Pratt School of Engineering

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Proof for the
2012
-
2013

Duke University Bulletin of Undergraduate Instruction
, p.
1

RETURN PROOF
BY MARCH 6, 2012
TO
INGEBORG WALTHER:
waltheri@duke.edu


________________________________________________________________________________


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P
ra
tt School of
Engineering

Professor Katsouleas,
Dean;
Senior Associate Dean for Education Glass; Associate Deans Absher, Franzoni, and
Simmons



For courses in Engineering (Interdepartmental), see
E
n
.



For courses in Biomedical Engineering, see
B
i
.



For courses in Civil and Environmental Engineering, see
Ci
v
.



For courses in Electrical
and Computer Engineering, see
El
e
.



For courses in Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, see
M
e
.

E
ngin
eering (Interdepartmental) (EGR)

10. Introduction to Engineering.
This course is designed to introduce students to the study and practice of
engineering. Presentations will be made by representatives of all four engineering departments as well as outside
p
ractitioners, researchers, and industrial leaders. Selected group design and/or laboratory modules will be required
of all participants. Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory grading only. Staff: Instructor. Half course.

20L. Engineering Innovation.
Introduces fresh
men to the process of team
-
based creative conceptualization,
visualization prototyping, and product realization. Students use computer
-
aided design tools to create custom circuit
boards and computer numerically controlled (CNC) machined components to produ
ce prototype systems. Design
concepts are introduced and supported through hands
-
on assignments. Instructor: Twiss and Simmons. One course.

25L. Introduction to Structural Engineering.
An introduction to engineering and the engineering method through
a wid
e variety of historical and modern case studies, ranging from unique structures like bridges to mass produced
objects like pencils. Instructor: Petroski. One course.

31FCS. Engineering The Planet.
This seminar examines the environmental impacts of large in
frastructure from
dam construction, to large
-
scale farming and irrigation, clear
-
cutting of natural forests, and extensive urbanization of
land
-
margin ecosystems. Focus on the social and engineering make
-
up of global environmental change and water
resource
s. Introduction to the science and technology of environmental adaptation and sustainability. Students will
organize in small research groups working on trans
-
disciplinary case
-
studies. Instructor: Barros. One course.

32FCS. Mapping Engineering into Biolog
y. NS, R, STS
Students will be introduced to the new and exciting ways
in which we can start to bring engineering and biology together. The course asks fundamental questions such as
"How did Nature solve problem X?" and "What are the problems that Nature h
as?" and explore how to forward
engineer new products and processes inspired by Nature's own solutions. The seminar will give students a
foundation to achieve technological innovation through effective channeling of creativity and scientific principles.
Th
e class divides in teams and ranges of expertise and interest in biology, chemistry, physics, mathematics, and
engineering are encouraged to join in. Instructor consent required. Instructors: Needham and Bonaventura. One
course.

49S. First
-
Year Seminar.
To
pics vary each semester offered. Instructor: Staff. One course.

Proof for the
2012
-
2013

Duke University Bulletin of Undergraduate Instruction
, p.
2

RETURN PROOF
BY MARCH 6, 2012
TO
INGEBORG WALTHER:
waltheri@duke.edu


________________________________________________________________________________


53L. Computational Methods in Engineering. QS
Introduction to computer methods and algorithms for analysis
and solution of engineering problems using numerical methods in a workstation environ
ment. Topics include;
numerical integration, roots of equations, simultaneous equation solving, finite difference methods, matrix analysis,
linear programming, dynamic programming, and heuristic solutions used in engineering practice. This course does
not
require any prior knowledge of computer programming. Instructor: Gustafson. One course.

54L. Simulations in JAVA.
Development of interactive computer simulations in JAVA using Reality.java, a library
that includes graphical objects such as spaceships, plan
ets, and standardized functions for Newtonian mechanics.
Introduction to object
-
oriented programming, linked and inherited structures, and aspects of computational
mathematics such as stability and computational error, orbital mechanics, collision detectio
n, strategy, etc.
Prerequisite: Engineering 53L or Computer Science 6 or Computer Science 100E. Instructor: Staff. One course.

60. Science and Policy of Natural Catastrophes. NS, SS, STS
In this interdisciplinary course students will
conduct a life cycle a
nalysis of a natural disaster. Invited experts will discuss meteorologic, hydrologic and geologic
factors that cause disasters; explore how societies plan for and/or respond to the immediate and long
-
term physical,
social, emotional and spiritual issues as
sociated with survival; and present case studies of response, recovery and
reconstruction efforts. Students will attend the lecture component of the course and complete on
-
line quizzes to
demonstrate understanding of the material presented. Additionally, t
hey will prepare on individual paper (~ 10
pages) on a relevant topic and one group paper, the results of which will be presented to the class. Instructor:
Schaad. One course. C
-
L: Public Policy Studies 107, Environment 161

61. Natural Catastrophes: Rebuil
ding from Ruins. NS, SS, STS
Research Service Learning Gateway course
where students will conduct a life cycle analysis of natural disasters. Invited experts will discuss meteorologic,
hydrologic and geologic factors that cause disasters; explore how socie
ties plan and/or respond to the immediate and
long
-
term physical, social, emotional and spiritual issues associated with survival; and present case studies of
response, recovery and reconstruction efforts. Students will attend the lecture component of the
course and complete
on
-
line quizzes to demonstrate understanding of the material presented. For the service learning experience, students
will carry out response activities over Spring Break in an area ravaged by a natural disaster. They will keep a journa
l
(audio and written) of their activities, write a brief synopsis (4
-
5 pages), and make a group oral presentation of their
findings following their return. They will also submit a hypothetical research proposal for a project which might
stem from the cours
e and their experiences. Instructor: Schaad. One course. C
-
L: Public Policy Studies 109,
Environment 162

75L. Mechanics of Solids.
Analysis of force systems and their equilibria as applied to engineering systems. Stresses
and strains in deformable bodies;
mechanical behavior of materials; applications of principles to static problems of
beams, torsion members, and columns. Selected laboratory work. Prerequisites: Mathematics 32 and Physics 61L.
Instructor: Albertson, Barros, Boadu, Dolbow, Gavin, Hueckel, N
adeau, or Virgin. One course.

75LA. Mechanics of Solids (1/2).
Summer Session I ONLY. First half of a single course in solid mechanics that
spans both summer sessions. Students must enroll in both EGR 75LA and EGR 75LB. (See course description for
EGR 75L)
. Prerequisites: Mathematics 32 and Physics 61L. Instructor: Staff. Half course.

75LB. Mechanics of Solids (2/2).
Summer Session II ONLY. Secon half of a single course in solid mechanics that
spans both summer sessions. Students must enroll in both EGR 75L
A and EGR 75LB. (See course description for
EGR 75L). Prerequisites: EGR 75LA, Mathematics 32, and Physics 61L. Instructor: Staff. Half course.

95FCS. First Year seminar for Focus students only. NS, SS, STS
Topics vary each semester offered. Focus
students

only. Instructor: staff. One course.

107. Mapping Engineering onto Biology.
Introduction to concepts and implementation of Mapping Engineering
onto Biology. Explores both a new learning paradigm as well as methodologies for reverse engineering biological
systems. Uses a Bow
-
Tie Hierarchy of scale applying traditional design methodology in order to reverse engineer
healthy functioning systems that represent Problems Nature Solved (Engineering Biology) and Problems Nature Has
(i.e. we have in disease) (Engin
eering Pathology). Third (inventive) phase is to forward engineer new approaches to
medicine or new technologies. Students in design teams of four, carry out course assignment that asks a different
and interesting to the student, problem nature solved? Out
-
of
-
class open counseling with instructors and expert
faculty across campus. Instructor: Needham. One course.

108S. Ethics in Professions: Scientific, Personal and Organizational Frameworks. EI, STS
Ethics studied
through the analysis and interpretation of

case studies from the scientific and engineering professions. Topics
include: moral development; concepts of truth and fairness; responsible conduct of research; the person and virtues;
confidentiality; risk and safety; social responsibility; etiology and

consequences of fraud and malpractice; legal
aspects of professionalism, and allocation of resources. The capstone course for students completing the certificate
Proof for the
2012
-
2013

Duke University Bulletin of Undergraduate Instruction
, p.
3

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BY MARCH 6, 2012
TO
INGEBORG WALTHER:
waltheri@duke.edu


________________________________________________________________________________


in the Program in Science, Technology, and Human Values. Instructor: Vallero. One course. C
-
L
: Ethics, Global
Health, Markets and Management Studies, Marine Science and Conservation

115. Engineering Systems Optimization and Economics. SS
Introduction to mathematical optimization,
engineering economic analysis, and other decision analysis tools use
d to evaluate and design engineering systems.
Application of linear and nonlinear programming, dynamic programming, expert systems, simulation and heuristic
methods to engineering systems design problems. Applications discussed include: production plant sc
heduling,
water resources planning, design and analysis, vehicle routing, resource allocation, repair and rehabilitation
scheduling and economic analysis of engineering design alternatives. Corequisite: Mathematics 107. Instructor:
Peirce. One course. C
-
L:

Economics 112

119L. Electrical Fundamentals of Mechatronics.
Introduction to mechatronics with a special emphasis on
electrical components, sensing, and information processing. Topics include circuit analysis and design, system
response characterization,
conversion between digital and analog signals, data acquisition, sensors, and motors.
Laboratory projects focus on analysis, characterization, and design of electrical and mechatronic systems.
Prerequisites: EGR 53L, EGR 75L, MATH 103, and PHYSICS 62L, or
equivalents, or permission of instructor:
Instructor: Gustafson. One course.

123L. Dynamics.
Principles of dynamics of particles, rigid bodies, and selected nonrigid systems with emphasis on
engineering applications. Kinematic and kinetic analysis of struc
tural and machine elements in a plane and in space
using graphical, computer, and analytical vector techniques. Absolute and relative motion analysis. Work
-
energy;
impact and impulse
-
momentum. Laboratory experiments. Prerequisites: Engineering 75L and Math
ematics 103 or
consent of instructor. Instructor: Dowell, Hall, Mann, or Virgin. One course.

150. Engineering Communication.
Principles of written and verbal technical communication; graphs, tables, charts
and figures. Multimedia content generation and pre
sentation. Individual and group written and verbal presentations.
Prerequisite: Engineering 53L and Writing 20 or equivalent. Instructor: Kabala or Peirce. Half course.

153. Numerical Computing for Engineers.
Numerical computing with applications for engin
eering in a C/C++
language environment. Computer programs will be developed to implement numerical algorithms and solve
engineering problems. Course topics include: solution of simultaneous sets of equations, eigenvalues, singular value
decomposition, root
-
finding in non
-
linear equations, solution of ordinary differential equations, optimization, and
spectral analysis. Prerequisites: Math 107 and either Engineering 53, Computer Science 6, Computer Science 100 or
equivalent. Instructor: Staff. One course

165
. Special Topics in Engineering.
Study arranged on special engineering topics in which the faculty have
particular interest and competence as a result of research or professional activities. Consent of instructor(s) required.
Quarter course, half course, o
r one course. Instructor: Staff. Variable credit.

171. Total Quality Systems.
An interdisciplinary approach to principles and practice in the applications of total
quality concepts to engineering operations and business managements; practice in using tools

of statistical process
control; practice in using quality tools of management and operations; principles of continuous quality
improvement; definitions and applications of Total Quality Management (TQM); case studies; personal
effectiveness habits and soc
ial styles; assignments and projects in team building using tools learned, communication;
group problem solving; practice in professional verbal and written technical communications. Prerequisite: junior or
senior standing. Instructor: Staff. One course.

1
75. Aesthetics, Design, and Culture.
An examination of the role of aesthetics, both as a goal and as a tool, in a
culture which is increasingly dependent on technology. Visual thinking, perceptual awareness, experiential learning,
conceptual modeling, and
design will be explored in terms of changes in sensory environment. Design problems will
be formulated and analyzed through individual and group design projects. Instructor: Staff. One course. C
-
L: Visual
and Media Studies 114A

176S. Global Climate Change.

One course.

183. Projects in Engineering.
Courses in which engineering projects of an interdisciplinary nature are undertaken.
The projects must have engineering relevance in the sense of undertaking to meet human need through a disciplined
approach under

the guidance of a member of the engineering faculty. Consent of instructor required. Instructor:
Staff. One course.

184. Projects in Engineering.
Courses in which engineering projects of an interdisciplinary nature are undertaken.
The projects must have e
ngineering relevance in the sense of undertaking to meet human need through a disciplined
approach under the guidance of a member of the engineering faculty. Consent of instructor required. Instructor:
Staff. One course.

Proof for the
2012
-
2013

Duke University Bulletin of Undergraduate Instruction
, p.
4

RETURN PROOF
BY MARCH 6, 2012
TO
INGEBORG WALTHER:
waltheri@duke.edu


________________________________________________________________________________


185. Smart Home Technology Developm
ent.
Engineering projects related to the Duke Smart Home Program are
undertaken. Projects should be interdisciplinary in nature and have engineering relevance in the sense of undertaking
to meet human need through a disciplined approach under the guidance
or a member of the engineering faculty.
Consent of instructor is required. Instructor: staff. 1/2 credit pass/fail course. Half course.

190L. Energy and Environment Design.
An integrative design course addressing both creative and practical
aspects of the
design of systems related to energy and the environment. Development of the creative design process,
including problem formulation and needs analysis, feasibility, legal, economic and human factors, environmental
impacts, energy efficiency, aesthetics, saf
ety, and design optimization. Application of design methods through a
collaborative design project involving students from the Pratt School of Engineering and Trinity College. Open only
to students pursuing the undergraduate certificate in Energy and Envir
onment. Prerequisites: CE 24L, ENV 130 and
ME 121. One course. One course.

B
iom
edical Engineering (BME)

Professor Truskey,
Chai
r
; Professor Neu,
Director of Undergraduate Studies;
Assistant Professor of the Practice
Gimm
, Associate Director of Undergraduate Studies;
Professors R. Anderson, Barr, Chilkoti, Collins, Dewhirst,
Erickson, Gauthier, Glower, Grill, Guilak, Henriquez, Iza
tt, Jaszczak, Johnson, Katz, Laursen, Leong, Lopez,
Massoud, Myers, Needham, Neu, Nicolelis, Nolte, Reichert, Samei, Setton, Simon, Smith, Song, Toth, Trahey, Vo
-
Dinh, von Ramm, Warren, Yuan, and Zalutsky; Associate Professors Dobbins, Lobach, MacFall, Ram
anujam,
Sommer, Tornai, and Wolf; Assistant Professors Bursac, Gersbach, Idriss, K. Nightingale, Mukundan, Tian, Wax,
Wong, and You; Professors Emeriti Burdick, Clark, Friedman, Hammond, Hochmuth, McElhaney, and Plonsey;
Associate Research Professors Bass,

R. Nightingale, and Turkington; Assistant Research Professors Bohs, Chen,
Dahl, Henderson, Klitzman, Liu, Lo, and Palmeri; Professor of the Practice Malkin; Adjunct Professors Goldberg
and Grinstaff

A major is available in this department. The biomedical
engineering program is accredited by the Engineering
Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology.
1

Biomedical engineering is the discipline in which the physical, mathematical, and engineering sciences and
associated
technology are applied to biology and medicine. Contributions range from computer modeling and
simulation of physiological systems through development of medical instrumentation and experimental research to
solutions of practical clinical problems. The goa
l of the Biomedical Engineering Program at Duke University is to
prepare students for a) professional employment in areas such as the medical device industry, engineering
consulting, and biotechnology, b) graduate work in biomedical engineering, or c) entr
ance into medical school. The
program is flexible to match the student’s interests. Options exist for dual majors and to provide specific knowledge
in biomedical imaging and measurement systems, biomaterials and biomechanics, bioelectricity, and molecular,

cellular and tissue engineering. Design experience is developed and integrated throughout the curriculum and
includes capstone design courses. Many students gain valuable design experience in the course of independent
student projects within the research
laboratories and programs of the BME department.

The undergraduate curriculum specifies that a student select one of four Areas of Interest in which to obtain
depth in their education. The Areas of Interest are matched to the laboratories and expertise of
the faculty in the
Department; they are: Bioelectricity, Biomaterials and Biomechanics, Molecular Cellular and Tissue Engineering,
and Imaging and Measurement Systems.

Biomedical engineering in bioelectricity involves the use of large
-
scale computer modeli
ng, scientific
visualization, and experimental data acquisition and analysis of electrical activity in the brain and heart tissue to
increase basic understanding of normal and abnormal behavior. Other projects involve the study of the effects of
externally

applied electric fields and radio frequency energy on activity in excitable tissue.

The ultrasound imaging and transducer laboratories are directed toward new signal and image processing
techniques, new system architecture and transducer designs to devel
op novel imaging methods and improve image
quality and spatial resolution. The laboratories are equipped with a variety of state
-
of
-
the
-
art ultrasound imaging
instruments, electronics and transducer fabrication tools, acoustic and transducer modeling softw
are as well as video
and display hardware.

The biophotonics group develops novel photonics technologies for biological and medical applications.
Research areas include optical imaging techniques, advanced spectroscopy methods, plasmonics applications, and



1

Engineering and Technology Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET) 111
Market Place, Suite 1050, Baltimore, MD 21202, tele
phone (410) 347
-
7700


Proof for the
2012
-
2013

Duke University Bulletin of Undergraduate Instruction
, p.
5

RETURN PROOF
BY MARCH 6, 2012
TO
INGEBORG WALTHER:
waltheri@duke.edu


________________________________________________________________________________


new microscopy modalities. Applications span from cell and developmental biology to clinical diagnostics and
imaging methods.

The biomechanics laboratories use advanced experimental test facilities, data acquisition technologies,
computer simulations and
theoretical modeling in the study of cells, tissues, and biological structures. The
mechanisms of injury, aging, degeneration, and mechanical signal transduction are studied in a variety of biological
systems, including biological fluids, the cervical and
lumbar spines, diarthrodial joints, and the heart.

Molecular, cellular and tissue engineering is concerned with the regulation of the external and internal cellular
environment of the cell for control of biosynthesis and degradation activities, as well as
determination of the factors
responsible for differentiation of cells into tissues with varying functional requirements. The groups in this program
investigate biomaterials, material property characterizations, surface modifications, cell cultures, and the

mechanics
of biofluids, tissues, and cells. Applications include the development of novel biosensors and drug delivery systems,
new techniques for enhanced biological transport, and improved techniques for stimulated repair or inhibited
degradation of bio
logical tissues.

Instruction in all these areas is offered at the undergraduate as well as graduate and postdoctoral levels, and
opportunities for undergraduate student research are available in most of the biomedical engineering laboratories.
The courses
offered by the Department of Biomedical Engineering are listed below. Some biomedical engineering
courses require students to have a suitable laptop computer with wireless capabilities.

Course Designators:

(C)

Satisfies an Area Core Class

(D)

Satisfies the

Design requirement

(G)

Satisfies a General BME Elective

(BB)

Satisfies a Biomechanics and Biomaterials Area Elective

(MC)

Satisfies a Molecular, Cellular and Tissue Engineering Area Elective

(EL)

Satisfies a Bioelectricity Area Elective

(IM)

Satisfies an
Imaging and Measurement Systems Area Elective

98. Biomedical Device Design (GE).
An introduction to the origin and characteristics of biologic signals and the
features of biomedical systems and devices, from sensor to display/output. Concepts of analog vs.

discrete signals,
simple detection schemes, sampling, data reduction, filtering, visualization, and imaging techniques are presented.
The course emphasizes team project and system design. Prerequisite: Engineering 110L or equivalent; limited to
freshmen.
Instructor: Henriquez or K. Nightingale. One course.

