geotechnical
engineering, structural engineering, transportation
engineering, and water resources engineering

................................

95

(m)

An ability to explain basic concepts in management, business,

public policy and leadership

................................
..............................

97

Opportunities on campus that are available to students for participation

and membership in those technical, professional, and/or honor
societies most closely associated with this program

........................

98

CRITERION 4. CONTINUOUS IMPROVEMENT

101

Information Used for Program Improvement

................................
............................

101

Actions to Improve the Program

................................
................................
...............

101

Action 1.

................................
................................
................................
.......

101

Action 2.

................................
................................
................................
.......

101

Action 3.

................................
................................
................................
.......

102

Action 4.

................................
................................
................................
.......

103

Action 5.

................................
................................
................................
.......

103

Action 6.

................................
................................
................................
.......

104

Action 7.

................................
................................
................................
.......

105

Action 8.

................................
................................
................................
.......

105

Action 9.

................................
................................
................................
.......

106

Action 10.

................................
................................
................................
.....

106

Action 11.

................................
................................
................................
.....

107

Action 12.

................................
................................
................................
.....

107

Action 13
.

................................
................................
................................
.....

108

Action 14.

................................
................................
................................
.....

108

Action 15.

................................
................................
................................
.....

109

Action 16
.

................................
................................
................................
.....

109

Action 17.

................................
................................
................................
.....

110

Action 18.

................................
................................
................................
.....

110

Action 19.

................................
................................
................................
.....

111

Action 20.

................................
................................
................................
.....

111

Action 21.

................................
................................
................................
.....

111

Action 22.

................................
................................
................................
.....

112

Action 23.

................................
................................
................................
.....

113

Action 24
.

................................
................................
................................
.....

113

CRITERION 5. PROGRAM CURRICULUM

115

CONTENTS





Program Curriculum

................................
................................
................................
..

115

Mathematics, Physics, and Chemistry

................................
.........................

1
15

Probability and Statistics

................................
................................
..............

115

Proficiency in Recognized Major Civil Engineering Areas

...........................

115

Laboratory Experiences

................................
................................
...............

116

Design Experiences

................................
................................
.....................

116

Professional Practice Issues

................................
................................
........

117

Prerequisite Flow Chart

................................
................................
............................

118

Course Syllabi

................................
................................
..............................

121

CRITERION 6. FACULTY

127

Leadership Responsibilities

................................
................................
......................

127

Authority and Responsibility of Faculty

................................
................................
.....

127

Faculty

128

Faculty Competencies

................................
................................
..............................

128

Education

................................
................................
................................
.....

129

Diversity

................................
................................
................................
.......

129

Experience

................................
................................
................................
...

129

Ability to Communicate

................................
................................
................

129

Developing an Effective Program

................................
................................

129

Scholarship

................................
................................
................................
..

130

Participation in Professional Societies

................................
.........................

130

Registration /Licensure as Professional Engineers

................................
.....

130

Instructional Workloads

................................
................................
................

130

Faculty Size

................................
................................
................................
...............

131

Advising and Counseling

................................
................................
..........................

131

Faculty Development

................................
................................
................................

132

CRITERION 7. FACILITIES

137

Space

137

Resources and Support

................................
................................
............................

139

Major Instructional and Laboratory Equipment

................................
.........................

140

CRITERION 8. SUPPORT

141

Program Budget Process and Sources of Financial Support

................................
...

141

Sources of Financial Support

................................
................................
.......

142

Adequacy of Budget

................................
................................
.....................

142

Support of Faculty Professional Development
................................
.............

143

Support of Facilities and Equipment

................................
............................

144

Adequacy of Support Personnel and Institutional Services

.........................

145

CRITERION 9. PROGRAM CRITERIA

147

APPENDIX A


COURSE SYLLABI

149

APPENDIX B


FACULTY RESUMES

185

AP
PENDIX C


LABORATORY EQUIPMENT

213

Foundation Sequence Laboratory
................................
................................
.............

213

Environmental Engineering Laboratory

................................
................................
....

213

Hydraulics and Hydrology Laboratory

................................
................................
.......

214

Traffic Laboratory

................................
................................
................................
.....

215

Geotechnical/Materials Laboratory

................................
................................
...........

215

CONTENTS



v




BACKGROUND INFORMATION



1

BACKGROUND INFORMATION

Degree
Title

Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering

(B.S.C.E.)

Program Mode

The program is offered as an on
-
campus day program.

Contact
I
nformation


Department Chairman

Dr.

Shahram Pezeshk, Emison Professor and Chair

Department of Civil Engineering

The University of Memphis

Memphis, TN 38152

Phone:


901
-
678
-
4727

Fax:


901
-
678
-
3026

Email:


spezeshk@memphis.edu

ABET Coordinator

Dr. Paul J. Palazolo, Associate Professor

Department of Civil Engineering

The University of Memphis

Memphis, TN 38152

Phone:


901
-
678
-
3275

Fax:


901
-
678
-
3026

Email:


ppalazol@memphis.edu

Program History

The Department of Civil Engineering was established in 1968 and the first
B.S.C.E. degree was

awarded in 1970. The program was accredited by the E
n-
gineering Council for Professional Development (ECPD) shortly after the
first d
e-
gree was
award
ed

and has continuously maintained accreditation by ECPD and
subsequently ABET since that time.

BACKGROUND INFORMATION



2

Options

Non
e

Organizational Structure

Dr. William Segui serves as the undergraduate coordinator for civil engineering
and reports to Dr. Shahram Pezeshk, Chair of Civil Engineering. Dr. Pezeshk
reports to Dr. Richard Warder, Dean of the Herff College of Engineering
who r
e-
ports to Dr. Ralph Faudree, Provost of the University of Memphis who reports to
Dr. Shirley Raines, President of the University of Memphis. An organization chart
for the University, including its governing board, is shown in Figure D
-
1 of A
p-
pendix D.

Program Delivery Modes

The Civil Engineering program is conducted in the day program mode. This is the
dominant program mode throughout the College. An engineering co
-
op program
is administered by the Office of the Associate Dean for Undergraduate Affairs
.
This co
-
op program is optional with a minimum entry requirement of a 2.5 GPA.
Enrolled students may participate on a one
-
semester
-
in, one
-
semester
-
out rot
a-
tion or as part
-
time employees throughout the entire year.



