SEEC Presentation - WisdomTools

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Nov 18, 2013 (3 years and 8 months ago)

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Game On!

Using
Video Games to Teach STEM in the Classroom

Adrienne
Evans Fernandez, Jamie Reaves
Kirkley

4 February 2012


Agenda



Introductions


Games as teaching tools


Overview of the field


Getting support from stakeholders


AstroEngineer: Moon Rover (AEMR)


Review games and learning


Overview of AstroEngineer game


Review the AEMR Teacher’s Guide


Explore a demo of the game



Who Are We…..




WisdomTools
, Inc.
creates serious games and e
-
learning solutions for education and
training


Use entertainment game approaches that engage and
teach; game mapped to objectives and standards


Focus on STEM
-
focused games that teach difficult
concepts in science, technology, engineering and
mathematics


AstroEngineer: Moon Rover (released Aug 2010)


AeroEngineer
: Race to Mars (TBR Aug 2012)


NanoMech

(TBR Fall 2012)

The
Challenge

of STEM

(Science, Math, Engineering & Mathematics)


U.S. is not able to fill STEM
-
related job positions due to
lack of STEM graduates


Many students lose interest in STEM
-
related courses at
the middle and high school levels


Minority and female students are more likely to
discontinue taking STEM related courses
(National Center for
Education Statistics, 2005)


Minorities are underrepresented in high
-
level science,
technology, engineering and math occupations
(Leslie,
1998
)

Serious

Games


Serious games (a subset of computer educational
games) seen as a way to engage students in STEM


Federation of American Scientists, Gates and
MacArthur Foundations, Woodrow Wilson Institute, etc.
etc.


White House office examining educational
benefits of
video
games:
http
://www.usatoday.com/news/washington/story/2012
-
01
-
26/edcuational
-
video
-
games
-
white
-
house/52908052/1

Advantages of Using Serious
Games in STEM


Take students to space!!


Reach students on their own terms; research shows they play
HOURS of video games at home each week


Playing games motivates students, and motivated students learn
more


Build student interest, engagement & learning in STEM


Teach concepts not possible in real life (i.e., dangerous)


Support inquiry
-
based learning


Combine with hands
-
on and other types of activities


Use
games as part of project and problem based
learning curricula



Serious Games & Learning


Serious games can facilitate:


Building interest and learning STEM content/careers


“Strategic thinking,
problem solving, plan formulation and execution,
and adaptation to rapid change” (Federation of American Scientists,
2006
)


Players are given opportunities for challenge, strategy and
problem
-
solving (
Lazzaro
, 2004).


Well
-
designed games can support:


Problem solving & decision making (Adams, 2006; Gee, 2003;
Taradi
,
Taradi
,
Radic

&
Pokrajac
, 2005)


Active
learning
(Winn, 2008
) and creativity


Complex systems thinking and literacies (
Steinkuhler
, 2008)


Experiments, inventions, & learning by doing (
Rickard &
Oblinger
,
2004)


Team
-
based
challenges/collaboration (
Bourgonjon
, 2008)


Creativity (Jackson et al, 2011)



Serious Games &
PBL


Games more effective when embedded in instructional
program that includes feedback and debriefing
(Hays,
2006)


Researchers have
promoted the use of digital games
within problem based learning
environments
(
Annetta
, Cook
& Schultz, 2007;
Kiili
, 2005; Maxwell et al, 2004)



Natural ties between PBL and games
(
Annetta
, Cook & Schultz,
2007;
Kiili
, 2005; Maxwell et al, 2004
)


Both are learner centered


Both provide authentic challenges to solve


Both often require collaboration, negotiation, and problem
solving

Disadvantages of Games


Implementation
:


Technical support


Learning and curriculum
Integration


Clarity of objectives/standards met


Monitoring
learning and assessment


Assessment and monitoring of student learning


Debriefing
and student report outs


Achievement of learning outcomes


Buy in from admin, parents and
IT


Using games
in ways that do not support effective STEM learning:


Game as reward only


Game as entertainment only


Babysitting tool


Little or no facilitation of
learning in classroom




Games As Teaching Tools


History of using games to support learning


Oregon Trail, SimCity, Math Blaster


Current games and virtual worlds


River City,
Wolfquest
, Selene, Supercharged!,
Whyville.net
,
WhyReef
, Quest Atlantis, Eco MUVE, Electrical Endeavors


Similarities and differences between simulations, games
& virtual worlds


Sims: First person, focus on realism/fidelity, algorithmic
formula with time and conditions as variables


Games: Provide rewards, entertainment, learn by failure


Virtual Worlds: Persistent world, interactive
community


Tips for Gaining Buy In


To get buy in from administrators and parents:


Write brief letter or newsletter article on the specific game
and how it’s being used to support STEM learning in your
classroom


Provide information on learning outcomes and provide
images


To get buy in from
IT:


Provide information on technical requirements


Have a back up plan in case Internet goes down!

AstroEngineer
: Moon Rover


AstroEngineer
: Moon Rover



AstroEngineer
: Moon Rover

is an educational video game
created to introduce middle
school students to the
engineering design process.


Developed
in partnership with
Project Lead the Way
(PLTW), a non profit that
provides middle and high
engineering curriculum to
schools in all 50
states


Project Lead the Way


PLTW approached us in 2009 to
form a partnership.