244L. Quantitative Physiology.
An examination of the importance of transport processes, mechanics, energetics,
and electrical activity in physiological systems. Topics will cover cellular physiology, th
e cardiovascular system,
nervous system, muscle physiology, and renal physiology. Selected labs to complement lectures and class
discussion. Prerequisite: BIO 101L, Corequisite: Math 103. Instructor: Truskey. One course.

253L. Biomedical Electronic Measur
ements I.
Basic principles of electronic instrumentation with biomedical
examples. Concepts of analog signal processing, filters, input and output impedances are emphasized. Students are
exposed to system design concepts such as amplifier design and variou
s transducers. Laboratories reinforce basic
concepts and offer the student design opportunities in groups. Prerequisite: Physics 152L; or consent of instructor.
Instructor: Grill, Izatt, Malkin, K. Nightingale, or von Ramm. One course.

255. Safety of Medi
cal Devices (GE, IM).
Engineering analysis of the safety of medical devices such as prosthetic
heart valves, silicon breast implants, medical imaging, and cardiac pacemakers. Engineering performance standards
and US FDA requirements for clinical trials for

selected medical devices such as medical diagnostic ultrasound,
surgical lasers, and prosthetic heart valves. Students will prepare a mock application for FDA premarket approval to
demonstrate safety of a selected medical device. Prerequisite: sophomore s
tanding; corequisite: Physics 152L or
equivalent. Instructor: S. Smith. One course.

260L. Modeling Cellular and Molecular Systems.
An introduction to the application of engineering models to
study cellular and molecular processes and develop biotechnologi
cal applications. Topics covered include chemical
equilibrium and kinetics, solution of differential equations, enzyme kinetics, DNA denaturation and rebinding, the
polymerase chain reaction (PCR), repressor binding, gene expression, receptor
-
mediated endo
cytosis, and gene
delivery to tissues and cells. Selected laboratory experiments apply concepts learned in class. Prerequisites:
Mathematics 212 and Biology 25L or equivalent; or consent of the instructor. Instructor: Gimm, Tian, Truskey, You,
or Yuan. One

course.

Proof for the
2012
-
2013

Duke University Bulletin of Undergraduate Instruction
, p.
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RETURN PROOF
BY MARCH 6, 2012
TO
INGEBORG WALTHER:
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________________________________________________________________________________


271. Signals and Systems.
Convolution, deconvolution, Fourier series, Fourier transform, sampling, and the
Laplace transform. Continuous and discrete formulations with emphasis on computational and simulation aspects
and selected biomedical examp
les. Prerequisites: Biomedical Engineering 253L or Electrical and Computer
Engineering 230L and Mathematics 216; or consent of the instructor. Instructor: Barr, Izatt, or Neu. One course.

290. Intermediate Topics (GE).
Intermediate subjects or selective t
opics related to programs within biomedical
engineering. Consent of instructor required. Instructor: Staff. One course.

301L. Electrophysiology (AC or GE).
The electrophysiology of excitable cells from a quantitative perspective.
Topics include the ionic
basis of action potentials, the Hodgkin
-
Huxley model, impulse propagation, source
-
field
relationships, and an introduction to functional electrical stimulation. Students choose a relevant topic area for
detailed study and report. Not open to students who h
ave taken Biomedical Engineering 101L or equivalent.
Instructor: Barr, Bursac, Grill, Henriquez, or Neu. One course. C
-
L: Neuroscience 301L

302L. Fundamentals of Biomaterials and Biomechanics (AC or GE).
This course will cover principles of
physiology, ma
terials science and mechanics with particular attention to topics most relevant to biomedical
engineering. Areas of focus include the structure
-
functional relationships of biocomposites including biological
tissues and biopolymers; extensive treatment of t
he properties unique to biomaterials surfaces; behavior of materials
in the physiological environment, and biomechanical failure criterion. The course includes selected experimental
measurements in biomechanical and biomaterial systems. Prerequisites: Math
ematics 353; Engineering 201L or
Biomedical Engineering 110L; Mechanical Engineering 221L or Biomedical Engineering 83L. Instructor: Staff. One
course.

303. Modern Diagnostic Imaging Systems (AC or GE).
The underlying concepts and instrumentation of sever
al
modern medical imaging modalities. Review of applicable linear systems theory and relevant principles of physics.
Modalities studied include X
-
ray radiography (conventional film
-
screen imaging and modern electronic imaging),
computerized tomography (inc
luding the theory of reconstruction), and nuclear magnetic resonance imaging.
Prerequisite: Biomedical Engineering 271, junior or senior standing. Consent of instructor required. Instructor:
Smith or Trahey. One course. C
-
L: Modeling Biological Systems

30
7. Transport Phenomena in Biological Systems (AC or GE, BB).
An introduction to the modeling of complex
biological systems using principles of transport phenomena and biochemical kinetics. Topics include the
conservation of mass and momentum using differen
tial and integral balances; rheology of Newtonian and non
-
Newtonian fluids; steady and transient diffusion in reacting systems; dimensional analysis; homogeneous versus
heterogeneous reaction systems. Biomedical and biotechnological applications are discus
sed. Prerequisites:
Biomedical Engineering 260L and Mathematics 353; or consent of the instructor. Instructor: Friedman, Katz,
Truskey, or Yuan. One course. C
-
L: Civil and Environmental Engineering 307, Mechanical Engineering and
Materials Science 307, Mod
eling Biological Systems

354L. Biomedical Electronic Measurements II.
Further study of the basic principles of biomedical electronics
with emphasis on transducers, instruments, micro
-
controller and PC based systems for data acquisition and
processing. Lab
oratories focus on measurements and circuit design emphasizing design criteria appropriate for
biomedical instrumentation. Prerequisite: Electrical and Computer Engineering 230L or Biomedical Engineering
253L and Biomedical Engineering 271 or Electrical an
d Computer Engineering 280L; or the consent of the
instructor. Instructor: Malkin, Trahey, Wax, or Wolf. One course.

385. Introduction to Business in Technology
-
Based Companies. R, SS, STS
This course covers fundamental
business concepts and how they affe
ct technology and engineering functions in a company. Students will learn to
look at business problems from multiple dimensions, integrating technical issues with marketing, finance,
management and intellectual property. Teams consisting of students from t
he Pratt School of Engineering and
Trinity College of Arts and Sciences (Markets and Management Studies program) will work together to develop and
present a business plan for a technical product concept. Students will learn the elements of a business plan
and how
to pitch a technology
-
based product concept. Topics covered include marketing of technical products, competitive
strategy, market research, financial statements and projections, capital budgeting, venture capital, intellectual
property, patent sear
ching, regulatory affairs, and reimbursement. Requirements: Junior or Senior standing and
permission of instructor. One course. Instructor: Boyd. One course.

394. Projects in Biomedical Engineering (GE).
For juniors and seniors who express a desire for su
ch work and
who have shown aptitude for research in one area of biomedical engineering. Reserved for Engineering
Undergraduate Fellows. Consent of program director required. Instructor: Staff. One course.

427L. Design in Biotechnology (DR or GE, MC, BB).
Design of custom strategies to address real
-
life issues in the
development of biocompatible and biomimetic devices for biotechnology or biomedical applications. Student teams
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2012
-
2013

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BY MARCH 6, 2012
TO
INGEBORG WALTHER:
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________________________________________________________________________________


will work with a client in the development of projects that incorporate materials

science, biological transport and
biomechanics. Formal engineering design principles will be emphasized; overview of intellectual properties,
engineering ethics, risk analysis, safety in design and FDA regulations will be reviewed. Oral and written report
s,
and prototype development will be required. This course is intended as a capstone design course for the upper
-
level
undergraduate biomedical engineering students with a focused interest in bimolecular science, biotechnology,
transport, drug delivery, bi
omechanics and related disciplines. Prerequisites: Biomedical Engineering 307, Statistical
Science 130, or equivalent. Instructors: Gimm. One course.

436L. Biophotonic Instrumentation (DR or GE, IM).
Theory and laboratory practice in optics, and in the de
sign
of optical instruments for biomedical applications. Section I focuses on basic optics theory and laboratory practice.
Section II focuses on deeper understanding of selected biophotonic instruments, including laboratory work. Section
III comprises the
design component of the course. In this part, student teams are presented with a design challenge,
and work through the steps of engineering design culminating in building a prototype solution to the design
challenge. Lecture topics include engineering des
ign, intellectual property protection, engineering ethics, and safety.
Prerequisites: Biomedical Engineering 354L and Statistical Science 130. Instructor: Izatt or Wax. One course.

460L. Devices for People with Disabilities (DR or GE, IM, BB).
Design of c
ustom devices to aid disabled
individuals. Students will be paired with health care professionals at local hospitals who will supervise the
development of projects for specific clients. Formal engineering design principles will be emphasized; overview of
a
ssistive technologies, patent issues, engineering ethics. Oral and written reports will be required. Selected projects
may be continued as independent study. Prerequisite: Biomedical Engineering 354L and Statistical Science 130.
Instructor: Bohs or Goldber
g. One course.

461L. Electronic Designs for the Developing World (DR or GE, IM).
Design of custom devices to help the
specific and unique needs of developing world hospitals. Formal engineering design principles will be emphasized;
overview of developing
world conditions, patent issues, engineering ethics. Designs must be based on
microcontroller or equivalent electronic circuitry. Oral and written reports will be required. Students may elect to
personally deliver their projects to a developing world hospi
tal, if selected, in the summer following the course.
Prerequisites: Biomedical Engineering 354L and Statistics 130. Consent of instructor required. Instructor: Malkin.
One course.

462L. Design for the Developing World (DR or GR).
Design of custom devices

to help the specific and unique
needs of developing world hospitals. Formal engineering design principles will be emphasized; overview of
developing world conditions, patent issues, engineering ethics. Oral and written reports will be required. Students
m
ay elect to personally deliver their projects to a developing world hospital, if selected, in the summer following the
course. Prerequisite: Biomedical Engineering 354L and Statistical Science 130. Instructor: Malkin. One course.

464L. Medical Instrument
Design (DR or GE, IM).
General principles of signal acquisition, amplification
processing, recording, and display in medical instruments. System design, construction, and evaluation techniques
will be emphasized. Methods of real
-
time signal processing will

be reviewed and implemented in the laboratory.
Each student will design, construct, and demonstrate a functional medical instrument and collect and analyze data
with that instrument. Formal write
-
ups and presentations of each project will be required. Pre
requisite: Biomedical
Engineering 354L and Statistical Science 130, or equivalent or senior standing. Instructor: Malkin, S. Smith, Trahey,
or Wolf. One course.

493. Projects in Biomedical Engineering (GE).
For juniors and seniors who express a desire for

such work and
who have shown aptitude for research in one area of biomedical engineering. Consent of instructor required.
Instructor: Staff. One course.

494. Projects in Biomedical Engineering (GE).
For juniors or seniors who express a desire for such wo
rk and who
have shown aptitude for research in one area of biomedical engineering. Consent of instructor required. Instructor:
Staff. One course.

502. Neural Signal Acquisition (GE, IM, EL).
This course will be an exploration of analog and digital signal
processing techniques for measuring and characterizing neural signals. the analog portion will cover electrodes,
amplifiers, filters and A/D converters for recording neural electrograms and EEGs. The digital portion will cover
methods of EEG processing inc
luding spike detection and spike sorting. A course pack of relevant literature will be
used in lieu of a textbook. Students will be required to write signal
-
processing algorithms. Prerequisite: Biomedical
Engineering 354L. Instructor: Wolf. One course. C
-
L
: Neuroscience 502

503. Computational Neuroengineering (GE, EL).
This course introduces students to the fundamentals of
computational modeling of neurons and neuronal circuits and the decoding of information from populations of spike
trains. Topics includ
e: integrate and fire neurons, Spike Response Models, Homogeneous and Inhomogeneous
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Poisson processes, neural circuits, Weiner (optimal), Adaptive Filters, neural networks for classification, population
vector coding and decoding. Programming assignments a
nd projects will be carried out using MATLAB.
Prerequisites: Biomedical Engineering 101/201 or equivalent. Instructor: Henriquez. One course. C
-
L: Neuroscience
503

504. Fundamentals of Electrical Stimulation of the Nervous System (GE, EL).
This course pre
sents a
quantitative approach to the fundamental principles, mechanisms, and techniques of electrical stimulation required
for non
-
damaging and effective application of electrical stimulation. Consent of instructor required. Instructor: Grill.
One course.

506. Measurement and Control of Cardiac Electrical Events (GE, IM, EL).
Design of biomedical devices for
cardiac application based on a review of theoretical and experimental results from cardiac electrophysiology.
Evaluation of the underlying cardiac eve
nts using computer simulations. Examination of electrodes, amplifiers,
pacemakers, and related computer apparatus. Construction of selected examples. Prerequisites: Biomedical
Engineering 101L and 253L or equivalents. Instructor: Wolf. One course.

511. Th
eoretical Electrophysiology (GE, EL).
Advanced topics on the electrophysiological behavior of nerve and
striated muscle. Source
-
field models for single
-
fiber and fiber bundles lying in a volume conductor. Forward and
inverse models for EMG and ENG. Bidomai
n model. Model and simulation for stimulation of single
-
fiber and fiber
bundle. Laboratory exercises based on computer simulation, with emphasis on quantitative behavior and design.
Readings from original literature. Prerequisite: Biomedical Engineering 10
1L or 301L or equivalent. Instructor: Barr
or Neu. One course. C
-
L: Neuroscience 511

512L. Theoretical Electrocardiography (GE, EL).
Electrophysiological behavior of cardiac muscle. Emphasis on
quantitative study of cardiac tissue with respect to propagat
ion and the evaluation of sources. Effect of junctions,
inhomogeneities, anisotropy, and presence of unbounded extracellular space. Bidomain models. Study of models of
arrhythmia, fibrillation, and defibrillation. Electrocardiographic models and forward si
mulations. Laboratory
exercises based on computer simulation, with emphasis on quantitative behavior and design. Readings from original
literature. Prerequisite: Biomedical Engineering 101L or 301L or equivalent. Instructor: Barr. One course.

513. Nonline
ar Dynamics in Electrophysiology.
Electrophysiological behavior of excitable membranes and nerve
fibers examined with methods of nonlinear dynamics. Phase
-
plane analysis of excitable membranes. Limit cycles
and the oscillatory behavior of membranes. Phase
resetting by external stimuli. Critical point theory and its
applications to the induction of rotors in the heart. Theory of control of chaotic systems and stabilizing irregular
cardiac rhythms. Initiation of propagation of waves and theory of traveling wa
ves in a nerve fiber. Laboratory
exercises based on computer simulations, with emphasis on quantitative behavior and design. Readings from
original literature. Prerequisite: Biomedical Engineering 101L or 301L or equivalent. Instructor: Krassowska. One
cou
rse.

515. Neural Prosthetic Systems.
This course will cover several systems that use electrical stimulation or recording
of the nervous system to restore function following disease or injury. For each system the course will cover the
underlying biophysica
l basis for the treatment,the technology underlying the treatment,and the associated clinical
applications and challenges. Systems to be covered include cochlear implants, spinal cord stimulation of pain, vagus
nerve stim. for epilepsy, deep brain stim. fo
r movement disorders, sacral root stim. for bladder dysfunction, and
neuromuscular electrical stim.for restoration of movement. Prerequisites: Biomedical Engineering 101L, Biomedical
Engineering 253L, and consent of instructor. Instructor: Grill. One cours
e.

516. Computational Methods in Biomedical Engineering (GE).
Introduction to practical computational methods
for data analysis and simulation with a major emphasis on implementation. Methods include numerical integration
and differentiation, extrapolatio
n, interpolation, splining FFTs, convolution, ODEs, and simple one
-

and two
-
dimensional PDEs using finite differencing. Introduction to concepts for optimizing codes on a CRAY
-
YMP.
Examples from biomechanics, electrophysiology, and imaging. Project work in
cluded and students must have good
working knowledge of Unix, Fortran, or C. Intended for graduate students and seniors who plan on attending
graduate school. Prerequisite: Engineering 110L or equivalent, Mathematics 216 or equivalent, or consent of
instru
ctor. Instructor: Henriquez. One course. C
-
L: Modeling Biological Systems

522L. Introduction to Bionanotechnology Engineering.
A general overview of nanoscale science/physical
concepts will be presented as those concepts tie in with current nanoscience an
d nanomedicine research. Students
will be introduced to the principle that physical scale impacts innate material properties and modulates how a
material interacts with its environment. Important concepts such as surface
-
to
-
volume ratio, friction,
electron
ic/optical properties, self
-
assembly (biological and chemical) will be contextually revisited. A number of
laboratory modules ("NanoLabs") will guide students through specific aspects of nanomedicine, nanomaterials, and
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engineering design. Prerequisites: B
iomedical Engineering 83L and Biomedical Engineering 260L or consent of
instructor. One course.

525. Biomedical Materials and Artificial Organs (GE, BB).
Chemical structures, processing methods, evaluation
procedures, and regulations for materials used in

biomedical applications. Applications include implant materials,
components of ex vivo circuits, and cosmetic prostheses. Primary emphasis on polymer
-
based materials and on
optimization of parameters of materials which determine their utility in applicati
ons such as artificial kidney
membranes and artificial arteries. Prerequisite: Biomedical Engineering 83L and 260L or their equivalent or consent
of instructor. Instructor: Reichert. One course. C
-
L: Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science 518

526. E
lasticity (GE, BB).
Linear elasticity will be emphasized including concepts of stress and strain as second
order tensors, equilibrium at the boundary and within the body, and compatibility of strains. Generalized solutions to
two and three dimensional prob
lems will be derived and applied to classical problems including torsion of
noncircular sections, bending of curved beams, stress concentrations and contact problems. Applications of elasticity
solutions to contemporary problem in civil and biomedical engi
neering will be discussed. Prerequisites: Biomedical
Engineering 110L or Engineering 201L; Mathematics 353. Instructor: Laursen. One course. C
-
L: Civil and
Environmental Engineering 521

527. Cell Mechanics and Mechanotransduction.
This course examines the

mechanical properties of cells and
forces exerted by cells in biological processes of clinical and technological importance and the processes by which
mechanical forces are converted into biochemical signals and activate gene expression. Topics covered in
clude
measurement of mechanical properties of cells, cytoskeleton mechanics, models of cell mechanical properties, cell
adhesion, effects of physical forces on cell function, and mechanotransduction. Students will critically evaluate
current literature and

analyze models of cell mechanics and mechanotransduction. Prerequisites: Engineering 201L
and Biomedical Engineering 307 or equivalent, knowledge of cell biology and instructoor consent. Instructror:
Truskey. One course.