BACKGROUND INFORMATION



3

Shortcomings Documented in the Final
Report from the

Previous Evaluation and the Actions Taken to Address Them


Program Concerns

Criterion 1. Students and Criterion 4. Professional Component

During the review of student transcripts, it was noted that the d
e-
partment is not totally consistent
in its handling of transfer credits.
For example, one transfer student had taken Calculus III at anot
h-
er institution but had not taken Calculus I or II. The department
accepted substitute courses for Calculus I and II. The substitute
courses as well as Cal
culus III at the other institution were all 3
-
unit courses. Therefore, the student was allowed to graduate with
only 13 units instead of the normal 16 units of mathematics. This
also resulted in a shortage of total math and basic sciences of 3
credit units

(29 compared to the required 32). The lack of stated
technical prerequisites for the senior design course could and, in
some cases, does result in students taking this course without the
requisite knowledge of the sub
-
discipline design concepts nece
s-
sary
to complete a culminating design experience. A review of r
e-
cent senior design projects revealed an inconsistent level of rigor
in the design process and in the production of a final project.
Some projects had little if any additional design rigor over the
sophomore
-
level designs that were reviewed, while others clearly
satisfied the rigor necessary for a culminating design experience.
Practitioner involvement with this course during the project
-
development and interim
-
work phases would aid in creating the
d
esign rigor and standards of practice that the profession d
e-
mands.

Actions Taken

The College of Engineering, in collaboration with the campus Registrar, deve
l-
oped and implemented an automatic online degree program requirement check
that serves all
departments in the College of Engineering. This system, which i
n-
cludes documentation of transfer credits, will not allow a student to register for a
class unless the prerequisites for that class have been met. All variances to this
process must be approved

by the
D
epartment
C
hair
,

and an electronic permit i
s-
sued by the Department Associate C
hair.



BACKGROUND INFORMATION



4

Criterion 4. Professional Component

Action Taken

The department has developed a set of guidelines regarding the scope and rigor
expected
from

the capstone design projects. The status and results of these e
f-
forts are shown below.




Prerequisites for senior design have been established as the terminal
r
e-
quired courses in each concentration area and have become prerequ
i-
sites for enrollment in senio
r design. This
will be
incorporated in the u
n-
dergraduate bulletin
.
.




Specific guidance is given for all design projects that require design
knowledge beyond that obtained in the prerequisite courses. Practitio
n-
ers and faculty act as mentors to the studen
ts to help them handle difficult
design issues that inevitably arise in real
-
world engineering designs. St
u-
dents have phone conversations and meetings with these consultants as
they (the students) seek to solve these important design issues.




Projects are
proposed before the start of each semester by faculty wor
k-
ing in conjunction with local engineers, developers, and permitting autho
r-
ities who act as practitioner advisors to the class as described above.




Final project selection is by consensus of the facu
lty at the start of each
semester. A single project is chosen for that semester. Depending on the
size of the class in any given semester, smaller classes undertake the
project as a group while larger classes are divided into competing teams.




The practit
ioner advisors are part of the teaching team and attend the le
c-
ture and

lab sessions as needed
. As the semester progresses, they e
m-
phasize specific uses of knowledge that the students have developed du
r-
ing their undergraduate program as well as additional
skills such as rea
d-
ing engineering plans, dealing with clients, writing specifications, etc. In
addition, they help the students deal with critical project issues and focus
the range of possible solutions.




Grades are determined based on the following comp
onents: work plan,
preliminary engineering report, oral presentations, and final design su
b-
mittal (plans, limited specifications, and final design report).



Criterion 5
.

Faculty and Criterion 8. Program Criteria

There are at least two faculty members pro
ficient in four of the five
areas of specialization; however, due to the recent death of one
faculty member, there is now only one faculty member proficient in
the geotechnical area. With Tennessee's budget situation, it is not
known if this position will
be filled in the near future.

BACKGROUND INFORMATION



5

Due Process Response

This position is expected to be filled by July 2004.

Action Taken

The department hired a new faculty member proficient in the geotechnical area in
August 2004. Currently, there are two faculty members in
the geotechnical area.


BACKGRO
UND INFORMATION



6



CRITERION 1. STUDENTS



7

CRITERION 1. STUDENTS

Student Admissions

Admission criteria for new students are described in the 2008
-
2009 edition of the
Undergraduate Bulletin
(hereafter referred to as the
Bulletin
), available at

http://www.memphis.edu/ugcatalog/
.

S
tudents must complete the following
courses before they can be classified as civil engineering majors: CHEM 1110,
CIV
L 1101, ENGL 1010, MATH 1910, and CIVL 1112. Until completion of these
courses, students are classified as pre
-
civil engineering students.

Transcripts from other institutions in Tennessee are evaluated in accordance with
articulation agreements between th
e various institutions involved. These agre
e-
ments are subject to routine review by the departments and programs involved. A
history of freshmen admissions for the past five years is given in Table 1
-
1.

Table 1
-
1. History Standards for Freshmen Admissions


* Data not available.

Evaluating Student Performance

It is the responsibility of the civil engineering faculty advisor to monitor a student's
progress to
ensure

that the student is following the prescribed curriculum. St
u-
dents must earn a grade o
f “C” or better in all civil

engineering courses
. The a
d-
visor checks to ensure that this requirement is satisfied.

The University’s Office of Admissions and Records audits students’ grades each
semester. Students failing to meet the
U
niversity
's

2.0 GPA requirement are
placed on probation for one semester and receive additional advising. If a st
u-
dent fails to raise his/her GPA after one semester of probation, he/she is no
longer allowed to continue in the Civil Engineering Program.



Academic
Year

Composite ACT

Percentile Rank
in High School

*

Number

of New Students E
n-
rolled

MIN.

AVG.

MIN.

MIN.

2008
-
2009

24

24.4



11

2007
-
2008

19

23.4



13

2006
-
2007

17

23.5



17

2005
-
2006

19

24.2



19

2004
-
2005

20

24.8



16

CRITERION 1. STUDENTS



8

Advising Stu
dents

Incoming freshmen, including those who have
decided on
a major and transfer
students who have no
t

yet selected a major, are advised by the College of Eng
i-
neering Undergraduate Academic Advisor. Most civil engineering students d
e-
clare their major when

they matriculate. After
they have completed the pre
-
civil
engineering course
requirements
, their records and adv
ising are transferred from
the C
ollege academic advisor to the Department of Civil Engineering.

