Charlotte County Public Schools

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Dec 4, 2013 (3 years and 9 months ago)

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Charlotte County Public Schools

Technology Plan

School Years

201
3
-
201
6


Prepared by:

Christopher J. Bress

Executive Director, Department of Learning Through Technology and Media


Written by:

Christina Carboni

District Technology Trainer



The School Board of Charlotte County does not discriminate in educational programs/activi
ti
es or employment on the
basis of race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, marital status or hand
icap. S.B.C.C.R. 4.30 (1)



Charlotte County District Technology Council Members


2


T
he council members represent
a diverse
demographic

of participants from all areas of our school
community. Using the Collaborative Learning Group model, teams are created to provide maximum
exposure

and
with
manageable
discussions

to provide feedback.

As the s
takeholders in the District
Technology Plan,
o
ur school community will have valid opportunities to review and comment on the
current plan as we

execute
the technology action plan
ning

process.


SY13-16 CHARLOTTE COUNTY PUBLIC SCHOOLS TECHNOLOGY PLAN COUNCIL MEMBERS
Charlotte County District Technology Executive Council
ADMINISTRATIVE TEAM
Chris Bress, Executive Director of Learning through Technology and Media (TEAM FACILITATOR)
Ian Vincent, Vice Chairman of the School Board
Doug Whittaker, Superintendent
Chuck Bradley, Executive Director of the Division of Learning
John Weant, Director of Information and Communications Services
April Prespitino, Director of Student Services
Karen LaPorte, Director of Learning, Secondary
Carmel Kisiday, Director of Learning, Elementary & ESOL
Karen Owens, Assistant Director, Exceptional Student Education
Maria Gifford, Principal, Murdock Middle School, IT Academy MS School
Barney Duffy, Director & Coordinator of Dual Enrollment & Middle School Academies, Charlotte Technical Center
Angie Taillon, Principal, Neil Armstrong Elementary
Patrick Keegan, CFEA President & Teacher, Charlotte High School
Bonnie Bistarkey, Paraprofessional, Neil Armstrong Elementary
Mary Fred Clemmons, Charlotte Local Education Foundation, Executive Director
Charlotte County District Technology Development Council
Council Representation by Team
DISTRICT TECHNOLOGY & SUPPORT TEAM
Dawn Botello, FOCUS IT Trainer, Murdock County Office (TEAM FACILITATOR)
Norm Bodnar, Analyst
Kathy Scott, Technology Buyer
Jennifer Kempton, Webdesign Specialist
Susan Dutery-Senior Programmer
Maggie Gentile, Library Media Technician
Sandra Howard-Computer Operator
Scott Morse, Technician, Murdock County Office
Zack Hartz,Technician , Murdock County Office
Mary DeBoer, District Technology Trainer, Murdock County Office
Debbie Jones, District Technology Trainer, Murdock County Office
Christina Carboni, District Technology Trainer, Murdock County Office (TEAM FACILITATOR)
CURRICULUM & INSTRUCTION SPECIALIST TEAM
Donna Dunakey, Social Studies/Health Curriculum & Instruction Specialist, Parent-HS (TEAM FACILITATOR)
Kym Sheehan, Language Arts/Reading/ESOL Curriculum & Instruction Specialist, Division of Learning
Bob Davis, Mathematics/Science Curriculum & Instruction Specialist, Division of Learning
Mary Ann Morehouse, Language Arts, Reading Elementary Curriculum & Instruction Specialist, Division of Learning
Ellen Harvey, Fine Arts & World Languages Curriculum & Instruction Specialist, Division of Learning
Annmarie Maynard, ESE, Curriculum & Instruction Specialist, Division of Learning
Lisa Degroot, Psychometrician, Division of Learning

3


Charlotte County District Technology Development Council Members Continued


Charlotte County District Technology Development Council
Council Representation by Team
SECONDARY TEAM/ASSISSTANT PRINCIPALS
Matt Whelden, Assistant Principal, L.A. Ainger Middle School (TEAM FACILITATOR)
Angela Staley, Assistant Principal, Murdock Middle School
Daniel McIntosh, Teacher, Port Charlotte Middle School
John Butts, Assistant Principal, Punta Gorda Middle School
Cheryl Edwards, Assistant Principal, Port Charlotte High School
Bob Bedford, Assistant Principal, Lemon Bay High School
Dee Lynn Bennett, Assistant Principal, Charlotte High School
Laura Meyer, Teacher, Academy
ELEMENTARY TEAM/LEAD TEACHERS
Dianna Padilla-Harris, LEAD Teacher, Vineland Elementary School (TEAM FACILITATOR)
Leissa Arrett, LEAD Teacher, East Elementary School
Shauna Krueger, LEAD Teacher, Kingsway Elementary
Celene Kipfinger, LEAD Teacher, Deep Creek Elementary
Brenda Latta, LEAD Teacher, Meadow Park Elementary
Michelle Hill, LEAD Teacher, Myakka River Elementary
Renee Wiley, LEAD Teacher, Liberty Elementary School
Leslie Boyle, LEAD Teacher, Neil Armstrong Elementary
Shana Moseley, LEAD Teacher, Sallie Jones Elementary
Vicki Polk, LEAD Teacher, Peace River Elementary
STEM TEAM
Sharon Bruno, STEM Teacher, Punta Gorda Middle School (TEAM FACILITATOR)
Toni Orr, STEM Teacher, Murdock Middle
Natalia Shea, STEM Teacher, LA Ainger Middle School
Lyman Welton, STEM Teacher, LA Ainger Middle School
Pam Ping, STEM Teacher, Port Charlotte Middle School
Doreen Alvarez, STEM Teacher, Liberty & Meadow Park Elementary
Alician Rhodes, STEM Teacher, Kingsway Elementary
John Probst, STEM Teacher, Sallie Jones Elementary
Chuck Hardy, STEM Teacher, Neil Armstrong Elementary
MEDIA SPECIALIST TEAM
Deborah Monck, Media Specialist, Port Charlotte High School (TEAM FACILITATOR)
Tracy Herman, Media Specialist, Port Charlotte Middle School
Gary Helinski, Media Specialist, Murdock Middle School
Tara Cain, Media Specialist, Charlotte High School
Jennifer Sloan, Media Specialist, Lemon Bay High School
TECHNOLOGY/CAREER EDUCATION TEAM
Shelley Baust, 6-8 Tech Teacher, Port Charlotte Middle School (TEAM FACILITATOR)
Susan Kickbush, 7th IT Academy Teacher, Tech Program Planner, Murdock Middle School
Karol Sweeterman, Technology Teacher, L.A. Ainger Middle School
Karen Smith, Adobe & MS Office Certified Tech Teacher, Charlotte High School
Michelle Wier, Secondary Career Specialist, Charlotte Technical Center

4


TABLE OF CONTENTS

Page #







1

MISSION AND VISION

…..…

8


1.1

Technology Vision

…..…

8

2

GENERAL INTRODUCTION/BACKGROUND

…..…

8


2.1

District Profile

…..…

8



~

Demographic

…..…

9



~

Occupational

…..…

15


2.2

Planning Process

…..…

16



~

Council Selection

…..…

16



~

Research

…..…

17



~

Partnerships

…..…

17


2.3

Collaboration with Existing Adult Literacy Service Providers

…..…

18

3

NEEDS ASSESSMENT/GOALS

…..…

19


3.1

Our Information
-
Based Processes

…..…

19


3.2

Identification of Needs

…..…

21



~

Bandwidth

…..…

21



~

Trained Personnel

…..…

23


3.3

District Technology Goals

…..…

23



~

Short
-
term Goals

…..…

23



~

Infrastructure Focus

…..…

23



~

Professional Development Focus

…..…

23



~

Long
-
Term,

Continuous Goals

…..…

24



~

ISTE Essential
Conditions

…..…

24

4

FUNDING PLAN

…..…

25


4.1

Major Source of Funding

…..…

25



~

E
-
rate

…..…

25



~

Capital Outlay and Operational Budget

…..…

26


4.2

Funding for Improvement of Educational Services

…..…

28



~

Professional Development

…..…

28


4.3

Public School Technology Funding

…..…

29

5

TECHNOLOGY ACQUISTION PLAN

…..…

29


5.1

Identification of Appropriate Technology Needs

…..…

29



~

Instructional Focus

…..…

29


5.2

Programs in Support of the Common Core State Standards (C
CSS), the
Next Generation State Standards (NGSS), and Partnership for the
Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers (PARCC)