528. Introduction to Biofluid Mec
hanics.
Methods and applications of fluid mechanics in biological and
biomedical systems including: Governing equations and methods of solutions,(e.g. conservation of mass flow and
momentum), the nature of biological fluids, (e.g.non Newtonian rheological
behavior),basic problems with broad
relevance, (e.g. flow in pipes, lubrication theory), applications to cells and organs in different physiological systems,
(e.g. cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, respiratory, reproductive and musculoskeletal systems), ap
plications to
diagnosis and therapy, (e.g.drug delivery and devices). Prerequisite: Biomedical Engineeering 307. Instructor: Katz.
One course.

529. Theoretical and Applied Polymer Science (GE, BB).
One course. C
-
L: see Mechanical Engineering and
Materials

Science 514

530. Tissue Biomechanics (GE, BB).
Introduction to the mechanical behaviors of biological solids and fluids with
application to tissues, cells and molecules of the musculoskeletal and cardiovascular systems. Topics to be covered
include stati
c force analysis and optimization theory, biomechanics of linearly elastic solids and fluids, anisotropic
behaviors of bone and fibrous tissues, blood vessel mechanics, cell mechanics and behaviors of single molecules.
Emphasis will be placed on modeling s
tress
-
strain relations in these tissues, and experimental devices used to
measure stress and strain. Student seminars on topics in applied biomechanics will be included. Prerequisites:
Biomedical Engineering 110L or Engineering 201L; Mathematics 353. Instr
uctor: Myers or Setton. One course.

531. Intermediate Biomechanics (GE, BB).
Introduction to solid and orthopaedic biomechanical analyses of
complex tissues and structures. Topics to be covered include: spine biomechanics, elastic modeling of bone, linear

and quasi
-
linear viscoelastic properties of soft tissue (for example, tendon and ligament), and active tissue responses
(for example, muscle). Emphasis will be placed on experimental techniques used to evaluate these tissues. Student
seminars on topics in

applied biomechanics will be included. Prerequisites: Biomedical Engineering 110L or
Engineering 201L; Mathematics 353. Instructor: Myers or Setton. One course.

542. Principles of Ultrasound Imaging (GE, IM).
Propagation, reflection, refraction, and diff
raction of acoustic
waves in biologic media. Topics include geometric optics, physical optics, attenuation, and image quality parameters
such as signal
-
to
-
noise ratio, dynamic range, and resolution. Emphasis is placed on the design and analysis of
medical
ultrasound imaging systems. Prerequisites: Mathematics 216 and Physics 152L. Instructor: von Ramm. One
course.

545. Acoustics and Hearing (GE, IM).
The generation and propagation of acoustic (vibrational) waves and their
reception and interpretation by th
e auditory system. Topics under the heading of generation and propagation include
free and forced vibrations of discrete and continuous systems, resonance and damping, and the wave equation and
solutions. So that students may understand the reception and i
nterpretation of sound, the anatomy and physiology of
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the mammalian auditory system are presented; and the mechanics of the middle and inner ears are studied.
Prerequisites: Biomedical Engineering 271 or equivalent and Mathematics 216. Instructor: Collins
or Trahey. One
course. C
-
L: Electrical and Computer Engineering 584

550. Modern Microscopy (GE, IM).
Overview of novel microscopy techniques that are under development in
research laboratories. New techniques are placed in context with basic understanding

of image formation in
conventional microscopy and laboratory work which applies this knowledge. A group project offers opportunity to
examine special topics of interest. Prerequisite: Biomedical Engineering 354L or graduate standing. Instructor: Wax.
One
course.

560. Molecular Basis of Membrane Transport (GE, MC, EL).
Transport of substances through cell membranes
examined on a molecular level, with applications of physiology, drug delivery, artificial organs and tissue
engineering. Topics include organiz
ation of the cell membrane, membrane permeability and transport, active
transport and control of transport processes. Assignments based on computer simulations, with emphasis on
quantitative behavior and design. Prerequisites: Biology 25L or equivalent, Ma
thematics 216 or equivalent.
Instructors: Friedman or Neu. One course. C
-
L: Neuroscience 560

561L. Genome Science and Technology Lab (GE, MC).
Hands
-
on experience on using and developing advanced
technology platforms for genomics and proteomics research.
Experiments may include nucleic acid amplification
and quantification, lab
-
on
-
chip, bimolecular separation and detection, DNA sequencing, SNP genotyping,
microarrays, and synthetic biology techniques. Laboratory exercises and designing projects are combine
d with
lectures and literature reviews. Prior knowledge in molecular biology and biochemistry is required. Instructor
consent required. Instructor: Tian. Variable credit. C
-
L: Computational Biology and Bioinformatics 561L, Genome
Sciences and Policy

565L.

Environmental Molecular Biotechnology (GE, MC).
One course. C
-
L: Civil and Environmental
Engineering 661L

566. Transport Phenomena in Cells and Organs (GE, MC).
Applications of the principles of mass and
momentum transport to the analysis of selected pro
cesses of biomedical and biotechnological interest. Emphasis on
the development and critical analysis of models of the particular transport process. Topics include: reaction
-
diffusion processes, transport in natural and artificial membranes, dynamics of bl
ood flow, pharmacokinetics,
receptor
-
mediated processes and macromolecular transport, normal and neoplastic tissue. Prerequisite: Biomedical
Engineering 307 or equivalent. Instructor: Truskey or Yuan. One course.

567. Biosensors (GE, IM, MC).
Biosensors a
re defined as the use of biospecific recognition mechanisms in the
detection of analyte concentration. The basic principles of protein binding with specific reference to enzyme
-
substrate, lectin
-
sugar, antibody
-
antigen, and receptor
-
transmitting binding. S
imple surface diffusion and absorption
physics at surfaces with particular attention paid to surface binding phenomena. Optical, electrochemical,
gravimetric, and thermal transduction mechanisms which form the basis of the sensor design. Prerequisites:
Bio
medical Engineering 83L and 260L or their equivalent and consent of instructor. Instructor: Reichert or Vo
-
Dinh. One course.

568. Laboratory in Cellular and Biosurface Engineering (GE, MC).
Introduction to common experimental and
theoretical methodologies

in cellular and biosurface engineering. Experiments may include determination of protein
and peptide diffusion coefficients in alginate beads, hybridoma cell culture and antibody production, determination
of the strength of cell adhesion, characterization

of cell adhesion or protein adsorption by total internal reflection
fluorescence, and Newtonian and non
-
Newtonian rheology. Laboratory exercises are supplemented by lectures on
experiment design, data analysis, and interpretation. Prerequisites: Biomedica
l Engineering 307 or equivalent.
Instructor: Truskey. One course.

569. Cell Transport Mechanisms (GE, MC).
Analysis of the migration of cells through aqueous media. Focus on
hydrodynamic analysis of the directed self
-
propulsion of individual cells, use of

random walk concepts to model the
nondirected propulsion of individual cells, and development of kinetic theories of the migrations of populations of
cells. Physical and chemical characteristics of the cells' environments that influence their motion, incl
uding
rheologic properties and the presence of chemotactic, stimulatory, or inhibitory factors. Cell systems include
mammalian sperm migration through the female reproductive tract, protozoa, and bacteria. Emphasis on
mathematical theory. Experimental desi
gns and results. Prerequisites: Biomedical Engineering 307 and consent of
instructor. Instructor: Katz. One course.

570L. Introduction to Biomolecular Engineering (GE, BB, MC).
Structure of biological macromolecules,
recombinant DNA techniques, principles

of and techniques to study protein structure
-
function. Discussion of
biomolecular design and engineering from the research literature. Linked laboratory assignments to alter protein
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structure at the genetic level. Expression, purification, and ligand
-
bind
ing studies of protein function. Consent of
instructor required. Instructor: Chilkoti. One course.

571L. Biotechnology and Bioprocess Engineering (GE, BB, MC).
Introduction to the engineering principles of
bioprocess engineering. Topics include: introduct
ion to cellular and protein structure and function; modeling of
enzyme kinetics, DNA transcription, metabolic pathways, cell and microbial growth and product formation;
bioprocess operation, scale
-
up, and design. Class includes a design project. A modern b
iotechnology process or
product is identified, the specific application and market are described (for example, medical, environmental,
agricultural) along with the engineering elements of the technology. Prerequisite: Biomedical Engineering 83L or
Mechanic
al Engineering 221L. Instructor: Chilkoti or Reichert. One course.

574. Modeling and Engineering Gene Circuits.
This course discusses modeling and engineering gene circuits,
such as prokaryotic gene expression, cell signaling dynamics, cell
-
cell communica
tion, pattern formation, stochastic
dynamics in cellular networks and its control by feedback or feedforward regulation, and cellular information
processing. The theme is the application of modeling to explore "design principles" of cellular networks, and
strategies to engineer such networks. Students need to define an appropriate modeling project. At the end of the
course, they're required to write up their results and interpretation in a research
-
paper style report and give an oral
presentation. Prerequis
ites: Biomedical Engineering 260L or consent of instructor. Instructor: You. One course.

577. Drug Delivery (GE, BB, MC).
Introduction to drug delivery in solid tumors and normal organs (for example,
reproductive organs, kidney, skin, eyes). Emphasis on q
uantitative analysis of drug transport. Specific topics
include: physiologically
-
based pharmacokinetic analysis, microcirculation, network analysis of oxygen transport,
transvascular transport, interstitial transport, transport across cell membrane, specif
ic issues in the delivery of cells
and genes, drug delivery systems, and targeted drug delivery. Prerequisite: Biomedical Engineering 307 and
Engineering 53. Instructor: Yuan. One course.

578. Tissue Engineering (GE, MC).
This course will serve as an over
view of selected topics and problems in the
emerging field of tissue engineering. General topics include cell sourcing and maintenance of differentiated state,
culture scaffolds, cell
-
biomaterials interactions, bioreactor design, and surgical implantation
considerations. Specific
tissue types to be reviewed include cartilage, skin equivalents, blood vessels, myocardium and heart valves, and
bioartificial livers. Prerequisites: Mathematics 353 or consent of instructor. Instructor: Bursac. One course.

590. A
dvanced Topics in Biomedical Engineering.
Advanced subjects related to programs within biomedical
engineering tailored to fit the requirements of a small group. Consent of instructor required. Instructor: Staff. One
course.

590L. Advanced Topics with Lab.

To be used as a "generic" course number for any advanced topics course with
lab sections. Instructor: Staff. One course.

THE MAJOR

The major requirements are included in the minimum total of thirty
-
four courses listed under general
requirements and depa
rtmental requirements. The following specific courses or their approved alternatives must be
included: Biomedical Engineering 100, 153, 154, 171; two Area of Interest Core classes: (Biomedical Engineering
201L, 202L, 207, 233); two electives from one selec
ted Area of Interest (BB, MC,EL, or IM); two general (G) BME
electives; and one Biomedical Engineering design course (D) (Biomedical Engineering 227L, 236L, 260L, 261L,
262L, 264L).

Ci
vil and Environmental Engineering (CEE)

Professor Albertson,
Chair;
Associate Professor of the Practice Schaad,
Associate Chair
; Associate Professor of the
Practice Nadeau,
D
irector of Undergraduate Studies;
Professors Albertson,

Barros, Deshusses, Di Giulio, Dolbow,
Haff, Hinton, Laursen, Katul, Malin, Hueckel, Oren, Petroski, Porporato, Richardson, Trangenstein, Vengosh,
Virgin, and Wiesner; Associate Professors Boadu, Fergu
son, Gavin, Kabala, Kasibhatla, Mann, and Peirce;
Assistant Professors Khlystov, Hsu
-
Kim, Gunsch, and Scruggs; Professors Emeriti Brown and Wilson; Associate
Professors of the Practice Nadeau and Schaad; Adjunct Associate Professor Vallero; Lecturer Brasie
r

A major is available in this department. The civil engineering program is accredited by the Engineering
Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology.
2




2

Engineering and Technology Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET) 111
Market Place, Suite 1050, Baltimore, MD 21202, telephone (410)347
-
7700


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________________________________________________________________________________


The infrastructure that makes up what we refer to as civilization

is, for the most part, the work of civil and
environmental engineers. Improving, or even maintaining, the quality of life is ever more challenging as urban
problems in the industrialized nations of the world intensify, while rapid urbanization in many dev
eloping countries
creates other opportunities and obligations for the civil and environmental engineer. The planning, design,
construction, and maintenance of necessary facilities, in an era of increasingly scarce monetary and other resources,
demand civil

and environmental engineers dedicated to work for the public good and prepared to seek more efficient
and effective solutions based on current technology. The challenges faced by civil and environmental engineers vary
widely in nature, size, and scope, an
d encompass both the public and private sectors. Examples include: high
-
rise
buildings and long
-
span bridges; concert halls and museums; hazardous waste disposal facilities; orbital structures;
water supply and treatment facilities; tunnels; dams; seaports
, airports, and offshore structures.

The mission of the undergraduate program in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Duke
University is to provide an education that prepares graduates to solve technical problems, to pursue life
-
long
le
arning in their field, to assume leadership roles in their chosen careers, and to recognize their professional and
personal obligations to the broader society and culture. The program is designed to provide a holistic educational
experience where engineeri
ng sciences and design are combined with humanities and social sciences to provide the
foundation for the critical thinking and skills that allow graduates to enjoy the benefits of a liberal education.

The goals of the program are to position our graduates

to:



use their knowledge and understanding of engineering sciences and design to advance their professional
career;



think critically when solving and managing tasks;



communicate effectively in multidisciplinary, professional environments;



exercise prof
essional responsibility and sensitivity in the context of the social, economic, ethical, and
environmental implications of their engineering work;



function effectively and efficiently as an individual and as a part of a team; and



pursue life
-
long learnin
g to earn relevant professional credentials (for example, licensure, professional or
graduate degrees).

Students may pursue a degree program in civil engineering coupled with a double major in another department
at Duke. Examples of recently completed doub
le majors reflect the breadth of interests shared by civil and
environmental engineering students at Duke; public policy studies, economics, French, mathematics, and music. A
certificate program in architectural engineering is also available.

The civil and

environmental engineering program is built upon the expertise and experience of the faculty and is
supported by commensurate laboratory and instructional facilities. The civil and environmental engineering
professors are committed to providing quality cla
ssroom instruction, advising, and laboratory experiences in settings
that encourage student
-
faculty as well as student
-
student interactions. The faculty conducts research of national and
international consequence, and undergraduates have ample opportunitie
s to be involved in such research, through
undertaking independent study projects and/or by working as research assistants. The research facilities in the
department, including laboratory equipment and instrumentation as well as computer resources, are com
parable to
those found in other major universities.

Graduates of the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering are able to select from a wide range of
career paths. Recent graduates have pursued advanced study in engineering, business, law, and arc
hitecture, while
others have accepted positions with major corporations and federal, state, and local government agencies as design
engineers and project managers.

160L. Introduction to Environmental Engineering and Science. QS, STS
Examination of enginee
ring and the
societal context of anthropogenic contributions and impacts to the built environment. Focus on the human
necessities of air, water, land, and energy and the technological interplays of environmental engineering in
sustainably meeting human nee
ds. Materials and energy balances applied to environmental engineering problems.
Water pollution control, applied ecology, air quality management, solid and hazardous waste control, and
environmental ethics. Instructor: Schaad or staff. One course.

190. S
pecial Topics in Civil Engineering.
Study arranged on a special topic in which the instructor has particular
interest and competence. Consent of instructor and director of undergraduate studies required. Half course or one
course each. Instructor: Staff. V
ariable credit.

201L. Uncertainty Design and Optimization.
Principles of design as a creative and iterative process involving
problem statements, incomplete information, conservative assumptions, constraining regulations, and uncertain
operating environme
nts. Parameterization of costs and constraints and formulation of constrained optimization
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problems. Analytical and numerical solutions to constrained optimization problems. Evaluation of design solutions
via sensitivity and risk analysis. Application to d
esign problems in civil and environmental engineering.
Prerequisite: Engineering 201L. Instructor: Gavin. One course.

205S. Practical Methods in Civil Engineering.
Introduction to the practical methods used by Civil Engineers,
including surveying, compute
r
-
aided
-
design, geographical information systems, and use of the mills, lathes, and
other machine tools. Instructor: Schaad. Half course.

301L. Fluid Mechanics.
Physical properties of fluids; fluid
-
flow concepts and basic equations; continuity, energy,
an
d momentum principles; dimensional analysis and dynamic similitude; viscous effects; applications emphasizing
real fluids. Selected laboratory work. Corequisites: Engineering 244L and Mathematics 353. Instructor: Boadu,
Kabala, Laursen, Medina, Porporato.
One course.

302L. Introduction to Soil Mechanics.
Origin and composition of soils, soil structure. Flow of water through soils.
Environmental geotechnology: land waste disposal, waste containment, and remediation technologies. Soil behavior
under stress;
compressibility, shear strength. Elements of mechanics of soil masses with application to problems of
bearing capacity of foundations, earth pressure on retaining walls, and stability of slopes. Laboratory included.
Prerequisite: Civil and Environmental En
gineering 301L. Instructor: Boadu, Hueckel. One course.

307. Transport Phenomena in Biological Systems (AC or GE, BB).
One course. C
-
L: see Biomedical
Engineering 307; also C
-
L: Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science 307, Modeling Biological Systems


311. Architectural Engineering I. ALP, STS
Analysis of the building through the study of its subsystems
(enclosure, space, structural, environmental
-
control). Building materials and their principal uses in the enclosure and
structural subsystems. Compute
r aided design. Field trips. Prerequisite: junior or senior standing, consent of
instructor for nonengineering students. Instructor: Brasier. One course.

315. Engineering Sustainable Design and Construction. QS, STS
Design and testing of solutions to comp
lex
interdisciplinary design products in a service learning context. Technical design principles; sustainable and
engineering best practices; prototype formation, testing and evaluation; and establishment of research and analysis
methodologies in a communi
ty based research experience. Working in partnership with a community agency (local,
national, or international) and participation in an experimental learning process by engineering a design solution for
an identified community need. Evaluation focused on
design deliverables, fabricated prototypes and a critical
reflection of the experimental learning process. One credit. Prerequisites: Engineering 201L or Electrical and
Computer Engineering 110L or consent of instructor. Instructor: Schaad. One course.

31
6. Transportation Engineering.
The role and history of transportation. Introduction to the planning and design
of multimodal transportation systems. Principles of traffic engineering, route location, and geometric design.
Planning studies and economic eval
uation. Prerequisite: Statistical Science 130 and consent of instructor for
nonengineering students. Instructor: Staff. One course.

390. Special Topics in Civil Engineering.
Study arranged on a special topic in which the instructor has particular
interest

and competence. Consent of instructor and director of undergraduate studies required. Half course or one
course each. Instructor: Staff. Variable credit.

391. Projects in Civil Engineering.
These courses may be taken by junior and senior engineering stud
ents who
have demonstrated aptitude for independent work. Consent of instructor and director of undergraduate studies
required. Half course or one course each. Instructor: Staff. Variable credit.

394. Engineering Undergraduate Fellows Projects.
Intensive
research project in Civil and Environmental
Engineering by students selected as Engineering Undergraduate Fellows. Course credit is contingent upon
satisfactory completion of 493 and 494. Consent of instructor and program director required. Instructor: Sta
ff. One
course.

411. Architectural Engineering II. ALP, STS
Design and integration of building subsystems (enclosure, space,
structural, environmental
-
control) in the design of a medium
-
sized building. Prerequisite: Civil Engineering 311 or
consent of ins
tructor. Instructor: Brasier. One course.

