Course Topics - Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology ...

denunequaledBiotechnology

Dec 1, 2012 (4 years and 4 months ago)

489 views

• Pharmacokinetics; pharmacodynamics
• Drugs targeting the autonomic nervous
system and skeletal neuromuscular junction
• Drugs used in treatment of psychosis and
mania, Parkinson’s Disease, insomnia and
epilepsy, and pain
• Drugs used in treatment of inflammation,
infection and cancer
• Drugs affecting the cardiovascular system
and the kidneys used for treating cardiac
pathologies, hypertension, and
hypercholestemia
• Drugs affecting the endocrine system
such as drugs for treatment of diabetes,
thyroid dysfunction, and contraceptive
drugs
Course Number: PHM 350


Sections Available: 001 (on-campus)
730 MSU program Students
731 Lifelong In-state
732 Lifelong Out-State


Semesters: Fall, Spring (on-campus)
Summer (online)

Credits: 3 credits
PHM 350
– Pharmacology as a discipline
“stands on the shoulders” of the disciplines of
physiology and biochemistry. This course is
designed to introduce the student to areas of
human pharmacology; it is not intended to cover
every topic within pharmacology.
This course is suitable for undergraduate
students enrolled in majors within the biomedical
science disciplines including physiology,
biochemistry, human biology, and also in chemistry;
it is also suitable for students who already have
an undergraduate degree with a major in these
disciplines.
Course objectives are to familiarize the student
with critical principles in pharmacology and with a
range of drug classes used therapeutically in clinical
medicine. The focus is on the mechanism of action
of these drugs, their therapeutic benefits, uses, and
side effects.
For MSU Undergraduates only, the following
courses are required:

PSL 250 or PSL 310, or

PSL 431 and PSL 432
For approval to enroll, contact

Dr. Cobbett at cobbett@msu.edu.
Pharmacology, 3rd Ed., Brenner & Stevens
--
recommended for those heading to medical school or biomedical
graduate school programs
Pharmacology for Nursing Care, 8th Ed., R.A. Lehne
--
for those in or heading for nursing major and those heading toward
postgraduate nurse practitioner and physicians’s assistant programs.
Introduction to Human Pharmacology

PHM 350
Course Overview
Course Instructor
Dr. Peter Cobbett
received his BS and PhD degrees
from the University of St An
-
drews, Scotland. His research
interests have ranged from
muscles of parasitic worms, to
physiology of neurons and glia
in mammalian brains, and most
recently, to neurons derived from
non-neuronal somatic cells.
Textbooks
(recommended)
Course Topics
Pre-requisites
Course Information
CONTACT: Pharmacology & Toxicology Academic Office at (517) 884-3553 | email: phm@msu.edu | www.phmtox.msu.edu
H i g h F l e x i b i l i t y. E n d l e s s P o s s i b i l i t y.


Pharmacology of Drug Addiction

• Brain areas targeted by addictive drugs
• Actions of addictive drugs on individual neurons
• Nicotine, alcohol, and opiate addictions
• Hallucinogens
• Public policy for managing addiction in society
Course Number: PHM 431


Sections Available: 001 (on-campus)

730 MSU Students
731 Lifelong In-State
732 Lifelong Out-State

Semesters: Summer (online)
Fall (on-campus)


Credits: 3 credits
www.phmtox.msu.edu
PHM 431
– This course was created for students
in both biomedical and social sciences with an
interest in understanding why some drugs are
addictive, how addiction can be treated, and the
social consequences of drug addition as a medical
problem.
Following an introduction to the biological basis
for drug addiction, the course will cover the major
groups of addictive drugs.
Lectures focus on:
• the history of drug use and abuse
• the molecular, cellular and integrative basis for

addictive properties
• the behavioral and social consequences of drug
use and abuse
Grades are based on a collaborative online
presentation and paper, two multiple choice exams,
and a term paper covering an aspect of public policy
related to drug addiction.
Zoology, Human Biology, Psychology,
Biochemistry, or Physiology
PHM 431
Addiction: From Biology to
Drug Policy, 2nd edition.
Avram Goldstein, M.D.
Oxford University Press
A background in the biological sciences is
recommended but not required.
PHM 431, in the Summer, is an online class
utilizing animation, audio, articles, and
asynchronous discussion forums.
Textbook
Course Overview
Course Topics
Requirements
Recommended Background
Course Information
Course Instructor
CONTACT: Pharmacology & Toxicology Academic Office at (517) 884-3553 | email: phm@msu.edu | www.phmtox.msu.edu
H i g h F l e x i b i l i t y. E n d l e s s P o s s i b i l i t y.
Dr. James Galligan
is a Professor in the Dept of
Pharma-cology & Toxicology, and
Director for the Neuroscience
Program at Michigan State
University. He received his PhD
from the University of Arizona.
His research interests focus on
synaptic transmission in the
autonomic nervous system.


Introduction to Chemical Toxicology

• Dose response curves
• Absorption, distribution and excretion of
chemicals
• Metabolic pathways for chemicals
• Toxicokinetics
• Receptors and biological action
• Toxicity of metals
• Naturally occurring toxins and insecticides
• Dioxins and polychlorinated biophenyls (PCBs)
• Cellular, hepatic, renal, respiratory, and
cardiovascular toxicology
• Mutagenesis, epigenetics and carcinogenesis
• Neurotoxicology and immunotoxicology
• Reproductive and developmental toxicology
• Risk assessment
Course Number: PHM 450


Sections Available: 001 (on-campus)

Semesters: Spring


Credits: 3 credits
www.phmtox.msu.edu
PHM 450
– This course introduces
mammalian toxicology, including disposition of
chemicals in the body, detoxication, elimination,
and mechanisms of toxicity in major organ
systems. Selected toxic agents are also discussed.
This course is open to students with a
prerequisite knowledge in biology and chemistry
and an interest in learning more about toxicology.
BS 161, and BS 162, and CEM 251

Restrictions:

Not open to freshmen or sophomores
PHM 450
“Principles of Biochemical
Toxicology.” 4th edition.

Timbral, J.A.


Informa Healthcare
Dr. Keith Lookingland
earned his PhD from the

University of Maryland.

Research interests include

areas of development of

neuroprotective pharmacologi
-
cal agents and strategies for the
treatment of dopamine neuro
-
degenerative disorders including
Parkinson’s Disease and Restless
Leg Syndrome.
Course Overview
Course Topics
Textbook (recommended)
Course Instructor
Course Information
Pre-requisites
CONTACT: Pharmacology & Toxicology Academic Office at (517) 884-3553 | email: phm@msu.edu | www.phmtox.msu.edu
H i g h F l e x i b i l i t y. E n d l e s s P o s s i b i l i t y.
Course Topics
• Cellular and molecular mechanisms of toxicity
• Toxicokinetics
• Mutagenesis and carcinogenesis
• Hepatic and renal toxicology
• Neurotoxicology and immunotoxicology
• Cardiovascular and respiratory toxicology
• Teratogenesis
• Toxicology within the drug development process
• Pharmaceuticals as toxicants
• Environmental toxicology
• Chemical risk assessment
Course Number: PHM 450 (online)

Sections Available: 730 MSU Students
731 Lifelong In-state
732 Lifelong Out-State

Semesters: Fall, Spring, Summer

Credits: 3 credits
www.phmtox.msu.edu
PHM 450
– This online course provides an
introduction to mammalian toxicology. The course
includes an overview of the general principles of
toxicology, toxicokinetics, and mechanisms of
toxicity in major organ systems. The course also
includes discussion of selected toxic agents.
Individuals not affiliated with the University may
enroll in this course as a Lifelong Education Student.
Introduction to Chemical Toxicology is open to
anyone with a prerequisite knowledge of biology
and chemistry, and an interest in learning more
about toxicology.
Required:

Cassaret and Doull’s
“Essentials of Toxicology.”
2nd edition.

McGraw-Hill Professional.
Course Overview
Course Instructors
Dr. Belinda Hawkins
holds a PhD in Pharmacology
& Toxicology-Environmental
Toxicology from Michigan State
University. She works for the

US-EPA in Cincinnati, OH. She is
currently Chief of the Chemical
Risk Assessment Branch within
EPA’s National Center for

Environmental Assessment.
BS 161, and BS 162, and CEM 251
Course Information
Textbooks
Course Topics


Introduction to Chemical Toxicology

PHM 450
Recommended:

Berne & Levy

Principles of Physiology,
4th edition.

Mosby.
Pre-requisites
CONTACT: Pharmacology & Toxicology Academic Office at (517) 884-3553 | email: phm@msu.edu | www.phmtox.msu.edu
H i g h F l e x i b i l i t y. E n d l e s s P o s s i b i l i t y.
Dr. Tobi Limke
Received her PhD in Pharmacol
-
ogy & Toxicology-Environmental
Toxicology from Michigan State
University. She also holds an MBA
from the University of Maryland. A
postdoctoral fellow at the National
Institute on Aging at the National
Institutes of Health in Baltimore,
MD, Dr. Limke has experience work
-
ing with classic pharmaceutical
and biotechnology companies in
both scientific and business roles.
Currently, she works as a freelance
technical marketing consultant for
the biopharmaceutical industry.
Special Problems

Research projects that fulfill the requirements of
this course are based on the student’s and the
faculty sponsor’s shared interest in a topic.


