E-Commerce in the Cloud

dizzyeyedfourwayInternet and Web Development

Nov 3, 2013 (3 years and 10 months ago)

113 views

E
-
Commerce in the Cloud

Brought to you by:

Sponsored by:

Featuring

David S. Linthicum

CTO, Founder

Blue Mountain Labs

David@bluemountainlabs.com

THREE LAYERS OF CLOUD COMPUTING

Software as a Service (
SaaS
)

Finished applications that you rent and customize (e.g., Salesforce.com)

Platform as a Service (
PaaS
)

Developer platform that abstracts the infrastructure, OS and middleware to drive
developer productivity (e.g., Force.com)

Infrastructure as a Service (
IaaS
)

Deployment platform that abstracts the infrastructure (e.g., Amazon Web
Services)

NIST defines cloud computing as a set of characteristics,
delivery models, and deployment models



On
-
demand self
-
service



Ubiquitous network
access



Resource pooling


Rapid elasticity


Pay per use


5 Characteristics



Software as a Service
(SaaS)



Platform as a Service
(PaaS)


Infrastructure as a
Service (IaaS)


3 Delivery Models



Private Cloud


Community Cloud


Public Cloud


Hybrid Cloud


4 Deployment Models

Infrastructure
-
as
-
a
-
Service

Security
-
as
-
a
-
Service

Storage
-
as
-
a
-
Service

Integration
-
as
-
a
-
Service

Database
-
as
-
a
-
Service

Information
-
as
-
a
-
Service

Process
-
as
-
a
-
Service

ORGANIZING THE CLOUDS

Platform
-
as
-
a
-
Service

Application
-
as
-
a
-
Service

Management/Governance
-
as
-
a
-
Service

Testing
-
as
-
a
-
Service

$

Capability

WHY CLOUD?

The existing trajectory is not good.

Capacity:
Compute,
Storage,

IT Labor,

Real Estate

Time

Traditional Provisioning

Cloud Provisioning

Actual Usage

With the cloud, you use and pay for
only what you need
.

Capital Expenditure

Capital Expenditure

Capital Expenditure

Capital Expenditure

Capital Expenditure

Underutilized but still
have capacity expenses

Not enough capacity,
increased costs and
dissatisfied clients

WHY IT MAKES SENSE

Cloud Economics vs. Traditional IT


For the cloud, we're all in.


Source: CA

CLOUD POPULARITY = HYPE

Path to clouds: start
with the architecture

PATH TO THE CLOUDS

Understand:


Mission drivers


Information under
management


Existing services under
management


Core business processes

A STEP
-
BY
-
STEP GUIDE FOR
DEPLOYING E
-
COMMERCE SYSTEMS
IN THE CLOUD

STEP 1:


UNDERSTAND THE BUSINESS CASE.

While it would seem that moving to the cloud is a technology
exercise, the reality is that the core business case should be
understood as to the potential benefits of cloud computing. This
is the first step because there is no need to continue if we can

t
make a business case. Things to consider include the value of
shifting risk to the cloud computing provider, the value of on
-
demand scaling (which has a high value in the world of
ecommerce), and the value of outsourcing versus in
-
sourcing.

STEP 2:



UNDERSTAND YOUR EXISTING DATA,
SERVICES, PROCESSES, AND APPLICATIONS.

You start with what you have, and cloud computing is no exception. You
need to have a data
-
level, service
-
level, and process
-
level understanding
of your existing problem domain, also how everything is bundled into
applications. I covered this in detail in my book, but the short answer is
to break your existing system or systems down to a functional primitive of
any architectural components, or data, services, and processes, with the
intention being to assemble them as components that reside in the cloud
and on
-
premise.

Once you understand what you need, it

s time to see where you

re
going. Selecting a cloud computing provider, or, in many cases,
several, is much like selecting other on
-
premise technologies. You line
up your requirements on one side, and look at the features and
functions of the providers on the other. Also, make sure to consider
the soft issues such as viability in the marketplace over time, as well as
security, governance, points
-
of
-
presence near your customers, and
ongoing costs.


STEP 3:


SELECT A PROVIDER.

In this step we migrate the right architectural assets to the cloud,
including transferring and translating the data for the new
environment, as well as localizing the applications, services, and
processes. Migration takes a great deal of planning to pull off
successfully the first time.


STEP 4:


MIGRATE.

Once your system is on the cloud computing platform, it

s time to
deploy it or turn it into a production system. Typically this means
some additional coding and changes to the core data, as well as
standing up core security and governance systems. Moreover, you
must do initial integration testing, and create any links back to on
-
premise systems that need to communicate with the newly deployed
cloud computing systems.


STEP 5:


DEPLOY.

Hopefully, everything works correctly on your new cloud computing
provider. Now you must verify that through testing. You need to
approach this a few ways, including functional testing, or how your
ecommerce system works in production, as well as performance
testing, testing elasticity of scaling, security and penetration testing.



STEP 6:


TEST.

Processes, applications, and data

are largely independent

Points of integration are

well defined

Lower level of security is fine

Core internal enterprise

architecture is healthy

Web is the

desired platform

Cost is an issue

Applications are new

Processes, applications, and data
are largely coupled

Points of integration are

not well defined

Higher level of security is required

Core internal enterprise
architecture needs work

The application requires

a native interface

Cost is an issue

Application is legacy

CLOUD COMPUTING

A Fit When:

Not A Fit When:

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