421L. Matrix Structural Analysis.
Development of stiffness matrix methods from first principles. Superposition of
loads and elements. Linear analysis by hand and computer of plane and space structures comprising o
ne
-
dimensional truss and beam elements. Prerequisites: Engineering 201L and Mathematics 216. Instructors: Gavin,
Laursen, or Virgin. One course.

422L. Concrete and Composite Structures.
Properties and design of concrete. Analysis and design of selected
re
inforced concrete structural elements according to strength design methodology. Mechanics forming the
foundation of the methodology is featured. Laboratory work on properties of aggregates, concrete, and reinforced
concrete. Prerequisite: Engineering 201L.

Instructor: Nadeau. One course.

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423L. Metallic Structures.
Design of tension, compression, and flexural members. Bolted and welded connections.
Design by LRFD methodology. Selected laboratory work. Prerequisite: Engineering 201L. Instructor: Nadeau. One
course.

425. Analytical and Computational Solid Mechanics.
Investigation and application of intermediate concepts of
mechanics, expanding upon elementary ideas covered in Engineering 201L. Topics include: generalized stress and
strain relations and differ
ential equations of equilibrium in solids; the theory of elasticity, including some
fundamental solutions; failure and strength theories from mechanics; and plate bending. Introduction of the finite
element method as a means of solution of plate and planar

elasticity problems, including basic theoretical concepts
and modeling techniques involved in applications. Assigned work will feature analytical work and application of
commercial finite element packages. Prerequisites: Engineering 201L, Mathematics 212
and 216, or consent of
instructor. Instructor: Laursen or Dolbow. One course. C
-
L: Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science 425,
Modeling Biological Systems

429. Integrated Structural Design.
Student design teams complete a preliminary design of an ac
tual structural
engineering project and present the design to a panel of civil engineering faculty and practitioners. A written
technical report is required. Topics to be addressed include: the design process; cost estimation; legal, ethical, and
social as
pects of professional engineering practice; short
-
term and long
-
term design serviceability considerations.
Open only to civil engineering students during their final two semesters. Prerequisites: Civil and Environmental
Engineering 421L, 422L, and 423L. In
structor: Nadeau. One course.

461L. Chemical Principles in Environmental Engineering.
Fundamentals of chemistry as applied in
environmental engineering processes. Chemistry topics include acid
-
base equilibrium, the carbonate system, mineral
surfaces inter
actions, redox reactions, and organic chemistry. Applied environmental systems include water
treatment, soil remediation, air pollution and green engineering. Laboratory included. Field trips will be arranged.
Prerequisite: Chemistry 20, 21, or 101DL, or c
onsent of instructor. Instructor: Hsu
-
Kim. One course. C
-
L: Energy
and the Environment

462L. Biological Principles in Environmental Engineering.
Fundamentals of microbiology related to biological
environmental engineering processes. Topics include microbi
al metabolism, molecular biological tools, mass
balance, and reactor models. Applications to include unit processes in wastewater treatment, bioremediation and
biofiltration. Laboratory included. Field trips to be arranged. Prerequisite: Civil and Environm
ental Engineering
301L. Instructor: Deshusses, Gunsch. One course. C
-
L: Energy and the Environment

463L. Water Resources Engineering.
Descriptive and quantitative hydrology, hydraulics of pressure conduits and
measurement of flow, compound pipe systems, a
nalysis of flow in pressure distribution systems, open channel flow,
reservoirs and distribution system storage. Groundwater hydrology and well
-
hydraulics. Probability and statistics in
water resources. Selected laboratory and field exercises, computer app
lications. Prerequisite: Civil and
Environmental Engineering 301L. Instructor: Kabala, Medina. One course.

469. Integrated Environmental Design.
Student design teams complete a preliminary design of an actual
environmental engineering project and present
the design to a panel of civil engineering faculty and practitioners. A
written technical report is required. Topics to be addressed include: the design process; cost estimation; legal,
ethical, and social aspects of professional engineering practice; shor
t
-
term and long
-
term design serviceability
considerations. Open only to civil engineering students during their final two semesters. Prerequisites: Civil and
Environmental Engineering 461L, 463L, and 462L. Instructor: Schaad. One course. C
-
L: Global Health


491. Projects in Civil Engineering.
These courses may be taken by junior and senior engineering students who
have demonstrated aptitude for independent work. Consent of instructor and director of undergraduate studies
required. Half course or one course
each. Instructor: Staff. Variable credit.

493. Engineering Undergraduate Fellows Projects.
Continuation course for Engineering Undergraduate Fellows,
contingent upon satisfactory completion of 394. Consent required. Instructor: Staff. One course.

494. En
gineering Undergraduate Fellows Projects.
Final continuation course for Engineering Undergraduate
Fellows, contingent upon satisfactory completion of 394 and 493. Consent required. Instructor: Staff. One course.

501. Applied Mathematics for Engineers.
Adv
anced analytical methods of applied mathematics useful in solving a
wide spectrum of engineering problems. Applications of linear algebra, calculus of variations, the Frobenius
method, ordinary differential equations, partial differential equations, and bo
undary value problems. Prerequisites:
Mathematics 353 or equivalent and undergraduate courses in solid and/or fluid mechanics. Instructor: Kabala. One
course. C
-
L: Modeling Biological Systems

502. Engineering Data Analysis.
Introduction to the statistical

error analysis of imprecise data and the estimation
of physical parameters from data with uncertainty. Interpolation and filtering. Data and parameter covariance.
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Emphasis on time series analysis in the time
-

and frequency
-
domains. Linear and nonlinear le
ast squares.
Confidence intervals and belts. Hypothesis testing. Introduction to parameter estimation in linear and nonlinear
dynamic systems. Prerequisite: graduate standing or instructor consent. Instructors: Boadu, Gavin, or Porporato. One
course.

520.

Continuum Mechanics.
Tensor fields and index notation. Analysis of states of stress and strain. Conservation
laws and field equations. Constitutive equations for elastic, viscoelastic, and elastic
-
plastic solids. Formulation and
solution of simple problem
s in elasticity, viscoelasticity, and plasticity. Instructors: Hueckel, Laursen, or Nadeau.
One course.

521. Elasticity (GE, BB).
One course. C
-
L: see Biomedical Engineering 526

525. Wave Propagation in Elastic and Poroelastic Media.
Basic theory, method
s of solution, and applications
involving wave propagation in elastic and poroelastic media. Analytical and numerical solution of corresponding
equations of motion. Linear elasticity and viscoelasticity as applied to porous media. Effective medium, soil/ro
ck
materials as composite materials. Gassmann's equations and Biot's theory for poroelastic media. Stiffness and
damping characteristics of poroelastic materials. Review of engineering applications that include NDT, geotechnical
and geophysical case histor
ies. Prerequisite: Mathematics 353 or consent of instructor. Instructor: Boadu. One
course.

530. Introduction to the Finite Element Method.
Investigation of the finite element method as a numerical
technique for solving linear ordinary and partial differe
ntial equations, using rod and beam theory, heat conduction,
elastostatics and dynamics, and advective/diffusive transport as sample systems. Emphasis placed on formulation
and programming of finite element models, along with critical evaluation of results
. Topics include: Galerkin and
weighted residual approaches, virtual work principles, discretization, element design and evaluation, mixed
formulations, and transient analysis. Prerequisites: a working knowledge of ordinary and partial differential
equatio
ns, numerical methods, and programming in FORTRAN or MATLAB. Instructor: Dolbow and Laursen. One
course. C
-
L: Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science 524

535. Engineering Analysis and Computational Mechanics.
Mathematical formulation and numerical an
alysis of
engineering systems with emphasis on applied mechanics. Equilibrium and eigenvalue problems of discrete and
distributed systems; properties of these problems and discretization of distributed systems in continua by the trial
functions with undete
rmined parameters. The use of weighted residual methods, finite elements, and finite
differences. Prerequisite: senior or graduate standing. Instructor: Dolbow and Laursen. One course. C
-
L: Modeling
Biological Systems

541. Structural Dynamics.
Formulation

of dynamic models for discrete and continuous structures; normal mode
analysis, deterministic and stochastic responses to shocks and environmental loading (earthquakes, winds, and
waves); introduction to nonlinear dynamic systems, analysis and stability o
f structural components (beams and
cables and large systems such as offshore towers, moored ships, and floating platforms). Instructor: Gavin. One
course.

560. Environmental Transport Phenomena.
Conservation principles in the atmosphere and bodies of wate
r,
fundamental equations for transport in the atmosphere and bodies of water, scaling principles, simplification,
turbulence, turbulent transport, Lagrangian transport, applications to transport of particles from volcanoes and
stacks, case studies: volcani
c eruption, Chernobyl accident, forest fires and Toms River power plant emission.
Instructor: Wiesner. One course.

562. Biological Processes in Environmental Engineering.
Biological processes as they relate to environmental
systems, including wastewater t
reatment and bioremediation. Concepts of microbiology, chemical engineering,
stoichemistry, and kinetics of complex microbial metabolism, and process analyses. Specific processes discussed
include carbon oxidation, nitrification/denitrification, phosphorus

removal, methane production, and fermentation.
Consent of instructor required. Instructor: Staff. One course.

563. Chemical Fate of Organic Compounds.
One course. C
-
L: see Environment 540

564. Physical Chemical Processes in Environmental Engineering.
Th
eory and design of fundamental and
alternative physical and chemical treatment processes for pollution remediation. Reactor kinetics and hydraulics, gas
transfer, adsorption, sedimentation, precipitation, coagulation/flocculation, chemical oxidation, disin
fection.
Prerequisites: introductory environmental engineering, chemistry, graduate standing, or permission of instructor.
Instructor: Staff. One course.

566. Environmental Microbiology.
Fundamentals of microbiology and biochemistry as they apply to
envir
onmental engineering. General topics include cell chemistry, microbial metabolism, bioenergetics, microbial
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ecology and pollutant biodegradation. Prerequisites: Civil and Environmental Engineering 462L or graduate
standing or consent of the instructor. Ins
tructor: Gunsch. One course.

569. Introduction to Atmospheric Aerosol.
Atmospheric aerosol and its relationship to problems in air control,
atmospheric science, environmental engineering, and industrial hygiene. Open to advanced undergraduate and
graduate

students. Prerequisites: knowledge of calculus and college
-
level physics. Consent of instructor required.
Instructor: Khlystov. One course.

571. Control of Hazardous and Toxic Waste.
Engineering solutions to industrial and municipal hazardous waste
probl
ems. Handling, transportation, storage, and disposal technologies. Biological, chemical, and physical processes.
Upgrading abandoned disposal sites. Economic and regulatory aspects. Case studies. Consent of instructor required.
Instructor: Peirce. One cour
se.

575. Air Pollution Control Engineering.
The problems of air pollution with reference to public health and
environmental effects. Measurement and meteorology. Air pollution control engineering: mechanical, chemical, and
biological processes and technol
ogies. Instructor: Peirce. One course.

576L. Aerosol Measurement Techniques for Air Quality Monitoring and Research.
Principles of measurements
and analysis of ambient particulate matter (aerosol). Traditional and emerging measurements techniques currentl
y
used in air quality monitoring and homeland defense. Open to advanced undergraduate and graduate students
interested in the science and engineering related to atmospheric aerosol. Consent of the instructor required.
Instructor: Khlystov. One course.

581
. Pollutant Transport Systems.
Distribution of pollutants in natural waters and the atmosphere; diffusive and
advective transport phenomena within the natural environment and through artificial conduits and storage/treatment
systems. Analytical and numeric
al prediction methods. Prerequisite: Civil and Environmental Engineering 301L and
Mathematics 353, or equivalents. Instructor: Medina. One course.

585. Vadose Zone Hydrology.
Transport of fluids, heat, and contaminants through unsaturated porous media.
Un
derstanding the physical laws and mathematical modeling of relevant processes. Field and laboratory
measurements of moisture content and matric potential. Prerequisites: Civil and Environmental Engineering 301L
and Mathematics 353, or consent of instructor
. Instructor: Kabala. One course.

621. Plasticity.
Inelastic behavior of soils and engineering materials. Yield criteria. Flow rules. Concepts of perfect
plasticity and plastic hardening. Methods of rigid
-
plasticity. Limit analysis. Isotropic and kinemati
c hardening.
Plastic softening. Diffused damage. Thermo
-
plasticity. Visco
-
plasticity. Prerequisite: Civil and Environmental
Engineering 520 or consent of instructor. Instructor: Hueckel. One course.

622. Fracture Mechanics.
Theoretical concepts concerning

the fracture and failure of brittle and ductile materials.
Orowan and Griffith approaches to strength. Determination of stress intensity factors using compliance method,
weight function method, and numerical methods with conservation laws. Cohesive zone m
odels, fracture toughness,
crack growth stability, and plasticity. Prerequisites: Civil and Environmental Engineering 520, or instructor consent.
Instructor: Dolbow. One course.

623. Mechanics of Composite Materials.
Theory and application of effective me
dium, or homogenization, theories
to predict macroscopic properties of composite materials based on microstructural characterizations. Effective
elasticity, thermal expansion, moisture swelling, and transport properties, among others, are presented along w
ith
associated bounds such as Voigt/Reuss and Hashin
-
Shtrikman. Specific theories include Eshelby, Mori
-
Tanaka,
Kuster
-
Toksoz, self
-
consistent, generalized self
-
consistent, differential method, and composite sphere and cylinder
assemblages. Tensor
-
to
-
matri
x mappings, orientational averaging, and texture analysis. Composite laminated plates,
environmentally induced stresses, and failure theories. Prerequisite: Civil and Environmental Engineering 520 or
consent of instructor. Instructor: Nadeau. One course.

625. Intermediate Dynamics: Dynamics of Very High Dimensional Systems.
One course. C
-
L: see Mechanical
Engineering and Materials Science 541

626. Energy Flow and Wave Propagation in Elastic Solids.
One course. C
-
L: see Mechanical Engineering and
Materials

Science 543

627. Linear System Theory.
Construction of continuous and discrete
-
time state space models for engineering
systems, and linearization of nonlinear models. Applications of linear operator theory to system analysis. Dynamics
of continuous and d
iscrete
-
time linear state space systems, including time
-
varying systems. Lyapunov stability
theory. Realization theory, including notion of controllability and observability, canonical forms, minimal
realizations, and balanced realizations. Design of linea
r feedback controllers and dynamic observers, featuring both
pole placement and linear quadratic techniques. Introduction to stochastic control and filtering. Prerequisites:
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Electrical and Computer Engineering 382 or Mecahnical Engineering 344L, or consent

of instructor. Instructor:
Staff. One course.

628. Stochastic Systems.
Analysis of continuous and discrete
-
time stochastic processes, with emphasis on
application to mechanics. Time
-
and frequency
-
domain analysis of stationary linear stochastic systems. O
ptimal
filtering and control of stochastic systems. Continuous
-
time Poisson counters and Wiener processes. Introduction to
stochastic (Ito) calculus. Continuous
-
time nonlinear and nonstationary stochastic processes, and the Fokker
-
Plank
equations. Failure
analysis and first
-
passage reliability analysis for continuous
-
time dynamic systems. Introduction
to approximate analysis of nonlinear stochastic systems. Prerequisites: Statistical Science 130 and Civil and
Environmental Engineering 627. Instructor: Staff
. One course.

630. Nonlinear Finite Element Analysis.
Formulation and solution of nonlinear initial/boundary value problems
using the finite element method. Systems include nonlinear heat conduction/diffusion, geometrically nonlinear solid
and structural
mechanics applications, and materially nonlinear systems (for example, elastoplasticity). Emphasis on
development of variational principles for nonlinear problems, finite element discretization, and equation
-
solving
strategies for discrete nonlinear equati
on systems. Topics include: Newton
-
Raphson techniques, quasi
-
Newton
iteration schemes, solution of nonlinear transient problems, and treatment of constraints in a nonlinear framework.
An independent project, proposed by the student, is required. Prerequisi
te: Civil and Environmental Engineering
530/Mechanical Engineering 524, or consent of instructor. Instructor: Dolbow, Laursen. One course. C
-
L:
Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science 525

635. Computational Methods for Evolving Discontinuities.
Prese
nts an overview of advanced numerical methods
for the treatment of engineering problems such as brittle and ductile failure and solid
-
liquid phase transformations in
pure substances. Analytical methods for arbitrary discontinuities and interfaces are revie
wed, with particular
attention to the derivation of jump conditions. Partition of unity and level set methods. Prerequisites: Civil and
Environmental Engineering 530, or 630, or instructor consent. Instructor: Dolbow. One course. C
-
L: Modeling
Biological S
ystems

641. Advanced Soil Mechanics.
Characterization of behavior of geomaterials. Stress
-
strain incremental laws.
Nonlinear elasticity, hypo
-
elasticity, plasticity and visco
-
plasticity of geomaterials; approximated laws of soil
mechanics; fluid
-
saturated

soil behavior; cyclic behavior of soils; liquefaction and cyclic mobility; elements of soil
dynamics; thermal effects on soils. Prerequisite: Civil and Environmental Engineering 302L or equivalent.
Instructor: Hueckel. One course.

642. Environmental Geom
echanics.
The course addresses engineered and natural situations, where mechanical and
hydraulic properties of soils and rocks depend on environmental (thermal chemical, biological) processes.
Experimental findings are reviewed, and modeling of coupled the
rmo
-
mechanical, chemo
-
mechanical technologies
are reviewed. Instructor: Hueckel. One course.

643. Environmental and Engineering Geophysics.
Use of geophysical methods for solving engineering and
environmental problems. Theoretical frameworks, techniques,
and relevant case histories as applied to engineering
and environmental problems (including groundwater evaluation and protection, siting of landfills, chemical waste
disposals, roads assessments, foundations investigations for structures, liquefaction and

earthquake risk assessment).
Introduction to theory of elasticity and wave propagation in elastic and poroelastic media, electrical and
electromagnetic methods, and ground penetrating radar technology. Prerequisite: Mathematics 353 or Physics 152L,
or con
sent of instructor. Instructor: Boadu. One course.

644. Inverse Problems in Geosciences and Engineering.
Basic concepts, theory, methods of solution, and
application of inverse problems in engineering, groundwater modeling, and applied geophysics. Determi
nistic and
statistical frameworks for solving inverse problems. Strategies for solving linear and nonlinear inverse problems.
Bayesian approach to nonlinear inverse problems. Emphasis on the ill
-
posed problem of inverse solutions. Data
collection strategie
s in relation to solution of inverse problems. Model structure identification and parameter
estimation procedures. Prerequisite: Mathematics 353 or consent of instructor. Instructor: Boadu. One course.

645. Experimental Systems.
Formulation of experiments
; Pi theorem and principles of similitude; data acquisition
systems; static and dynamic measurement of displacement, force, and strain; interfacing experiments with digital
computers for data storage, analysis, and plotting. Students select, design, perfor
m, and interpret laboratory
-
scale
experiments involving structures and basic material behavior. Prerequisite: senior or graduate standing in
engineering or the physical sciences. Instructor: Gavin. One course.

