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M49:

Using IBM WebSphere Application Server


and IBM WebSphere MQ together

Matt Leming

lemingma@uk.ibm.com

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Agenda


Why are we here?


What options are available?


Choosing between them


How to do it

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Why are we here?


Reasons for being here



“We currently use WebSphere MQ as our messaging backbone, we need
to access that backbone from our WebSphere Application Server system”



“We’re going to be using messaging in WebSphere Application Server,
we’re trying to choose a messaging provider and are thinking that
WebSphere MQ might fit the bill”





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The basics

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WAS’ messaging
in a slide


WebSphere Application Server (WAS) is a JEE application server, JEE includes
support for asynchronous messaging using
JMS

(Java Message Service)




Allows Java application interactions to be loosely coupled


Temporal and transactional decoupling of applications


A standardised programming interface


Implemented by a
JMS provider


JMS applications can be coded to be ignorant of the underlying JMS provider


Provider specific configuration, such as how to connect to a messaging provider, is contained
within
JMS resources

held in
JNDI
, defined at application deployment time


JMS is not a transport protocol


No standardised ability to couple different JMS providers




JMS Supports two messaging models


Point
-
to
-
point



using queues


Publish/subscribe



using topics



WebSphere Application Server provides first class support for two JMS
messaging providers


An embedded messaging provider, the
Default Messaging provider

(or
Service
Integration Bus
)


WebSphere MQ

as an external messaging provider



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WebSphere MQ
in a slide


WebSphere MQ (WMQ)


WMQ is IBM’s flagship asynchronous messaging product


Queues are managed by
queue managers


Queue Managers can be connected together to form a network, or
cluster


Messaging applications connect to queue managers to access queues


Applications can send messages to any queue in the network from their queue
manager


Applications can receive messages from queues on their queue manager


WMQ supports the point
-
to
-
point and publish/subscribe messaging models



WMQ as the JMS provider in WAS


WMQ supports the JMS programming interface for Java applications.


Applications in WAS can use JMS to interact with WMQ queues (and topics)


WAS V6 and V6.1 contains a WMQ JMS client to enable this


WAS V7 contains the WMQ V7 JCA resource adaptor


WAS applications connect to a queue manager using:


Bindings



when application and queue manager are on the same server


Client



when application server and queue manager are on separate, networked,
servers
-

using a TCP/IP socket



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Service integration bus
in a slide


Service Integration Bus (SIBus)


SIBus is a native component of WAS, forming the asynchronous messaging
platform for application server based products


Logically:


A
bus

is a logical entity that contains
destinations

(e.g. queues/topic spaces)


Messaging applications connect to the bus to access the destinations


A bus is
location transparent
, all destinations and their messages are available from
anywhere in the bus


Physically:


A WAS cell contains application servers, or clusters of application servers


These can optionally be made a
member of a bus


Destinations are assigned to
bus members


Bus members run
messaging engines

within the application server JVMs


Messaging engines manage the runtime and persistent state of messages in the bus


Messaging applications form a connection to a messaging engine


Messages are routed from any messaging engine in the bus to the application



SIBus as the JMS provider in WAS


SIBus supports the JMS programming interface for Java applications.


Natively supporting both point
-
to
-
point and publish/subscribe messaging models


SIBus is the default JMS provider in WAS


hence the

“Default messaging
provider”





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Options

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Options for accessing your WMQ backbone


Three key options


1.
Use WMQ as the JMS provider in WAS


2.
Use the service integration bus in WAS and connect that messaging
system with your WMQ backbone


3.
Use SIBus for intra
-
WAS messaging, use WMQ for inter
-
system
messaging



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Option 1


WMQ

QMgr

Application

Server

Application

Server

WMQ

QMgr

WMQ

QMgr

Application

Application

WebSphere MQ as the JMS provider in WAS

WMQ

QMgr

Existing WMQ

application

CICS

application

WAS

WMQ backbone

Applications connect
directly into the
WMQ backbone

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WMQ

QMgr

Application

Server

Application

Server

WMQ

QMgr

WMQ

QMgr

Application

Application

Messaging

Engine

SIBus for WAS application messaging,

An SIBus interacts with WMQ to access the messaging backbone

SIBus

WMQ backbone

WAS

Existing WMQ

application

CICS

application

Messages flow between
SIBus and WMQ where
interactions with the WMQ
backbone are necessary