…..…

32



~

Student Focus

…..…

32



~

Programs

…..…

36


5.3

Acquisition Timetable

…..…

36


5.4

Acquisition Policies and Procedures

…..…

38



~

Consistency and Interoperability

…..…

38


5




~

Upward Migration

…..…

39



~

Support and Maintenance Requirements

…..…

39


5.5

Technical Guidance

…..…

40

6

ACCESS

…..…

40


6.1

Equitable and Effective Access

…..…

40



~

Distribution of Resources

…..…

40



~

Best Practices

…..…

41



~

Diversity

…..…

43



~

External Services

…..…

43


6.2

Acceptable Use Policy

…..…

44



~

Confidentiality, Ethics, and Integrity

…..…

44


6.3

Technology Protection Measures

…..…

44

7

USER SUPPORT PLAN

…..…

45


7.1

End User Support

…..…

45



~

Cycle of Service

…..…

46



~

Communication Web

…..…

46



~

Network of Support

…..…

47


7.2

Equipment Maintenance and Repair

…..…

47

8

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

…..…

48


8.1

Increase Technology Use in the Classroom and Media Center

…..…

48



~

Development and Acquisition of New
Programs

…..…

48



~

Technology Integration

…..…

49



~

Coordination of Training and Support

…..…

50



~

Staff Development Necessities

…..…

50



~

Professional Development Delivery System

…..…

51



~

Coaching to Increase the Use of Technology

…..…

51


8.2

Resources of Ongoing Training and Technical Assista
nce

…..…

53

9

PROGRAM EVALUATION

…..…

54


9.1

Ongoing Evaluation of Technology Integration

…..…

55



~

Curriculum Integration

…..…

55



~

National Education Technology Standards for Teachers

…..


55



~

Ongoing Evaluation of Technologies Affecting

Student Performance

…..…

57



~

National Education T
echnology Standards for Students

…..…

58


9.2

Facilitate Mid
-
Course Corrections as Needed

…..…

59

10

E
-
Rate Program Planning Criteria

…..…

59

11

NCLB


…..…

60








6



APPENDICES


Appendix A

…..…

62


The Local Instruction Improvement System (LIIS)

…..…

62


Appendix B

…..…

66


Charlotte County Public Schools Acceptable Use Policy/Gui
delines for Student
E
-
mail

…..…

66


Appendix C

…..…

67


School Board of Charlotte County Bylaws and Policies (Technology and
Digital)

…..…

67


~

5136
-
Electronic/Wireless Communications Devices

…..…

67


~

7310
-
Disposition of Surplus Property

…..…

67


~

7530
-
Lending of Board Owned Equipment

…..…

68


~

7540
-
Computer Technology and Networks

…..…

68


~

7540.1
-
Technology Privacy

…..…

69


~

7540.02
-
District Web Page

…..…

70


~

5740.03
-
Student Network and Internet Acceptable Use and Safety

…..…

71


~

7540.04
-
Staff Network and Internet Acceptable Use and
Safety

…..…

72


~

7542
-
Network Access from Personally Owned Computer and/or Other
Web Enabled Devices

…..…

73


~

7543
-
Utilization of Districts Website and Remote Access to the District’s
Network

…..…

74


The Student Code of Conduct, which includes the
following documents:

…..…

75


~

Charlotte County Public Schools Statement on Cheating

…..…

75


~

Charlotte County Public Schools Statement of Academic Honesty

…..…

76


~

Student Records

…..…

76


~

Network and Internet Rules, Safety and Use Agreement

…..…

77


~

Electronic Communication and Laser Devices

…..…

78












7





























8


1. MISSION AND VISION

1.1

Technology Vision

Success
in

Digital
-
Literacy & Global
-
Competency

Technology Mission Statemen
t

Students creatively manipulate digital resources to produce and communicate globally
competitive results, foster positive, collaborative, diverse, solution
-
oriented, and efficacious
relationships,
synthesize

complex and innovative concepts,
while
achieving

mastery of Next
Generation and Common Core State Standards

in
pursu
i
t

of i
ndividual
goals
and academic
prowess
.





2.

GENERAL INTRODUCTION/BACKGROUND


With the
increase in

digitally
-
mature individuals, and
the accessibility of

social
-
media resources, the
implementation of technology in the school district of Charlotte County Public Schools will
“reasonably” increase our infrastructure to meet the needs of our school community, while providing a
safe web
-
interactive environment.

As we strategically increase our bandwidth upload and download
speeds in our already taxed infrastruc
ture, continue to acquire media
-
rich texts and software, add to
our wireless and Bluetooth
-
enabled sophisticated hardware and devices,
and gravitate towar
d the
Single Sign On (SSO) requirement,
we have come to a crossroads, which will be addressed within
this
2013
-
2016
District Technology Plan.

2.1

District Profile

The data aggregated in the following charts will address the
social, economic, geographic, and
demographic factors that influence Charlotte County Public Schools’ implementation of technology.

Digital

Literacy

Global

Competency

Student

Success


9


In Figure 2.1
A
, the demographic data illustrates
four

geographical areas
, Charlotte County Public
Schools (CCPS)

and
Charlot
te County,
which are located in the Southwest portion of Florida,
the
State of Florida, and the United States. The reasoning for this statistical information provides
social

data by race,
gender
, Special Education services (ESE), English Speakers of Other
Languages
(ESOL), homeless, free and reduced lunch (state assistance services), High School
g
raduates,
Bachelor’s Degree or higher and
also,
the median household income.


D
ata

explanation

and observation
for

F
igure 2.1
A
-
Demographics




Charlotte County
Public Schools: Data was based on information derived via our Focus
program
,

which is our school community grading and information portal

dated

October 31,
2012.



Charlotte County, State of Florida, and the United States: Information gathered from the United
States Census Bureau and the Social Security Administration, dated 2010
-
2011.



Approximately ten percent of Charlotte County’s current population is K
-
12 studen
ts.


Demographic
f
acts of relevance
,

which will greatly influence technology implementation due to fiscal,
adaptive, and

time
-
management

issues
, are as follows
:

CHARLOTTE COUNTY
PUBLIC SCHOOLS
(FOCUS Report) 10/31/2012
STATE OF
FLORIDA
UNITED
STATES
Total Population
16,951
19,057,542
311,591,917
White
72.40%
57.50%
63.40%
Black
9.30%
16.50%
13.10%
Mix
4.00%
18.00%
2.30%
Hispanic
12.50%
22.90%
16.70%
Asian
1.60%
26.00%
5.00%
Indian
0.27%
60.00%
1.40%
Female
48.60%
51.10%
50.80%
Male
51.40%
48.90%
49.20%
ESE
18.80%
no data
no data
Full Time ESE
5.12%
no data
no data
ESOL
2.90%
26.60%
20.10%
Homeless
1.50%
no data
no data
53.7 Social Security(SS)
17.70%
3.3 Supplemental Security Income (SSI)
2.60%
1.0 Cash Public Assistance
5.3 Food Stamps
<TOTAL (All Public Assistance Combined)>
34.23%
34.10%
High School Graduates
87.00%
85.30%
85.00%
Bachelor's Degree or Higher
no data
25.90%
27.90%
Median Household Income
no data
$47,661
$51,914
Figure 2.1A- Data derived via Charlotte County Public Schools FOCUS report on 10/31/2012, US Census, and Social Security Administration
21.30%
$41,524
13.80%
13.80%
Free/Reduced Lunch
(approx. eligibility income
level for Free: $28,665 and
Reduced: $40,793)
60.00%
63.30%
88.30%
20.43%
161,000
85.80%
6.00%
1.50%
5.90%
1.30%
9.30%
1.90%
no data
0.30%
51.40%
48.60%
CHARLOTTE COUNTY
(Based on 2010 Census Results)
no data
DEMOGRAPHICS
(Figure 2.1A)
Data: FOCUS 10
/31/2012,
Census 2010, & Social
Security Admi
nistration

10




The amount to qualify for reduced lunch is $731 less than the Median Household Income.



The percent for Free and Reduced Lunch
coincides with

the percent of residence on public
assistance.

o

Thus, as we move to the 1:1 initiative

of Bring Your Own Device (BYOD
)
,
implementation of the piloted ‘flipped classroom’ model, and online instruction,
e
specially for all students to complete for High School,

students and families may have
difficulties providing funding for
digital
devices
and

adequate Internet accessibility.