646. Plates and Shells.
Differential equation

and extremum formulations of linear equilibrium problems of
Kirchhoffian and non
-
Kirchhoffian plates of isotropic and aelotropic material. Solution methods. Differential
equation formulation of thin aelotropic shell problems in curvilinear coordinates; me
mbrane and bending theories;
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specialization for shallow shells, shells of revolution, and plates. Extremum formulation of shell problems. Solution
methods. Prerequisites: (Civil and Environmental Engineering 421L or Mechanical Engineering 321L) and
Mathema
tics 353. Instructor: Virgin. One course. C
-
L: Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science 626

647. Buckling of Engineering Structures.
An introduction to the underlying concepts of elastic stability and
buckling, development of differential equation and

energy approaches, buckling of common engineering
components including link models, struts, frames, plates, and shells. Consideration will also be given to inelastic
behavior, postbuckling, and design implications. Prerequisite: Civil and Environmental En
gineering 421L, or
consent of instructor. Instructor: Virgin. One course. C
-
L: Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science 527

648. Multivariable Control.
Synthesis and analysis of multivariable linear dynamic feedback compensators.
Standard problem form
ulation. Performance norms. Full state feedback and linear quadratic Gaussian synthesis.
Lyapunov and Riccati equations. Passivity, positivity, and self
-
dual realizations. Nominal performance and robust
stability. Applications to vibration control, noise s
uppression, tracking, and guidance. Prerequisite: a course in linear
systems and classical control, or consent of instructor. Instructor: Bushnell, Clark, or Gavin. One course. C
-
L:
Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science 548

649. Structural Engineer
ing Project Management.
Apply project management tools and skills to a structural
engineering design project. Implement changes in schedule, budget, and changing client and/or regulatory climate.
Work with a design team of undergraduate students. Prerequis
ites: not open to students who have had Civil and
Environmental Engineering 429, 469, or 679. Consent of instructor required. Instructor: Nadeau. One course.

661L. Environmental Molecular Biotechnology (GE, MC).
Principles of genetics and recombinant DNA
for
environmental systems. Applications to include genetic engineering for bioremediation, DGGE, FISH, micro
-
arrays
and biosensors. Laboratory exercises to include DNA isolation, amplification, manipulation and analysis.
Prerequisites: Civil and Environmen
tal Engineering 462L, Biology 20, Biology 201L, or graduate standing, or
consent of instructor. Instructor: Gunsch. One course. C
-
L: Biomedical Engineering 565L

662. Physico
-
Bio
-
Chemical Transformations.
Surveys of a selection of topics related to the int
eraction between
fluid flow (through channels or the porous media) and physical, chemical, and biochemical transformations
encountered in environmental engineering. Numerous diverse phenomena, including solute transport in the vicinity
of chemically reacti
ng surfaces, reverse osmosis, sedimentation, centrifugation, ultrafiltration, rheology,
microorganism population dynamics, and others will be presented in a unifying mathematical framework.
Prerequisites: Civil and Environmental Engineering 301L and Mathem
atics 353, or consent of instructor. Instructor:
Kabala. One course.

665. Introduction to Atmospheric Chemistry. NS
One course. C
-
L: see Environment 739

666. Aquatic Geochemistry.
Geochemistry of the water
-
solid interface of soils, minerals, and particle
s in earth
systems. Topics will vocer a quantitative description of the chemical composition of soils, geochemical specalation,
mindral weathering and stability, sorption and ion exchange, soil redox processes, and chemical kinetics at
environmental surfac
es. Pre
-
requisite: Civil and Environmental Engineering 561/Environment 542 or Civil and
Environmental Engineering 461L, or consent of instructor. Instructor: Hsu
-
Kim. One course.

671. Physicochemical Unit Operations in Water Treatment.
Fundamental bases f
or design of water and waste
treatment systems, including transport, mixing, sedimentation and filtration, gas transfer, coagulation, and
absorption processes. Emphasis on physical and chemical treatment combinations for drinking water supply.
Prerequisite
: Civil and Environmental Engineering 462L. Instructor: Kabala. One course.

672. Solid Waste Engineering.
Engineering design of material and energy recovery systems including traditional
and advanced technologies. Sanitary landfills and incineration of so
lid wastes. Application of systems analysis to
collection of municipal refuse. Major design project in solid waste management. Prerequisite: Civil and
Environmental Engineering 462L, or consent of instructor. Instructor: Staff. One course. C
-
L: Environment

548

675. Introduction to the Physical Principles of Remote Sensing of the Environment.
The course provides an
overview of the radiative transfer principles used in remote
-
sensing across the electromagnetic spectrum using both
passive and active sensors.
Special focus is placed on the process that leads from theory to the development of
retrieval algorithms for satellite
-
based sensors, including post
-
processing of raw observations and uncertainty
analysis. Students carry on three hands
-
on projects (Visible

and Thermal Infrared, Active Microwave, and Passive
Microwave). Background in at least one of the following disciplines is desirable: radiation transfer, signal
processing, and environmental physics (Hydrology, Geology, Geophysics, Plant Biophysics, Soil
Physics).
Instructor consent required. Instructor: Barros. One course.

676. Fundamentals and Applications of UV Processes in Environmental Systems.
Ultraviolet light based
processes as they relate to treatment of contaminants in water and air. Concepts in

photochemistry and
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photobiology, fluence determination, UV disinfection, photodegradation processes for chemical containments,
advanced oxidation processes, mathematical modeling and design of UV systems. Includes laboratory exercises.
Prerequisites: Civi
l and Environmental Engineering 564, or consent of instructor. Instructor: Staff. One course.

679. Environmental Engineering Project Management.
Apply project management tools and skills to an
environmental engineering design project. Implement changes in

schedule, budget, and changing client and/or
regulatory climate. Work with a design team of undergraduate students. Consent of instructor required.
Prerequisites: not open to students who have had Civil and Environmental Engineering 429, 469, or 649. Inst
ructor:
Schaad. One course.

681. Analytical Models of Subsurface Hydrology.
Reviews the method of separation of variables, surveys integral
transforms, and illustrates their application to solving initial boundary value problems. Three parts include:
math
ematical and hydrologic fundamentals, integral transforms and their philosophy, and detailed derivation via
integral transforms of some of the most commonly used models in subsurface hydrology and environmental
engineering. Discussion and use of parameter
estimation techniques associated with the considered models.
Prerequisite: Mathematics 353 and (Civil and Environmental Engineering 301L or 463L), or consent of instructor.
Instructor: Kabala. One course.

682. Dynamic Engineering Hydrology.
Dynamics of th
e occurrence, circulation, and distribution of water; climate,
hydrometeorology, geophysical fluid motions. Precipitation, surface runoff and stream flow, infiltration, water
losses. Hydrograph analysis, catchment characteristics, hydrologic instrumentatio
n, and computer simulation
models. Prerequisite: Civil and Environmental Engineering 301L, or consent of instructor. Instructor: Medina. One
course.

683. Groundwater Hydrology and Contaminant Transport.
Review of surface hydrology and its interaction with

groundwater. The nature of porous media, hydraulic conductivity, and permeability. General hydrodynamic
equations of flow in isotropic and anisotropic media. Water quality standards and contaminant transport processes:
advective
-
dispersive equation for so
lute transport in saturated porous media. Analytical and numerical methods,
selected computer applications. Deterministic versus stochastic models. Applications: leachate from sanitary
landfills, industrial lagoons and ponds, subsurface wastewater injectio
n, monitoring of groundwater contamination.
Conjunctive surface
-
subsurface models. Prerequisite: Civil and Environmental Engineering 301L, or consent of
instructor. Instructor: Medina. One course.

684. Physical Hydrology and Hydrometeorology.
The objectiv
e of this course is to introduce and familiarize
graduate students with the fundamental physical processes in Hydrology and Hydrometeorology that control and
modulate the pathways and transformations of water in the environment. The content of the course w
ill be strongly
oriented toward providing students with a specific basis for quantitative analysis of the terrestrial water cycle
including land
-
atmosphere interactions and clouds and precipitation (rain and snow) processes. The course should be
of interes
t to undergraduate and graduate students interested in Environmental Science and Engineering, and
Atmospheric and Earth Sciences. Instructor: Barros. One course.

685. Water Supply Engineering Design.
The study of water resources and municipal water requir
ements including
reservoirs, transmission, treatment and distribution systems; methods of collection, treatment, and disposal of
municipal and industrial wastewaters. The course includes the preparation of a comprehensive engineering report
encompassing al
l aspects of municipal water and wastewater systems. Field trips to be arranged. Prerequisite: Civil
and Environmental Engineering 462L, or consent of instructor. Instructor: Staff. One course.

686. Ecohydrology.
This course provides the theoretical basis

for understanding the interaction between hydrologic
cycle, vegetation and soil biogeochemistry which is key for a proper management of water resources and terrestrial
ecosystems especially in view of the possible intensification and alteration of the hyd
rologic regime due to climate
change. Topics include: Probabilistic soil moisture dynamics; plant water stress; coupled dynamics of soil moisture,
transpiration and photosynthesis; and infiltration, root uptake, and hydrologic control on soil biogeochemist
ry.
Instructor: Porporato. One course.

690. Advanced Topics in Civil and Environmental Engineering.
Opportunity for study of advanced subjects
relating to programs within the civil and environmental engineering department tailored to fit the requirements
of
individuals or small groups. Instructor: Staff. Variable credit.

THE MAJOR

The major requirements are included in the minimum of thirty
-
four courses listed under general requirements
and departmental requirements. The following specific courses must be

included. All majors must take Engineering
25L, 53L, 75L, 115, 123L, and 150L: Civil and Environmental Engineering 24L, 100, 122L, 130L, and 139L.
Majors choosing the structural engineering and mechanics sequence must take Civil and Environmental engineer
ing
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131L, 133L, 134L and 192. Majors choosing the environmental engineering and water resources sequence must take
Civil and Environmental Engineering 120L, 123L, 124L and 193.

El
ectrical and Computer Engineering (ECE)

Professor Collins,
Chair
; Associate Professor Board,
Associate Chair
; Associate Professor of the Practice Huettel,
Director of Undergraduat
e Studies
; Professors Brady, Brown, Calderbank, Carin, Chakrabarty, Daubechies
,
Donald,

Fair, Glass, Harer, Joines, Jokerst, Katsouleas, Krolik, Lebeck, Liu, Maggs, Massoud, Nolte, Smith, and Trivedi;
Associate Professors Brooke, Cummer, Ferrari, Kim, Ked
em, Nowacek, Sorin, and Teitsworth; Assistant Professors
Cox, Dwyer, Lee, Peterchev, Reynolds, Roy Choudhury, Stiff
-
Roberts, Willett, Yang, and Yoshie; Professors
Emeriti Casey, George, Marinos, Wang, and Wilson; Professor of the Practice Ybarra; Associate

Professor of the
Practice Gustafson; Assistant Research Professors Liao, Marks, Maunz, Morizio, Morton, Poutrina, Raginsky,
Torrione, and Urzhumov; Adjunct Professors Derby, Lampert, Natishan, Stoner and Wilson; Adjunct Associate
Professors Janet and Ozev
; Adjunct Assistant Professors Remus and Stohl; Visiting Professors Kaiser and
McCumber

The educational mission of the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering is to facilitate the
development of graduates who are highly technically skilled, well
rounded, productive, and ethical individuals
versed in social, economic, political, and environmental issues. Our goals are to develop within each student a robust
repertoire of professional skills, to provide each with avenues for exploring diverse intere
sts, and to launch each
successfully into one of a variety of careers offering lifelong learning, service, and leadership within their own local,
national, and global communities. To achieve our mission, the department puts forth the following educational
objectives for the extremely capable students entering the ECE program.

Our graduates

1.

will be prepared to enter careers in academia, industry, or government with problem solving and
technical skills that will facilitate their advancement into leadership r
oles in the profession of electrical
and computer engineering or related areas;

2.

will utilize their analytical skills, knowledge of modern engineering tools, and interdisciplinary
project
-
based learning to function effectively in positions that require crea
tive solutions, involve
coordination of multiple disciplines, and concern for positive societal outcomes; and

3.

will be prepared to solve problems based upon fundamental knowledge of electrical and computer
engineering, abilities to engage in life
-
long learn
ing, and in
-
depth exposure to the humanities and
social sciences.

The Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE) program is fully accredited by the Engineering Commission of
the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET)
3

and leads to a Bache
lor of Science in
Engineering (BSE) degree. The ECE curriculum provides a solid foundation in mathematics, physical and life
sciences, computer science, and humanities and social sciences that complements a set of 12 theme
-
based ECE
courses.

The Departmen
t of Electrical and Computer Engineering has designed its curriculum based on the theme of
Integrated Sensing and Information Processing

(ISIP). The ISIP theme capitalizes on the collective research
expertise of the ECE faculty and provides a coherent, ove
rarching framework that links principles of ECE to each
other and to real
-
world engineering problems. The cornerstone of the new ECE curriculum is the first course
Fundamentals of Electrical and Computer Engineering
, which has been designed to provide stud
ents with a holistic
view of ECE by introducing concepts spanning how to interface sensors and systems with the physical world, how
to transfer/transmit energy/information, and how to extract, manipulate, analyze and interpret information. The
integrated d
esign challenge in this first course introduces students to team problem solving and motivates in
-
depth
study of ECE concepts in subsequent terms. Each of four follow
-
on core courses focuses on a specific subfield of
ECE (Digital Systems, Microelectronics,

Sensing and Waves, Signals and Systems), and integrates lateral and
vertical connections to other courses through the use of thematic examples. Following the five core courses are
seven ECE technical electives that include a culminating engineering design

course where teams of students address
a significant real
-
world problem or opportunity.

The ECE curriculum emphasizes creative problem solving through open
-
ended design challenges in many
courses. Working in teams, students collaborate to utilize and deve
lop their individual and collective technical,



3
Engineering Accrediation Commission of

the Accrediation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET) 111 Market Place, Suite
1050, Baltimore, MD 21202, telephone (410) 347
-
7700


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management, and leadership skills to design, simulate, build, and test components and systems to meet a set of
specifications, often defined by industry standards.

Students have the option to pursue two or thr
ee areas of concentration, depending on personal interests. The
upper
-
level technical electives, which extend the breadth and depth of the ECE core curriculum, provide a firm
foundation for future technical accomplishment and for effective problem solving
in the diverse fields that our
graduates pursue.

The flexibility of the ECE curriculum enables students and their faculty advisors to tailor a unique educational
experience for every student. This may include a semester abroad; a second major, minor, or ce
rtificate program;
and/or a research experience with a faculty member. The most popular second majors are computer science and
biomedical engineering. Other popular second majors include mathematics, economics, physics, and public policy.
Interests such as

premedicine, prelaw, art, music, psychology, and social sciences can be accommodated through
individually designed programs. Students are encouraged to take more than the minimum required courses in the
sciences and the liberal arts, as is fitting at an e
ngineering school in a university with a strong liberal arts tradition.

110L. Fundamentals of Electrical and Computer Engineering.
Students learn core ECE concepts, providing a
foundation on which subsequent courses build. These concepts include techniques

for analyzing linear circuits,
semiconductor and photonic devices, frequency representation, filtering, and combinational and sequential logic.
Central to the course is an extensive design challenge that requires students to integrate knowledge across top
ics
while honing practical design and project management skills. The course culminates in an exciting competition in
which teams of robots race to overcome challenging obstacles using sensor data acquisition and processing.
Prerequisite: Engineering 110L.
Corequisite: Mathematics 122. Instructor: Huettel or Ybarra. One course.

230L. Introduction to Microelectronic Devices and Circuits.
Hands
-
on, laboratory driven introduction to
microelectronic devices, sensors, and integrated circuits. Student teams of 3
-
4 students/team compete in a design,
assembly, testing, characterization and simulation of an electronic system. Projects include microelectronic devices,
sensors, and basic analog and digital circuits. Classroom portion designed to answer questions genera
ted in
laboratory about understanding operation of devices and sensors, and the performance of electronic circuits. Student
evaluation based on project specification, prototyping, integration, testing, simulation and documentation.
Prerequisites: Engineeri
ng 110L, and either Electrical and Computer Engineering 110L or Biomedical Engineering
253L. Instructor: Brooke or Massoud. One course.

250L. Introduction to Digital Systems.
Techniques for the analysis and design of combinational and sequential
networks
via manual and automated methods. Introduction to hardware description languages. Introduction to
simple computer systems, including their lower
-
level architecture, assembly language programming, and computer
arithmetic. Lab stresses simulation of target c
ircuits and physical realization with both discrete and high
-
complexity
programmable components. Final design project. Prerequisite: Engineering 110L, and either Electrical and
Computer Engineering 110L or Biomedical Engineering 253L. Instructor: Board, Dw
yer, or Sorin. One course.

270L. Introduction to Electromagnetic Fields.
Fundamentals and application of transmission lines and
electromagnetic fields and waves, antennas, field sensing, and signal transmission. Transmission line transients and
digital si
gnal transmission; transmission lines in sinusoidal steady state, impedance transformation, and impedance
matching; electrostatics and magnetostatics, including capacitance and inductance; electromagnetic waves in
uniform media and their interaction with i
nterfaces; antennas and antenna arrays. Alternating laboratories and
recitations. Laboratory experiments include transmission line transients, impedance matching, static and dynamic
electromagnetic fields, and antennas. Prerequisites: Engineering 110L, Mat
hematics 216 and either Electrical and
Computer Engineering 110L or Biomedical Engineering 253L. Instructor: Carin, Cummer, Joines, Liu, or Smith.
One course.

280L. Introduction to Signals and Systems.
Continuous and discrete signal representation and cla
ssification;
system classification and response; transfer functions. Fourier series; Fourier, Laplace, and z transforms.
Applications to Integrated Sensing and Information Processing; networks, modulation, sampling, filtering, and
digital signal processing
. Laboratory projects using digital signal processing hardware and microcontrollers.
Computational solutions of problems using Matlab and Maple. Prerequisite: Engineering 110L, and either Electrical
and Computer Engineering 110L or Biomedical Engineering 2
53L. Instructor: Collins, Gustafson, or Huettel. One
course.

311. Thermal Physics.
Thermal properties of matter treated using the basic concepts of entropy, temperature,
chemical potential, partition function, and free energy. Topics include the laws of t
hermodynamics, ideal gases,
thermal radiation and electrical noise, heat engines, Fermi
-
Dirac and Bose
-
Einstein distributions, semiconductor
statistics, kinetic theory, and phase transformations. Also taught as Physics 363. Prerequisites: Mathematics 212 o
r
equivalent and Physics 51L, 152L or equivalent. Instructor: Staff. One course.

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________________________________________________________________________________


330. Fundamentals of Microelectronic Devices.
Fundamentals of semiconductor physics and modeling
(semiconductor doping technology, carrier concentrations, carrier transport b
y drift and diffusion, temperature
effects, semiconductor device models). Principles of semiconductor device analysis (current
-
voltage and
capacitance
-
voltage characteristics). Static and dynamic operation of semiconductor contacts, PN junction diodes,
MOS

capacitors, MOS field
-
effect transistors (MOSFETs), and bipolar
-
junction transistors (BJTs). SPICE models
and parameter extraction. Prerequisite: Electrical and Computer Engineering 230L. Instructor: Massoud. One
course.

331L. Introduction to Electronics
: Integrated Circuits.
Analysis and design of electronic circuits in bipolar and
MOS technologies, with emphasis on both large
-
signal and small
-
signal methods. Circuits for logic gates, latches,
and memories. Single
-
stage and multistage amplifiers and op a
mps. Circuits with feedback, including stability and
frequency response considerations. Analog and mixed analog/digital circuit applications. Extensive use of SPICE for
circuit simulation. Prerequisite: Electrical and Computer Engineering 230L. Instructor:

Derby, Dwyer, or Fair. One
course.