Although the department does not have the forma
l advising role
during a st
u-
dent's

first year, these students are enrolled in civil engineering classes (CIVL
1101 and CIVL 1112) and have close contact with civil en
gineering faculty me
m-
bers. The C
ollege advisor maintains close contact with the department

and ide
n-
tifies the civil engineering students she advises and forwards the information to
the department. Students
who have completed the pre
-
civil engineering course
requirements

and

transfer students who enter the university as civil engineering
majors
are sent to the department for advising.

Dr.

William Segui,

the
Associate C
hair
, is responsible for assigning students to
faculty advisors. Assignments are made in such a way as to distribute the nu
m-
ber of
students
uniformly

to adviso
rs
; however, if the st
udent has a preference for
a specific advisor, that preference is honored. At any time, either the student or
the advisor can request that a new advisor be assigned.

Students admitted to the civil engineering program are

initially advised by the a
s-
sociate

chair. These students are sent a letter that welcomes them to the d
e-
partment and provides them with their advisor’s name and contact information.
Student folders are retained in the department office and are available to faculty.
Faculty can also review s
tudent transcripts by accessing the University’s Banner
computer database system.

Each semester, students pre
-
register for the next semester. Students are not
cleared to register until they have met with their advisor. Once the student has
been advised, th
e advisor issues a clearance via the Banner System. Although
students can subsequently change their schedule without clearance from their
advisor,
this procedure
ensures

that students meet with their advisor at least
once each semester. The computer regist
ration process does not allow students
to register for civil engineering courses unless the prerequisite courses have
been completed. For exceptional circumstances, pre
-
requisite waivers can be
permitted upon approval of instructor, advisor, and the
D
epar
tment
C
hair.



CRITERION 1. STUDENTS



9

Transfer Students and Transfer Courses

The
A
ssociate
C
hair is responsible for validating all transfer credits. Lower div
i-
sion courses taken at Tennessee Board of Regents (TBR) institutions, which i
n-
clude the community colleges, have a commo
n numbering system. For courses
taken at other institutions, the
A
ssociate
C
hair may review the catalog from the
institution, consult institutional web pages, and/or require the student to produce
documentation that the course has the same content as an eq
uivalent course at
the University of Memphis.

Each student's file contains a degree sheet (see Table 1
-
5), which is used to re
c-
ord the student's progress toward the degree. The reverse side of this sheet lists
all of the options for electives, both for civ
il engineering and general educa
tion
courses. The Department C
hair must approve substitutions for required courses,
with the exception of General Education courses. The College Undergraduate
Academic Advisor, in consultation with the University Transfer Ar
ticulation Office,
must approve in writing substitutions for General Education courses. These su
b-
stitutions are usually for transfer students who have taken similar courses. Ge
n-
eral Education requirements are waived for students who already have a bacc
a-
lau
reate degree from a regionally accredited institution of higher education.


Graduation Requirements

During the semester preceding the student’s final semester, the advisor checks
and certifies that the student has met all requirements for the degree and t
hat all
EAC of ABET engineering criteria requirements have been satisfied. Students
are required to earn a grade of “C” or above in all civil engineering courses
counted toward graduation. The
D
epartment C
hair must also approve the s
tudent
for graduation,
and the C
ollege undergraduate academic advisor

makes a final
check of all requirements.



Enrollment and Graduation Trends

Enrollment and graduation trends for the past fi
ve years are given in Tables 1
-
1

through 1
-
4.




CRITERION 1. STUDENTS





Table 1
-
2. Transfer Students

for Past Five Academic Years

Academic Year

Number of Transfer Students Enrolled

2008
-
2009

8

2007
-
2008

7

2006
-
2007

13

2005
-
2006

12

2004
-
2005

13



Table 1
-
3. Enrollment Trends for Past Five Academic Years


2004
-
2005

2005
-
2006

2006
-
2007

2007
-
2008

2008
-
2009

Full
-
time Students

90

91

106

87

9
7

Part
-
time Students

21

23

25

25

1
9

Student FTE

98.2

101.2

116.1

98.1

101.9

Graduates

13

9

2
0

16

16




CRITERION 1. STUDENTS





Table 1
-
4. Program Graduates



Student Name

Year

Matriculated

Year

Graduated

Certification/

Licensure

(If
Applicable)

Initial or Current Employment/

Job Title/

Other Placement

Edward Bond

2004

2009



James Lamport

2005

2009


Pickering Firm, Memphis

Talal Mayahi

2007

2009


City of Memphis

James

Nabakowski

2004

2009

EIT

U.S.
Army
Corps of Engineer
s
,

Memphis

Phillip Pinkston

1991

2009


U.S.
Army
Corps of Engineer
s
,

Memphis

Chase Staggs

2004

2009



Jacob Storz

2004

2009

EIT

MLGW

Nathaniel Taylor

2004

2009


City of Memphis

Stephen Williams

2006

2009


U.S.
Army
Corps of Engineer
s
,

Memphis

Sue
Ellen Barnes

2004

2008


Moved to Arizona, Looking for job

Derrick Brasher

2005

2008

EIT

Looking for job

Carl Dawson

2005

2008

EIT

Looking for job

Robert Gambill

2006

2008


U.S.
Army
Corps of Engineer
s
,

Memphis

Matthew Taylor

2006

2008

EIT

The Reaves
Firm, Memphis

Titilola Adeleye

2004

2008

EIT

PSI, San Antonio, Texas

Emily Boswell

2001

2008

EIT

City of Lakeland

Daniel Bowling

2004

2008

EIT

Pickering Firm, Memphis

Michael Falls

2004

2008

EIT

Tetra Tech, Memphis

Phillip Huntley

2003

2008

EIT

Pickering Firm, Memphis

Andrew Long

2005

2008

EIT

Seattle City Light, Washington

Bhargav Patel

2005

2008


Planning to Start Graduate
School

Ryan Pickett

2005

2008

EIT

Graduate School, U. of Memphis

Cole H. Smith

2003

2008

EIT

U.S.
Army
Corps of
Engineer
s
,

Memphis

Rachel Stone

2005

2008

EIT

Neel
-
Schaffer, Jackson, Tenne
s-
see

Emma Campbell

2003

2007

EIT

Askew, Hargraves, Harcourt,
Jackson, TN

CRITERION 1. STUDENTS





Table 1
-
5. BSCE Degree Requirements, Fall, 2009

Last updated 02/16/2009





Name ___________________________________________









Advisor __________________________________________

University of
Memphis Entry Date _________________________



Social Security Number _________________________________



Course Number and Name



hrs.