There are 23.92% students receiving ESE services, which is approximately one qua
rter of all
students.

o

Thus, adaptive
digital
devices and time
-
manageme
nt strategies

will be needed to
service this student population

due to added access, modifications, and documentation
.

In Figure 2.1
B
,

the data derived from the United States Census Bur
eau lists in order of high to low,
the percent of Charlotte County’s employees by Industry categories. The yellow bars represent
positions that require a college degree.

Data
explanation

and observation
for

F
igure 2.1
B
-
Percent of Industry Positions
-
Charlotte County



Four out of the thirteen Industry categories require college degrees.



The highest employer of workers is
E
ducational
S
ervices,
H
ealth
C
are and
S
ocial
Assistance.

o

As evident in the occupational data provided in this section,
H
ealth
C
are s
upports most
of these positions.



Retail trade is next on the list and

employers seek individuals that have refined

‘soft skills
.

o

Soft skills

are
the

‘social’ skills companies are seeking from their employers.
As they
relate to technology,

here are some examples:
e
mail etiquette,
technical writing,
online
time
-
management

techniques
, creating collaborative workspaces,
mastery of personal
digital equipment, keyboarding and documentation, basic technical troubleshooting, etc.


11



In Figure 2.1
C
,

Industry information for Charlotte County and the State of Florida are included in th
e

chart. T
he data provide
s

information on the jobs

ranked
by the greatest number of people employed
in each industry
. Also included, besides the matching State of Florida information, is the growth,
monthly earnings, growth in earnings, and the education level needed for each of the thirty
-
seven
industry p
osition
s

listed.

All data is dated 2011.

Data
explanation

and obs
ervation
for

Figure 2.1
C
-

High Growth Industries
-
Charlotte County and the
State of Florida



Nine positions out of thirty
-
seven require a degree, nine suggest a high school diploma, and
nineteen have no educational requirements.



Specific to the top ten industries, two thirds are split equally between Health, and Food
Service/Retail.



Fiscal positions are the highest paying jobs ranging from $7,336 to $3,542 per month, which
do not require an advanced degree.



The Columns:

o

Columns 1/2: Data is sorted to include all Charlotte County
industry p
osition
s
, totaling
thirty
-
seven, which are ranked by the largest number of employed workers

with
m
atching data
from the
State of Florida
industry p
osition
s
.

o

Column 3: Lists all the
indus
try p
osition
s

flanked by the three digit code of the North
American Industry Classification System (NAICS.)


12


o

Columns 4/5: Total number of jobs for each
industry p
osition

for county and state.

o

Columns 6/7: Percent of job growth
in each industry p
osition for
county and state.

o

Columns 8/9: Monthly earnings in dollars

in each industry p
osition for county and state.

o

Columns 10/11: Percent of earnings growth

in each industry p
osition for
county and
state
.

o

Columns 12: Estimated education level for each
industry p
os
ition
.


13



In Figure 2.1
D
,

national data

was aggregated to substantiate and extend the occupational outlook,
while providing information about the number of new or replacement positions, wages and levels of
Charlotte
County %
Growth in
# of Jobs
(2010-
2011)
Florida %
Growth in #
of Jobs
(2010-
2011)
Charlotte
County
Monthy
Earnings
($) (2010-
2011)
Florida
Monthy
Earnings ($)
(2010-
2011)
Charlotte
County
Earning
Growth
(%) (2010-
2011)
Florida
Earning
Growth (%)
(2010-
2011)
1
1
722 Food Services and Drinking Places
3,841
586,094
-7.28
3.24
$1,497.00
$1,636.00
1.66
4.43
Less than high school
2
4
621 Ambulatory Health Care Services
3,392
396,619
3.16
2.51
$4,450.00
$4,883.00
7.67
5.60
Bachelor's degree
or less
3
5
622 Hospitals
2,139
264,458
-2.37
1.56
$3,484.00
$4,288.00
3.84
5.34
Bachelor's degree
or less
4
8
623 Nursing and Residential Care Facilities
2,107
182,721
6.95
1.05
$2,454.00
$2,433.00
9.24
3.19
Associate's degree
or High
School Diploma or equivalent
5
2
561 Administrative and Support Services
2,017
503,535
-44.57
-0.68
$2,683.00
$2,876.00
16.32
6.68
Bachelor's Degree

or High
School Diploma or equivalent
6
7
452 General Merchandise Stores
1,774
183,259
0.53
9.39
$1,871.00
$1,793.00
1.82
3.41
Less than high school
7
6
238 Specialty Trade Contractors
1,535
197,169
-1.35
0.66
$2,653.00
$3,151.00
4.11
3.04
High school diploma or
equivalent
8
3
541 Professional, Scientific, and Technical
Services
1,361
445,115
2.45
2.03
$4,277.00
$5,523.00
2.10
4.60
Bachelor's degree or Higher
9
9
445 Food and Beverage Stores
1,229
167,301
-4.04
1.75
$1,952.00
$1,858.00
-1.04
-3.76
Less than high school
10
13
713 Amusement, Gambling, and Recreation
Industries
936
156,025
-3.77
1.21
$1,850.00
$2,328.00
4.45
2.54
Less than high school
11
17
441 Motor Vehicle and Parts Dealers
909
113,101
-4.76
3.43
$3,432.00
$3,828.00
2.10
5.08
Less than high school
12
24
444 Building Material and Garden Equipment
and Supplies Dealers
663
73,803
7.45
-0.82
$2,361.00
$2,763.00
4.40
5.50
Less than high school
13
22
812 Personal and Laundry Services
602
81,363
-23.86
3.42
$1,858.00
$2,021.00
12.85
3.51
Less than high school
14
12
522 Credit Intermediation and Related
Activities
523
156,975
-5.99
3.55
$3,838.00
$4,836.00
18.67
7.32
High school diploma or
equivalent
15
16
531 Real Estate
515
116,579
-26.27
0.91
$2,355.00
$3,439.00
13.45
6.94
High school diploma or
equivalent
16
25
811 Repair and Maintenance
499
70,716
9.88
-8.56
$2,750.00
$3,052.00
4.91
7.42
High school diploma or
equivalent
17
27
236 Construction of Buildings
460
67,735
-1.92
-12.60
$2,714.00
$4,360.00
8.46
3.20
High school diploma or
equivalent
18
19
624 Social Assistance
436
107,779
-15.64
-0.39
$1,753.00
$2,068.00
5.08
3.83
Associate's Degree or higher
19
30
453 Miscellaneous Store Retailers
428
50,135
6.86
2.64
$1,866.00
$2,366.00
-1.13
3.44
Less than high school
20
20
448 Clothing and Clothing Accessories Stores
387
99,049
-8.74
0.18
$1,508.00
$1,787.00
6.43
9.34
Less than high school
21
11
721 Accommodation
356
157,811
-15.38
6.33
$1,835.00
$2,474.00
5.94
4.07
Less than high school
22
23
446 Health and Personal Care Stores
350
75,109
-7.64
3.71
$2,870.00
$3,226.00
10.25
13.10
Less than high school
23
33
111 Crop Production
340
43,467
-5.80
4.43
$2,344.00
$2,186.00
16.32
6.80
Less than high school
24
26
813 Religious, Grantmaking, Civic, Professional,
and Similar Organizations
338
70,281
-2.67
-3.67
$2,049.00
$3,062.00
14.55
4.70
Bachelor's degree
25
15
524 Insurance Carriers and Related Activities
320
125,846
10.56
6.27
$3,542.00
$5,300.00
15.88
5.44
High school diploma or
equivalent
26
28
451 Sporti ng Goods, Hobby, Book, and Musi c Stores
271
58,757
23.84
70.26
$1,708.00
$2,507.00
6.40
44.54
Less than high school
27
10
423 Merchant Wholesalers, Durable Goods
250
159,790
4.16
0.62
$3,566.00
$5,376.00
-1.45
7.01
Less than high school
28
38
447 Gasoline Stations
244
37,883
-30.86
0.15
$1,798.00
$1,873.00
1.59
0.74
Less than high school
29
14
611 Educational Services
244
129,168
1.67
5.81
$1,463.00
$3,325.00
-12.67
4.56
Bachelor's degree
30
42
442 Furniture and Home Furnishings Stores
242
32,009
7.41
0.18
$2,264.00
$2,694.00
4.35
3.79
Less than high school
31
18
424 Merchant Whol esal ers, Nondurabl e Goods
221
111,433
1.28
-1.59
$3,671.00
$4,792.00
15.02
5.43
Less than high school
32
44
511 Publishing Industries (except Internet)
221
31,695
0.00
1.37
$2,720.00
$5,694.00
6.77
-1.03
High school diploma or
equivalent
33
31
237 Heavy and Civil Engineering Construction
217
49,694
8.57
-12.60
$3,061.00
$4,106.00
-6.78
0.35
Bachelor's degree
34
37
523 Securities, Commodity Contracts, and
Other Financial Investments and Related
Activities
143
40,100
20.53
5.02
$7,336.00
$10,532.00
13.72
7.38
High school diploma or
equivalent
35
52
454 Nonstore Retailers
128
23,411
-0.74
0.46
$2,839.00
$3,930.00
-6.81
6.94
Less than high school
36
36
425 Wholesale Electronic Markets and Agents
and Brokers
124
41,008
0.00
-1.56
$4,730.00
$6,265.00
-4.94
8.03
High school diploma or
equivalent
37
66
337 Furniture and Related Product
Manufacturing
100
10,019
21.78
0.49
$3,145.00
$2,917.00
-17.35
8.52
Less than high school
All NAICS subsectors
31,467
6,103,277
-4.83
1.67
$2,815.00
$3,628.00
7.03
5.11
(FIGURE 2.1C) High Growth Industries-Data Available for Private Firms Only-Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Local Employment Dynamics (QWI-Quarterly Workforce Indicators)
Figure 2.1C- Data derived from the United States Census Bureau's High Growth Industries on October 31, 2012
Education Level Needed
(Estimated +/- )
Averages
Rank by
Greatest #
of
Employees
in
Charlotte
County
Rank by
Greatest #
of
Employees
in Florida
Charlotte
County #
of Jobs
(2010-
2011)
Industry Name to include North American Industry
Classification System(NAICS) 3-digit code
Florida # of Jobs
(2010-2011)