340. Optics and Photonics. NS
One course. C
-
L: see Physics 320; also C
-
L: Visual and Media Studies 325

350. Introduction to Computer Architecture.
Architecture and organization of digital computer systems.
Processor op
eration, computer arithmetic, instruction set design. Assembly language programming. Selected
hardware and software exercises culminating in the design, simulation, and implementation in FPGA technology of
the major components of a complete computer system
. Not open to students who have taken Computer Science 250.
Prerequisite: Electrical and Computer Engineering 250L and Computer Science 100E. Instructor: Board or Sorin.
One course. C
-
L: Information Science and Information Studies, Modeling Biological Syst
ems

353. Introduction to Operating Systems.
Basic concepts and principles of multiprogrammed operating systems.
Processes, interprocess communication, CPU scheduling, mutual exclusion, deadlocks, memory management, I/O
devices, file systems, protection me
chanisms. Also taught as Computer Science 210. Prerequisites: Computer
Science 201 and 250. Instructor: Chase or Ellis. One course.

356. Computer Network Architecture.
The architecture of computer communication networks and the hardware
and software requi
red to implement the protocols that define the architecture. Basic communication theory,
transmission technology, private and common carrier facilities. International standards. Satellite communications
and local area networks. Performance analysis and mod
eling of communication networks. Prerequisite: Electrical
and Computer Engineering 250L. Instructor: Chakrabarty. One course. C
-
L: Information Science and Information
Studies

363L. Electric Vehicle Project.
Analysis, design, and construction of electrical

and mechanical components found
in electric vehicles. Traction motors, controllers, batteries and chargers, and metering. Hybrid and fuel cell vehicle
systems. Project includes building electrical devices and wiring of traction, control, lighting, and oth
er components
along with construction of adapters and devices necessary for the conversion of a vehicle to electric drive.
Prerequisite: Physics 152L, Electrical and Computer Engineering 110L or Engineering 224L. Instructor: Klenk. One
course. C
-
L: Mechani
cal Engineering and Materials Science 463

381. Fundamentals of Digital Signal Processing.
An introduction to theory and applications of digital signal
processing. Concepts, analytical tools and design techniques to process signals in digital form. Signal
sampling and
reconstruction, discrete
-
time transforms including the z
-
transform, discrete
-
time Fourier transform, and discrete
Fourier transform. Discrete systems including the analysis and design of FIR and IIR filters. Introduction to
applications of dig
ital signal processing such as image processing, and optimal detection of signals in noise. Discrete
system simulations using MATLAB. Prerequisite: Electrical and Computer Engineering 280L and Statistical
Science 130 or Mathematics 230 or Electrical and Co
mputer Engineering 555 or permission of instructor. Instructor:
Huettel or Nolte. One course. C
-
L: Modeling Biological Systems

382. Linear Control Systems.
Analysis and design of feedback control systems. Block diagram and signal flow
graph system models.

Servomechanism characteristics, steady
-
state errors, sensitivity to parameter variations and
disturbance signals. Time domain performance specifications. Stability. Root locus, Nyquist, and Bode analysis;
design of compensation circuits; closed loop frequ
ency response determination. Introduction to time domain
analysis and design. Prerequisite: Electrical and Computer Engineering 280L or consent of instructor. Instructor:
Gustafson. One course.

383. Introduction to Robotics and Automation.
Fundamental not
ions in robotics, basic configurations of
manipulator arm design, coordinate transformations, control functions, and robot programming. Applications of
artificial intelligence, machine vision, force/torque, touch and other sensory subsystems. Design for au
tomatic
assembly concepts, tools, and techniques. Application of automated and robotic assembly costs, benefits, and
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economic justification. Selected laboratory and programming assignments. Prerequisites: Electrical and Computer
Engineering 280L. Instructo
r: Janet. One course. C
-
L: Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science 442,
Information Science and Information Studies

384LA. Sound in the Sea: Introduction to Marine Bioacoustics. NS, R, STS
One course. C
-
L: see Environment
280LA; also C
-
L: Earth and O
cean Sciences 280LA, Marine Sciences, Marine Science and Conservation

391. Undergraduate Research in Electrical and Computer Engineering.
For juniors only. Half course or one
course each. Instructor: Staff. Variable credit.

392. Undergraduate Research in

Electrical and Computer Engineering.
For juniors only. Half course or one
course each. Instructor: Staff. Variable credit.

449. Opto
-
Electronic Design Projects.
Teams of students design an opto
-
electronic board
-
level system to a
published specification.
The system is built, tested, and compared to the design specifications. Optical, analog,
digital, and radio frequency (RF) components are used to complete the projects. Group tasks include resource
planning and management using GANTT charts, project budget
ing, estimating product Bill of Materials costs,
background study of the standard specification and component characteristics, testing of an evaluation board,
interaction with component vendors, design of the team's board, submission of that design to a qu
ick
-
turnaround
board fabrication foundry, assembly of the purchased components onto the fabricated board, and board
-
level system
test. The opto
-
electric board design incorporates considerations such as cost, economic viability, environmental
impact, ethica
l issues, manufacturability, and social and political impact. Prerequisite: Senior standing in Electrical
and Computer Engineering or Electrical and Computer Engineering 340, 162L, or 331L. Instructor: Brooke, Jokerst.
One course.

459. Introduction to Emb
edded Systems.
An introduction to hardware/software codesign of embedded computer
systems. Structured programming techniques for high and low level programs. Hardware interfacing strategies for
sensors, actuators, and displays. Detailed study of Motorola 6
8HC11 and 68HC12 microcomputers as applied to
embedded system development. Hardware and simulation laboratory exercises with 68HC11 and 68HC12
development boards. Major design project. Prerequisite: Electrical and Computer Engineering 350 or equivalent and

consent of instructor. Instructor: Board. One course. C
-
L: Modeling Biological Systems

483. Introduction to Digital Communication Systems.
Introduction to the design and analysis of modern digital
communication systems. Communication channel characteriza
tion. Baseband and passband modulation techniques.
Optimal demodulation techniques with performance comparisons. Key information
-
theoretic concepts including
entropy and channel capacity. Channel
-
coding techniques based on block, convolutional and Trellis
codes.
Equalization techniques. Applications to design of digital telephone modems, compact discs and digital wireless
communication systems. Prerequisite: Electrical and Computer Engineering 280L and Statistical Science 130 or
equivalent. Instructor: Krol
ik. One course.

486. Wireless Communication Systems.
Fundamentals of wireless system analysis and design; channel
assignment, handoffs, trunking efficiency, interference, frequency reuse and capacity planning. Path loss models
including large and small sc
ale, multipath interference, diffraction, and scattering. Signal manipulation and
conditioning including modulation/demodulation, equalization and speech coding. Air interference standards and
multiple access techniques including CDMA, TDMA and OFDM. Prere
quisites: Electrical and Computer
Engineering 280L and one of Statistical Science 130, Electrical and Computer Engineering 555 or Mathematics 230.
Instructor: Ybarra. One course.

488. Digital Image and Multidimensional Processing.
Introduction to the theo
ry and methods of digital image and
video sampling, denoising, coding, reconstruction, and analysis. Both linear methods (such as 2
-

and 3
-
D Fourier
analysis) and non
-
linear methods (such as wavelet analysis). Key topics include segmentation, interpolation
,
registration, noise removal, edge enhancement, halftoning and inverse halftoning, deblurring, tomographic
reconstruction, superresolution, compression, and feature extraction. While this course covers techniques used in a
wide variety of contexts, it pla
ces a strong emphasis on medical imaging applications. Prerequisites: Electrical and
Computer Engineering 280L and Statistical Science 130 or Mathematics 230 or Electrical and Computer
Engineering 555 or permission of instructor. Instructor: Willett. One c
ourse. C
-
L: Information Science and
Information Studies, Modeling Biological Systems

493. Undergraduate Research in Electrical and Computer Engineering.
For seniors only. Half course or one
course each. Instructor: Staff. Variable credit.

494. Undergradu
ate Research in Electrical and Computer Engineering.
For seniors only. Half course or one
course each. Instructor: Staff. Variable credit.

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495. Special Topics in Electrical and Computer Engineering.
Study of selected topics in electrical engineering
tailo
red to fit the requirements of a small group. Consent of instructor and director of undergraduate studies
required. Half course or one course each. Instructor: Staff. Variable credit.

496. Special Topics in Electrical and Computer Engineering.
Study of se
lected topics in electrical engineering
tailored to fit the requirements of a small group. Consent of instructor and director of undergraduate studies
required. Half course or one course each. Instructor: Staff. Variable credit.

521. Quantum Mechanics.
Di
scussion of wave mechanics including elementary applications, free particle
dynamics, Schrödinger equation including treatment of systems with exact solutions, and approximate methods for
time
-
dependent quantum mechanical systems with emphasis on quantum p
henomena underlying solid
-
state
electronics and physics. Prerequisite: Mathematics 216 or equivalent. Instructor: Brady, Brown, or Stiff
-
Roberts.
One course.

522. Introduction to Micro
-
Electromechanical Systems (MEMS).
Design, simulation, fabrication, and

characterization of micro
-
electromechanical systems (MEMS) devices. Integration of non
-
conventional devices into
functional systems. Principles of fabrication, mechanics in micrometer scale, transducers and actuators, and issues in
system design and integ
ration. Topics presented in the context of example systems. Lab covers design, simulation,
and realization of MEMS devices using commercially available foundry process. Prerequisite: Electrical and
Computer Engineering 230L or Mechanical Engineering 344L o
r equivalent. Instructor: Kim. One course.

523. Quantum Information Science. NS
Fundamental concepts and progress in quantum information science.
Quantum circuits, quantum universality theorem, quantum algorithms, quantum operations and quantum error
corr
ection codes, fault
-
tolerant architectures, security in quantum communications, quantum key distribution,
physical systems for realizing quantum logic, quantum repeaters and long
-
distance quantum communication.
Prerequisites: Electrical and Computer Engine
ering 521 or Physics 464 or equivalent. Instructor: Kim. One course.
C
-
L: Physics 627

524. Introduction to Solid
-
State Physics.
Discussion of solid
-
state phenomena including crystalline structures, X
-
ray and particle diffraction in crystals, lattice dynam
ics, free electron theory of metals, energy bands, and
superconductivity, with emphasis on understanding electrical and optical properties of solids. Prerequisite: quantum
physics at the level of Physics 264L or Electrical and Computer Engineering 521. Ins
tructor: Teitsworth. One
course.

525. Semiconductor Physics.
A quantitative treatment of the physical processes that underlie semiconductor device
operation. Topics include band theory and conduction phenomena; equilibrium and nonequilibrium charge carrie
r
distributions; charge generation, injection, and recombination; drift and diffusion processes. Prerequisite: Electrical
and Computer Engineering 330 or consent of instructor. Instructor: Staff. One course.

526. Semiconductor Devices for Integrated Circu
its.
Basic semiconductor properties (energy
-
band structure,
effective density of states, effective masses, carrier statistics, and carrier concentrations). Electron and hole behavior
in semiconductors (generation, recombination, drift, diffusion, tunneling
, and basic semiconductor equations).
Current
-
voltage, capacitance
-
voltage, and static and dynamic models of PN Junctions, Schottky barriers,
Metal/Semiconductor Contacts, Bipolar
-
Junction Transistors, MOS Capacitors, MOS
-
Gated Diodes, and MOS
Field
-
Effect

Transistors. SPICE models and model parameters. Prerequisites: Electrical and Computer Engineering
330. Instructor: Massoud. One course.

527. Analog Integrated Circuits.
Analysis and design of bipolar and CMOS analog integrated circuits. SPICE
device mod
els and circuit macromodels. Classical operational amplifier structures, current feedback amplifiers, and
building blocks for analog signal processing, including operational transconductance amplifiers and current
conveyors. Biasing issues, gain and bandwi
dth, compensation, and noise. Influence of technology and device
structure on circuit performance. Extensive use of industry
-
standard CAD tools, such as Analog Workbench.
Prerequisite: Electrical and Computer Engineering 526. Instructor: Richards. One cour
se.

528. Integrated Circuit Engineering.
Basic processing techniques and layout technology for integrated circuits.
Photolithography, diffusion, oxidation, ion implantation, and metallization. Design, fabrication, and testing of
integrated circuits. Prere
quisite: Electrical and Computer Engineering 330 or 331L. Instructor: Fair. One course.

529. Digital Integrated Circuits.
Analysis and design of digital integrated circuits. IC technology. Switching
characteristics and power consumption in MOS devices, bi
polar devices, and interconnects. Analysis of digital
circuits implemented in NMOS, CMOS, TTL, ECL, and BiCMOS. Propagation delay modeling. Analysis of logic
(inverters, gates) and memory (SRAM, DRAM) circuits. Influence of technology and device structure
on
performance and reliability of digital ICs. SPICE modeling. Prerequisites: Electrical and Computer Engineering 330
and 331L. Instructor: Massoud. One course.

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531. Advanced Topics in Electrical and Computer Engineering.
Opportunity for study of advanced

subjects in
electrical and computer engineering. Instructor: Staff.

532. Analog Integrated Circuit Design.
Design and layout of CMOS analog integrated circuits. Qualitative review
of the theory of pn junctions, bipolar and MOS devices, and large and smal
l signal models. Emphasis on MOS
technology. Continuous time operational amplifiers. Frequency response, stability and compensation. Complex
analog subsystems including phase
-
locked loops, A/D and D/A converters, switched capacitor simulation, layout,
extr
action, verification, and MATLAB modeling. Projects make extensive use of full custom VLSI CAD software.
Prerequisite: Electrical and Computer Engineering 330 or 331L. Instructor: Morizio. One course.

534. CAD For Mixed
-
Signal Circuits.
The course focuses

on various aspects of design automation for mixed
-
signal circuits. Circuit simulation methods including graph
-
based circuit representation, automated derivation and
solving of nodal equations, and DC analysis, test automation approaches including test equ
ipments, test generation,
fault simulation, and built
-
in
-
self
-
test, and automated circuit synthesis including architecture generation, circuit
synthesis, tack generation, placement and routing are the major topics. The course will have one major project, 4
-
6
homework assignments, one midterm, and one final. Prerequisites: Electrical and Computer Engineering 331L.
Permission of instructor required. Instructor: Staff. One course.

536. Synthesis and Verification of VLSI Systems.
Algorithms and CAD tools for V
LSI synthesis and design
verification, logic synthesis, multi
-
level logic optimization, high
-
level synthesis, logic simulation, timing analysis,
formal verification. Prerequisite: Electrical and Computer Engineering 250L or equivalent. Instructor: Chakraba
rty.
One course.

537. Radiofrequency (RF) Transceiver Design.
Design of wireless radiofrequency transceivers. Analog and digital
modulation, digital modulation schemes, system level design for receiver and transmitter path, wireless
communication standard
s and determining system parameters for standard compliance, fundamentals of synthesizer
design, and circuit level design of low
-
noise amplifiers and mixers. Prerequisites: Electrical and Computer
Engineering 280L and Electrical and Computer Engineering 33
1L or equivalent. Instructor: Staff. One course.

538. VLSI System Testing.
Fault modeling, fault simulation, test generation algorithms, testability measures,
design for testability, scan design, built
-
in self
-
test, system
-
on
-
a
-
chip testing, memory testin
g. Prerequisite:
Electrical and Computer Engineering 250L or equivalent. Instructor: Chakrabarty. One course.

539. CMOS VLSI Design Methodologies.
Emphasis on full
-
custom chip design. Extensive use of CAD tools for
IC design, simulation, and layout verifi
cation. Techniques for designing high
-
speed, low
-
power, and easily
-
testable
circuits. Semester design project: Groups of four students design and simulate a simple custom IC using Mentor
Graphics CAD tools. Teams and project scope are multidisciplinary; ea
ch team includes students with interests in
several of the following areas: analog design, digital design, computer science, computer engineering, signal
processing, biomedical engineering, electronics, photonics. A formal project proposal, a written proje
ct report, and a
formal project presentation are also required. The chip design incorporates considerations such as cost, economic
viability, environmental impact, ethical issues, manufacturability, and social and political impact. Prerequisites:
Electrica
l and Computer Engineering 250L and Electrical and Computer Engineering 331L. Some background in
computer organization is helpful but not required. Instructor: Chakrabarty. One course.

545. Nanophotonics.
Theory and applications of nanophotonics and sub
-
w
avelength optics. Photonic crystals, near
-
field optics, surface
-
plasmon optics, microcavities, and nanoscale light emitters. Prerequisite: Electrical and
Computer Engineering 270L or equivalent. Instructor: Yoshie. One course.

546. Optoelectronic Devices.

Devices for conversion of electrons to photons and photons to electrons. Optical
processes in semiconductors: absorption, spontaneous emission and stimulated emission. Light
-
emitting diodes
(LEDs), semiconductor lasers, quantum
-
well emitters, photodetecto
rs, modulators and optical fiber networks.
Prerequisite: Electrical and Computer Engineering 526 or equivalent. Instructor: Stiff
-
Roberts. One course.

552. Advanced Computer Architecture I. QS, R
One course. C
-
L: see Computer Science 550; also C
-
L: Modeli
ng
Biological Systems

554. Fault
-
Tolerant and Testable Computer Systems.
Technological reasons for faults, fault models, information
redundancy, spatial redundancy, backward and forward error recovery, fault
-
tolerant hardware and software,
modeling and an
alysis, testing, and design for test. Prerequisite: Electrical and Computer Engineering 350 or
equivalent. Instructor: Sorin. One course. C
-
L: Computer Science 554

555. Probability for Electrical and Computer Engineers.
Basic concepts and techniques used
stochastic modeling
of systems with applications to performance and reliability of computer and communications system. Elements of
probability, random variables (discrete and continuous), expectation, conditional distributions, stochastic processes,
discre
te and continuous time Markov chains, introduction to queuing systems and networks. Prerequisite:
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Mathematics 216. Instructor: Trivedi. One course. C
-
L: Computer Science 555, Information Science and
Information Studies, Modeling Biological Systems

556. Wi
reless Networking and Mobile Computing.
Theory, design, and implementation of mobile wireless
networking systems. Fundamentals of wireless networking and key research challenges. Students review pertinent
journal papers. Significant, semester
-
long research

project. Networking protocols (Physical and MAC, multi
-
hop
routing, wireless TCP, applications), mobility management, security, and sensor networking. Prerequisites:
Electrical and Computer Engineering 356 or Computer Science 310. Instructor: Roy Choudhur
y. One course. C
-
L:
Computer Science 515

557. Performance and Reliability of Computer Networks.
Methods for performance and reliability analysis of
local area networks as well as wide area networks. Probabilistic analysis using Markov models, stochastic P
etri nets,
queuing networks, and hierarchical models. Statistical analysis of measured data and optimization of network
structures. Prerequisites: Electrical and Computer Engineering 356 and 555. Instructor: Trivedi. One course. C
-
L:
Information Science an
d Information Studies

558. Computer Networks and Distributed Systems. QS, R
One course. C
-
L: see Computer Science 514

559. Advanced Digital System Design.
This course covers the fundamentals of advanced digital system design, and
the use of a hardware de
scription language, VHDL, for their synthesis and simulation. Examples of systems
considered include the arithmetic/logic unit, memory, and microcontrollers. The course includes an appropriate
capstone design project that incorporates engineering standards

and realistic constraints in the outcome of the design
process. Additionally, the designer must consider most of the following: Cost, environmental impact,
manufacturability, health and safety, ethics, social and political impact. Each design project is e
xecuted by a team of
4 or 5 students who are responsible for generating a final written project report and making an appropriate
presentation of their results to the class. Prerequisite: Electrical and Computer Engineering 250L and
Senior/graduate student
standing. Instructor: Derby. One course.