Students are encouraged to contact potential
faculty sponsors to discuss a research topic and

the scope of the project to ensure that the goals are
reasonable and attainable.
Course Number: PHM 480 (on-campus)

Sections Available: 001 (independent study)
002 (see course overview)
003 (see course overview)

Semesters: Fall, Spring, Summer


Credits: Variable (1-3 at a time)
www.phmtox.msu.edu
PHM 480

This course allows undergraduate
students the opportunity to do individual work on
selected research problems in a laboratory situation
with faculty members of the Department of
Pharmacology and Toxicology as mentors (section
001--independent study. Fall, Spring, Summer
semesters).
Section 002 -- Neuropharmacology

(Dr. W.D. Atchison--Instructor, 2 credits, Fall
semester).
Section 003 -- Neurobiology of Disease

(Dr. S.M. Barman--Instructor, 2 credits, Spring
semester).
A student may earn a maximum of 9 credits in all
enrollments.
Restrictions:

Each section needs Approval of the Instructor.
PHM 480
None
Course Overview
Course Topics
Re-enrollment
Textbooks
Course Instructors
All Pharmacology and Toxicology faculty are
potential instructors. Students must contact
individual faculty in order to determine the
availability of research opportunities.
Course Information
CONTACT: Pharmacology & Toxicology Academic Office at (517) 884-3553 | email: phm@msu.edu | www.phmtox.msu.edu
H i g h F l e x i b i l i t y. E n d l e s s P o s s i b i l i t y.


Current Topics in Pharmacology

Topics include:
• The use of hormone replacement in
postmenopausal women
• Epidemiology of human cancer
• Vioxx & Celebrex: How to mishandle or
survive a potential drug recall
• Thalidomide: A banished drug returns
• Drug shortages: Causes and outcomes
• Rogaine & Viagra: Drugs with different uses
than originally intended
• Delalutin: Preventing Miscarriage - How
much is it worth?
• SSRIs: Do antidepressant drugs cause
suicide?
• Other topics may be suggested by students
PHM 487

For many reasons, issues of drug
development, use, abuse and side effects get
into the mainstream news media. This course is
designed to examine examples of drugs receiving
media publicity including the reasons for the
publicity and the outcome of that publicity.
This course is suitable for undergraduate
students enrolled in majors within biomedi-
cal science disciplines including physiology,
biochemistry, human biology, and also chemistry.
This is a combined lecture, reading and in-class
discussion course; students will be expected to
make class presentations and to prepare a paper on
a topic covered in the course.
PHM 487
Course Instructor
None
Textbooks
Course Overview
Course Topics
Approval of department required.
Pre-requisites
Course Number: PHM 487 (on-campus)


Sections Available: 001

Semesters: Fall and Spring


Credits: 2 credits
Course Information
CONTACT: Pharmacology & Toxicology Academic Office at (517) 884-3553 | email: phm@msu.edu | www.phmtox.msu.edu
H i g h F l e x i b i l i t y. E n d l e s s P o s s i b i l i t y.
Dr. Peter Cobbett
received his BS and PhD degrees
from the University of St An
-
drews, Scotland. His research
interests have ranged from
muscles of parasitic worms, to
physiology of neurons and glia
in mammalian brains, and most
recently, to neurons derived from
non-neuronal somatic cells.
Course Topics

Formal project management culture,

principles, knowledgeable areas, and
terminology

Specific tools and techniques, including work
break-down structure, earned value analysis, risk
management, and quality control for managing
scientific research

Introduction to work planning, estimating,
assigning and integrative resources

Introduction to risk management and quality
management

Understanding global regulations and
requirements

Risk management in commercial biomedical
research

Decision-making and problem-solving for
drug development projects

Portfolio management for prioritizing biotech
and life projects

Managing projects throughout the drug
development lifecycle
Course Number: PHM 659 (online)

Sections Available: 730 MSU program Students
731 Lifelong In-state
732 Lifelong Out-State

Semesters: Fall

Credits: 3 credits
PHM 659
– This course involves principles
and activities in drug development, the regulatory
process for obtaining marketing authorization,
the fundamental aspects of project management
including work breakdown structure, scheduling,
earned value analysis, and risk management.
While this course is required for students
enrolled in the Certificate in Clinical Research Trials
Management - Program in Public Health, College of
Human Medicine at MSU, any MSU graduate student
may take the course.
Not open to graduate students with credit in

PHM 857 or PHM 858.
Recommended Background -- Though not
required, participants are encouraged to have
a basic background in biology, chemistry, and
mathematics.
“Project Management:

A Managerial Approach.”
Meredith and Mantel.

8th edition.

Wiley.
Thomas C. Herzig, PhD, PMP
is a Commander in the U.S. Navy and
Director of the Warfighter Performance Lab
at the Naval Health Research Center, where
he oversees applied biomedical research
to enhance the health, safety, readiness,
and performance of our military forces.
He is engaged in developing new research
programs, managing current research, and
providing medical research solutions for the
Navy-Marine Corps team.
Jonathon M. Parker, RPH, MS
i
s a Senior Director in Worldwide
Regulatory Strategy for Pfizer, Inc. with
21+ years of drug development experience.
Responsibilities encompass leading global
regulatory teams, developing and executing
regulatory strategies for drugs and biologics
and interacting with health agencies
worldwide. He is also an Assoc. Prof. at
Temple University School teaching courses
in Regulatory Affairs.

Regulatory Affairs and Project Management in Clinical Research
PHM 659
Course Overview
Textbook
Restrictions
Course Information
Course Instructors
Course Topics
CONTACT: Pharmacology & Toxicology Academic Office at (517) 884-3553 | email: phm@msu.edu | www.phmtox.msu.edu
H i g h F l e x i b i l i t y. E n d l e s s P o s s i b i l i t y.
• Historical developments in synaptic transmission
• Inhibitory synaptic mechanisms in the central
nervous system
• Synaptic pathology in ALS
• Neuropeptides and synaptic transmission
• Synaptic signaling in neurohumoral mechanisms
• Vascular neuroeffector transmission
• Synaptic transmission in chemical sensory
pathways
• Role of scaffolding proteins and axonal transport
in synaptic transmission
• Synaptic mechanisms in central autonomic
pathways
• Synaptic transmission in the enteric nervous
system
Course Number: PHM 810 (on-campus)

Sections Available: 001


Semesters: Spring, odd-numbered yrs


Credits: 3 credits
PHM 810
– This course is taught as a seminar-
style class meeting on Mondays and Wednesdays
from 3:30pm to 5:00pm in B408 Life Sciences Bldg.
Mondays will be a lecture presentation of
an advanced topic in synaptic transmission or
neuropharmacology. Wednesdays will be for class
discussion of a paper(s) relevant to the previous
lecture. Students will be expected to explain
specific methods, figures, results and conclusions
from the paper. Students must read the papers and
come to class prepared for the discussion sessions.
Students will present a topic of their own
choosing and lead a paper discussion. Student
presentation should contain introductory
information, current status of the field and current
unanswered issues or future directions of work in
the area. There will be no exams or term papers.
Grades will be based on class participation and the
quality of the student’s presentations.
Approval of the Department.
PHM 810
No textbooks required; electronic materials utilized.
Dr. Xiaochun Bian
is an Assistant Professor in
the Dept of Pharmacology &
Toxicology at Michigan State
University. He received his PhD
from the University of Melbourne/
Australia. His interests focus on
neural control of gastrointestinal
motility.
Course Overview
Course Topics
Textbooks


Synaptic Transmission
Restrictions
Course Information
Dr. James Galligan
is a Professor in the Dept of
Pharmacology & Toxicology, and
Director for the Neuroscience
Program at Michigan State
University. He received his PhD
from the University of Arizona.
His research interests focus on
synaptic transmission in the
autonomic nervous system.
Course Coordinators
CONTACT: Pharmacology & Toxicology Academic Office at (517) 884-3553 | email: phm@msu.edu | www.phmtox.msu.edu
H i g h F l e x i b i l i t y. E n d l e s s P o s s i b i l i t y.