14


education needed for the projected years of 2010
-
2020.
Please note that the available statistics were
for private firms only,

Data explanation
and observation
for

Figure 2.1
D
-
Largest Numeric Growth of Occupations Nationally



In the analysis of the twenty oc
cupations, only two
will
require
a
four
-
year degree, which
are

in
the teaching profession.



Registe
red nurses, needing a two
-
year
Associate’s
degree, will add twenty
-
six percent new
positions, plus offer a substantial wage.



Eight of the top ten positions re
quire a high school diploma or less. This trait is prevalent
throughout the research of occupational outlook data, thus, degreed position, which tend to
pay more, will continue to have fierce competition as more students graduate college.


In Figure 2.1
E
,

the

occupations
displayed
will
see
grow
th due to the positions that will be added in
each area of employment.

The chart
provides information
for career choices and

confirms th
at

technology education
, no matter the level of education needed, will play an i
mportant role in job
security
.

Matrix
Code
Occupation
Number of
new jobs
added
Percent
change
Wages (May
2010 median)
Entry-Level Education
Related Work
Experience
On-the-job Training
29-1111
Registered Nurses
711,900
26
$64,690
Associate's degree
None
None
41-2031
Retail Salespersons
706,800
17
20,670
Less than high school
None
Short-term on-the-job training
31-1011
Home Health Aides
706,300
69
20,560
Less than high school
None
Short-term on-the-job training
39-9021
Personal Care Aides
607,000
70
19,640
Less than high school
None
Short-term on-the-job training
43-9061
Office Clerks, General
489,500
17
26,610
High school diploma or equivalent
None
Short-term on-the-job training
35-3021
Combined Food Preparation
and Serving Workers, Including
Fast Food
398,000
15
17,950
Less than high school
None
Short-term on-the-job training
43-4051
Customer Service
Representatives
338,400
15
30,460
High school diploma or equivalent
None
Short-term on-the-job training
53-3032
Heavy and Tractor-Trailer
Truck Drivers
330,100
21
37,770
High school diploma or equivalent
1 to 5 years
Short-term on-the-job training
53-7062
Laborers and Freight, Stock,
and Material Movers, Hand
319,100
15
23,460
Less than high school
None
Short-term on-the-job training
25-1000
Postsecondary Teachers
305,700
17
62,050
Doctoral or professional degree
None
None
31-1012
Nursing Aides, Orderlies, and
Attendants
302,000
20
24,010
Postsecondary non-degree award
None
None
39-9011
Childcare Workers
262,000
20
19,300
High school diploma or equivalent
None
Short-term on-the-job training
43-3031
Bookkeeping, Accounting, and
Auditing Clerks
259,000
14
34,030
High school diploma or equivalent
None
Moderate-term on-the-job
training
41-2011
Cashiers
250,200
7
18,500
Less than high school
None
Short-term on-the-job training
25-2021
Elementary School Teachers,
Except Special Education
248,800
17
51,660
Bachelor's degree
None
Internship/residency
43-4171
Receptionists and Information
Clerks
248,500
24
25,240
High school diploma or equivalent
None
Short-term on-the-job training
37-2011
Janitors and Cleaners, Except
Maids and Housekeeping
Cleaners
246,400
11
22,210
Less than high school
None
Short-term on-the-job training
37-3011
Landscaping and
Groundskeeping Workers
240,800
21
23,400
Less than high school
None
Short-term on-the-job training
41-4012
Sales Representatives,
Wholesale and Manufacturing,
Except Technical and Scientific
Products
223,400
16
52,440
High school diploma or equivalent
None
Moderate-term on-the-job
training
47-2061
Construction Laborers
212,400
21
29,280
Less than high school
None
Short-term on-the-job training
(Figure 2.1D) Occupations with the largest numeric growth, projected 2010-20 (Department of Labor's National Statistics)
Figure 2.1D- National projections for 2010-2020 by Department of Labor, occupations with the largest numeric growth, thus to the job totals.

15


Data explanation
and observation
for

Figure 2.1
E
-
Occupations with the Fastest Growth Nationally



Six careers will need a Bachelor’s degree or higher, four require an Associate’s degree, and
ten will need a
H
igh
S
chool diploma
or less.



Five occupations are categorized as therapists with diplomas ranging from High School

to
Doctorate
.



Fifty percent of the occupations are in the Health field.



One third of the twenty occupations are in the skilled trades.


Occupational

f
acts of relevance which will greatly influence technology implementation due to
college, career and technical preparedness:



Diplomas are not mandatory

for a majority of the jobs that will be readily available once
students
prepare to
exit High School.

o

Prio
r to leaving middle school, students will need to obtain ‘soft skills’ to prepare them
for the job market like time management, communication, networking, etc. Online
resources, such as the Department of Labor’s, “Soft Skills: The Competitive Edge,” can
be

used for instructional support, found at the following link,
http://www.dol.gov/odep/topics/youth/softskills/
.
Also, business skills in technology, like
Microsoft Office will give students an advantage in their quest for employment
,
especially in Excel
, t
hus continued funding for Industry Certification is suggested
.

Also,
mastery of Adobe software or its equivalent will provide added marketability.



Home
Health
and Food Service industries
represent the

bulk

of
employers, and many of the
positions are for en
try level positions, such as aides, and food service workers.