Application

Server

Messaging

Engine

Application

Option 2

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WMQ

QMgr

Application

Server

Application

Server

WMQ

QMgr

Application

SIBus for WAS
-
WAS application messaging,

WMQ for WAS
-

other’

messaging

SIBus

WMQ backbone

WAS

Existing WMQ

application

CICS

application

WMQ

QMgr

Application

Server

Application

Messaging

Engine

Application

Messaging

Engine

Application

Option 3

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Just a simple matter of choosing…

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‘Side by side’

Service integration bus

WebSphere MQ

Fully Integrated with WAS runtime,
configuration and console

Own runtime, admin domain and explorer
interface

Included with WAS (c. 2005)


growing customer base


limited tooling support

Separate product (c. 1993)


huge install base


widespread tooling support

Underpins WESB, WPS, …

Underpins WMB, FTE, …

Provides point
-
point & publish
-
subscribe messaging models

Supports JMS

Supports multiple programming languages,
including JMS

Optimised for WAS
-
based messaging
performance

Optimised for heterogeneous messaging
performance

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Just a simple matter of choosing…

When accessing messages on WMQ queues in a

WMQ backbone

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Option 1:
WMQ as the JMS provider in WAS

When accessing messages on WMQ queues in a WMQ backbone:



Pros



The most
direct

route to WMQ queues


Best performing way to get messages on and off a WMQ queue


Least moving parts


Least things to configure


Least places where things can go wrong


Simplest problem determination


A single messaging system to maintain rather than two



Cons


WAS application deployment depends on knowledge of WMQ topology


E.g. the WMQ queue location is required when connecting applications


WAS applications dependent on two systems being simultaneously available
(application servers and queue managers)


Can be complex to exploit WAS and WMQ

high availability and scalability features















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Option 2:
SIBus messaging system

When sending or receiving messages to or from a WMQ backbone:



Pros


Messaging runtime is embedded into the same runtime as the applications


Probably better performing way to get messages produced by WAS applications into
WAS applications


Ability to asynchronously queue messages in the WAS system while connectivity
with the WMQ backbone is unavailable


JMS resource configuration relates to WAS
-
defined SIBus configuration objects


WMQ
-
aware configuration in WAS is minimised


Applications can be unaware of actual queue locations


Cons


Two messaging systems to configure and maintain


Additional complexity in configuring interactions

between SIBus and WMQ


Additional problem determination may be required

to resolve issues


Performance overhead when passing from one

messaging system to another










































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Just a simple matter of choosing…

When starting with a JMS messaging provider

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Option 1:
WMQ as the JMS provider in WAS

When used as the messaging system for WAS alone:



Pros


‘Industry

standard’


Proven to be robust and scalable in very large messaging deployments


Extensive knowledge base


Cons


Added complexity of two different configuration and monitoring systems









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Option 2:
SIBus messaging system

When used as the messaging system for WAS alone:



Pros


Messaging configuration is completely integrated into the WAS configuration
model


SIBus configuration and runtime concepts are closer aligned with the WAS
configuration and runtime concepts


SIBus exploits many WAS Network Deployment features


A centrally managed, federated, configuration model


Embedded high availability of the messaging resources using application server
clusters


Cons


Smaller customer base


More limited support through external tooling

































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Option 2…. options!

When accessing messages on WMQ queues in a WMQ
backbone

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How to achieve Option 2


Two ways to connect to WMQ through SIBus:


Asynchronous

connectivity to WMQ


Synchronous

connectivity to WMQ










































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Asynchronous

connectivity to WMQ

through the SIBus

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Asynchronous connectivity to WMQ

WMQ
-
to
-
WMQ


WMQ queue managers can be networked together, allowing messages to
be asynchronously sent from applications connected to one queue
manager to queues located on other queue managers


Store and forward

of routed messages


Network connections using
channels


Message routing using
remote queue managers

and
remote queues

Queue

Manager

app

app

WMQ network

Queue

Manager

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Asynchronous connectivity to WMQ

SIBus
-
to
-
SIBus


SIBuses, which may be a network of bus members, can be
networked together, allowing messages to be asynchronously sent
from one SIBus to queues located on other SIBuses


Allows SIBus messaging to span multiple WAS ND cells


Store and forward

of routed messages


Network connections using
links


Message routing using
foreign buses

and
alias destinations


AppServer

AppServer

ME

AppServer

ME

AppServer

ME

app

app

Bus

Bus

SIBus network

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Asynchronous connectivity to WMQ

SIBus
-
to
-
WMQ


So, it’s just a matter of joining the two together…



The
WMQ

queue manager sees the connected SIBus as
another remote queue
manager
, connected via a sender and receiver channel, allowing messages to be
routed through to the SIBus as for any other connected queue manager.