Cardiovascular Pharmacology

• Cardiovascular anatomy and physiology
• Receptors and signaling pathways involved
in the cardiovascular system
• Cardiovascular toxicology
• Hypertension/hypotension
• Heart failure
• Arrhythmias
• Coronary artery disease
• Pharmacological interventions
• Current research findings in cardiovascular
pharmacology
Course Number: PHM 813 (online)


Sections Available: 730 MSU program Students
731 Lifelong In-state
732 Lifelong Out-State


Semesters: Summer


Credits: 2 credits
to be determined
contact department

for update
PHM 813
– This course will examine normal
cardiovascular functions and mechanisms,
cardiovascular mechanisms/functions during
altered pathophysiological states and how various
drugs and toxic substances can modify them.
Lastly, the course will highlight some of
the current research findings with regards to
cardiovascular pharmacology.
At the conclusion of the course, students should
understand the following:
• Basic anatomic and physiological principles of
the cardiovascular system
• Neural, humoral and metabolic control of
cardiovascular function
• Pathophysiology of cardiovascular diseases
• Pharmacology and rationale of the drugs used
in the treatment of cardiovascular disease
• Effects of toxicants on the cardiovascular
system
Undergraduate courses in biology and chemistry,
or approval of department.


It is also expected that the student will have a
basic understanding of physiology from previous
coursework.
PHM 813
No textbooks required; electronic materials
utilized.
Course Overview
Course Instructor
Course Topics
Textbooks
Course Information
Pre-requisites
CONTACT: Pharmacology & Toxicology Academic Office at (517) 884-3553 | email: phm@msu.edu | www.phmtox.msu.edu
H i g h F l e x i b i l i t y. E n d l e s s P o s s i b i l i t y.
• Introduction to toxicologic pathology; general
concepts
• Pathways to cell death; oxidative stress; hypoxia
and chemical hypoxia
• Pathology of chemical-induced inflammation and
cellular injury; adaptation and repair
• Receptor-mediated toxicity
• Pathology of chemical-induced cancer, and
neurotoxicity
• Mutagenesis and carcinogenesis
• Toxicology of the immune system
• Liver toxicology/pathology
• Neurotoxicology
• Respiratory system toxicology/pathology
• Genetic susceptibility
• Risk assessment -- introduction
• Risk/safety assessment -- noncarcinogens,
pollutants in air/water, cancer
• Drug discovery and regulatory toxicology
• Epigenetic, transgenerational effects of chemicals
Course Number: PHM 816 (on-campus)

Sections Available: 001

Semesters: Fall (odd-numbered years)

Credits: 3 credits
Interdepartmental with
Animal Science, Biochemistry and Molecular Biology,
Pathobiology & Diagnostic Investigation
Administered by
Pharmacology & Toxicology
PHM 816
– This course covers biochemical,
molecular, and physiological mechanisms of

toxicology; functional and pathological responses
of major organ systems to chemical insult;

mechanisms of mutagenesis and carcinogenesis,
and concepts in risk and safety assessment.
Students will be expected to attend and

participate in class, take written examinations, and
give a short oral presentation.
Some biology or chemistry is strongly
recommended.
No textbooks required; electronic materials utilized.
Dr. Patricia Ganey
received her PhD in

Pharmacology and Toxicology
at Michigan State University.
Her interests focus on the role
of inflammation in drug-

induced liver injury; interaction
of environmental chemicals
with inflammatory response.
Dr. Jack Harkema
received his DVM from Michigan
State University and his PhD
from the University of Calif-Da
-
vis. His interests focus on respi
-
ratory pathology and inhalation
toxicology, mechanisms of air
-
way epithelial injury, adaptation
and repair after exposure to air
pollutants, toxicologic pathol
-
ogy, upper airway toxicology &
pathology.
Course Overview
Textbooks
Course Topics

Integrative Toxicology:
Mechanisms, Pathology and Regulation
PHM 816
Course Instructors
Recommended Background
Course Information
CONTACT: Pharmacology & Toxicology Academic Office at (517) 884-3553 | email: phm@msu.edu | www.phmtox.msu.edu
H i g h F l e x i b i l i t y. E n d l e s s P o s s i b i l i t y.


Neurotoxicology

• General principles of toxicology
• Review of toxicokinetics
• Overview of normal structure and function of
the nervous system
• Aspects of normal cellular neurophysiology
• Mechanisms of neurotoxicity
• Glial-neuronal interactions and neuro-
inflammation
• Neurotransmission-associated neurotoxicity
• Models of neurodegenerative disease
• Neurotoxicity assessment
• Pharmacological neuroprotective strategies
Course Number: PHM 817 (online)


Sections Available: 730 MSU Graduate Students
731 Lifelong In-State
732 Lifelong Out-State

Semesters: Spring


Credits: 2 credits
PHM 817
– Neurotoxicology is a 15-week online
course that covers the basic biochemical, molecular
and physiological consequences of toxicant
exposure on the nervous system. Course objectives
are to familiarize students with the mechanisms
underlying neurotoxicity and how these are
assessed. Factors predisposing the nervous system
to selective toxicants will be discussed as well
as the pathophysiology and models of toxicant-
induced neurodegenerative diseases. The course
will provide an in-depth discussion of how different
classes of toxicants affect the physiological function
of the central nervous system.
PHM 819 and PHM 450 or equivalent
pharmacology & toxicology courses;
undergraduate biochemistry and cell biology
PHM 817
Casarett & Doull’s Toxicology:
The Basic Science of Poisons,
Seventh Edition.
McGraw-Hill Professional.
Dr. Keith Lookingland
earned his PhD from the Univer
-
sity of Maryland. His interests

encompass the areas of

development of neuroprotective
pharmacological agents and

strategies for the treatment of

dopamine neurodegenerative
disorders including Parkinson’s
Disease and Restless Leg

Syndrome.
Course Overview
Textbooks
(recommended)
Pre-requisites
Course Topics
Course Information
Course Instructor
CONTACT: Pharmacology & Toxicology Academic Office at (517) 884-3553 | email: phm@msu.edu | www.phmtox.msu.edu
H i g h F l e x i b i l i t y. E n d l e s s P o s s i b i l i t y.
• Absorption, distribution, metabolism and
elimination of drugs/toxicants
• Computation of pharmacokinetics and
toxicokinetic parameters
• Drug-receptor theories, their derivation and

application
• Calculating pharmacological parameters such
as drug affinity, potency, efficacy from real and
constructed experiments
• Methods by which drug-receptor interaction can
be measured
• Application of drug-receptor theory to
experimental and physiological situations
• Introduction of cutting edge theories, techniques
and controversies in the above fields
Course Number: PHM 819 (online)


Sections Available: 730 MSU Graduate Students
731 Lifelong In-State
732 Lifelong Out-State
733 Session A (see above)
734 Session B (see above)

Semesters: Summer, Fall


Credits: 2 credits
PHM 819
– Students are introduced to the
basic principles of drug pharmacokinetics
(absorption, distribution, metabolism and
elimination) and pharmacodynamics (drug-receptor
interaction) through online materials.
Online coursework will be imparted primarily
through ANGEL lessons which include reading
assignments, interactive animations, simulations,
and self-tests.
Pharmacology & Toxicology PhD students are also
required to be enrolled for 1 credit of PHM 980,
section 001 (the on-campus portion for those
enrolled in PHM 819).
Sections 730/731/732 are the full semester session
for Summer and Fall (2 credits)
Section 733, Summer Session A only (1 credit)

-first half of summer session


(PhD students only)
Section 734, Summer Session B only (1 credit)
-second half of summer session


(PhD students only)


Principles of Drug-Tissue Interactions

PHM 819
Principles of Pharmacology:

The Pathophysiologic Basis of
Drug Therapy.

3rd edition.
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.
Dr. Stephanie Watts
earned her PhD in Pharmacology
& Toxicology from Indiana

University and was a

Postdoctoral Fellow in

Physiology at The University of
Michigan. Her interests include
vascular dysfunction in hyper
-
tension, with a focus on sero
-
tonin, endothelin and veins.
Course Instructor
Course Topics
Course Section Descriptions
Course Information
Recommended Textbook
Course Overview
CONTACT: Pharmacology & Toxicology Academic Office at (517) 884-3553 | email: phm@msu.edu | www.phmtox.msu.edu
H i g h F l e x i b i l i t y. E n d l e s s P o s s i b i l i t y.
Cellular, Molecular and Integrated Systems

Pharmacology & Toxicology
• Regulation of extracellular fluid composition
• Cardiovascular pharmacology
• Gastrointestinal pharmacology
• Endocrine pharmacology
• Convulsants and anticonvulsants
• Anaesthetics
• Autonomic pharmacology
• Antihypertensive drugs
• Psychopharmacology
• Narcotic analgesics
• Antimicrobials
• Anticancer agents
• Immune modulatory drugs
• Hepatotoxicity
• Anticoagulants, thrombolytics, anti-thrombolytics
• Toxicology as an essential component in drug
design
Course Number: PHM 820 (on-campus)
Sections Available: 001

Semesters: Fall

Credits: 4 credits
PHM 820
– This course provides a
comprehensive overview of the cellular and
molecular mechanisms of drug and chemical
actions on the major organ systems of humans and
other mammals.
The course meets Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday
and Thursday from 8-8:50am in B448-9 Life
Sciences Bldg during the Fall semester.
Course Overview
Prerequisites
BMB 801, BMB 802, PHM 827, and PSL 828

or approval of department.
PHM 820
Goodman and Gilman’s

“The Pharmacological

Basis of Therapeutics.”

