Possible solutions Building the Biotechnology Sector in Houston ...

drawerbeamerBiotechnology

Dec 6, 2012 (4 years and 6 months ago)

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Building the Biotechnology

Sector in Houston



Introduction



Houston Biotechnology Atmosphere



Why so few companies?



Possible solutions

Building the Biotechnology

Sector in Houston



Introduction



Houston Biotechnology Atmosphere



Why so few companies?



Possible solutions

Building the Biotechnology

Sector in Houston



Introduction



Houston Biotechnology Atmosphere



Why so few companies?



Possible solutions

BioHouston Background

Non
-
profit 501(c)3 founded by
Houston
-
area research institutions
to develop the Houston region


defined as College Station, to

The Woodlands, to Galveston


Northcut

Mendelsohn


Gillis

Regional Research Strength from

College Station to Galveston


Texas Medical Center


Largest medical center in the world; 42+ member institutions


$2.1 billion spent for additions to facilities from 2002
-
2004


800+ acres; 100+ permanent buildings


Ground broken for
The University of Texas Research Park


Texas A&M University
-
College Station


Ranked 11
th

by NSF for total research and development
expenditures


5,200+ acres, including a 324
-
acre research park


2.5M+ square feet of research space


University of Texas Medical Branch
-
Galveston


Ranked 19
th

of 121 medical schools in NIH funding


84 acres; 77 major buildings


385k+ square feet of research space




Massive but under
-
recognized research


and commercialization assets

Leading Medical Institutions in the U.S.

World Class Research Institutions

Baylor College of Medicine


#1 in Pediatric Research funding
-
NIH

(with TCH)


#11 in NIH Awards to Med Schools
-
NIH


#13 Research Intensive Medical Schools

The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center



#1 in Oncology



#5 in Gynecology



#10 in Urology



#10 in Ear, Nose and Throat



#10 in Rehabilitation

The University of Texas Medical Branch


1 of 2 Infectious Disease and Biodefense National
Laboratories


1 of 6 Regional Centers of Excellence for Biodefense


#19 in NIH Awards to Med Schools
-
NIH

Methodist Hospital


#10 in Neurology and Neurosurgery


#17 in Cardiology and Cardiac Surgery

Rice University


#1 in Nanotechnology Commercialization

The University of Texas Health Science Center
School of Public Health


#1 in Health Education

Texas Children’s Hospital


#1 in Pediatric Research funding
-
NIH

(with BCM)


#4 in Pediatrics

Texas Heart Institute


#9 in Cardiology and Cardiac Surgery

University of Houston


#2 in Health Law



Source: U.S. News and World Report, 2004, NIH database,
Small Times


Other Selected Centers of Excellence






Gulf Coast Consortium for
Bioinformatics


Gulf Coast Center for
Computational

Cancer Research


John S. Dunn, Se. GCC for Chemical
Genomics


John S. Dunn, Sr. GCC For Magnetic
Resonance


Gulf Coast Consortium for Membrane
Biology


Gulf Coast Consortium for Protein
Crystallography


Gulf Coast Consortium for Theoretical
and Computational Neuroscience

Brown Foundation

Institute for Molecular Medicine

Source: Battelle Memorial Institute and the State Science

and Technology Institute study

Research Leadership


Historical firsts:


First multiple organ
transplant


First identification of C
60


First draft of the human
genome


One of two National
Biocontainment Labs


First artificial artery


First successfully cloned
companion animal


First total heart transplant


National Recognition:


Three Nobel laureates


16 members of the National
Academy of Sciences


Two Presidential Advisors


Hundreds of members of
national academies


Next Generation of Leaders:


#2 in higher education
degrees in bioscience


#3 for university expenditures
in biosciences


22,000+ biomedical students
in the Texas Medical Center

Houston region highlights


Total annual academic research investments exceed
$1.5 billion


140+ life science companies


Number of companies has doubled since 2003


Approximately 1/3 are therapeutic, 1/3 are device and
1/3 are tools and service providers


Recent VC investment activity in region


Best Biotech Fields for Houston to Grow

Oncology

Neuroscience

Metabolic

Diseases

Biodefense /

Infectious

Disease

Cardiovascular

Medicine

Genomics

Genetics

Nanotechnology

Texas Emerging Technology Fund


Initiated in 2005.


$175 million in funds available


$52.9 million in total statewide life science grants
have been awarded or are currently under final review
by State leadership


9 Houston region life science companies have received
grants for $10.1 million since inception


Texas Life Science Committee conducts extensive due
diligence (business/science/IP) on technologies and
companies before forwarding to leadership for final
approvals

$3 Billion Cancer Research Initiative
Approved in November 2007


Established Cancer Prevention and Research Institute
of Texas


Peer reviewed distribution of up to $300 mm in grants
per year over next decade


Every $1 invested will require $0.50 in matching
spending by recipient organizations


Public and private educational institutions and medical
research facilities will be eligible for grants


First investment expected in 2009


Tanox

A 20
-
year and $919 Million Journey to Success


The Houston region is home to the 2
largest IPO’s in biotech history:


Tanox:

Acquired by Genentech for $919 million
in 2007


Lexicon Pharmaceuticals:

Ten products in
clinical pipeline


Also…



Agennix:
Developing drugs for cancer and
diabetic ulcers; in late
-
stage trials for NSCLC


Cyberonics:
VNSTherapy for epilepsy and
depression


Introgen Therapeutics:
In

late
-
stage
development of ADVEXIN to treat head and
neck cancer


Repros Therapeutics:
Lead drug Proeelex;
IND will be submitted to initiate Phase 3 trials
for Uterine Fibroid indications

Snapshot of Success

Introgen


Texas Life Science Conference


Largest investment conference in Southwestern U.S.


2007 Conference


More than $6 billion in current funds in attendance


50+ company presentations


Record attendance


Texas Governor Rick Perry addressed meeting


2008 Conference will be held November 5
-
7


Why Houston?


Nowhere in the country is there such research
infrastructure, scientific leadership, and patient
numbers in such close proximity.”

Building the Biotechnology

Sector in Houston



Introduction



Houston Biotechnology Atmosphere



Why so few companies?



Possible solutions

Why so few companies?



Everybody wants to be “the next San Diego”.



Institutions doing more development.



Easier to export ideas and talent.



Lack of experienced management.



No soft landing for failures.



Insufficient informed Venture Capital.



Unfamiliar value proposition.

Building the Biotechnology

Sector in Houston



Introduction



Houston Biotechnology Atmosphere



Why so few companies?



Possible solutions

Possible solutions



Support pump priming efforts



Insist on regional cooperation



Strategic recruiting



Monitor the ETF and CPRIT $



Philanthropic investments