Semester


Grade


Course Number and Name



hrs.


Semester


Grade


See next
page for notes.

CIVL 1101 Civil Engineering Measureme
nts (Fall)


3







CHEM 1110 Chemistry I


3



CIVL 3121 Structural Analysis [C]


3



CHEM 1111 Chemistry Lab


1



CIVL 3180 Civil Engineering Hydraulics


3



ENGL 1010 English Composition


3



CIVL 3103 Approximation and Uncertainty in Engr. (Fall)


3



MATH 1910 Calculus I


4



CIVL 3137 Civil Engineering Materials (Fall)


3



First Semester Total Hours

14



CIVL 3325 Mechanics of Materials Lab (Fall)


1







Gen. Ed.


Humanities/Fine Arts (see note 3)


3



Physical Science (See note 1)


4




Fifth Semester Total Hours

16



CIVL 1112 Civil Engineering Analysis (Spring)


3







ENGL 1020 English Composition & Analysis


3



CIVL 3131 Design of Steel Structures (Spring) or

CIVL 4135 Reinforced Concrete Design (Fall)


3



MATH 1920 Calc
ulus II


4



CIVL 3161 Transportation Systems Engineering (Spring)


3



PHYS 2111 Physics I Lab


1



CIVL 3182 Hydrology and Hydraulics Lab


1



PHYS 2110 Physics for Science & Engineering I


3



CIVL 3140 Environmental Systems Engineering


4




Second Semester Total Hours

18



CIVL 4151 Soil Mechanics (Spring)


4







ENGL 3603 Engineering Communication


3



CIVL 2131 Statics


3




Sixth Semester Total Hours

18



CIVL 2101 Civil Engineering Visualization (Fall)


3







ENGL 2201 or 2202 L
iterary Heritage


3



Gen. Ed.
-

Social Science (see note 2)

3



MATH 2110 Calculus III


4



CIVL 3181
Hydrology and Hydraulics


3



PHYS 2121 Physics II Lab


1



CIVL
4195

(Spring)


3



PHYS 2120 Physics for Science & Engineering II


3



CIVL Electi
ve (Group 2
-

See note 4)


3




Third Semester Total Hours

17



Gen. Ed.


Humanities/Fine Arts (see note 3)


3








Seventh Semester Total Hours

15



MECH 2332 Dynamics


3







EECE 2201 or MECH 3311


3



CIVL 4111 Engineering Economics


3



CI
VL 2107 Civil Engineering Computation (Spring)


3



CIVL 4199 Civil Engineering Design [W,I]


3



CIVL 3322 Mechanics of Materials


3



CIVL Elective (Group 1 or Group 2
-

See note 4)


3



MATH 3120 Differential Equations


3



CIVL Elective (Group 2
-

See note 4)


3



Gen. Ed.
-

Social Science (see note 2)


3




Eighth Semester Total Hours


12




Fourth Semester Total Hours

18




Grand Total Hours

128




CRITERION 1. STUDENTS





Table 1
-
5 (Continued)

Notes:


Last updated 05/06/2008



1.
Physical Science:

Choose one of the following: BIOL 1110/1111, ESCI 1040, or ESCI 1103


2. Gen. Ed.


Social/Behavioral Sciences

(6 hours) Choose any two of the following:



ANTH 1100, ANTH 1200, CSED 2101, ECON 2110, ECON 2120, ESCI 1301, ESCI 1401, POLS 1100, POLS 1301, POLS 1501, PSYC 1200,
PSYC 3510, SOCI 1111, SOCI 2100, UNIV 2304


3.

Gen. Ed.


Humanities
(6 hours)

Choose

any two of the following:



ART 1030, CLAS 2481, COMM 1851, DANC 1151, HIST 1110, HIST 1120, JDST 2580, MUS 1030, MUS 1040, PHIL 1101, PHIL 1102, POLS
1101, POLS 1102, THEA 1030, UNIV 3580, UNIV 3581


4
.
Civil Engineering Electives: Group 1:



Civil
Engineering Electives: Group 2:



CIVL 4122 Structural Analysis II (Spring)


CIVL 3131 Design of Steel Structures (unless taken as a required course)
(Spring)

CIVL 4171 Construction Engineering I (Fall)

CIVL 4131 Intermediate Steel Design (Fall)

CIVL 4172 Construction Engineering II (Spring)

CIVL 4135 Reinforced Concrete Design (unless taken as a required course) (Fall)

TECHNICAL ELECTIVE

CIVL 4136 Intermediate Reinf. Concrete Design (Spring)


(Approved upper
-
division engineering cours
e)

CIVL 4140 Environmental Engineering Design (Spring)


CIVL 4143 Physical/Chemical Treatment Systems (Fall)


CIVL 4144 Biological Wastewater Treatment Systems (Spring)


CIVL 4149 Pump Station Design (Fall)


CIVL 4152 Applied Soil Mechanics
(Spring)


CIVL 4162 Traffic Engineering


CIVL 4163 Airport Planning and Design (Fall)


CIVL 4164 Route Location and Design


CIVL 4180 Advanced Hydrology and Hydraulics


CIVL 4190 Water Resources Planning and Design


CIVL 4191 Civil Engineering
Projects


CIVL 4900 Special Topics in Civil Engineering




CRI
TERION 1. STUDENTS








CRITERION 2. PROGRAM EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES





CRITERION 2. PROGRAM EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES

Consistency among Department, College, and University

Mission
Statements

The Department of Civil Engineering mission statement is:


"Civil Engineering is a profession that has a long and distinguished tradition of im
pro
v-
ing the quality of lif
e for humanity. The mission of the Department of Civil Engineering
at the University of Memphis is to perpetuate this noble tradition through quality ed
u-
cation, research, and public service.”


The mission of the Herff College of Engineering
is
:


“We will provide quality education, research, and service that responds to th
e needs
and challenges of this region and nation. We will promote the knowledge, skills, et
h-
ics, creativity, and critical thinking necessary for professional competence and lifelong
learning, including an international perspective and a social awareness. W
e will co
n-
duct quality scholarship and research across the College, and world
-
class research in
selected areas.”


T
he
University of Memphis mission
statement is:




The University of Memphis is a learner
-
centered metropolitan research university
providing
high quality educational experiences while pursuing new knowledge through
research, artistic expression, and interdisciplinary and engaged scholarship.