Matrix
Code
Occupation
Percent
Change
Number of
new jobs
added
Wages (May
2010
median)
Entry-level Education
Related Work
Experience
On-the-job Training
39-9021
Personal Care Aides
70
607,000
$19,640
Less than high school
None
Short-term on-the-job training
31-1011
Home Health Aides
69
706,300
20,560
Less than high school
None
Short-term on-the-job training
17-2031
Biomedical Engineers
62
9,700
81,540
Bachelor's degree
None
None
47-3011
Helpers--Brickmasons, Blockmasons,
Stonemasons, and Tile and Marble Setters
60
17,600
27,780
Less than high school
None
Short-term on-the-job training
47-3012
Helpers--Carpenters
56
25,900
25,760
Less than high school
None
Short-term on-the-job training
29-2056
Veterinary Technologists and Technicians
52
41,700
29,710
Associate's degree
None
None
47-2171
Reinforcing Iron and Rebar Workers
49
9,300
38,430
High school diploma or equivalent
None
Apprenticeship
31-2021
Physical Therapist Assistants
46
30,800
49,690
Associate's degree
None
None
47-3015
Helpers--Pipelayers, Plumbers, Pipefitters,
and Steamfitters
45
26,300
26,740
High school diploma or equivalent
None
Short-term on-the-job training
13-1121
Meeting, Convention, and Event Planners
44
31,300
45,260
Bachelor's degree
Less than 1 year
None
29-2032
Diagnostic Medical Sonographers
44
23,400
64,380
Associate's degree
None
None
31-2011
Occupational Therapy Assistants
43
12,300
51,010
Associate's degree
None
None
31-2022
Physical Therapist Aides
43
20,300
23,680
High school diploma or equivalent
None
Moderate-term on-the-job training
47-2121
Glaziers
42
17,700
36,640
High school diploma or equivalent
None
Apprenticeship
27-3091
Interpreters and Translators
42
24,600
43,300
Bachelor's degree
None
Long-term on-the-job training
43-6013
Medical Secretaries
41
210,200
30,530
High school diploma or equivalent
None
Moderate-term on-the-job training
13-1161
Market Research Analysts and Marketing
Specialists
41
116,600
60,570
Bachelor's degree
None
None
21-1013
Marriage and Family Therapists
41
14,800
45,720
Master's degree
None
Internship/residency
47-2021
Brickmasons and Blockmasons
41
36,100
46,930
High school diploma or equivalent
None
Apprenticeship
29-1123
Physical Therapists
39
77,400
76,310
Doctoral or professional degree
None
None
(Figure 2.1E) Occupations with the fastest growth, projected 2010-20 (Department of Labor's National Statistics)
Figure 2.1E- National projections for 2010-2020 by Department of Labor, occupations with the fastest growth, thus jobs that will increase in their current amount quickest.

16


o

Training in ‘soft skills’ will be necessary for potential employees to service their
customers and/or patients at the level of professionalism to sustain a lucrative
position/s.

Basic technology

skills are important as many of the food service
establishments
, and the duties of home health aide
s

use digital equipment
.




Some of the highest paying positions in Florida that require
Associate degrees or less

are in
the health
,
insurance, and
investment industr
ies
.

o

The increase in high schools training for data and financial software will become a factor
as we need to supply employees that are job ready.

o

Also, training for technical so
ftware to run medical equipment, document
patient data
,
and
master the coursework to obtain the credentials to match the position
.



The highest paying position
s

requiring an advanced degree

is i
n the Professional, Scientific
and
Technical Services
, also the Marketing Research and Specialists
.

o

Thus, advanced technic
al training in
a variety of
data collection and manipulation
software will be requested by employers.


o

Also, advanced technological expertise will be required to complete the extensive
coursework.



Basically, even though the data states that advanced degree
d positions will be in the minority,
technical skills will be needed for the majority of positions no matter what the educational
requirements.




Also, to produce competitive graduates, we must institute basic technology
and keyboarding
programs in K
-
5
, not

only to instruct, but to prepare for the online writing tests.

We need to
teach business technology skills in middle and high, plus
,

offer Industry Certifications that we
can reasonably fund
. We will contemplate, as funding become
s

available, the
add
ition

of

competitive
curriculum

and/
or expand our current programs

at our Charlotte Technical Center
to meet the demands of the
changing
job market.

2.2

Planning Process

Council

Selection

The technology plan development process proceeded to permeate throughout
all facets of our school
community
, and requests were received for council participation
.
Thus,
we will be
gathering data from
all stakeholders to include a balanced demographic of our school community and provide a valid and
substantiated Technology Plan
for Charlotte County Public Schools.

Due to the enormity of the
desired
list of council members, we divided them into teams, with
a
designated

facilitator

and a District Technology Trainer providing support as needed.

The team
facilitators develop a coll
aborative workspace to discuss the technology plan, as they gather
feedback. The facilitators will attend the meetings in real time
, if applicable,

and share their respective
teams


comments and suggestions.

Charlotte County District Technology
Executive Council Members

are the

decision
-
making

representatives from
the

S
chool
B
oard,
and
administrative team to include
:

the Superintendent,
Learning through Technology and Media and Information and Communication Systems
, Student

17


Services, Division of Elementary, Secondary Learning, Exceptional Student Education, High, Middle
and Elementary Principals, and our CFEA and FEA Union Representatives.

Charlotte County District Technology
Development Counc
il Teams

are organized as follows:



The Technology
Support Team include
s

the following

representatives
: Analyst, Technology
Buyer, District Webmaster, Library Media Technician, Network Technician, FOCUS
Informati
on Technology Trainer, and District
Technology Trainer.



The following representatives were selected on behalf of their expertise in their area and
valued commentary. The
teams were established as follows
:

Curriculum and Instruction
Specialist
,
Secondary
,

Elementary
,

Stem, Media Specialist,
a
nd Technology and Career
Education
Teams.




All teams are encouraged to share the district technology plan with their
school community
.

Research

Extensive research ensued while developing a blueprint
for the district

technology action plan for not
only the next 3 years, but to establish a ba
seline

that addresses the increasing data exchange
requirement
, as we meet

the

needs of our community. Basically, our bandwidth needs to meet the
demands for the delivery of the mu
ltitude of technology based instructional programs and online
testing requirements to support Common Core State Standards (CCSS), Next Generation State
Standards (NGSS),
Partnership for the Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers (PARCC),
digital t
extbooks, and other media
-
rich software

and the state’s Local Instruction Improvement
System (LIIS), which are the guidelines our infrastructure needs to accommodate for the
web
-
based
iObservation and student assessment
information delivery system.


Partne
rships

Due to the extensive research, not only for Charlotte County, but to also include state and national
data, development of partnerships with community, bu
siness
,

and industry is essential.
Understanding that the health field will
be in high demand
, partnerships need to be massaged with
the health professionals in
and outside
our area. To meet this goal, web conferencing, social
networking, podcasts, and professional sponsors can conveniently provide the support and
connections digitally
, while expo
sing students to a broader employment pool to obtain financially
lucrative health care positions
.


The Charlotte Technical Center offers many programs to help
students gain an advantage in nursing, emergency medical responder (these two professions are in
demand with
a substantial salary
,
)

dental, and medical administrative specialist.

The success of our culinary program at
the Charlotte Technical Center is the hands
-
on training
methods
. They participate in a simulation model represented in the Papa G’s res
taurant
establishment. Students receive on
-
the
-
job and ‘soft skills’ training in an environment they can easily
transfer to a position in the food service industry. Students need management training to advance in
this profession, to increase their earning
potential, and technology training is a major part of that
success.


18


Our current partnerships that aid in the use of technology in our school community are:

CHARLOTTE COUNTY PUBLIC SCHOOLS TECHNOLOGY
-
FOCUSED PARTNERSHIPS

Embry Riddle Aeronautical
University

FOCUS

Discovery Education

Edison State College

First Class

National Geographic

Full Sail University

Microsoft

STEM Florida

Florida Department of Education

Apple

LJ Create & Jaeger Corp
oration

Automotive Youth Education System (AYES)

Hewlett
Packard

Workforce Florida Inc.

United Data Technologies (UDT)

Adobe

The Whetstone Group

Editure/Avatar

Google

CCI Learning Solutions

Safari Live/Montage

Edmodo

Khan Academy

Promethean

Compass

Florida/Charlotte Virtual School

Pearson

FPL

Vocational
Rehabilitation

FCITL
(Florida Council of Instructional Technology Leaders)

Comcast

Habitat for Humanity

FAEDS

(Florida Association of Educational Data Systems)

Think Central

Families First

eRate 360

Trillion

Secure Florida.org

Charlotte County Sheriff’s Office
(
Resource Officer
Division)

CLEF

EDIS
(Education Improvement Suite)


Integration of technology in all areas of the curriculum, support for
our
ESOL

programs,

and students

in need of accommodations
,

are

consider
ed

as we partner
with the various companies
listed
who

potentially service our school community. We ask for software that offers a translation component,
supports the different modalities and reading levels,
possesses

audio, text, speech
-
to
-
text
and visual
f
eature
s
,

as well as hardware with adaptive properties like specialized keyboards, headphones with
microphone, and built in magnification features.
Also, many ESE students with dysgraphia are issued
a word processor for note
-
taking. We have in place, specif
ic for our ESOL population, iPods with
translation apps and software to meet their comprehension needs. Every classroom is outfitted with
an audio enhancement system. Every high, soon to be all middle and some elementary schools have
Promethean Interactiv
e Whiteboards for added tactile exposure
. E
ach elementary school
’s

media
center has a smart table to provide hands on experience for students. Middle scho
ols have a program
called ‘Read
Out
Aloud

6
’ that transforms any text into an interactive

tool, comple
te with
documentation and research features.