571. Electromagnetic Theory.
The classical theory of Maxwell's equations; electrostatics, magnetostatics,
boundary value problems including numerical solutions, currents and their interactions, and force and energy

relations. Three class sessions. Prerequisite: Electrical and Computer Engineering 270L. Instructor: Carin, Joines,
Liu, or Smith. One course.

572. Electromagnetic Communication Systems.
Review of fundamental laws of Maxwell, Gauss, Ampere, and
Faraday.
Elements of waveguide propagation and antenna radiation. Analysis of antenna arrays by images.
Determination of gain, loss, and noise temperature parameters for terrestrial and satellite electromagnetic
communication systems. Prerequisite: Electrical and C
omputer Engineering 270L or 571. Instructor: Joines. One
course.

573. Optical Communication Systems.
Mathematical methods, physical ideas, and device concepts of
optoelectronics. Maxwell's equations, and definitions of energy density and power flow. Trans
mission and reflection
of plane waves at interfaces. Optical resonators, waveguides, fibers, and detectors are also presented. Prerequisite:
Electrical and Computer Engineering 270L or equivalent. Instructor: Joines. One course.

574. Waves in Matter.
Anal
ysis of wave phenomena that occur in materials based on fundamental formulations for
electromagnetic and elastic waves. Examples from these and other classes of waves are used to demonstrate general
wave phenomena such as dispersion, anisotropy, and causal
ity; phase, group, and energy propagation velocities and
directions; propagation and excitation of surface waves; propagation in inhomogeneous media; and nonlinearity and
instability. Applications that exploit these wave phenomena in general sensing applic
ations are explored.
Prerequisites: Electrical and Computer Engineering 270L. Instructor: Cummer. One course.

575. Microwave Electronic Circuits.
Microwave circuit analysis and design techniques. Properties of planar
transmission lines for integrated circ
uits. Matrix and computer
-
aided methods for analysis and design of circuit
components. Analysis and design of input, output, and interstage networks for microwave transistor amplifiers and
oscillators. Topics on stability, noise, and signal distortion. Pre
requisite: Electrical and Computer Engineering 270L
or equivalent. Instructor: Joines. One course.

577. Computational Electromagnetics.
Systematic discussion of useful numerical methods in computational
electromagnetics including integral equation techniq
ues and differential equation techniques, both in the frequency
and time domains. Hands
-
on experience with numerical techniques, including the method of moments, finite
element and finite
-
difference time
-
domain methods, and modern high order and spectral d
omain methods.
Prerequisite: Electrical and Computer Engineering 571 or consent of instructor. Instructor: Carin or Liu. One course.

578S. Inverse Problems in Electromagnetics and Acoustics.
Systematic discussion of practical inverse problems
in electroma
gnetics and acoustics. Hands
-
on experience with numerical solution of inverse problems, both linear
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and nonlinear in nature. Comprehensive study includes: discrete linear and nonlinear inverse methods, origin and
solution of nonuniqueness, tomography, wave
-
equation based linear inverse methods, and nonlinear inverse
scattering methods. Assignments are project oriented using MATLAB. Prerequisites: Graduate level acoustics or
electromagnetics (Electrical and Computer Engineering 571), or consent of instructor
. Instructor: Liu. One course.

581. Random Signals and Noise.
Introduction to mathematical methods of describing and analyzing random
signals and noise. Review of basic probability theory; joint, conditional, and marginal distributions; random
processes.
Time and ensemble averages, correlation, and power spectra. Optimum linear smoothing and predicting
filters. Introduction to optimum signal detection, parameter estimation, and statistical signal processing.
Prerequisite: Mathematics 230 or Statistical Sci
ence 130. Instructor: Collins or Nolte. One course.

582. Digital Signal Processing.
Introduction to fundamental algorithms used to process digital signals. Basic
discrete time system theory, the discrete Fourier transform, the FFT algorithm, linear filter
ing using the FFT, linear
production and the Wierner filter, adaptive filters and applications, the LMS algorithm and its convergence,
recursive least
-
squares filters, nonparametric and parametric power spectrum estimation minimum variance and
eigenanalysi
s algorithms for spectrum estimation. Prerequisite: Electrical and Computer Engineering 581 or
equivalent with consent of the instructor. Instructor: Collins, Krolik, Nolte, Tantum, or Willett. One course. One
course.

584. Acoustics and Hearing (GE, IM).
One course. C
-
L: see Biomedical Engineering 545

585. Signal Detection and Extraction Theory.
Introduction to signal detection and information extraction theory
from a statistical decision theory viewpoint. Subject areas covered within the context of a dig
ital environment are
decision theory, detection and estimation of known and random signals in noise, estimation of parameters and
adaptive recursive digital filtering, and decision processes with finite memory. Applications to problems in
communication the
ory. Prerequisite: Electrical and Computer Engineering 581 or consent of instructor. Instructor:
Nolte. One course.

587. Information Theory.
This class provides an introduction to information theory. The student is introduced to
entropy, mutual informatio
n, relative entropy and differential entropy, and these topics are connected to practical
problems in communications, compression, and inference. The class is appropriate for beginning graduate students
who have a good background in undergraduate electrica
l engineering, computer science or math. Instructor: Carin.
One course.

590. Advanced Topics in Electrical and Computer Engineering.
Opportunity for study of advanced subjects
related to programs within the electrical and computer engineering department t
ailored to fit the requirements of a
small group. Instructor: Staff. One course.

652. Advanced Computer Architecture II. QS
One course. C
-
L: see Computer Science 650; also C
-
L: Modeling
Biological Systems

675. Optical Imaging and Spectroscopy.
Wave and c
oherence models for propagation and optical system analysis.
Fourier optics and sampling theory. Focal plane arrays. Generalized and compressive sampling. Impulse response,
modulation transfer function and instrument function analysis of imaging and spectr
oscopy. Code design for optical
measurement. Dispersive and interferometric spectroscopy and spectral imaging. Performance metrics in optical
imagine systems. Prerequisite: Electrical and Computer Engineering 270L and 280L. Instructor: Brady. One course.

676. Lens Design.
Paraxial and computational ray tracing. Merit functions. Wave and chromatic aberrations. Lenses
in photography, microscopy and telescopy. Spectrograph design. Emerging trends in lens system design, including
multiple aperture and catadiop
tric designs and nonimaging design for solar energy collection. Design project
management. Each student must propose and complete a design study, including a written project report and a
formal design review. Prerequisite: Electrical and Computer Engineeri
ng 340 or 274. Instructor: Brady. 3 units. One
course.

681. Pattern Classification and Recognition Technology.
Theory and practice of recognition technology: pattern
classification, pattern recognition, automatic computer decision
-
making algorithms. Appli
cations covered include
medical diseases, severe weather, industrial parts, biometrics, bioinformation, animal behavior patterns, image
processing, and human visual systems. Perception as an integral component of intelligent systems. This course
prepares s
tudents for advanced study of data fusion, data mining, knowledge base construction, problem
-
solving
methodologies of "intelligent agents" and the design of intelligent control systems. Prerequisites: Mathematics 216,
Statistical Science 130 or Mathematics

230, Computer Science 101, or consent of instructor. Instructor: Collins or P.
Wang. One course.

683. Digital Communication Systems.
Digital modulation techniques. Coding theory. Transmission over
bandwidth constrained channels. Signal fading and multipa
th effects. Spread spectrum. Optical transmission
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techniques. Prerequisite: Electrical and Computer Engineering 581 or consent of instructor. Instructor: Staff. One
course.

686. Adaptive Filters.
Adaptive digital signal processing with emphasis on the the
ory and design of finite
-
impulse
response adaptive filters. Stationary discrete
-
time stochastic processes, Wiener filter theory, the method of steepest
descent, adaptive transverse filters using gradient
-
vector estimation, analysis of the LMS algorithm, le
ast
-
squares
methods, recursive least squares and least squares lattic adaptive filters. Application examples in noise canceling,
channel equalization, and array processing. Prerequisites: Electrical and Computer Engineering 581 and 582 or
consent of instru
ctor. Instructor: Krolik. One course.

688. Sensor Array Signal Processing.
An in
-
depth treatment of the fundamental concepts, theory, and practice of
sensor array processing of signals carried by propagating waves. Topics include: multidimensional frequen
cy
-
domain representations of space
-
time signals and linear systems; apertures and sampling of space
-
time signals;
beamforming and filtering in the space
-
time and frequency domains, discrete random fields; adaptive beamforming
methods; high resolution spati
al spectral estimation; optimal detection, estimation, and performance bounds for
sensor arrays; wave propagation models used in sensor array processing; blind beamforming and source separation
methods; multiple
-
input
-
multiple
-
output (MIMO) array processin
g; application examples from radar, sonar, and
communications systems. Instructor: Staff. One course.

722. Quantum Electronics.
Quantum theory of light
-
matter interaction. Laser physics (electron oscillator model,
rate equations, gain, lasing condition, o
scillation dynamics, modulation) and nonlinear optics (electro
-
optic effect,
second harmonic generation, phase matching, optical parametric oscillation and amplification, third
-
order
nonlinearity, optical bistability.) Prerequisite Electrical and Computer
Engineering 521, Physics 464, or equivalent.
Instructors: Stiff
-
Roberts or Yoshie. One course. One course.

THE MAJOR

The requirements for the Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE) major are included in the minimum total
of 34 courses listed under the

general requirements and departmental requirements. The program of study must
include an approved engineering design course taken in the junior or senior year of the program.

M
ec
hanical Engineering and Materials Science (ME)

Professor Dowell,
Chair;
Associate Professor Bliss,
Director of Undergraduate Studies;
Professors Bejan, Cocks,
D
owell, Garg, Hall, Marszalek, Needham, Shaughnessy, Tan, and Virgin; Associate Professors Bliss, Curtarolo,
Ferrari, Howle, Knight, Mann, Zauscher, and Zhong; Assistant Professors Chen, Hotz, Protz, Yellen, and Zhao;
Professor of the Practice Franzoni; Ass
ociate Research Professor Tang; Assistant Research Professors Simmons and
Thomas; Senior Research Scientist Kielb; Adjunct Professor Lorente, Twiss; Adjunct Assistant Professor Stepp

A major in mechanical engineering is available in this department. The me
chanical engineering program is
accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and
Technology.
4

Mechanical engineers are concerned with the optimum use of materials, energy, time, and individual effort to
serve societal needs through the design of machines, structures, and mechanical and thermal systems, and through
better understanding of dynamic processes involving these systems. They have a wide involvement in many
industries including aerospace, biomech
anical and biomedical engineering, construction, electronics, manufacturing,
national defense, power generation, and transportation. Within these industries, the engineer might specialize in the
design, analysis, automation, operation, or marketing of syst
ems or services. The individual's contribution may lie
anywhere in the spectrum from highly theoretical to imminently practical, and often involves leadership as an
engineering manager or organization executive.

Because mechanical engineers in industry and

research engage in such a great variety of activities, their
education must be broadly based. Although individual engineers may specialize within their industry positions or in
graduate study, each must have the background needed to contribute in any of s
everal technical areas, to combine
knowledge of multiple topics when necessary, and to interact with members of other disciplines and professions in
accomplishing broad goals. Thus the mechanical engineer's program of study must include fundamental groundi
ng
in mathematics and basic sciences, applications in several engineering sciences, and team
-
based experience in the
process of design, where theory is applied in the context of real needs and limitations and where judgment must be
exercised. Furthermore,
to be a responsible member of the engineering profession, each graduate must be aware of



4

Engineering Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET) 111 Market Pl
ace, Suite
1050, Baltimore, MD 21202, telephone (410)347
-
7700


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social, ethical, environmental, and economic factors and constraints on engineering activity, and must understand
the importance of these matters in a global context.

With these considerations in mind, the educational objectives of the undergraduate mechanical engineering
program are to graduate students who:



identify and address significant needs and challenges in engineering and society, and effectively
communicate so
lutions



advance in professional careers that may encompass a broad range of endeavors, both technical and non
-
technical



exhibit intellectual depth and creativity in employment, advanced education, and research



uphold high ethical standards and show a commi
tment to the betterment of society through service and
professional work

The curriculum capitalizes on the exceptional abilities of our highly select students to cultivate the learning,
thinking, and problem
-
solving abilities needed to adapt, to develop, a
nd to exercise responsible leadership through
times of rapid change. The program provides firm preparation in the essential engineering topics while allowing
wide flexibility for students to pursue their own specialized interests.

221L. Structure and Pro
perties of Solids.
Introduction to materials science and engineering, emphasizing the
relationships between the structure of a solid and its properties. Atomic and molecular origins of electrical,
mechanical, and chemical behavior are treated in some detai
l for metals, alloys, polymers, ceramics, glasses, and
composite materials. Prerequisites: Chemistry 20, 21, or 101DL and Engineering 201L or Biomedical Engineering
110L. Instructor: Curtarolo, Lazarides, Simmons, or Zauscher. One course.

307. Transport P
henomena in Biological Systems (AC or GE, BB).
One course. C
-
L: see Biomedical
Engineering 307; also C
-
L: Civil and Environmental Engineering 307, Modeling Biological Systems

321L. Mechanical Engineering Analysis for Design.
Calculation of 3D stresses, st
rains, and deflections
encountered in mechanical designs. Types of problems include: curved beams, contact stresses, press/shrink fits, etc.
Reliability and uncertainty analysis, failure theories, fatigue, and fracture mechanics. Computational methods of
a
nalysis, such as finite elements analysis are covered. Prerequisites: Engineering 121L, 201L, 244L, and
Mathematics 353. Instructor: Franzoni, Howle, Laursen, Zhao. One course.

331L. Thermodynamics.
The principal laws of thermodynamics for open and closed

systems and their application
in engineering. Properties of the pure substance, relationships among properties, mixtures and reactions. Power and
refrigeration cycle analysis. Prerequisite: Mathematics 212 and Physics 151L. Instructor: Bejan, Marszalek, o
r Tan.
One course.

336L. Fluid Mechanics.
An introductory course emphasizing the application of the principles of conservation of
mass, momentum, and energy in a fluid system. Physical properties of fluids, dimensional analysis and similitude,
viscous eff
ects and integral boundary layer theory, subsonic and supersonic flows, normal shockwaves. Selected
laboratory work. Prerequisites: Engineering 244L and Mechanical Engineering 331L, Co
-
requisite or prerequisite:
Mathematics 353. Instructor: Bliss, Howle, K
night, Shaughnessy, or Zhong. One course.

344L. Control of Dynamic Systems.
Model dynamic systems and characterize time and frequency domain
response with respect to particular inputs. Characterize systems in terms of rise
-
time, settling
-
time and bandwidt
h.
Identify the difference between stable and unstable system. Apply feedback control to modify the response of
dynamic systems based upon specified design objectives. Develop methods of designing compensators for single
-
input, single
-
output, and multiple
-
input, multiple
-
output dynamic systems based upon classical and modern control
approaches. Introduce optimal control theory, the linear quadratic regulator (LQR) problem, and the linear quadratic
Gaussian (LQG) problem. Gain a physical understanding of wha
t can be accomplished with feedback control in
modifying the dynamics of a system. Pre
-
requisite: Engineering 224L and Mathematics 216. Instructor: Ferrari,
Garg. One course.

391. Undergraduate Projects in Mechanical Engineering.
Individual projects arran
ged in consultation with a
faculty member. Open to students who show special aptitude for research and design. Taught in the Fall. Consent of
director of undergraduate studies. Instructor: Staff. Variable credit.

392. Undergraduate Projects in Mechanical
Engineering.
Individual projects arranged in consultation with a
faculty member. Open to students who show special aptitude for research and design. Taught in the Spring. Consent
of director of undergraduate studies. Instructor: Staff. Variable credit.

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39
4. Engineering Undergraduate Fellows Projects.
Intensive research project in Mechanical Engineering by
students selected as Engineering Undergraduate Fellows. Course credit is contingent upon satisfactory completion of
493 and 494. Consent of instructor an
d program director required. Instructor: Staff. One course.

415L. Failure Analysis and Prevention.
A study and analysis of the causes of failure in engineering materials and
the diagnosis of those causes. Elimination of failures through proper material se
lection, treatment, and use. Case
histories. Examination of fracture surfaces. Laboratory investigations of different failure mechanisms. Prerequisites:
Engineering 201L and Mechanical Engineering 221L. Instructor: Cocks. One course.

416. Experimental Mat
erials Science.
Exposure to experimental methods used in the preparation and evaluation of
alloys, intermetallic compounds, crystals, and ceramics. Extensive work with x
-
ray diffraction and scanning electron
microscopy methods. Includes vacuum and arc melt
ing processes. Instructor: Cocks. One course.

421L. Mechanical Design.
A study of practical aspects of mechanical design including conceptualization,
specifications, and selection of mechanical elements. The design and application of mechanical components

such as
gears, cams, bearings, springs, and shafts. Practice in application of process through design projects. Prerequisite:
Engineering 244L and Mechanical Engineering 321L. Instructor: Franzoni, Howle, or Knight. One course.

424L. Mechanical Systems D
esign.
An integrative design course addressing both creative and practical aspects of
the design of systems. Development of the creative design process, including problem formulation and needs
analysis, feasibility, legal, economic and human factors, aesth
etics, safety, synthesis of alternatives, and design
optimization. Application of design methods through several projects including a term design project. Prerequisites:
Mechanical Engineering 344L, 421L, and 431L. Instructor: Kielb or Knight. One course.

425. Analytical and Computational Solid Mechanics.
One course. C
-
L: Civil and Environmental Engineering
425, Modeling Biological Systems

431L. Heat and Mass Transfer.
A rigorous development of the laws of mass and energy transport as applied to a
continu
um. Energy transfer by conduction, convection, and radiation. Free and forced convection across boundary
layers. Application to heat exchangers. Selected laboratory work. Prerequisites: Mechanical Engineering 331L,
Mechanical Engineering 336L, and Mathemat
ics 353 Instructor: Chen, Howle, Knight, or Protz. One course.

438. Constructal Theory and Design.
Flow configuration in nature and engineering emerges from the constructal
law of increase of flow access in time, when the flow system is endowed with freed
om to morph. The course brings
together the basic principles of fluid mechanics, heat transfer and thermodynamics, and teaches how to generate (to
'discover') shape and structure for energy flow systems. The course teaches design as science, and presents a

paradigm that is applicable across the board, from engineering to biology, geophysics and social dynamics.
Instructor: Bejan and Lorente. One course.

