NetWare 5 Monitoring

dingdongboomNetworking and Communications

Oct 27, 2013 (4 years and 16 days ago)

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Network Connectivity

Network Operating Systems

How Do I Connect a Device to
the Network?


So, all I have to do is install a NIC?



Network Interface Cards (NIC)



The NIC resides inside the network device
providing the communications link between the
device and the network cable.


No, you also need to configure the:



Workstation Client



Protocol Stack



Services



NIC

Configuring a Workstation


NIC



Network type dependent

Ex: Ethernet NIC will not work on Token Ring



The default settings work for most cases



Install the driver


Protocol Stack



Language used to communicate over the network

Ex: TCP/IP, NetBEUI, IPX/SPX



Configure the protocol with appropriate address
and parameters for your network.

Configuring a Workstation (cont.)


Workstation Client



Software translator between applications and NIC



Client is Network Operating System dependent
Ex:
-

Novell client for Novell NetWare



-

Client for MS Windows for peer
-
to
-
peer or



Windows NT



Uniquely identify the PC on the network

Connect the Workstation


Finishing up



Connect “Patch Cable” from NIC to network jack



When you finish, the system will BIND the
protocol stack and services to the NIC and reboot
the system


Services



Most common are file and printer sharing

Network Topologies


Network Topology


A type of network map



Bus
-

all nodes connected to a backbone, must be
terminated at each end.



Ring
-

nodes are connected to a central ring.




Star
-

nodes are connected to a central device,
typically a hub or MAU.




Hybrid
-

combination of any or all of the
topologies



Daisy Chain
-

nodes are connected through each
other in
-
line, must be terminated at each end.

Network Transport Systems


Token Ring



Nodes are connected to a ring
-
star hybrid network
via MAUs (Multistation Access Unit)



Node can not talk unless it “owns” a token, thereby
eliminating “data collisions” and “chatter”



Very reliable for smaller groups



“Tokens” are released on the network for traffic
control



Typically more expensive, more overhead and
slower (4 or 16 Mbps) than Ethernet

Network Transport Systems (cont.)


Ethernet



Many versions over many topologies

Ex. 10BaseT
-

10Mbps over Category 3, 4, or 5
UTP (Unshielded Twisted Pair) cable



All nodes can talk at once using CSMA/CD
(Carrier Sense Multiple Access with Collision
Detection)



Typically cheaper, faster (10 Mbps, 100 Mbps and
1 Gbps) and easier to implement



Why?

Network Transport Systems (cont
.)


CSMA/CD



Node listens for network activity, if it hears traffic,
waits, if not, transmits



Detects collision?



Yes, jams network and waits to retransmit



No, considers transmission successful!!!!

Networking Hardware


Repeaters


Hubs or MAUs



One input and one output port, only useful in Bus
topology



Regenerates and amplifies the signal



Multiport repeater



Can connect many Hubs or MAUs to each other
AND to the network backbone



Can usually be “managed” to assist in data flow
control and error detection

Networking Hardware (cont.)


Bridges


Switch




Only allows traffic that is meant for the “remote”
segment to pass through, hence, less traffic



Connects
only

two segments of a network together



Multiport bridge



Connects many segments of a network together



Allows networks to grow in manageable segments

Networking Hardware (cont.)


Router



Connects many segments running various protocols
at various speeds over various wire types



A switch with brains on steroids!



Can determine shortest, fastest and best paths
between two nodes



“Learns” changing network paths and conditions



The Internet is a collection of millions of network
segments connected through millions of routers