12th edition.
McGraw-Hill Professional.
Dr. Norbert Kaminski
holds a PhD from North Carolina State
University. He is Director of the Center
for Integrative Toxicology, and Professor
of Pharmacology & Toxicology at
Michigan State University. His interests
encompass the role of the cannabinoid
receptors in immunomodulation
by cannabinoid compounds; signal
transduction in T-cell activation;
immunotoxicology of chlorinated
hydrocarbons; interactions between the
liver and the immune system.
Dr. Keith Lookingland
earned his PhD from the
University of Maryland. His
interests encompass the areas of
development of neuroprotective
pharmacological agents and
strategies for the treatment of
dopamine neurodegenerative
disorders including Parkinson’s
Disease and Restless Leg Syndrome
(RLS).
This course is taught by the following group of
faculty:

From Pharmacology & Toxicology:
Drs. Peter Cobbett, Greg Fink, James Galligan,
Patricia Ganey, Jay Goodman, John Goudreau,
Norbert Kaminski, Barbara Kaplan, Keith
Lookingland, Ken Moore, Robert Roth, John
Thornburg, Stephanie Watts

Other individuals also lecturing in this course:
Dr. John LaPres, Biochemistry & Molecular Biology,
MSU; Drs. Haitian Lu and Dale Morris, DowAgro,
Indianapolis
Course Overview
Course Topics
Course Instructors
Textbook
Course Coordinators
Course Information
CONTACT: Pharmacology & Toxicology Academic Office at (517) 884-3553 | email: phm@msu.edu | www.phmtox.msu.edu
H i g h F l e x i b i l i t y. E n d l e s s P o s s i b i l i t y.

Physiology and Pharmacology of Excitable Cells
• Neuronal structure
• Generation of membrane potential
• Properties and behavior of ion channels, and
membrane excitability
• Intracellular calcium homeostasis
• Synaptic mechanisms, integration and plasticity
• Synaptic transmitters and their receptors
• Muscle structure and function
• Sensory receptor function, processing and
perception
Course Number: PHM 827 (on-campus)

Sections Available: 001

Semesters: Fall

Credits: 4 credits
Course Information
www.phmtox.msu.edu
PHM 827

– This course is an advanced cell
physiology course with an emphasis on the
physiology of cells with excitable membranes,
and the function and interactions of these cells.
Students enrolled in this course are principally
from graduate programs of biomedical disciplines
of Pharmacology & Toxicology, Neuroscience,
Physiology, Psychology, and Biochemistry and
Molecular Biology. The course is open to graduate
students in other disciplines and to advanced
undergraduates.
Grades are based on performance in exams
composed of short-essay type questions scheduled
throughout the semester.
Background in biological sciences is
advantageous but not required.


(The following MSU courses provide excellent
background: PSL 431, ZOL 402.)
PHM 827
Recommended:
1) Principles of Neural Science, 5th edition -

Kandel, Schwartz & Jessell
2) Neurobiology, 3rd edition - Shepherd
3) Ionic Channels of Excitable Membranes,

3rd edition - Hille
4) Molecular Biology of the Cell, 5th edition -
Albers et al.
5) Cellular Physiology of Nerve and Muscle,

4th edition - Matthews
6) The Neuron (Cell and Molecular Biology),

3rd edition - Levitan & Kaczmarek
This course is by the following group of faculty:


From Pharmacology & Toxicology
:
Drs. William Atchison, Peter Cobbett, James
Galligan, Colleen Hegg, and William Jackson.

Other lecturers from MSU include:

Dr. Ke Dong, Entomology
Dr. Ron Meyer, Physiology
Dr. Kyle Miller, Zoology
Dr. Stephen Schneider, Physiology
Dr. Arthur Weber, Physiology
Course Instructors
Course Overview
Course Coordinator
Course Topics
Textbooks
Recommended Background
CONTACT: Pharmacology & Toxicology Academic Office at (517) 884-3553 | email: phm@msu.edu | www.phmtox.msu.edu
H i g h F l e x i b i l i t y. E n d l e s s P o s s i b i l i t y.
Dr. Peter Cobbett
received his BS and PhD degrees
from the University of St An
-
drews, Scotland. His research
interests have ranged from
muscles of parasitic worms, to
physiology of neurons and glia
in mammalian brains, and most
recently, to neurons derived from
non-neuronal somatic cells.
• Characteristics of cancer
• Epidemiology of human cancer
• Major causes of cancer
• Cell and molecular biology of carcino-
genesis, including the role of epigenetics
• Cancer diagnosis, with emphasis on
molecular approaches
• Safety assessment: Enhancing science-
based understanding of the cancer-causing
potential of chemicals

Course Number: PHM 828 (online)


Sections Available: 730 MSU program Students
731 Lifelong In-state
732 Lifelong Out-State


Semesters: Fall


Credits: 2 credits
Dr. Jay Goodman
received his PhD at the

University of Michigan-Ann Arbor
and his postdoctoral research
at the McArdle Laboratory for
Cancer Research, University of
Wisconsin-Madison.


Research interests include

focusing on chemical toxicity

and epigenetic alterations

including DNA methylation.
www.phmtox.msu.edu
PHM 828
– This course will focus on the
mechanisms underlying the transformation of a
normal cell into a frank malignancy. The course will
teach students how to use this information to better
evaluate the carcinogenic potential of chemicals.
The format will consist of guided, selected
reading assignments from the required textbook
plus research-based papers in the literature.
Grades will be determined by the outcome
of two examinations and a term paper based
on a constructive, critical review of an aspect of
carcinogenesis.
A graduate level course in biochemistry or
molecular biology (e.g., BMB 801 or BLD 830)
and PHM 819.
For additional information contact:

Dr. Goodman (goodman3@msu.edu).
Enrollment requires approval of the course
instructor.
Cancer Biology,

4th ed.

RW Ruddon

Oxford Press, NY,
2007.
Course Overview
Course Topics
Textbook
(required)


Concepts in Carcinogenesis

PHM 828
Pre-requisites
Course Instructor
Course Information
CONTACT: Pharmacology & Toxicology Academic Office at (517) 884-3553 | email: phm@msu.edu | www.phmtox.msu.edu
H i g h F l e x i b i l i t y. E n d l e s s P o s s i b i l i t y.
• Basic biology of neurons including genera-
tion of membrane potential and of action
potentials
• Synaptic physiology
• Drugs targeting:
• Voltage-gated chemicals, action potential
generation and propagation
• Central GABAergic systems
• Central noradrenergic and serotonergic
systems
• Central dopaminergic systems
• Central opiate systems
• Central cholinergic and glutaminergic
systems
• Peripheral cholinergic and noradrenergic
systems
Course Number: PHM 829 (online)


Sections Available: 730 MSU Students
731 Lifelong In-State
732 Lifelong Out-State


Semesters: Fall


Credits: 2 credits
www.phmtox.msu.edu
PHM 829
– Neuropharmacology is a
subdiscipline of pharmacology and is concerned
primarily with the actions of drugs on the normally
functioning nervous system and the dysfunctional
nervous system.
The course is suitable for graduate students
enrolled in majors within biomedical science
disciplines or for students who already have an
undergraduate degree with a major in a biomedical
discipline.
Course objectives are to familiarize the student
with the following principles in Neurophysiology
and Neuropharmacology:


Properties of individual neurons and neuronal
communication

Mechanisms by which drugs affect neuronal
function

• Various dysfunctions of the nervous systems, and

how drugs may be used to treat these
dysfunctions.
PHM 819
No textbooks required;

electronic materials utilized.
Course Information
Course Topics
Course Overview
Textbooks

Neuropharmacology
PHM 829
Pre-requisites
(for MSU students)
Course Instructor
CONTACT: Pharmacology & Toxicology Academic Office at (517) 884-3553 | email: phm@msu.edu | www.phmtox.msu.edu
H i g h F l e x i b i l i t y. E n d l e s s P o s s i b i l i t y.
Dr. Peter Cobbett
received his BS and PhD degrees
from the University of St An
-
drews, Scotland. His research
interests have ranged from
muscles of parasitic worms, to
physiology of neurons and glia
in mammalian brains, and most
recently, to neurons derived from
non-neuronal somatic cells.