Again, a
s the curriculum is enhanced with sophisticated media
-
rich software, we continue to struggle
with providing reasonable access to stream video, and run Internet based programs
, which are cost
effective
, but not infrastructure friendly
. It is our hope that
funds are
bundled

with their adoption to
support the hardware needed to run the program
s

effectively and efficiently
.


2.3

Collaboration with Existing Adult Literacy Service Pro
viders

Technology hardware, software, and networked and wireless Internet access are supplied to our adult
literacy service providers.
Realizing that 17.9% of the adult population in Charlotte County is
functionally illiterate, help is available to increase with
their reading, math and digital literacy skills,
while providing a robust volunteer network for individualized assistance. The caretaker of our adult
literacy services is our Charlotte Technical Center, which offers testing services for GED, Wonderlic,

19


FBA
T, TABE, Certiport, and oth
er occupational tests, plus

computer lab access for the community.
Charlotte Technical Center’s Adult Learning Center, with its satellite offices offering

additional f
amily
s
ervices
, strategically maximizes community
program s
aturation

at these locations,
downtown Port
Charlotte,

Northport and
at
the Charlotte Cultural Center
. The adult literacy service provider

offers

the
following
services
:



Literacy and GED Preparation

o

The target age of this program is for18 and up, which pro
vides an opportunity to
improve basic reading, writing, and/or math skills leading to a GED. Technology access
is available.



E.S.O.L.

o

Students receive instruction in speaking, reading, listening, and understanding English.



Adult Transition

o

Targeted
participants are ages 18 and over needing accommodations and modifications
to perform basic living skills.



Citizenship

o

The class provides information necessary to pass the United States Citizenship
Examination.



Family Literacy

The target students are
parents to assist with increasing family lite
racy skills. Support is also
provided for foreign born students, parenting classes, and childcare.


In the continuation of increasing services to meet the needs of our community, l
ocated on the
Charlotte Techni
cal Centers’ campus,
The Academy provides
technology
-
rich,
alternative education
for at
-
risk teens. They provide services for teen parents with childcare services
, which offer academic
and parental support for the students,

with
time built in to their sche
dules

to
at
tend to

their children
.
Support services are also provide
d

to
teens that previously dropped out of school
, so they may return
to their academia and receive individualized assistance
. Flexible block scheduling provides
opportunit
ies

for accelerat
ed credit retrieval and alternative diploma options

for students who do not
have appropriate credit to move to the next phase of their education.


3.

NEEDS ASSESSMENT/GOALS

3.1

Our Information
-
Based Processes

The data contained in F
igure

3.1 displays the relevant results from the 2012
School Technology and
Resource
Survey

(STaRS) completed by all
K
-
12
schools

and Centers in the district
.
The categories
are divided in the phases to allow time and funding to be made available to implement t
he proposed
1:1 initiative

(
one online device per student,
)

provide appropriate online testing environments, the
networking speed
,

and access needed to support the district’s increasing digital consumption.

Data explanation and observation for

Figure
3
.1
-
Needs Assessment to Meet 1:1 Initiative



The data is categorized by Elementary, Middle, High, and Centers, which service our student
population of K
-
Adult.

o

Included is the total number of students and schools in each category.


20




The Wide Area Network is the ‘highway’ that services our digital communication needs.

o

There are 3 phases in this section:



Phase one is our current status.



Phase two is our first targeted increase when funding becomes available.



Phase three is our next tar
geted increase, which will require a complete overhaul
of our infrastructure to include
the installation

of
a fiber
to create a fiber
ring
,
which will require funding resources not currently available
.



The next section is devoted to the increase in our di
gital hardware to meet the needs of our 1:1
and online testing initiatives.

o

There are three phases in this section:



Phase one illustrates our current status which includes the number of total
computers

and

the average
available per student
, the number comp
uters used
for online testing

and the average available per student, the number of online
devices that are Internet ready, the total of all online devices to include
computers and iPads, tablets, etc., and the final average of online devices per
student th
at are Internet ready.



Phase two and three calculates the addition of needed Internet ready devices so
we can provide one device per student, and the averages available per student,
with the final result being 1:1.


District instructional and administrat
ive telecommunications and technology needs will require a solid
infrastructure that supports the extensive online traffic to meet the needs of our school community.
Funding for the hardware, support service staff, software and hardware upgrading, and basi
cally
supplying the services to meet the demands will be a ‘big rock’ in our ongoing technology action plan.

SCHOOLS
PHASE 1
*PHASE 2
*PHASE 3
Grade Level
#
Students
Total #
of
Schools
# of
CPUs
CPU Per
Student
# of
CPUs/
Online
Testing
Online
CPUs
/Student
# of
Online
Devices
(iPads
Tablets,
etc.)
# of
Online
Units
# of
Online
Units/
Student
# of
Online
Units
Estimate
(+P1/2)
# of
Online
Units/
Student
# of
Online
Units
Estimate
# of
Online
Units/
Student
Elementary K-5
6746
10
100Mbps,
50Mbps,
Fi ber
500Mbps
1Gbps
2664
2.53
1382
4.88
522
3186
2.12
4966
+1780
P1/2
1.35
6746
+1780
P2/3
1
Middle 6-8
3663
4
50Mbps
500Mbps
1Gbps
1420
2.58
603
6.07
705
2125
1.72
2894
+769
P1/2
1.26
3663
+769
P2/3
1
High 9-12
4856
3
100Mbps
500Mbps
1Gbps
1858
2.61
716
6.78
506
2364
2.05
3610
+1246
P1/2
1.35
4856
+1246
P2/3
1
Centers K-Adult
1303
6
100Mbps
/50Mbps
500Mbps
1Gbps
540
2.41
244
5.3
116
656
1.98
980
+324
P1/2
1.35
1303
+323
P2/3
1
TOTALS>
16568
23
6482
2.55
2945
5.625
1849
8331
1.988
12450
+4119
P1/2
1.328
16568
+4118
P2/3
1
Figure 3.1 STaR Survey Data used to show the progression of hardware accumulation, without including the 20% exchange rate for obsolete equipment.
WAN
(Wide Area Network)
(Figure 3.1) NEEDS ASSESSMENT TO MEET 1:1 INITIATIVE (STaR)
Data: 10/31/2012
(*estimate)
PHASE 1
*PHASE 2
*PHASE 3

21


In Figure 3.1, the current studen
t population is numbered at 16,
568 as of October 31, 2012. We
currently have fifty percent of the computer’s needed to reach our 1:1 ratio. Taking the balance and
dividing it in half is how the addition of 4119 and 4118
Internet ready digital devices

was derived for
phase two and three
respectively.

The major issue
,

our twenty percent computer replacement
process to provide a healthy rotation of hardware and software is not factored in
; thus, void of this
rotation,

there will be an
increase
in
the instance
s

of incompatibility with digita
l textbook software and
online testing requirements.
This is a major issue that will need
future

discussion.

Even if we participate in the proposed ‘rent to own’ program, or support student owned devices, the
same issues
will need to be resolved
. The only
caveat is that older computers do not abuse the
bandwidth as much as thos
e with faster processing speeds, which is negated by the institution of our
‘Guest Network’ that provides Wi Fi services to all Internet enabled devices. Thus, in addition to
providin
g bandwidth to the district owned equipment, we also provide free access to anyone within
range of our wireless routers.

Other relevant data aggregated from the STaRS survey is as follows:



There are 1,
610

teacher

and

administrative
computers operating with

Windows XP or 7.



Using a sampling of the data, the average bandwidth test results were as follows:

o

Upload speeds: AM
-
1.13Mbps and PM
-
1.23Mbps

o

Download speeds: AM
-
3.70 and PM
-
4.08



Minimum should be the following:



Upload 2.5 Mbps



Download 5Mbps

3.2


Identification of Needs

Bandwidth

The Network Map illustrated in Figure 3.2A,
illustrates the flow of our Trillion
W
ireless WAN
S
ystem,
which includes
the three

sites connected via
fiber.
The map contains a visual of our data stream, the
connecting Mbps of

each site, and
the proposed phase system
created to

implement
the

needed
infrastructure to support the needs of our school community.

If funding become available, our goal is
to transition to a fiber ring, which will increase our bandwidth to 1Gbps.