The D
epartment statement is consistent with
the statements

for the Herff College of E
n-
gineering and
the University of Memphis.

Program Educational Objectives

Current Pr
ogram Educational Objectives:

1.

Our graduates will meet or exceed the expectations of employers.

2.

Our graduates will be prepared to pursue and to obtain professional licenses.

3.

Our graduates
will be prepared to pursue advanced degrees in engineering and
other professional fields.

The Civil Engineering program educational objectives are published in the following m
a-
terials:

The
Undergraduate Bulletin,
available at:

http://www.memphis.edu/ugcat
alog/archive/index.php

The Civil Engineering home page, available at:

http://www.ce.memphis.edu/welcome/goals_2008.html

CRITERION 2. PROGRAM EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES





The program fact sheet that is part of a recruitment brochure.

Progra
m Constituencies

Our constituents include
representation

from each of the following groups: employers of
civil engineering graduates
,

including local and regional consulting firms engaged in pr
o-
jects with a civil engineering component
,

state and federal ag
encies whose tasks include
civil engineering projects, alumni, current undergraduate students, and departmental
faculty. In addition to these constituents, care

is taken to ensure that our Program Ed
u-
cational Objective
s meet the
requirements as set out by
the U
niversity community in the
mission of the instituti
on and with the mission of the C
ollege.

Process for Establishing Program Educational Objectives

Establishing measurable Program Educational Objectives (PEOs) is a dynamic process.
The Department of
Civil Engineering established educational objectives for the unde
r-
graduate program prior to the 2003 accreditation visit. Our initial PEOs were developed
by the faculty and published in the University Undergraduate Bulletin.

Because our PEOs represent the

mid
-
career expectations that we have of our grad
u-
ates, we believe it is critical that they reflect (and respond to) the “real
-
time” needs of our
constituents. A methodology for development and refinement of these objectives was
developed from the analyses

and integration of input from all of our program constitue
n-
cies. We used a variety of data collection instruments to collect constituent feedback i
n-
cluding alumni survey data, student exit survey data, employer survey data, and faculty
feedback.

In ad
diti
onal
, each semester exit interviews are conducted to review
relevance of d
e-
partmental objectives. This process provides an opportuni
ty for the D
epartment
C
hair
and the student
s

to review the objectives and discuss them as related to the current pr
o-
gram
activities. Recently we have added a new mode of constituent feedback through
online surveys, where feedback may be sent to the department on the suitability and
achievement of the PEOs.

In general, PEOs are revisited every three years
,

but may also be rev
iewed and modified
as needed.

Figure 2
-
1 shows a graphical presentation of the process. Included as an example of this
process are the modifications and development of the current PEOs from the PEOs that
were in place at the time of the 2003
EAC of ABET

vi
sit.


CRITERION 2. PROGRAM EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES






Figure 2
-
1
. PEO
s

Development and Review Process


A timeline for the development of the current program educational objectives is presen
t-
ed in
Table 2
-
1
. Details
for each
PEOs
revision
are

included in the following par
a-
g
raphs.



Table 2
-
1
. Timeline for Evolution of Program Educational Objectives


Time

Event

Spring 2003

PEOs presented as part of the

2003 accreditation visit.

Spring 2006

Revision of PEOs,

submission to constituent review.

Spring 2009

Revision of PEOs,

submission to constituent review.



CRITERION 2. PROGRAM EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES





Program Educational Objectives


2003 Report


1.

Our graduates will meet or exceed the expectations of Civil Engineering e
m-
ployers in industry, private practice/consultation, and/or governmen
tal service.


2.

Our graduates will effectively interface with other engineers, professionals from
other disciplines, and the public to solve engineering problems.


3.

Our graduates will achieve success in earning advanced degrees, both in eng
i-
neering and other
professional fields when pursued.


4.

Our graduates will engage in a broad range of self
-
development activities that
benefit the Civil Engineering profession and the community.

With the recognition that the second objective was more closely a program outcome
r
a-
ther than a program educational objective, it was
subsequently
removed
.

In 2006, a web
-
based comprehensive constituent survey was created and distributed to
constituent
s

via e
-
mail. The department used an initial list of alumni provided
by

the
Un
i-
versity

of Memphis Alumni Association

as

well as contact information from

employers.
This information was updated using the department’s list of e
-
mail addresses. The alu
m-
ni portion of the survey elicited information about their current position, type of work and

responsibilities, salary, as well as questions about their achievements since graduation,
including promotions, licensure, advanced degrees, publications, and leadership roles.

Program Educational Objectives

-

2006



1.

Our graduates will meet or exceed the
expectations of employers.


2.

Our graduates will be prepared to pursue and obtain professional licenses and
advanced degrees in engineering and other professional fields.


3.

Our graduates will engage in lifelong learning to maintain professional comp
e-
tency.

In

2006, the suitability and achievement of these PEOs were
addressed

in a general
survey of all constituents. A total of 75 responses to the survey were collected. Constit
u-
ents were asked to rate the PEOs on a 5
-
point scale where 1 was unnecessary or und
e-
si
rable, 3 was acceptable, and 5 was highly necessary or desirable. The responses to
this question are summarized in
Table 2
-
2
and a graphical breakdown of how constit
u-
ents responded is shown in
Figure 2
-
2.




CRITERION 2. PROGRAM EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES





Table 2
-
2
. Suitability of PEOs

-

2006

Lumped
Constituent Survey Response


Average

Stdev

1.

Our graduates will meet or exceed the expectations
of employers.

4.66

0.60

2.

Our graduates will be prepared to pursue and obtain
professional licenses and advanced degrees in e
n-
gineering and other
professional fields.

4.57

0.64

3.

Our graduates will engage in lifelong learning to
maintain professional competency.

4.53

0.74




Figure 2
-
2
. Suitability of PEOs

2006 Lumped Constituent Survey Response


In a
separate
2006 survey, alumni were
also
asked to rate how well they were achieving
the program educational objectives on a 5
-
point scale where
1 was not achieved, 3 was
mostly achieved, and 5 was completely achieved.
The responses to this survey are
summarized in
Table 2
-
3
,

and a graphical brea
kdown of how constituents responded is
shown in
Figure 2
-
3.