Experimental Design and Data Analysis
• Variables and measurement scale
• Distribution and descriptive statistics
• Statistical inference and introduction to
hypothesis testing
• Hypothesis testing: Comparison of two
groups
• Introduction to analysis of variance
• Simple ANOVA designs and their non-
parametric alternatives
• Factorial ANOVA
• A posteriori or posthoc multiple compari-
son methods
• Transformations, outliers and missing data
• Correlation and regression analysis
• Analysis of categorical data
• Survival analysis
Course Number: PHM 830 (online)


Sections Available: 730 MSU Students
731 Lifelong In-State
732 Lifelong Out-State


Semesters: Summer, Fall


Credits: 3 credits
www.phmtox.msu.edu
PHM 830
– This is an online, 15-week course
providing instruction in the practical application of
statistical methods to the design of experimental
and analysis of experimental data in pharmacology,
toxicology and other biomedical sciences.
This is accomplished through online and other
readings, problem sets, online live-chats, online
quizzes and online exams. Numerous examples
are provided to students as Microsoft Excel
Worksheets.
Students use Microsoft Excel, as well as a number
of web-based applications, to complete problem
sets and apply the knowledge learned in the course
modules to experimental design and data analysis.
PHM 819
PHM 830
No textbooks required;

electronic materials utilized.
Course Overview
Course Topics
Textbooks
Course Information
Pre-requisites
Course Instructor
CONTACT: Pharmacology & Toxicology Academic Office at (517) 884-3553 | email: phm@msu.edu | www.phmtox.msu.edu
H i g h F l e x i b i l i t y. E n d l e s s P o s s i b i l i t y.
Dr. William Jackson
is the Director and Academic
Advisor for the PSM in

Integrative Pharmacology

Program, and Professor and
Acting Chairperson of Pharma
-
cology & Toxicology. He holds
a PhD from Michigan State
University, and specializes in
microvascular cell ion channel
physiology and pharmacology,
control of peripheral arteriolar
tone and local control of blood
flow.
Course Topics
• Introduction to endocrinological

pharmacology
• Hypothalamic hormones
• Posterior pituitary hormones
• Anterior pituitary hormones
• Hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis
• Hypothalamo-pituitary-gonadal axis
• Other local hormones
• Endocrine system and metabolic disorders
• Endocrine disruptors and animal models
of endocrine/metabolic disease
Course Number: PHM 831 (online)


Sections Available: 730 MSU Students
731 Lifelong In-State
732 Lifelong Out-State


Semesters: Spring


Credits: 2 credits
www.phmtox.msu.edu
PHM 831
– This course entails the study of
physiology, pharmacology and toxicology of the
endocrine system.
The student will learn about endocrine diseases,
pharmacological intervention, hormone therapy,
endocrine disruptors, role of hormones in normal
metabolism and metabolic disorders and animal
models of endocrine and metabolic disorders.
PHM 819
Not o
pen to students with credit in PHM 820.
1) Williams Textbook of
Endocrinology, 12th edition -
Kronenberg & Williams.
Saunders.




Course Overview
Textbooks
Dr. Sheba MohanKumar,
BVSc, PhD
received her PhD in

Neuroendocrinology from

Kansas State University and a
BVSc from Madras Veterinary
College/India, and is an Assis
-
tant Professor in Pharmacology
& Toxicology at Michigan State
University. Her research interests
focus on neuroendocrine changes
in inflammation, aging and

metabolic disorders.
Course Instructor
Course Information
Course Topics

Endocrinology and Metabolism

PHM
831
Pre-requisites
(for MSU students)
CONTACT: Pharmacology & Toxicology Academic Office at (517) 884-3553 | email: phm@msu.edu | www.phmtox.msu.edu
H i g h F l e x i b i l i t y. E n d l e s s P o s s i b i l i t y.
2) Goodman & Gilman’s

The Pharmacological Basis of
Therapeutics, 12th edition.

McGraw-Hill Professional.
Course Number: PHM 832

Sections Available: 740
(Hybrid course PSM Students only)
Semesters: Summer

Credits: 4 credits
PHM 832
– This course is a 15-week hybrid
(online + 1 week on campus) course that
culminates in an on-campus, one-week, hands-
on laboratory where students will learn research
methods for studying integrative physiology
and pharmacology and may include training in
methods to study autonomic control of cardiac
function and blood pressure; measuring vascular
reactivity; analyzing renal function; measuring
liver toxicity; studying drug effects on the brain;
and assessing gastrointestinal motility. Students
with prior experience in these areas will have the
opportunity to apply these approaches to problems
in integrative pharmacology with emphasis
on experimental design, data analysis, data
interpretation and communication of results.
PHM 819 and PHM 830
No textbooks required; electronic materials utilized.
Dr. William Jackson
is the Director and Academic
Advisor for the PSM Integrative
Pharmacology Program, Professor
and Acting Chair of Pharmacology
& Toxicology. He holds a PhD
from Michigan State University,
and specializes in micro-vascular
cell ion channel physiology and
pharmacology, control of peripheral
arteriolar tone and local control of
blood flow.
Students may be presented with an unknown drug and
asked to determine its site and mechanism of action on
the cardiovascular system using both
in vitro
and
in vivo

approaches. For this Online modules might contain:
• Training/review of local regulatory issues related
to the handling and use of laboratory animals
• Training in the use of analgesics, anesthetics, and
surgical procedures
• Review of the physiology of smooth muscle and
methods for isometric tension recording from blood
vessel preparations
• Review of the autonomic nervous system and
autonomic pharmacology
• Review of cardiovascular physiology, determinants
of blood pressure and autonomic regulation of
blood pressure
• Review of direct recording of blood pressure
In the hands-on, on-campus lab, students would then use
a variety of approaches to study the pharmacology of
the unknown drug. Training would be provided for each
of the experimental preparations used. For example,
for determining the site and mechanisms of action on
an unknown drug on the cardiovascular system, the
schedule for the on-campus lab might be:


Day 1
--Animal handling/preparation refresher, instru-
mentation/data acquisition, review of cardiovascular
physiology/pharmacology.

Day 2
--Determine if unknown drug is a vasodilator or
vasoconstrictor using isometric tension recording from
rat aortic rings.

Day 3
--determine if unknown drug affects blood
pressure and heart rate using direct measurement of
blood pressure in anesthetized rats with femoral venous
and arterial catheters.

Day 4
--Determine if unknown drug affects blood
pressure and heart rate through the autonomic nervous
system using direct measurement of blood pressure in
conscious rats instrumented with femoral venous and
arterial catheters.

Day 5
--Determine if unknown drug affects blood
pressure and heart rate via central nervous system
effects using direct measurement of blood pressure
in rats instrumented with femoral venous and arterial
catheters and cerebral cannulas.
Course Overview
Course Topics
Course Topics
(continued)
Textbooks
Pre-requisites
Course Information
Course Coordinator

Applied Integrative Pharmacology Lab
PHM 832
CONTACT: Pharmacology & Toxicology Academic Office at (517) 884-3553 | email: phm@msu.edu | www.phmtox.msu.edu
H i g h F l e x i b i l i t y. E n d l e s s P o s s i b i l i t y.

Gastrointestinal Liver Pharmacology and Toxicology
• Gastrointestinal anatomy and physiology
• Neurohumoral control of gastrointestinal
motility
• Pharmacotherapy of gastrointestinal motility
disorders
• Neurohumoral control of gastric acid secretion
• Pharmacotherapy of acid secretory disorders
• Neurohumoral mechanisms of nausea and
vomiting
• Pharmacotherapy of nausea and vomiting
• Inflammatory bowel disease
• Pharmacological treatment of inflammatory
bowel disease
• Pathophysiology of pancreatic acid and biliary
disorders
• Liver physiology
• Drug-induced liver toxicology and endogenous
protective mechanisms
• Alcohol-induced liver injury
• Hepatitis virus subtypes and liver injury
• Chemotherapy for treatment of hepatitis
infections
• Preclinical, clinical and post-marketing

assessment of drug-induced hepatotoxicity
Course Number: PHM 833 (online)


Sections Available: 730 MSU Students
731 Lifelong In-State
732 Lifelong Out-State


Semesters: Spring


Credits: 2 credits
www.phmtox.msu.edu
PHM 833
– This course exposes students to
specific drugs and their mechanisms of action in
the treatment of gastrointestinal and liver diseases,
toxic effects of drugs and other xenobiotics on the
gastrointestinal tract, including the liver.
PHM 819
PHM 833
No textbook required; electronic materials utilized.
Course Overview
Textbooks
Pre-requisites
Course Topics
Course Information
Course Instructor
CONTACT: Pharmacology & Toxicology Academic Office at (517) 884-3553 | email: phm@msu.edu | www.phmtox.msu.edu
H i g h F l e x i b i l i t y. E n d l e s s P o s s i b i l i t y.
Dr. James Galligan
is a Professor in the Dept of
Pharmacology & Toxicology, and
Director for the Neuroscience
Program at Michigan State
University. He received his PhD
from the University of Arizona.
His research interests focus on
synaptic transmission in the
autonomic nervous system.
• Function and structure of the respiratory
system
• Ventilation, diffusion, and exchange of

respiratory gases
• Blood flow and metabolism in lungs
• Ventilation-perfusion relationships in the lungs
• Mechanics of breathing
• Neural control of breathing
• Autonomic pharmacology as it relates to the
respiratory system
• Fundamentals of pulmonary pathophysiology
• Asthma
• Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease
• Ideopathic pulmonary disease
• Cystic fibrosis
• Respiratory distress syndrome

(adult and infant)
• Pulmonary arterial hypertension
Course Number: PHM 834 (online)


Sections Available: 730 MSU Students
731 Lifelong In-State
732 Lifelong Out-State


Semesters: Spring


Credits: 2 credits
www.phmtox.msu.edu
PHM 834
– This course exposes students to
physiology, pathophysiology, and pharmacology
of the respiratory system. It is designed to help
the student understand the underlying pathologies
and current treatment strategies of several major
respiratory diseases. Students learn through
directed readings, self-development of study
guides, and the writing and peer review of term
papers.
Some prior coursework in physiology or
pharmacology is recommended.
Respiratory Physiology:
The Essentials,

9th edition.