Data
explanation and observation for

Figure
3.2A
-
CCPS Phases of Future Bandwidth Increase



The network map provides a visual of our district’s movement of data.

All facilities share the
bandwidth, thus the Mbps is divided between each user. For instance, 100 stu
dents using 1
Mpbs of bandwidth will consume the 100Mpbs allocated to that particular data stream. To offer
a comparison of Mpbs, an average digital camera takes pictures that are 5Mb so if you wanted
to transfer one photo across the network, you would be
using 1/20 of the 100Mbps. Note, that
not all schools sites have 100Mpbs, and even if they do, the network is constantly sharing
bandwidth across the district to meet the needs of the school community. Currently, o
ur district

22


has maximized their
bandwidth

use
, which affects the availability of uninterrupted Intranet and
Internet service.

o

Th
e blue lines represent 100Mbps; B
andwidth
traffic
is shared between all the
connecting facilities.

o

The red dotted lines represent 50Mpbs
; Bandwidth traffic
is shared bet
ween all the
connecting facilities.

o

The pink line represents 36 Mbps
, to establish a
connect
ion

to
Lemon Bay and
Charlotte High,
which completes the bandwidth ‘loop,’ so that all sites have an alternate
route if their default one is compromised.

o

The black

line is our fiber connection that runs underground. It is only used to connect
Vineland
,
Sallie Jones Elementary
, and Peace River Elementary

to their host sites.
T
hey still have to share data streams, which slows their service down.



Fiber consists of a double
line, one for incoming and another for outgoing data.



The looping process of
wireless service

is used so that if one line of telecommunications is
severed, there is an alternate to keep the data stream alive.



Trillion wireless WA
N

towers are used to ‘communicate’ signals across the county. Antennas
are
aligned

in strategic directions to radio

wireless signal
s

across the district
.

T
he
main hub,
represented by the star on Figure 3.2A, is the end point of all service, where informati
on is
processed and/or stored.


Bandwidth is the main commodity for our technology resources to reach the level of uninterrupted
Intranet and Internet
service. To continue to support our infrastructure, and continue its growth as
exemplified in the
stages presented,
funding is the main issue.
With the advent of media
-
rich
curriculum, compatibility issues are in an endless troubleshooting cycle, especially as our hardware
ages, and the new incoming
computer
systems are interspersed sporadically throug
hout our schools.

23


Our exchange rate for computers is approximately every 5 years
. A
ccording to the STaRS data, we
currently own the following:



6,840 Windows XP computers running Microsoft Office 2003



1,097 Windows 7 computers
running Microsoft Office 2010

o

I
t will take approximately
four to five

years to exchange the XP models for newer ones

with our current exchange policy
.



According to
“Moore’s L
aw,


the newest computers will have
four to five

times the
processing speed of the computers we take delivery of this year
,
feeding

into the
endless cycle
of

faster equals
add
ed

bandwidth consumption.

Trained Personnel

With added infrastructure, the need for a highl
y
-
qualified technology staff,
specializing in

programming,
networks, hardware and software advances,
online accessibility for curriculum,
and
training
,

will
multiply
exponentially. T
echnology support staff will need to serve a more complex
machine,
processing media rich data,
as well a
s, a more sophisticated user.

A
lso, as

we
increase on site

caching servers to accommodate the online testing process

and attempt
to alleviate high bandwidth traffic
,
technicians

who service the hardware and testing software will
require continued training
and support to
perform the necessary

requirements
.
T
echnicians
and staff
handling the

processing of data
, testing
,

and information will need to heed the Race to the Top Local
Instruction Improvement System or LIIS
, which

is a
n

aggregation machine in the ma
king, thus,
there
will need to be
significant training in
hardware and
software
demands

for mastery

of the systemic
requirements
.
For the details of the requirements, refer to Appendix A to view the breakdown of
the
necessary components

directly related to Data Integration and IT Platform and Security
.

3.3

District Technology Goals

Short
-
term Goals



Infrastructure Focus

o

Analyzing

the
iBoss management and security software to troubleshoot glitches, we will
s
trategically increase our bandwi
dth upload and download speeds within our budgetary
constraints
, and continue to focus on
the forward migration to

Phase 2
.

o

Continue to prepare for the onslaught of online testing administrations due to

the

P
artnership for Assessment of Readiness for
College and Careers

(PARCC) which is
slated to

be fully implemented by 2014, ongoing certification testing requirements, our
current testing schedules,
and
the transition to digital textbooks and media rich
curriculum, we will troubleshoot alternatives to
provide a continuity of digital service.

o

Prepare for Single Sign On (SSO) with the Florida Department of Education, and
provide resources to access the CPalms repository of approved lesson plans.



Professional Development

Focus


24


o

Provide support for acquired
hardware and software to aid in project implementation.
Ex. Khan Academy Technical Support, Promethean Interactive Whiteboard Training,
and iPad Training and support.

o

Establish a cache of online training materials to meet specific baseline needs in suppor
t
of time management, and alternatives to avoid time out of class

for teachers
.

o

Develop a collaboration system with cadre graduates, so their expertise can be shared
within their respective sites,
while networking with other colleagues, and to
provide
supp
ort to foster continuous improvement as it relates to digital literacy.

Long
-
Term
,

Continuous Goals

The following goals are set by the International Society of Technology in Education (ISTE):

Essential Conditions



Necessary conditions to effectively
leverage technology for learning:

o

Shared Vision



Proactive leadershi
p in developing a shared vision
for educational

technology
among all education
stakeholders, includ
ing teachers and support staff,
school
and district adm
inistrators, teacher educators,
students, parents, and the
community

o

Empowered Leaders



Stakeholders at ever
y level empowered to be leaders
in effecting change

o

Implementation Planning



A systemic plan aligned
with a shared vision for school
effectiveness and studen
t
learning through the in
fusion
of information and com
munication technology (ICT)
and
digital learning resources

o

Consistent and Adequate Funding

o

Ongoing funding to sup
port technology infrastructure,
personnel, digital resources, and
staff development

o

Equitable Access



Robust and
reliable

access to current and emerging
technolog
ies and digital
resources, with connectivity
for all students, teachers, staff, and school leaders

o

Skilled Personnel



Educators, support staff, a
nd other leaders skilled in the
selection and e
ffective
use of
appropriate ICT
resources

o

Ongoing Professional Learning



Technology
-
related
professional learning plans and
opportunities with

dedicated
time to practice and
share ideas

o

Technical Support



Consistent and relia
ble assistance for maintaining,
renewing, and usi
ng ICT and
digital learning resources

o

Curriculum Framework



Content standards

and related digital curriculum
resources that are align
ed with
and support digital age
learning and work

o

Student
-
Centered Learning



Planning, teaching,

and assessment centered arou
nd
the needs and abilities of
students


25


o

Assessment and Evaluation



Continuous assess
ment of teaching, learning, and
leadership, and evaluatio
n of
the use of ICT and digital
resources

o

Engaged Communities



Partnerships and coll
aboration within communities to
su
pport and fund the
use of
ICT and digital learning
resources

o

Support Policies



Policies, financial
plans, accountability measures,
and incentive struc
tures to
support the use of ICT
and other digital resourc
es for learning and in district
school operations

o

Supportive External Context



Policies and initiatives

at the national, regional, and
local levels

to support
schools and teacher preparation
programs in the effecti
ve implementation of
technology
for achieving curriculu
m and learning technology (ICT)
standa
rds


4. FUNDING PLAN

4.1

Major Source of Funding

E
-
rate

To offset the cost of our telecommunications,
we use Operational funding, and Federal
E
-
rate

funding, which covers approximately sixty percent of our bandwidth costs. We currently have two
hundred and fifty thousand dollars in CCPS, privately
-
owned, wireless radio frequencies that are FCC
licensed to maintain security.
T
he
re

is a layer of
stipulations
to

secur
e

E
-
rate

funding
, which are
explained as follows
.

The district submits the Federal Free and Reduced Lunch Report between August and January. The
E
-
rate dollars we receive are a direct correlation of the percent of CCPS students receiv
ing Free and
Reduced Lunch. Thus, if sixty percent of
the

student population receive
s

free and reduced lunch
,

then
,

our
E
-
rate funding
will match

that amount.
It is imperative

th
at all eligible students apply

so that
o
ur Free and Reduced Lunch Report would

be a more accurate measure of our community needs,
and more funding can go to our school community

to provide the proper service for all
. P
lus,
the most
important reason
,
students would be guaranteed a healthy meal twice a day,
one
in the morning and
one in the
afternoon.