0
5
10
15
20
25
30
35
40
45
50
PEO 1
PEO 2
PEO 3
Number Responded
1
-
Unnecessary
2
3
-
Acceptable
4
5
-
Highly Necessary
CRITE
RION 2. PROGRAM EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES





Table 2
-
3
. Achievement of PEOs

-

2006 Lumped Constituent Survey Response


Program Educational Objectives

Average

Stdev

1.

Our graduates will meet or exceed the expectations
of employers.


4.38

0.75

2.

Our graduates will be prepared to pursue and obtain
professional licenses and advanced degrees in eng
i-
neering and other professional fields.


4.55

0.62

3.

Our graduates will engage in lifelong learning to
maintain professional competency.

4.42

0.83





Figure 2
-
3
. Achievement of PEOs


2006 Lumped Constituent Survey Response




0
5
10
15
20
25
30
35
40
45
50
PEO 1
PEO 2
PEO 3
Number Responded
1
-
Not Achieved
2
3. Mostly Achieved
4
5. Complete Achieved
CRITERION 2. PROGRAM EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES





Current Program Educational Objectives

Because life
-
long learning is
identified as a

program outcome,
it was considered to be
inap
propriate for inclusion
as a PEO.

The department faculty agreed and the PEOs were
modified. In addition, the pursuit of advanced degrees and professional licensure were
separated into two outcomes.

The following were the proposed outcomes that were pr
e-
sented for adoption:

1.

Our graduates wi
ll meet or exceed the expectations of employers.

2.

Our graduates will be prepared to pursue and to obtain professional licenses.

3.

Our graduates will be prepared to pursue advanced degrees in engineering and
other professional fields.

In 2009, these PEOs were
again
reviewed for suitability and achievement. Two sep
a-
rate surveys were developed for employers and for alumni. The alumni results are br
o-
ken down into cohorts based on the time frame of graduation with an additional column
for employer responses.

The r
esponses of recent graduating seniors collected during
their exit interviews are also included.

A summary of the responses is presented in
Table
2
-
4.

Table 2
-
4
. Suitability of PEOs
-


Results by Cohort for 2009 Survey



Spring 2006
to Fall 2008

Spring 2001

to Fall 2005

Spring 1996
to Fall 2000

All Classes

Employers

Graduating

Students



9

Responses

6

Responses

12

Responses

74

Responses

16

Responses

9

Responses



PEO 1

Critical

77.8%

83.3%

100.0%

75.7%

75.0%

77.8%

Important

11.1%

16.7%

0.0%

21.6%

18.8%

11.1%

Useful

11.1%

0.0%

0.0%

2.7%

6.4%

11.1%

Not Important

0.0%

0.0%

0.0%

0.0%

0.0%

0.0%

No Opinion

0.0%

0.0%

0.0%

0.0%

0.0%

0.0%



PEO 2

Critical

77.8%

66.7%

66.7%

63.5%

37.5%

77.8%

Important

22.2%

33.3%

33.3%

32.4%

62.5%

11.1%

Useful

0.0%

0.0%

0.0%

4.1%

0.0%

11.1%

Not Important

0.0%

0.0%

0.0%

0.0%

0.0%

0.0%

No Opinion

0.0%

0.0%

0.0%

0.0%

0.0%

0.0%



PEO 3

Critical

22.2%

33.3%

0.0%

15.1%

6.3%

77.8%

Important

77.8%

66.7%

50.0%

53.4%

56.3%

22.2%

Useful

0.0%

0.0%

50.0%

27.4%

31.3%

0.0%

Not Important

0.0%

0.0%

0.0%

4.1%

6.3%

0.0%

No Opinion

0.0%

0.0%

0.0%

0.0%

0.0%

0.0%



CRITERION 2. PROGRAM EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES





While there is strong support for the suitability of PEOs 1 and 2, the support for PEO 3 is
less strong but greater than 50% for each cohort measured. However, among
alumni
who have advanced degree
s
, 89% of their responses show that they consider the pu
r-
suit of advanced degrees to be an important program educational objective.

In 2009, alumni w
ere
asked to evaluate how well they felt
they were
prep
ared to achieve
each
of the PEO
s. In addition, employers were asked to evaluate how well they felt the
ir

e
mployees who were also our
alumni
, were prepared to achieve each of the PEOs.
The
responses of recent graduating seniors collected during their exit interviews are also i
n-
cluded.
The results of these surveys are summarized in
Table 2
-
5.

Table
2
-
5
. Achievability of PEOs
-

Results by Cohort from 2009 Survey



Spring
2006 to
Fall 2008

Spring 2001
to Fall 2005

Spring 1996
to Fall 2000

All Classes

Employers

Graduating

Students



9

Responses

6

Responses

12

Responses

74

Responses

16

Responses

9

Responses



PEO 1

Very Well

Prepared

33.3%

50.0%

58.3%

44.4%

18.8%

11.1%

Well Prepared

55.6%

33.3%

16.7%

40.3%

5
0.0%

77.8%

Prepared

11.1%

16.7%

25.0%

15.3%

18.
7
%

11.1%

Poorly
Prepared

0.0%

0.0%

0.0%

0.0%

0.0%

0.0%

No
Response

0.0%

0.0%

0.0%

0.0%

12.5%

0.0%



PEO 2

Very Well

Prepared

33.3%

33.3%

66.7%

52.9%

25.0%

22.2%

Well Prepared

44.4%

50.0%

8.3%

28.6%

37.5%

66.7%

Prepared

22.2%

16.7%

25.0%

18.6%

25.0%

11.1%

Poorly
Prepared

0.0%

0.0%

0.0%

0.0%

0.0%

0.0%

No
Response

0.0%

0.0%

0.0%

0.0%

12.5%

0.0%



PEO 3

Very Well

Prepared

33.3%

33.3%

50.0%

40.3%

18.8%

33.3%

Well Prepared

55.6%

33.3%

25.0%

44.4%

31.3%

55.6%

Prepared

11.1%

33.3%

25.0%

15.3%

37.5%

11.1%

Poorly
Prepared

0.0%

0.0%

0.0%

0.0%

6.3%

0.0%

No
Response

0.0%

0.0%

0.0%

0.0%

12.5%

0.0%


These results show that a significant majority of the graduates over all the cohorts b
e-
lieve that they are well
-
prepared to achieve all
three PEOs.