John B. West.
Lippincott Williams &
Wilkins
Dr. Susan Barman
is Professor of Pharmacology
& Toxicology, and President
of the American Physiological
Society. She received her PhD
from Loyola University. She
has had a career-long research
interest in the central neural
control of cardiorespiratory
function.
Course Overview
Textbooks
Course Topics
Course Information
Recommended Background
Course Instructor

Respiratory Pharmacology
PHM 834
CONTACT: Pharmacology & Toxicology Academic Office at (517) 884-3553 | email: phm@msu.edu | www.phmtox.msu.edu
H i g h F l e x i b i l i t y. E n d l e s s P o s s i b i l i t y.

Biopharmaceuticals: From Development to Manufacturing

Developing biopharmaceuticals;
• Pharmacological principles of

biopharmaceuticals
• Cell-based therapies - recombinant

proteins and antibodies, vaccines, cellular
therapeutics, gene therapy
• Manufacturing strategies
Real-world considerations for development and
manufacture of biologic therapeutics:
• Safe manufacture of biologics
• New product development and

manufacturing strategies
• Therapeutic applications of biopharma-
ceutical drug products
Course Number: PHM 835 (online)

Sections Available: 730 MSU Students
731 Lifelong In-State
732 Lifelong Out-State

Semesters: Fall

Credits: 3 credits
www.phmtox.msu.edu
PHM 835
– Cell-based biopharmaceuticals
are the fastest growing class of pharmaceuticals
worldwide. This course explores biopharma-
ceutical development and manufacturing processes
for recombinant proteins, monoclonal antibodies,
vaccines and cell-based therapeutics (stem cells).
Emphasis on real-world case studies and group
projects.
Topics covered include pharmacological
principles of biopharmaceuticals, a review of cell-
based therapies and therapeutic applications, and
new product development and manufacturing
strategies. Assignments are structured to
encourage utilization of online resources and
interactive tutorials, as well as gain experience
analyzing data typically generated during
biopharmaceutical development and production.
PHM 819
Open to MSU graduate students enrolled in
majors within biomedical disciplines.
PHM 835
Manufacturing of
Pharmaceutical Proteins,
1st edition.

Stefan Behme.
Wiley-VCH.
Course Overview
Textbooks (Required)
Course Instructor
Pre-requisites
Course Information
Course Topics
Dr. Tobi Limke
Received her PhD in Pharmacol
-
ogy & Toxicology-Environmental
Toxicology from Michigan State
University. She also holds an MBA
from the University of Maryland.
She was a Postdoctoral Fellow at
the National Institute on Aging at
the National Institutes of Health
in Baltimore, MD. Dr. Limke has
experience working with classic
pharmaceutical and biotechnol
-
ogy companies in both scientific
and business roles. Currently,
she works as a freelance techni
-
cal marketing consultant for the
biopharmaceutical industry.
CONTACT: Pharmacology & Toxicology Academic Office at (517) 884-3553 | email: phm@msu.edu | www.phmtox.msu.edu
H i g h F l e x i b i l i t y. E n d l e s s P o s s i b i l i t y.
• Functional components of the autonomic and
somatic nervous system

• Influence of the autonomic nervous system on
body tissues and organs
• Drugs modulating autonomic control of body
tissues and organs
• Control of skeletal muscle tone
• Drugs affecting skeletal muscle tone
Course Number: PHM 837 (online)


Sections Available: 730 MSU Students
731 Lifelong In-State
732 Lifelong Out-State


Semesters: Spring


Credits: 1 credit
www.phmtox.msu.edu
PHM 837
– There are two general course
objectives:
1) to familiarize students with the functions
of the autonomic nervous system to control the
activity of a variety of organs in the body and how
drugs may modulate the influence of the autonomic
system
2) to familiarize students with normal
physiology of control of skeletal muscle tone and
how drugs can be used to modulate this tone
The course is suitable for graduate students
enrolled in biomedical science degree programs
and for advanced undergraduate students. The
course is also suitable for students who already
have an undergraduate degree with a major in
a biomedical discipline and may be considering
future graduate education.

Autonomic Pharmacology

PHM 837
Course Overview
Course Topics
None
Pre-requisites
No textbook required; electronic materials
utilized.
Textbooks
Course Instructor
Course Information
CONTACT: Pharmacology & Toxicology Academic Office at (517) 884-3553 | email: phm@msu.edu | www.phmtox.msu.edu
H i g h F l e x i b i l i t y. E n d l e s s P o s s i b i l i t y.
Dr. Peter Cobbett
received his BS and PhD degrees
from the University of St An
-
drews, Scotland. His research
interests have ranged from
muscles of parasitic worms, to
physiology of neurons and glia
in mammalian brains, and most
recently, to neurons derived from
non-neuronal somatic cells.

In vivo
and
in vitro
experimental models
• Data analysis and risk assessment using
case studies

• Animal welfare concerns
• Regulatory guidelines of the United States,
European Union and Japan
• Overview of the processes and procedures
of safety pharmacology used
Course Number: PHM 840 (online)


Sections Available: 730 MSU Students
731 Lifelong In-State
732 Lifelong Out-State


Semesters: Spring


Credits: 2 credits
www.phmtox.msu.edu
PHM 840

– Safety Pharmacology can be
defined as the interface of pharmacology and
toxicology in the discovery and design of new
drugs. Pharmaceutical companies and regulatory
agencies use a variety of preclinical studies to
investigate the potential undesirable effects of a
substance on body functions.
This course provides a solid introduction to
organ system studies of current experimental
models, risk assessment and regulatory guidelines
for evaluating drug candidates in various organ
systems.
PHM 350 and PHM 819
Anatomy and/or physiology is helpful although
cardiovascular, gastrointestinal and central
nervous system physiology are overviewed in
class.
No textbook required; electronic materials
utilized.
Course Overview
Course Topics
Pre-requisites
Textbooks
Course Information
Course Instructor

Safety Pharmacology
PHM 840
CONTACT: Pharmacology & Toxicology Academic Office at (517) 884-3553 | email: phm@msu.edu | www.phmtox.msu.edu
H i g h F l e x i b i l i t y. E n d l e s s P o s s i b i l i t y.
Dr. Jane Maddox
is the Co-Director of the online MS
program in Pharmacology &

Toxicology. She received her DVM
from Michigan State University.

Following a few years of private
practice, she earned her PhD in
Pathobiology from Pennsylvania
State University and held a post
-
doctoral position at Harvard. Her
research interests include inflam
-
mation and mechanisms of drug-
induced liver injury.
• Molecular techniques in toxicology
• Cellular techniques in toxicology
• Cytochrome P450
• Phase I-Metabolism of toxicants
• Phase II-Conjugation of toxicants
• Xenobiotic transporters
• Mechanisms of cell death
• Mitochondrial dysfunction
• Oxidative stress
• Reactive oxygen species
• Toxicity of metals
• DNA damage and mutagenesis/DNA
repair
Course Number: PHM 841 (online)


Sections Available: 730 MSU Students
731 Lifelong In-State
732 Lifelong Out-State


Semesters: Fall


Credits: 3 credits
www.phmtox.msu.edu
PHM 841
– Cellular and molecular toxicology is
a 3-credit course that covers mechanistic concepts
and techniques of toxicology at the cellular and
molecular levels. This course includes in-depth
examination of various molecular events and
cellular modifications that result from and/or are
associated with chemically/environmentally induced
toxicity and disease.
PHM 450 or equivalent introductory toxicology
course
Molecular and Biochemical
Toxicology, 4th edition.
Smart, Hodgson.
Wiley.

Cellular and Molecular Toxicology
PHM 841
Course Overview
Course Topics
Textbooks
Course Instructor
Course Information
Pre-requisites
CONTACT: Pharmacology & Toxicology Academic Office at (517) 884-3553 | email: phm@msu.edu | www.phmtox.msu.edu
H i g h F l e x i b i l i t y. E n d l e s s P o s s i b i l i t y.
Dr. Jane Maddox
is the Co-Director of the online MS
program in Pharmacology &

Toxicology. She received her DVM
from Michigan State University.