Data explanation and observation for

Figure
4
.1
A
-
Pricing for the
E
-
rate

Bidding Process



The chart illustrates the current cost and the proposed cost of Bandwidth.

o

Current Cost is $3,7
00 per month for 100Mpbs of service

o

Proposed Cost
,
to be bid on in July, is $1,800 for the same service, a savings of $
1,900
per month.


26



Note
in Figure 4.1A,
that the price for our current use
,
of 100Mpbs will decrease in July
.

To maintain
our bandwidth consumption,

which
currently
peaks at ninety
five
percent, which is thirty percent over
the optimal buffer rate of sixty
-
five percent
, we still need to increase our service to accomplish Phase
2
’s proposed 500Mbps
. The added cost will be one thousand
per month
,

for a total of
twe
lve
thousand dollars per y
ear of
additional funds. Currently, our
E
-
rate

funding is stagnant, thus the
increase in cost will be absorbed within our already stretched budget.

Added funding may be made
available

via the state
, but it is proposed as a one
-
time source.

The balance of
E
-
rate

funding must cover all telecommunications
to include: basic phone service

and
internal connections needed to provide access to all communication services, digital as well as
analog
.

Added to
E
-
rate

funding requirements, in support of the Children’s Internet Protection Act (CIPA),
services
are provided
to filter inappropriate material

accessed on the district’s digital services
. Also,

each school in our
district, that offers online access to students
,

must
include
documented use of
curriculum and instruction that
support the iSafe program
, which

was established to

educate our
school community of online dangers.

Capital Outlay
and Operational
Budget

Other funding for technology
and support services
comes from the district’s Capital Outlay

and
Operational

Budget
.

Data explanation and observation for

Figure
4.1
B
-
District
-
Wide Technology Funding Data



The projected funding years of 2014
-
2016 cover the future, the present and the past
technology plans.



Included in the chart is the description, location abbreviation for the department the funding is
allocated to, and the
set
priority status.

Seven hundred is specific to the Learning Through
Technology (LTT) and Information and Communication Technology (IC
S) monetary
allocations.

(Figure 4.1A)
Date of
Pricing
Availability:
Bandwidth
Service
Monthly
Cost
Yearly Cost
Current Cost
10/31/2012
100Mpbs
$3,700.00
$44,400.00
Proposed Cost
7/1/2013
100Mbps
$1,800.00
$21,600.00
Proposed Cost
7/1/2013
500Mbps
$4,700.00
$56,400.00
Proposed Cost
7/1/2013
1Gbps
$7,467.00
$89,604.00
FIGURE 4.1A- Current Pricing List for Bandwidth Services

Pricing for the E-Rate Bidding Process

27




Included as priority status twenty one

for the projected funds for the life of this Technology
Plan
, are
the addition of
caching server
s.


The inclusion of the Technology Plan cycl
ing

between 2006 and 2012, demonstrate
s

the attrition of
funding as exemplified in the
Figure 4.1B.

As seen, o
ur operational budget has been greatly
diminished for our current school year. Thus, an increase in funding specific to ‘location 729, wireless
infrastructure
’ is the main short term go
al
, but only deemed a priority status of fifteen according to the
current ranking.

Plans to level up status 729
is a necessity
, otherwise the preceding priorities are null
and void.

Note
,

the top priority of the technology department’s seven hundred funds

is High, Middle, and
Elementary School replacements
, which translates to obsolete models switched to new computers
.

Interestingly, to meet the one to one initiative, so each student possesses a web enabled device, we
need to reevaluate our twenty percent

replacement ratio. We must maintain and double the amount of
all web enabled devices to meet this goal, either through purchase or the three year rent
-
to
-
own plan,
as proposed from the Department of Education.
Even with the rent
-
to
-
own proposal, once the
payment is made, the devices will need to be transitioned out in two years to continue with our five
year computer rotation plan to foster equipment validity.

Figure 3.1 provides the data to support this
argument.

A
c
aching
s
erver

cost
s

approximately ten t
o fifteen thousand dollars
. The purpose is they aid in data
transfer, storage and consumption on site, plus they are required to meet the online testing needs per
the state guidelines.
Two are required for
basic

data protection, thus each site will need
tw
enty to
Priority
Status
Location
Abbrev.
Description
Amount
Recurring or
NonRecurring
Amount
Recurring or
NonRecurring
Amount
Recurring or
NonRecurring
Amount
New or
Replacement
Amount
New or
Replacement
Amount
New or
Replacement
N/A
125
State Inservice State
$27,000.00
N/A
$27,000.00
N/A
$27,000.00
N/A
$27,000.00
N/A
$27,000.00
N/A
$120,000.00
N/A
N/A
126
Equipment $
$106,000.00
N/A
$106,000.00
N/A
$106,000.00
N/A
$106,000.00
N/A
$106,000.00
N/A
$425,697.00
N/A
6
701
Instructional Hardware
$200,000.00
Recurri ng
$200,000.00
Recurri ng
$200,000.00
Recurri ng
$340,000.00
New
$200,000.00
New
$200,000.00
New
8
703
Support Hardware
$50,000.00
Recurri ng
$50,000.00
Recurri ng
$50,000.00
Recurri ng
$50,000.00
New
$75,000.00
New
$150,000.00
New
9
704
Support Replacement
$50,000.00
Recurri ng
$50,000.00
Recurri ng
$50,000.00
Recurri ng
$50,000.00
Repl acement
$75,000.00
Repl acement
$150,000.00
Repl acement
7
705
Computer Network
$150,000.00
Recurri ng
$150,000.00
Recurri ng
$150,000.00
Recurri ng
$150,000.00
Repl acement
$150,000.00
Repl acement
$150,000.00
Repl acement
5
708
District Software (non-insructional)
$75,000.00
Recurri ng
$75,000.00
Recurri ng
$75,000.00
Recurri ng
$75,000.00
New
$75,000.00
New
$200,000.00
New
11
709
ICS Software (non-instructional)
$5,000.00
Recurri ng
$5,000.00
Recurri ng
$5,000.00
Recurri ng
$5,000.00
New
$5,000.00
New
$5,000.00
New
10
710
ICS Replacement
$20,000.00
Recurri ng
$20,000.00
Recurri ng
$20,000.00
Recurri ng
$100,823.00
Repl acement
$20,000.00
Repl acement
$20,000.00
Repl acement
4
713
Instructional Software
$100,000.00
NonRecurri ng
$100,000.00
NonRecurri ng
$100,000.00
NonRecurri ng
$0.00
N/A
$100,000.00
N/A
$200,000.00
N/A
17
714
Vocational Programs
$30,000.00
Recurri ng
$30,000.00
Recurri ng
$30,000.00
Recurri ng
$30,000.00
New
$40,000.00
New
$40,000.00
New
13
716
ESE Technology
$40,000.00
Recurri ng
$40,000.00
Recurri ng
$40,000.00
Recurri ng
$40,000.00
New
$90,000.00
New
$90,000.00
New
14
719
ESOL/Families First Technology
$20,000.00
Recurri ng
$20,000.00
Recurri ng
$20,000.00
Recurri ng
$20,000.00
New
$40,000.00
New
$40,000.00
New
2
720
Middle Schools Replacement
$150,000.00
Recurri ng
$150,000.00
Recurri ng
$150,000.00
Recurri ng
$150,000.00
Repl acement
$200,000.00
Repl acement
$280,000.00
Repl acement
1
722
High School Replacement
$150,000.00
Recurri ng
$150,000.00
Recurri ng
$150,000.00
Recurri ng
$150,000.00
Repl acement
$225,000.00
Repl acement
$350,000.00
Repl acement
3
723
Elementary Replacement
$250,000.00
Recurri ng
$250,000.00
Recurri ng
$250,000.00
Recurri ng
$250,000.00
Repl acement
$288,000.00
Repl acement
$488,000.00
Repl acement
12
725
Administrative/Staff Software
$50,000.00
Recurri ng
$50,000.00
Recurri ng
$50,000.00
Recurri ng
$50,000.00
N/A
$50,000.00
N/A
$30,000.00
N/A
16
726
Read 180 Hardware Materials
$10,000.00
Recurri ng
$10,000.00
Recurri ng
$10,000.00
Recurri ng
$10,000.00
Repl acement
$10,000.00