CRITERION 3. PROGRAM OUTCOMES





CRITERION 3. PROGRAM
OUTCOMES

Program
Outcomes

Process
es

The establishment of
a set of
measurable Program Outcomes (POs) follows a dynamic
process similar to that used in the development and refinement of

our
Program Educ
a-
tional Objectives
(
PEOs
)
. The POs are
essentially those

of the engineering criteria “a”
through “k” outcomes and modified to reflect

the needs of our constituents and the r
e-
quirements to practice civil engineering
. Achievement of these POs

should

prepare our
graduates to move into their chosen careers and prof
essions. The process for the mod
i-
fication and refinement of POs is similar to that for PEOs. A general overview of the pr
o-
cess is illustrated in

Figure 3
-
1.

CRITERION 3. PROGRAM OUTCOMES






Figure 3
-
1
.
Process Overview for Developing Program Outcomes



CRITERION 3. PROGRAM OUTCOMES





A
n example of this process
is

the devel
opment of the current Pos, which were
modified
from the POs at the time of the 2003
EAC of ABET
accreditation visit.

Program Outcomes for 2003
EAC of ABET
accreditation

visit:

At the time of the 2003
EAC of ABET

visit,

the following POs were in place:



Graduates will compete successfully for positions at the regional, state, national,
and international levels.



Graduates will demonstrate application of solid foundation skills in mathematics,
basic and engineering sciences
, current computer applications, and experimental
techniques necessary to solve civil engineering problems in the planning, design,
and construction of infrastructure projects.



Graduates will demonstrate teamwork and communications skills necessary to
perf
orm effectively as professional civil engineers
.



Graduates will demonstrate sufficient background knowledge of math, science,
and engineering skills to pursue graduate studies in engineering and related di
s-
ciplines.



Graduates will demonstrate an awareness
of the need to stay abreast of the la
t-
est knowledge in civil engineering and to continue professional development
through the processes of lifelong learning and/or graduate study.



Graduates will display an awareness of the importance of ethics, professiona
l r
e-
sponsibility and contemporary issues relating to the practice of civil engineering.



Graduates will actively promote interest in and awareness of our Civil Enginee
r-
ing Department and the Herff College of Engineering to promote the field of civil
enginee
ring.

Based on discussion with the department faculty and external advisory committee, it was
decided to adopt the engineering criteria “a” through “k” outcomes supplemented by the
outcomes specified in the current civil engineering program criteria.





CRITERION 3. PROGRAM OUTCO
MES





C
urrent
Program Outcomes (POs)


Upon graduation, our civil engineering program must demonstrate that our students
have
attained the following outcomes
:

a.

an ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering

b.

an ability to design and conduct
experiments and to analyze and interpret data in
two or more of the following areas: environmental engineering, geotechnical e
n-
gineering, hydraulics, and materials

c.

an ability to design a civil engineering system, component, or process to meet
specified per
formance, cost, time, safety and quality needs, and objectives

d.

an ability to function on multi
-
disciplinary teams

e.

an ability to identify, formulate, and solve civil engineering problems

f.

an understanding of professional and ethical responsibility

g.

an ability

to convey technical material through oral presentations and written p
a-
pers and reports

h.

the broad education necessary to understand the impact of engineering solutions
in a global and societal context

i.

a recognition of the need for professional licensure an
d a recognition of the need
for, and an ability to engage in life
-
long learning

j.

a knowledge of contemporary issues

k.

an ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools necessary
for engineering practice.

l.

an ability to apply knowledge to d
evelop engineering solutions in a minimum of
four of the following areas: environmental engineering, geotechnical engineering,
structural engineering, transportation engineering, and water resources enginee
r-
ing

m.

an ability to explain basic concepts in manag
ement, business, public policy and
leadership

These program outcomes
support the PEO
s and form the basis
of

program and curricular
changes.




CRITERION 3. PROGRAM OUTCOMES





Relationship of Program Outcomes to Program Educational Obje
c-
tives

Table 3
-
1
provides a
mapping

between
the Progr
am

Educational Objectives and
the
Program Outcomes.

Table 3
-
1
. Program Outcomes Support of PEOs



Relationship of Courses in the Curriculum to the Program Outcomes

Table 3
-
2

maps
our POs and
the

required courses in
the
civil engineering
curriculum
based on the learning outcomes for each course. The
strength
of
the
relationship is ind
i-
cated by a

numerical code
in
which
:

3


I
ndicat
es

strong support
,

2

I
ndicat
es

supported
,

and

1

I
ndicat
es

minimal
support
.




Program Educational Objective

Program Outcome

1

2

3

a







b






c







d





e







f






g







h





i






j





k







l






m





CRITERION 3. PROGRAM OUTCOMES





Table 3
-
2
. Relationship between
Required

Courses and Program Outcomes


Program Outcomes

Course

a

b

c

d

e

f

g

h

i

j

k

l

m

CIVL 1101

Civil Engineering
Measurements

3

3

3

1

3


2




2



CIVL 1112

Civil Engineering
Analysis

3

3

3

1

3


2




2



CIVL 2101

Civil Engineering

Visualization

3


1

1

2


2

1



3



CIVL 2107

Civil Engineering

Computation

3




3


2




2



CIVL 2131

Statics

3




1






3



CIVL 3103

Approximation and

Uncertainty in

Engineering

3

3



3

1

3




3



CIVL 3121

Structur
al Analysis I

3

2

2

1

2


2




2



CIVL 3131


or

Design of
Steel

Stru
c-
tures


3


3


2




1


2



CIVL4135

Reinforced Concrete
Design

3


3


3


1


3


2



CIVL 3137

Civil Engineering

Materials

3

3






3


3

3



CIVL 3140

Environmental

Systems Engineering

3

3

2


3


1



1

3



CIVL 3161

Transportation

Systems Engineering

3

3

2


3

1

1

2

1

2

3



CIVL 3180

Civil Engineering

Hydraulics

3




3









CIVL 3181

Hydrology and

Hydraulics

3

2

2


3

1

1

2

1

1

2



CIVL 3182

Hydrology and

Hydraulics Lab

1

3


2



3







CIVL 3322

Mechanics of

Materials

3


1


2






2



CIVL 3325

Mechanics of

Materials Lab

2

1



2


1




3



CIVL 4111

Engineering

Economics

3










2



CIVL 4151

Soil Mechanics

2

3



3






2



CIVL 4195

Professional Practice
in Civil Engineering





2




2



3


CIVL 4199

Civil Engineering

Design



3

3


3

3





3


Number of Classes with Strong

Relationship (3)

1
6

8

5

1

10

1

3

1

1

1

7

2

0

Number of Classes with Moderate

Relationship (2)

2

2

4

1

6

0

5

2

1

1

10

0

0

Number of Cl
asses with

Weak Relationship (1
)

1

1

2

4

1

3

5

1

3

2

0

0

0


CRITERION 3. PROGRAM OUTCOMES





Documentation

For each
program outcome
,
one or more courses were identified
as a point of asses
s-
ment. These courses were selected as terminal points in the development of the st
u-
dent’s ability to achieve the particular PO. The direct assessment tools utilized in these
courses give the strongest measure of the student
's

achievement

level.
For each r
e-
quired course, we provide a syllabus showing the linkage between the course learning
outcomes and the POs. We
will also
provide documentation
of
representative student
work organized by course
together
with assessment tools and evaluat
io
n of
student pe
r-
formance as part of the supplementary materials made available
during

the on
-
site visit.