Following a few years of private
practice, she earned her PhD in
Pathobiology from Pennsylvania
State University and held a post
-
doctoral position at Harvard. Her
research interests include inflam
-
mation and mechanisms of drug-
induced liver injury.
Effective writing is an absolute requirement for
success in any scientific career. This course will
provide students with practical guidelines for
scientific writing so that the information can be
conveyed to the target audience in an accurate and
efficient manner. Students in this class will learn
the essential principles of scientific writing and put
them into practice by composing scientific text and
revising the writing of others.
• Scientific Writing Principles

»
Word choice

»
Sentence structure

»
Paragraph structure
• Parts of a Scientific Article

»
Abstract

»
Introduction

»
Materials and Methods

»
Results

»
Discussion
• Term Paper


Course Number: PHM 850 (online)

Sections Available: 730 (Pharm/Tox MS- PSM
Online Students only)

Semesters: Summer, Fall

Credits: 2 credits
www.phmtox.msu.edu
PHM 850
– This course is intended for
advanced graduate students in the online PSM
and MS programs in Pharmacology & Toxicology.
Ideally, students will take this course the semester
before they intend to enroll in PHM 895 or PHM
980. Students may take the course earlier with
permission.
The first part of the course will focus on basic
principles of scientific writing. Major topics include
word choice, sentence structure, and paragraph
structure. In the second part of the course,
students will implement the principles they have
learned to compose a short term paper. In addition
they will learn the elements of each of the major
parts of a scientific article: Abstract, Introduction,
Materials and Methods, Results, and Discussion.

The emphasis of this course will be on
producing clear and concise prose to communicate
information in the area of biomedical sciences.
Consequencely, students will be evaluated primarily
on writing and editing scientific text.
Essentials of Writing
Biomedical Research
Papers, 2nd edition.
Zeiger.
McGraw-Hill Professional.

Communication for Biomedical Researchers
PHM 850
Course Overview
Course Instructor
Dr. Roseann Vorce
is an Academic Specialist who
advises online students in both
the PSM & MS Programs in
Pharmacology & Toxicology. She
earned a PhD in Pharmacology
& Toxicology at Michigan State
University. In the past, Dr. Vorce
was an Associate Professor of
Pharmacology at the University
of Nebraska Medical Center,
where she directed a research
program in non-genotoxic car
-
cinogenesis. Subsequently, she
worked for Pfizer as a toxicolo
-
gist specializing in nonclinical
safety assessment & regulatory
submissions.
Course Topics
Course Information
Textbooks
CONTACT: Pharmacology & Toxicology Academic Office at (517) 884-3553 | email: phm@msu.edu | www.phmtox.msu.edu
H i g h F l e x i b i l i t y. E n d l e s s P o s s i b i l i t y.
• Introduction to copyrights, trademarks and
trade secrets
• Emerging trends and recent developments
in biopharmaceutical patent law
• Research collaborations, technology
transfer and university spinoffs
• Strategies for maximizing
biopharmaceutical product life cycles
• Brand and generic drug patent battles
under the Hatch-Waxman Act
• Research and clinical exemptions to patent
infringement
• International patenting
• Resolution of patent conflicts under the
Biologics Price Competition and Innovation
Act
Course Number: PHM 851 (online)

Sections Available: 730 MSU graduate students
731 Lifelong (In-state)
732 Lifelong (Out-state)

Semesters: Fall

Credits: 2 credits
www.phmtox.msu.edu
PHM 851
– This course will provide an overview
of intellectual property law, with a particular
emphasis placed on biopharmaceutical patent
law and the unique role of life scientists as both
researchers and inventors in the public and private
biopharmaceutical sectors. It focuses on how
patent protection can best be utilized to maximize
the life cycles of biopharmaceutical products, and
more particularly to, how life scientists can engage
patent counsel to strategically maximize patent
protection for biopharmaceutical products resulting
from their research.

Course Objectives:
1) Understand the different
forms of intellectual property protection available;
2) identify valuable and protectable intellectual
property assets routinely discovered during
biopharmaceutical research; 3) learn how patents
incentivize innovative research and development
from conception to commercialization; and 4)
obtain a working knowledge of the procedures,
challenges and strategies involved in obtaining and
enforcing patents.
No textbooks required; electronic materials
utilized.

Strong reading and writing skills helpful. An
undergraduate degree in the life sciences may
also be helpful.
Not open to Law students.

Intellectual Property and Patent Law
PHM 851
Course Overview
Course Topics
Recommended background
Restrictions
Textbooks
David Fazzolare, JD, MS
David earned his JD from J. Reuben
Clark Law School, clerked as a

Patent Agent for Myriad Genetics,
Inc., and holds a BS in Pharma-

cology from SUNY@StonyBrook
and an MS in Biotechnology from
Johns Hopkins University. He is a

registered patent attorney who
works at Morse, Barnes-Brown &
Pendleton, PC. His practice focuses
on helping clients strategically

acquire patent protection world
-
wide, with particular emphasis on
drafting and prosecuting patent

applications in the areas of

biotechnology, pharmaceuticals,
and biomedical devices.
Course Instructor
Course Information
CONTACT: Pharmacology & Toxicology Academic Office at (517) 884-3553 | email: phm@msu.edu | www.phmtox.msu.edu
H i g h F l e x i b i l i t y. E n d l e s s P o s s i b i l i t y.
• Evaluation of current leadership methods
• Models of leadership and teams
• Practice of specific skills, including thinking
and communication skills
• Development of a plan to increase influence
and learning beyond the class
Course Number: PHM 854 (online)


Sections Available: 730 MSU graduate students
731 Lifelong (In-state)
732 Lifelong (Out-state)


Semesters: Spring


Credits: 2 credits
www.phmtox.msu.edu
PHM 854
– Students are introduced to various
leadership models, group development and
conflict resolution, challenges to contemporary
teams (intercultural, generational, and virtual),
planning models, and change management. By
the end of the course, students will be able to
choose leadership approaches suitable for various
contexts, including models for the contemporary,
information-oriented work world. Instruction is
provided through the MSU learning management
system using a combination of assigned readings,
video, personal reflective writing, and practice
activities. Students will be given opportunities
to choose how they will approach projects and
problems.
Experience supervising others and/or partici-
pation in workplace teams is strongly suggested.
Not open to students with credit in

CMBA 804, CMBA805, CMBA 806, or CMBA 832.
Managing Scientists:
Leadership Strategies
in Scientific Research;
Wiley-Liss, 2004 -
Sapienza, A.
Christina Dokter,
CHRS, MS, PhD
holds a BS in Political Science,
an MS in Education Technology,
and a PhD in Adult Learning/
Education Administration.
Her research interests include
various adult learning contexts
including issues with technology,
health education, leadership
and organizational change. She
is a seasoned leader in Toast
Masters Intl and is a member of
an advanced club. As a certified
Human Resources Specialist, she
brings a wealth of knowledge
about policies pertinent to the
workplace.

Leadership and Team Management
PHM 854
Course Overview
Course Topics
Textbooks
Recommended background
Course Instructor
Course Information
There will be a list of paperback books on various
leadership/team topics and each student will
choose one to read and share with the class during
the semester.
CONTACT: Pharmacology & Toxicology Academic Office at (517) 884-3553 | email: phm@msu.edu | www.phmtox.msu.edu
H i g h F l e x i b i l i t y. E n d l e s s P o s s i b i l i t y.
• The biomedical drug, diagnostic, and device
industries
• Researching biomedical markers
• Intellectual property, licensing and business
models
• New product development
• Regulated markets
• Biomedical manufacturing
• Taking a product to market
Course Number: PHM 855 (online)


Sections Available: 730 MSU graduate students
731 Lifelong (In-state)
732 Lifelong (Out-state)


Semesters: Spring


Credits: 2 credits
www.phmtox.msu.edu
PHM 855
– Biomedical research organizations
combine scientific breakthroughs with forward-
thinking business practices to bring new
products to market. This course will broaden
student’s thinking about their role within a larger
organization and build appreciation for the effects
of market demands, regulatory constraints, and
emerging technology on the scientific and business
practices of biomedical organizations.
A combination of lectures, case studies, and
guest lectures by experts in the biomedical
industry provides students with insight into
the commercialization of successful biomedical
products, and their potential roles within the
industry.
Commercializing Successful
Biomedical Technologies,

1st edition.

Mehta.

Cambridge University Press.