Gateway to Technology: Middle
school engineering curriculum


Wanted a product that required
students to design solutions to a
problem and reinforce the cyclic
steps of the engineering design
process.


You do NOT have to be affiliated
with PLTW to use
AstroEngineer
:
Moon Rover
!

Engineering Design Process


Game play focuses on use of the engineering design
process to :


Analyze mission requirements and key design
criteria/constraints for an unmanned lunar rover


Design your rover to meet mission requirements by
choosing among various parts (e.g., body type, wheel
type, power source, and sensors)


Test your rover by driving it on an authentic lunar surface
and under realistic conditions


Redesign your rover until the mission is successful and
then move on to the next mission



Background of Game


Set 30 years in the future, the
player is aboard the Goliath, a
manned lunar mobile base
stationed near the Mare
Humorum



Core challenge in the game is
design, test, and redesign a lunar
rover based on specific
engineering design criteria and
constraints.


Players design smaller rovers;
confronted with authentic lunar
terrain, hazards, and environmental
conditions

Overall Mission

Game Design




The game itself consists of five sets of missions (a
tutorial, three regular missions, and a rescue mission)


Each mission is comprised of 4 to 5 legs, each with a
different goal.


Speed


Durability


Collection of samples


Each leg will require a different configuration of parts in
order to be successful!

Rover Construction Area

Test Your Rover Design

Mission Feedback Screen

AstroEngineer

Leaderboard

AEMR Problem
-
Centered
Curriculum Unit


Week long teaching unit with:


Game Introduction and Overall Challenge (10 min)


How
can the different design choices that you make impact your rover

s
performance?


What factors influence the design choices that you make?


What strategies can you use to improve your rover design?


Game Play (25 min)


Debriefing (15 min)


What was the core mission today?


What
design criteria

you were given?


What design constraints did you encounter?


How did you optimize your design
?

Classroom
Implementation



In a traditional 50 minute
period students are
expected to complete
about 1 mission per day


On block schedules
students can complete 2
-
3 missions per day.

Scientifically Authentic


Authentic


Lunar Geography


NASA Images


Vocabulary


Engineering process


Includes Earth and Space science objectives,
including


Characteristics of the Lunar environment


Topographical characteristics and vocabulary
(regolith,
rilles
, mares, etc.)


Specific locations and structures the game
visits (craters,
rimae
, etc.)


Common elements and minerals found on the
moon



As close as we could get..


Design Simplifications:


Rover Parts & Capabilities
(middle school audience)


Speeds


Pushing the Envelope…!


Presence of Ice on the
Moon?


Research Findings


Research funded, in part, by NSF


Pre
/post quasi
-
experimental study conducted with 341
middle school students (~equal number of
males/females; racially diverse population)


Females = 54.4% of sample


Males = 45.6% of sample


Students played for ~2 hours (113 minutes) over one
week period, or 45.2% of overall class time; does not
include game introduction and debriefing sessions

Research Findings


Analysis of variance (ANOVA) was conducted to
examine pre/post differences


Results indicated statistically significant differences in
learning between the pre
-

and post
-
test (F [1, 681] =
475.135, p < .001, partial eta
-
squared = .411), with
higher scores on the post
-
test


Both male and female students provided positive
feedback on the game’s design, ease of use, and
graphics

Supporting Educators



AstroEngineer
: Moon Rover™
includes curriculum support


Teacher Guide


Student Guide


FAQs


Lesson plans


Enrichment activities

The Teacher’s Guide



AstroEngineer
: Moon Rover
includes documents to help
you and your students get the
most out of the game


The guide includes


Basic instructional and
narrative overview


Learning objectives

The Teacher’s Guide


Getting started FAQ


Controls and parts
overview for teachers


Mission flow charts

The Teacher’s Guide


Standards Alignment


ITEEA


NSES


NSTA


Glossary


General Moon Terms


Engineering Terms


Description of Parts

Student Guide


Includes


Game Overview


Getting Started Tips


Engineering design
steps


Glossary

Supplemental Activities


Sometimes the internet
goes down.


MINI Card Game!

Extension Opportunities


Additional activities
that can extend the
AstroEngineer
:
Moon Rover game
out of the computer
lab.


Tires for the Moon


Cost Analysis
Activities

Release of AEMR




AstroEngineer

was
released
in August 2010 to over
6000 PTLW teachers and 60,000
students, as well as
2500 students in Indiana’s NASA IGNITE STEM
program


AstroEngineer

can now be purchased and downloaded
from:
http://
space.wisdomtools.com

Let’s Play!

Installation



When you get your drive, insert it into your USB port


Select which version you want to install (MAC or PC)
and drag the file to your desktop. PLEASE NOTE: You
cannot run it from the drive!


Double click to unzip (if needed), and have fun!

Questions?

Contact us!

http://
www.wisdomtools.com

Adrienne
Evans Fernandez

Lead Content and

Curriculum
Game Designer

adrienne@wisdomtools.com

Jamie
Kirkley

Chief Learning Officer,

Senior
Instructional Designer

jamie@wisdomtools.com

AeroEngineer
: Race to Mars


Serious game
with five
game modules and week
-
long
curriculum
unit designed to interest and teach high
school students (10
th

-

12
th

grade), particularly females,
about core aerospace engineering concepts