Materials regarding

extracurricular activities, ancillary documentation of processes (e.g.,
program advising form), alumni
and employer correspondence,

and faculty and su
b-
committee meeting minutes and reports
will be

available for on
-
site review.

In addition to the usual
c
ourse

notebooks,
we
will
provide
an outcome

notebook that
summarizes the documentation of the student attainment of each of the 13 civ
il eng
i-
nee
r
ing program outcomes.

Achievement of Program Outcomes

Assessment Processes

The primary purpose of assessment is to determine how well our students are achieving
the POs. This is
accomplished

by measuring student performance

as well as
obtainin
g
feedback from constituencies. Using the assessment results, our faculty and
the d
e-
partmental ABET
committee members review Program Outcomes, alumni satisfaction
levels, employer expectations and evaluations, and student/graduate performance in an
ongoing

process of continuing improvement.

General Approach

The goal of
this component of
our assessment strategy is to collect data
that can be
used to evaluate the degree
to
which our graduates achieve the program outcomes

and
to then
address these evaluations

in a
systematic

manner.
Although

the
assessment and
evaluation processes have been in place for the last 15 years,
candidly,
th
e current cycle
is the first attempt to create a department
-
level assessment strategy that extends to the
course level. To
acco
mplish

this, the ABET Committee
considered

available information
and research regarding formal assessment strategies and combined this information
with
other

guidelines for
development of ‘best practices’
assessment.



CRITERION 3. PROGRAM OUTCOMES





Department
ABET Committee:

Charges
and Responsibilities:



To assure that program POs and PEOs
support
the
University's and the Co
l-
lege's mission
s



To assist
program

faculty in refining course
-
level
learning outcomes

and POs



To supervise data collection for the department assessment strategy



To develop and implement new assessment instruments and metrics for evalu
a-
tion



To integrate University and C
ollege graduation requirements into the civil eng
i-
neering undergraduate curriculum



To examine course content to
ensure

the
civil engineering
curricu
lum meets
pr
o-
gram

POs and PEOs


The primary internal evaluation tool for the evaluation of achievement of POs is the
a
s-
sessment of the POs in specific classes
.
Each course in the curriculum has one or more
learning outcomes
that
directly support one or mor
e POs
. The assessment of the
achievement of the course learning outcomes in each class provides a milestone indic
a-
tor of the student performance toward achievement of the POs. Thus

the achievement of
the learning outcomes will be a strong internal indicato
r of the achievement of the POs
that they support. Other indicators of achievement of POs are the perspectives of the
students upon graduation, the longer viewpoint of alumni after they have been in indu
s-
try, and
feedback about the performance

of our gradu
ates from their employers and i
m-
mediate supervisors.

Our department
-
level assessment process is multi
-
modal in focus and includes a variety
of assessment instruments designed to incorporate and involve all of our program co
n-
stituents. As expected, differen
t constituencies require different methods to elicit their r
e-
sponses.
Table 3
-
3
presents a summary of our current assessment instruments grouped
by constituency base.








CRITERION 3. PROGRAM OUTCOMES





Table 3
-
3
. Assessment Instruments for Various Constitu
encies

Instrument

Assessment

Method

Constituency

Frequency

Program Outcome Terminal Course

Assessment

In Course
Material

Current


Students

Each

Semester

Senior Exit Interviews with Chair

Direct

Interview

Graduating
Seniors

Each

Semester

Senior
Capstone Design Survey

On
-
line

Survey

Graduating

Seniors

Each


Semester

Student Course Survey

On
-
line

Survey

Current

Students

Each


Semester

Fundamentals of Engineering Exam (FE)

National

Exam

Students in
Final Year

Each


Semester

Course Learning
Assessments

In Course

Material

Current

Students

Each

Semester

Alumni Surveys

On
-
line

Survey

Alumni

Three Year
Cycle

Employer Surveys

On
-
line

Survey

Employers

Three Year
Cycle


Detailed descriptions of the assessment instruments currently in use
are
provided

in the
following material
.

Assessment Instruments:


1.

Program Outcome Terminal Course Assessment

Type of Instrument:

The program outcome course level assessment is a course com
p
o-
nent

or series of components with a direct measurement of some factor addressing a
specific program outcome. These may include performance at a specific task relating to
the program outcome such as the ability to solve a specific type of problem or the ability

to integrate information from a number of sources in a paper or presentation.

Description
:
Courses are identified at the beginning of each academic year to include d
i-
rect PO assessment.


Data Analysis Procedure
:
The course instructor, in concert with th
e ABET
committee;

sets target levels for achievement of the POs as measured by the instruments in each
class. The ABET committee reviews end
-
of
-
year results and responses are developed
as necessary.

Frequency
: Each semester

Outcomes Links
: This instrument
supports
all POs
.

CRITERION 3. PROGRAM OUTCOMES





Feedback Mechanism
: The
ABET

Committee

shares the results from the course a
s-
sessments with the faculty members in the respective areas

and
they develop strategies
to address
areas
that can be improved.


2.

Senior Exit Interviews with Chair

T
ype of instrument:

Written questionnaire and open
-
ended verbal interviews between
each graduating senior and the
D
epartment
C
hair.

Description
: The exit interview
with graduating seniors
has a
20
-
year history in the
d
e-
partment
and
typically
consists of a 1
5
-
30

minute individual interview with each gradua
t-
ing senior. The format includes open
-
ended questions designed by the
D
epartment
C
hair, and the results are made available in the Department Chair’s office.

Data Analysis Procedure
: The Department Chair comp