442. Introduction to Robotics and Automation.
One course. C
-
L: see Electrical and Computer Engineering 3
83;
also C
-
L: Information Science and Information Studies

445. Introduction to Vibrations.
Mechanical vibrations are studied primarily with emphasis on application of
analytical and computational methods to machine design and vibration control problems. A

single degree
-
of
-
freedom system is use to determine free vibration characteristics and response to impulse, harmonic and periodic
excitations. The study of two and three degree
-
of
-
freedom systems includes the determination of the ecigenvalues
and ecigenve
ctors, and introduction to modal analysis. The finite element method is used to conduct basic vibration
analysis of systems with a large number of degrees of freedom. The student learns how to balance rotating
machines, and how to design suspension systems
, isolation systems, vibration sensors, and tuned vibration
absorbers. Prerequisite: Mechanical Engineering 344L. Instructor: Kielb. One course.

453. Patent Technology and Law.
The use of patents as a technological data base is emphasized including
inform
ation retrieval in selected engineering disciplines. Fundamentals of patent law and patent office procedures.
Consent of instructor required. Instructor: Cocks. One course.

461. Energy Engineering and the Environment.
Efficiencies of both new and establis
hed energy sources and
conversion methods. Evaluation of alternative energy technologies by statistical information and by modeling using
principals of fluid mechanics, thermodynamics and heat transfer. Electricity generation by fossil fuels, nuclear,
sola
r, wind and hydro. Space heating and cooling by traditional methods and by solar. Transportation energy in
automobiles, mass transit and freight. Environmental consequences of energy choices on local, national and global
scales, including toxic emissions,
greenhouse gases and resource depletion. Prerequisite: Mechanical Engineering
331L Thermodynamics. Instructors: Cocks and Knight. One course. C
-
L: Energy and the Environment

462. Power Generation.
Basic concepts of thermodynamics, heat transfer, and fluid

flow applied to power
generation processes. Nuclear reaction theory and reactor technology; fossil fuel combustion theory and modern
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boiler practice. Power plant ancillary equipment and processes. Design considerations and analyses include
economic and en
vironmental factors. Instructor: Staff. One course.

463. Electric Vehicle Project.
One course. C
-
L: see Electrical and Computer Engineering 363L

472. Aircraft Performance.
Brief overview of the aerodynamics of wings and bodies including profile and induc
ed
drag, performance of propellers and internal combustion and gas turbine power plants; the power curve and
implications on the performance of the aircraft in steady
-
state and accelerated flight included power required,
airspeeds to fly, takeoff and landi
ng performance, performance of aircraft in turning flight; introduction to the
conceptual design of new aircraft. Co
-
requisite: Mechanical Engineering 126. Instructor: Hall or staff. One course.

474. Jet and Rocket Propulsion.
Performance and characterist
ics of rocket engines and aircraft gas turbine engines
as determined by thermodynamic and fluid mechanic behavior of components: turbomachinery, combustion, nozzles
and inlets, material limitations. Liquid, solid, and hybrid rockets. Turbojet, turbofan, an
d turboprop gas turbines.
Applications to space launch vehicles and jet aircraft. Prerequisites: Mechanical Engineering 331L, Mechanical
Engineering 336L. Instructor: Protz or staff. One course.

490. Special Topics in Mechanical Engineering.
Study arrange
d on a special engineering topic in which the
faculty has particular interest and competence as a result of research and professional activities. Consent of
instructor and director of undergraduate studies required. Half or one course. Instructor: Staff. V
ariable credit.

491. Special Projects in Mechanical Engineering.
Individual projects arranged in consultation with a faculty
member. Open only to seniors enrolled in the graduation with distinction program or showing special aptitude for
research. Half co
urse to two courses. To be taught in the Fall. Prerequisites:
B

average and consent of the director of
undergraduate studies. Instructor: Staff. Variable credit.

492. Special Projects in Mechanical Engineering.
Individual projects arranged in consultation

with a faculty
member. Open only to seniors enrolled in the graduation with distinction program or showing special aptitude for
research. Half course to two courses. To be taught in the Spring. Prerequisites:
B

average and consent of the director
of under
graduate studies. Instructor: Staff. Variable credit.

493. Engineering Undergraduate Fellows Projects.
Continuation course for Engineering Undergraduate Fellows,
contingent upon satisfactory completion of 394. Consent required. Instructor: Staff. One cour
se.

494. Engineering Undergraduate Fellows Projects.
Final continuation course for Engineering Undergraduate
Fellows, contingent upon satisfactory completion of 394 and 493. Consent required. Instructor: Staff. One course.

499. Undergraduate Research Sem
inar Series.
For students enrolled in senior
-
level undergraduate research.
Intended for those pursuing Graduation with Departmental Distinction. Course will give students an opportunity to
present research results to their peers and faculty in mechanical e
ngineering throughout the semester, as well as
provide exposure to the research of other mechanical engineering seniors. 0.0 Credit. S/U. Permission of Instructor.

512. Thermodynamics of Electronic Materials.
Basic thermodynamic concepts applied to solid
state materials
with emphasis on technologically relevant electronic materials such as silicon and GaAs. Thermodynamic functions,
phase diagrams, solubilities and thermal equilibrium concentrations of point defects; nonequilibrium processes and
the kinetic

phenomena of diffusion, precipitation, and growth. Instructor: Tan. One course.

514. Theoretical and Applied Polymer Science (GE, BB).
An intermediate course in soft condensed matter
physics dealing with the structure and properties of polymers and biopo
lymers. Introduction to polymer syntheses
based on chemical reaction kinetics, polymer characterization. Emphasizes (bio)polymers on surfaces and interfaces
in aqueous environments, interactions of (bio)polymer surfaces, including wetting and adhension phe
nomena.
Instructor: Zauscher. One course. C
-
L: Biomedical Engineering 529

515. Electronic Materials.
An advanced course in materials science and engineering dealing with materials
important for solid
-
state electronics and the various semiconductors. Empha
sis on thermodynamic concepts and on
defects in these materials. Materials preparation and modification methods for technological defects in these
materials. Prerequisite: Mechanical Engineering 221L. Instructor: Curtarold or Tan. One course.

517. Electro
magnetic Processes in Fluids.
Electromagnetic processes and transport phenomena in fluids is
overviewed. Topics to be discussed include: Maxwell's equations, statistical thermodynamic processes, origin of
surface forces (i.e.Van der Waals), plasma in gases

and electrolyte distribution, wave propagation near boundaries
and in complex media, transport equations in continuum limit. Consent of instructor required. Instructor: Yellen.

518. Biomedical Materials and Artificial Organs (GE, BB).
One course. C
-
L: se
e Biomedical Engineering 525

519. Soft Wet Materials and Interfaces.
The materials science and engineering of soft wet materials and
interfaces. Emphasis on the relationships between composition, structure, properties and performance of
macromolecules, se
lf assembling colloidal systems, linear polymers and hydrogels in aqueous and nonaqueous
Proof for the
2012
-
2013

Duke University Bulletin of Undergraduate Instruction
, p.
32

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BY MARCH 6, 2012
TO
INGEBORG WALTHER:
waltheri@duke.edu


________________________________________________________________________________


liquid media, including the role of water as an ''organizing'' solvent. Applications of these materials in
biotechnology, medical technology, microelectronic technolog
y, and nature's own designs of biological materials.
Instructor: Needham. One course.

524. Introduction to the Finite Element Method.
One course. C
-
L: Civil and Environmental Engineering 530

525. Nonlinear Finite Element Analysis.
One course. C
-
L: Civil
and Environmental Engineering 630

527. Buckling of Engineering Structures.
One course. C
-
L: Civil and Environmental Engineering 647

531. Engineering Thermodynamics.
Axiomatic formulations of the first and second laws. General thermodynamic
relationships
and properties of real substances. Energy, availability, and second law analysis of energy conversion
processes. Reaction and multiphase equilibrium. Power generation. Low temperature refrigeration and the third law
of thermodynamics. Thermodynamic design.

Instructor: Bejan or Hotz. One course.

532. Convective Heat Transfer.
Models and equations for fluid motion, the general energy equation, and transport
properties. Exact, approximate, and boundary layer solutions for laminar flow heat transfer problems.
Use of the
principle of similarity and analogy in the solution of turbulent flow heat transfer. Two
-
phase flow, nucleation,
boiling, and condensation heat and mass transfer. Instructor: Bejan. One course.

533. Fundamentals of Heat Conduction.
Fourier heat

conduction. Solution methods including separation of
variables, transform calculus, complex variables. Green's function will be introduced to solve transient and steady
-
state heat conduction problems in rectangular, cylindrical, and spherical coordinates.

Microscopic heat conduction
mechanisms, thermophysical properties, Boltzmann transport equation. Prerequisite: Mathematics 111 or consent of
instructor. Instructor: Bejan. One course.

534. Fundamentals of Thermal Radiation.
Radiative properties of materi
als, radiation
-
materials interaction and
radiative energy transfer. Emphasis on fundamental concepts including energy levels and electromagnetic waves as
well as analytical methods for calculating radiative properties and radiation transfer in absorbing, e
mitting, and
scattering media. Applications cover laser
-
material interactions in addition to traditional areas such as combustion
and thermal insulation. Prerequisite: Mathematics 353 or consent of instructor. Instructor: Staff. One course.

536. Compressi
ble Fluid Flow.
Basic concepts of the flow of gases from the subsonic to the hypersonic regime.
One
-
dimensional wave motion, the acoustic equations, and waves of finite amplitude. Effects of area change,
friction, heat transfer, and shock on one
-
dimensiona
l flow. Moving and oblique shock waves and Prandtl
-
Meyer
expansion. Prerequisite: Mechanical Engineering 126 or equivalent. Instructor: Shaughnessy. One course.

537. Mechanics of Viscous Fluids.
Equations of motion for a viscous fluid, constitutive equati
ons for momentum
and energy transfer obtained from second
-
law considerations, general properties and exact solutions of the Navier
-
Stokes and Stokes (creeping
-
flow) equations, applications to problems of blood flow in large and small vessels.
Prerequisite:

Mechanical Engineering 126 or equivalent. Instructor: Staff. One course.

541. Intermediate Dynamics: Dynamics of Very High Dimensional Systems.
Dynamics of very high dimensional
systems. Linear and nonlinear dynamics of a string as a prototypical example
. Equations of motion of a nonlinear
beam with tension. Convergence of a modal series. Self
-
adjoint and non
-
self
-
adjoint systems. Orthogonality of
modes. Nonlinear normal modes. Derivation of Lagrange's equations from Hamilton's Principle including the eff
ects
of constraints. Normal forms of kinetic and potential energy. Component modal analysis. Asymptotic modal
analysis. Instructor: Dowell or Hall. One course. C
-
L: Civil and Environmental Engineering 625

542. Modern Control and Dynamic Systems.
Dynamic m
odeling of complex linear and nonlinear physical
systems involving the storage and transfer of matter and energy. Unified treatment of active and passive mechanical,
electrical, and fluid systems. State
-
space formulation of physical systems. Time and frequ
ency
-
domain
representation. Controllability and observability concepts. System response using analytical and computational
techniques. Lyapunov method for system stability. Modification of system characteristics using feedback control
and compensation. Emp
hasis on application of techniques to physical systems. Instructor: Garg. One course.

543. Energy Flow and Wave Propagation in Elastic Solids.
Derivation of equations for wave motion in simple
structural shapes: strings, longitudinal rods, beams and membr
anes, plates and shells. Solution techniques, analysis
of systems behavior. Topics covered include: nondispersive and dispersive waves, multiple wave types (dilational,
distortion), group velocity, impedance concepts including driving point impedances and
moment impedances. Power
and energy for different cases of wave propagation. Prerequisites: Engineering 244L and Mathematics 353 or
consent of instructor. Instructor: Franzoni. One course. C
-
L: Civil and Environmental Engineering 626

544. Advanced Mechani
cal Vibrations.
Advanced mechanical vibrations are studied primarily with emphasis on
application of analytical and computational methods to machine design and vibration control problems. Equations of
motion are developed using Lagrange's equations. A sing
le degree
-
of
-
freedom system is used to determine free
vibration characteristics and response to impulse, harmonic periodic excitations, and random. The study of two and
Proof for the
2012
-
2013

Duke University Bulletin of Undergraduate Instruction
, p.
33

RETURN PROOF
BY MARCH 6, 2012
TO
INGEBORG WALTHER:
waltheri@duke.edu


________________________________________________________________________________


three degree
-
of
-
freedom systems includes the determination of the eigenvalues and eigen
vectors, and an in
-
depth
study of modal analysis methods. The finite element method is used to conduct basic vibration analysis of systems
with a large number of degrees of freedom. The student learns how to balance rotating machines, and how to design
sus
pension systems, isolation systems, vibration sensors, and tuned vibration absorbers. Instructor: Kielb. One
course.

545. Robot Control and Automation.
Review of kinematics and dynamics of robotic devices; mechanical
considerations in design of automated
systems and processes, hydraulic and pneumatic control of components and
circuits; stability analysis of robots involving nonlinearities; robotic sensors and interfacing; flexible manufacturing;
man
-
machine interaction and safety consideration. Prerequisit
es: Mechanical Engineering 542 or equivalent and
consent of instructor. Instructor: Garg. One course.

546. Intelligent Systems.
An introductory course on learning and intelligent
-
systems techniques for the modeling
and control of dynamical systems. Review

of theoretical foundations in dynamical systems, and in static and
dynamic optimization. Numerical methods and paradigms that exploit learning and optimization in order to deal
with complexity, nonlinearity, and uncertainty. Investigation of theory and al
gorithms for neural networks, graphical
models, and genetic algorithms. Interdisciplinary applications and demonstrations drawn from engineering and
computer science, including but not limited to adaptive control, estimation, robot motion and sensor planni
ng.
Prerequisites: Mathematics 216 or 111. Consent of instructor required. Instructor: Ferrari. One course.

548. Multivariable Control.
One course. C
-
L: Civil and Environmental Engineering 648

555. Advanced Topics in Mechanical Engineering.
Opportunity f
or study of advanced subjects related to
programs within mechanical engineering tailored to fit the requirements of a small group. Approval of director of
undergraduate or graduate studies required. Instructor: Staff. Variable credit.

571. Aerodynamics.
F
undamentals of aerodynamics applied to wings and bodies in subsonic and supersonic flow.
Basic principles of fluid mechanics analytical methods for aerodynamic analysis. Two
-
and three
-
dimensional wing
theory, slender
-
body theory, lifting surface methods, v
ortex and wave drag. Brief introduction to vehicle design,
performance and dynamics. Special topics such as unsteady aerodynamics, vortex wake behavior, and propeller and
rotor aerodynamics. This course is open only to undergraduate seniors and graduate st
udents. Prerequisites:
Mechanical Engineering 126 and Mathematics 353 or equivalent. Instructor: Bliss. One course.

572. Engineering Acoustics.
Fundamentals of acoustics including sound generation, propagation, reflection,
absorption, and scattering. Emph
asis on basic principles and analytical methods in the description of wave motion
and the characterization of sound fields. Applications including topics from noise control, sound reproduction,
architectural acoustics, and aerodynamic noise. Occasional cla
ssroom or laboratory demonstration. This course is
open only to undergraduate seniors and graduate students. Prerequisites: Mathematics 353 or equivalent or consent
of instructor. Instructor: Bliss. One course.

626. Plates and Shells.
One course. C
-
L: Civ
il and Environmental Engineering 646

631. Intermediate Fluid Mechanics.
A survey of the principal concepts and equations of fluid mechanics, fluid
statics, surface tension, the Eulerian and Lagrangian description, kinematics, Reynolds transport theorem, t
he
differential and integral equations of motion, constitutive equations for a Newtonian fluid, the Navier
-
Stokes
equations, and boundary conditions on velocity and stress at material interfaces. Instructor: Shaughnessy. One
course.

632. Advanced Fluid Me
chanics.
Flow of a uniform incompressible viscous fluid. Exact solutions to the Navier
-
Stokes equation. Similarity methods. Irrotational flow theory and its applications. Elements of boundary layer
theory. Prerequisite: Mechanical Engineering 631 or consen
t of instructor. Instructor: Shaughnessy. One course.

633. Lubrication.
Derivation and application of the basic governing equations for lubrication; the Reynolds
equation and energy equation for thin films. Analytical and computational solutions to the go
verning equations.
Analysis and design of hydrostatic and hydrodynamic slider bearings and journal bearings. Introduction to the
effects of fluid inertia and compressibility. Dynamic characteristics of a fluid film and effects of bearing design on
dynamics

of machinery. Prerequisites: Mathematics 353 and Mechanical Engineering 336L. Instructor: Knight. One
course.

639. Computational Fluid Mechanics and Heat Transfer.
An exposition of numerical techniques commonly used
for the solution of partial differenti
al equations encountered in engineering physics. Finite
-
difference schemes
(which are well
-
suited for fluid mechanics problems); notions of accuracy, conservation, consistency, stability, and
convergence. Recent applications of weighted residuals methods (
Galerkin), finite
-
element methods, and grid
generation techniques. Through specific examples, the student is guided to construct and assess the performance of
the numerical scheme selected for the particular type of transport equation (parabolic, elliptic,

or hyperbolic).
Proof for the
2012
-
2013

Duke University Bulletin of Undergraduate Instruction
, p.
34

RETURN PROOF
BY MARCH 6, 2012
TO
INGEBORG WALTHER:
waltheri@duke.edu


________________________________________________________________________________


Instructor: Howle. One course. C
-
L: Modeling Biological Systems
643. Adaptive Structures: Dynamics and
Control.
Integration of structural dynamics, linear systems theory, signal processing, transduction device dynamics,
and control theory
for modeling and design of adaptive structures. Classical and modern control approaches applied
to reverberant plants. Fundamentals of adaptive feedforward control and its integration with feedback control.
Presentation of a methodical design approach to a
daptive systems and structures with emphasis on the physics of the
system. Numerous MATLAB examples provided with course material as well as classroom and laboratory
demonstrations. Instructor: Staff. One course.

668. Cellular and Biosurface Engineering.
A combination of fundamental concepts in materials science, colloids,
and interfaces that form a basis for characterizing: the physical properties of biopolymers, microparticles, artificial
membranes, biological membranes, and cells; and the interactions o
f these materials at biofluid interfaces. Definition
of the subject as a coherent discipline and application of its fundamental concepts to biology, medicine, and
biotechnology. Prerequisite: Mechanical Engineering 208 or consent of instructor. Instructor:

Needham. One course.

671. Advanced Aerodynamics.
Advanced topics in aerodynamics. Conformal transformation techniques. Three
-
dimensional wing theory, optimal span loading for planar and nonplanar wings. Ground effect and tunnel
corrections. Propeller the
ory. Slender wing theory and slender body theory, transonic and supersonic area rules for
minimization of wave drag. Numerical methods in aerodynamics including source panel and vortex lattice methods.
Prerequisite: Mechanical Engineering 571. Instructor:
Hall. One course.

672. Unsteady Aerodynamics.
Analytical and numerical methods for computing the unsteady aerodynamic
behavior of airfoils and wings. Small disturbance approximation to the full potential equation. Unsteady vortex
dynamics. Kelvin impulse
and apparent mass concepts applied to unsteady flows. Two
-
dimensional unsteady thin
airfoil theory. Time domain and frequency domain analyses of unsteady flows. Three
-
dimensional unsteady wing
theory. Introduction to unsteady aerodynamic behavior of turbom
achinery. Prerequisite: Mechanical Engineering
571. Instructor: Hall. One course.