The Business of Biomedical Research Organizations
PHM 855
Course Overview
Course Topics
Textbooks
Restrictions
Course Information
Course Instructor
Dr. Tobi Limke
Received her PhD in Pharmacol
-
ogy & Toxicology-Environmental
Toxicology from Michigan State
University. She also holds an MBA
from the University of Maryland.
She was a Postdoctoral Fellow at
the National Institute on Aging at
the National Institutes of Health
in Baltimore, MD. Dr. Limke has
experience working with classic
pharmaceutical and biotechnol
-
ogy companies in both scientific
and business roles. Currently,
she works as a freelance techni
-
cal marketing consultant for the
biopharmaceutical industry.
CONTACT: Pharmacology & Toxicology Academic Office at (517) 884-3553 | email: phm@msu.edu | www.phmtox.msu.edu
H i g h F l e x i b i l i t y. E n d l e s s P o s s i b i l i t y.
Open to MSU graduate program students, and
Graduate-level Lifelong Education students.
• Formal project management culture, principles,
knowledgeable areas, and terminology
• Specific tools and techniques, including work
breakdown structure, earned value analysis,
risk management, and quality control for
managing scientific research
• Introduction to work planning; estimating,
assigning and integrative resources
• Introduction to risk management and quality
management
Course Number: PHM 857 (online)


Sections Available: 730 MSU graduate students
731 Lifelong (In-state)
732 Lifelong (Out-state)


Semesters: Summer


Credits: 2 credits
www.phmtox.msu.edu
PHM 857
– This course aims to enable the
immediate practice of project management
principles increasingly used in pharmaceutical
industries and biomedical research.
Although of value to managers in particular,
this course will enable all students to participate
more effectively on project teams and to better
communicate project progress with colleagues,
project sponsors and industry executives.
This course is open to all individuals and is a
sound introduction for those seeking CAPM or
PMP certification.
REQUIRED:

Project Management: A
Managerial Approach.

8th edition.

Meredith JR, Jantel SJ.

Wiley.

Open to MSU graduate program students, and
Graduate-level Lifelong Education students.

Introduction to Project Management
PHM 857
Course Overview
Course Topics
Textbooks
Restrictions
Course Instructor
Dr. Thomas Herzig, PMP
received his PhD in Pharma
-
cology from the University of
Texas Health Science Center at
San Antonio. He was commis
-
sioned a Lieutenant in the US
Navy and is now a Commander
and Director of the Warfighter
Performance Lab at the Naval
Health Research Center, where
he oversees applied biomedical
research to enhance the health,
safety, readiness, and perfor
-
mance of our military forces. He
is engaged in developing new
research programs, managing
current research, and providing
medical research solutions for
the Navy-Marine Corps team
Course Information
RECOMMENDED:

“PMBOK Guide”

Project Mgmt Institute

4th Edition.
CONTACT: Pharmacology & Toxicology Academic Office at (517) 884-3553 | email: phm@msu.edu | www.phmtox.msu.edu
H i g h F l e x i b i l i t y. E n d l e s s P o s s i b i l i t y.
• Understanding global regulations and
requirements
• Risk management in commercial biomedical
research
• Decision-making and problem-solving for
drug development projects
• Portfolio management for prioritizing biotech
and life sciences
• Managing projects throughout the drug
development lifecycle
Course Number: PHM 858 (online)

Sections Available: 730 MSU graduate students
731 Lifelong (In-state)
732 Lifelong (Out-state)

Semesters: Spring

Credits: 3 credits
www.phmtox.msu.edu
PHM 858
– This course covers the full drug
development process and pharmaceutical product
lifecycle from synthesis & screening of a new
compound through Phase 1, 2, and 3 clinical
development to registration and post-marketing.
Students build their capacity to contribute to
projects at a higher level. Topics include: managing
drug candidate portfolios, addressing global
regulatory requirements, risk management in
commercial biomedical research decision-making
and problem-solving for drug development
projects, and post-approval product maintenance.
The entire pharmaceutical product lifecycle is
covered in this class including: the discovery
phase, Investigatory New Drug applications
(INDs), nonclinical and clinical research, labeling,
interacting with regulatory agencies and advisory
committees, pediatric issues, fast track and post-
approval issues, New Drug Applications (NDAs),
and post-approval issues. Students will gain a
broad understanding of pharmaceutical industry
terminology, processes and requirements.
Drug and Biological
Development from
Molecule to Product,
1st edition.

Evens, R.

Springer.
Some experience working on laboratory or clinical
research projects is useful.

Drug Development Process
PHM 858
Course Overview
Course Topics
Textbook
Course Instructor
Jonathon M. Parker, RPH, MS
is a Senior Director in Worldwide
Regulatory Strategy for Pfizer,
Inc. with 21+ years experience.
His responsibilities encompass
leading global regulatory teams
developing and executing regu
-
latory strategies for drugs and
biologics and interacting with
health agencies worldwide. He
is also an Associate Professor
at Temple University School of
Pharmacy and teaches courses in
Regulatory Affairs.
Course Information
Recommended Background
CONTACT: Pharmacology & Toxicology Academic Office at (517) 884-3553 | email: phm@msu.edu | www.phmtox.msu.edu
H i g h F l e x i b i l i t y. E n d l e s s P o s s i b i l i t y.
Students will be graded upon criteria

stemming from knowledge and skills they should
have acquired through their PSM coursework
including experimental design, data analysis, organ
systems knowledge, applications for integrative
pharmacology, management, communication, and
contribution to the student’s workplace.
Specific objectives and weighing of grade for
the course will be provided by their Academic
Advisor or the PSM Director prior to the start of the
student’s project, as well as a Formatting Guide for
the final written product of the Project.
Course Number: PHM 895


Sections Available: 730 (PSM Students only)

Semesters: Fall, Spring, Summer


Credits: Variable (1-6)
www.phmtox.msu.edu
PHM 895
– Students must earn a minimum of
3.0 in PHM 895 in order to graduate. Beginning no
earlier than two semesters prior to the expected
graduation date (upon earning approximately
25 credits), the PSM student must enroll in PHM
895 Applied Project in Integrative Pharmacology.
Students may elect to take between 3-6 credits in
PHM 895 either simultaneously or in consecutive
semesters.
Students will choose and plan their Applied
Projects with the assistance of their Academic
Advisor or the PSM Director and with the
cooperation and support of their employer.
Students are responsible for organizing a location
to conduct their applied project. The Department
of Pharmacology & Toxicology may, on occasion,
be able to arrange a project on-campus or
with industry associates. However, the final
responsibility for the project lies with the student.
Projects can be based on a laboratory
research-focused problem, or development of
novel business or management approaches to
conducting integrative pharmacological research
in an academic, corporation or government agency
environment.
No textbook required; electronic materials
utilized.
All coursework for the PSM in Integrative
Pharmacology should be completed prior to
beginning the Applied Project unless there is
Department approval to complete final courses
concurrently with the Applied Project.

Applied Project in Integrative Pharmacology
PHM 895
Course Overview
Course Overview
(continued)
Textbooks
Recommended Background
Course Coordinator
Course Information
CONTACT: Pharmacology & Toxicology Academic Office at (517) 884-3553 | email: phm@msu.edu | www.phmtox.msu.edu
H i g h F l e x i b i l i t y. E n d l e s s P o s s i b i l i t y.
Dr. William Jackson
is the Director and Academic
Advisor for the PSM in

Integrative Pharmacology

Program, and Professor and
Acting Chairperson of Pharma
-
cology & Toxicology. He holds
a PhD from Michigan State
University, and specializes in
microvascular cell ion channel
physiology and pharmacology,
control of peripheral arteriolar
tone and local control of blood
flow.
• Absorption, distribution and transport
• Metabolite identification and chemical
toxicity
• Excretion
• Pharmacokinetics
• Drug receptor theory
• Measures of drug action
• Receptor regulation and characterization:
Drug tolerance and dependence
• Signal transduction of receptor activation
• Drug interaction PK/PD mechanisms
Course Number: PHM 980 (on-campus)

Sections Available: 001 PhD Students only
Semesters: Summer

Credits: 1 credits
PHM 980, section 001, must be taken in
conjunction with PHM 819.

(Summer semester only.)
Dr. Anne McLaren Dorrance
earned her PhD at Glasgow
University in Scotland. Her
research interests focus pri
-
marily on hypertension and
stroke and how hypertension
affects structure and function
of cerebral blood vessels. Her
lab uses a wide variety of
in
vivo
and
in vitro
techniques
in an effort to correlate the
damage caused by an ischemic
stroke with the structure of the
cerebral vessels.
www.phmtox.msu.edu
PHM 980

Special Topics in Drug
and
Tissue Interaction



This class will meet weekly to discuss advanced
topics in pharmacology. Faculty will lead students
in discussions of recent advances and controversies
in pharmacology. Students will be expected to
read and discuss primary literature in the field.
Homework will be assigned weekly. Grades will be
assigned for homework and for class participation.
No textbook required; electronic materials utilized.
Course Overview
Course Topics
Textbooks
(required)
Course Instructor
Course Information


Problems (for PhD Students only)

PHM 980
CONTACT: Pharmacology & Toxicology Academic Office at (517) 884-3553 | email: phm@msu.edu | www.phmtox.msu.edu
H i g h F l e x i b i l i t y. E n d l e s s P o s s i b i l i t y.