The
SIBus

sees the connected queue manager as
another bus
, connected via a
foreign bus connection, allowing messages to be routed through to the queue
manager as for any other connected bus.



Messaging applications on either side are not aware of the transition.

AppServer

AppServer

ME

app

Bus

SIBus network

app

WMQ network

Queue

Manager

Queue

Manager

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Asynchronous connectivity with WMQ


What does this add?


Ability to asynchronously queue messages in the WAS system while
connectivity with the WMQ backbone is unavailable


All JMS resources defined are SIBus resources, referring to SIBus
objects.


Fine grain authorisation access to those resources can be managed
using SIBus authorisation, within the WAS configuration domain.


WMQ configuration is restricted to the SIBus configuration domain.


WMQ topology is hidden from JMS resource configuration




What does it cost?


Extra latency


Only able to
send

messages to WMQ queues,

unable to
receive

from WMQ queues


WMQ applications must send to queues located

in the SIBus (using remote WMQ queues)


Additional configuration


Additional runtime management


SIBus network

WMQ network

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Synchronous

connectivity to WMQ

through the SIBus

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Synchronous connectivity with WMQ


When WMQ is the JMS provider in WAS, a JMS application will connect
directly to a queue manager


This requires a
WMQ JMS ConnectionFactory
, defining where the queue
manager is and how to connect to it.


The embedded WMQ JMS client in WAS is then used to synchronously connect
to the queue manager.


The application will also require a
WMQ JMS Queue

which defines the actual
queue located on that queue manager.


This allows
synchronous

style messaging with WMQ

WMQ JMS client

AppServer

app

WMQ network

Queue

Manager

WAS config

JNDI

ConnectionFactory

<
QMgr

location>

JMS Queue

<
WMQ

queue name>

WMQ JMS

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SIBus synchronous connectivity with WMQ


It is possible to insert the SIBus runtime between the application and the queue
manager, such that the JMS application actually connects to the SIBus runtime and the
bus manages the synchronous connection to a queue manager when required.



This requires an
SIBus JMS ConnectionFactory
, defining which bus to connect to, and an
SIBus JMS Queue
, defining which SIBus queue to send or receive messages from.


The configuration detailing which queues are available on which queue managers, and how
to connect to those queue managers is contained in the SIBus configuration.


A connection will then be made to a messaging engine in the bus, which will then make a
synchronous connection to the correct queue manager.


This allows synchronous style messaging with WMQ

AppServer

WMQ network

Queue

Manager

WAS config

SIBus config

WMQ bus member

<QMgr location>

JNDI

SIBus queue


<WMQ queue>

app

ME

ConnectionFactory

<
SIBus

name>

JMS Queue

<
SIBus

queue name>

SIBus JMS

WMQ

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SIBus synchronous connectivity with WMQ


What does this add?


All JMS resources defined are SIBus resources, referring to SIBus
objects within the WAS configuration domain.


WMQ configuration is restricted to the SIBus configuration domain.


WMQ
shared queue

on z/OS can be fully utilised from WAS


Supports transaction recovery across multiple members of the queue
sharing group, enabling full shared queue workload balancing and high
availability.




What does it cost?


Extra code path, slower performance


Additional overall configuration complexity


Additional runtime management


WMQ network

WAS config

SIBus config

JNDI

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WMQ direct vs. SIBus asynchronous vs. SIBus synchronous


WMQ direct


Solution has the least moving parts when trying to access WMQ
resources


Not a seamless fit with WAS



SIBus asynchronous


Fits well with the WMQ asynchronous networking principles


Keeps WAS application configuration within their comfort zone


Increases latency between WAS applications and WMQ



SIBus synchronous



Keeps WAS application configuration within their comfort zone


Increases overall complexity when accessing WMQ resources


Reduces performance between WAS applications and WMQ




Don’t underestimate the importance of your current skill base when choosing your messaging provider


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Putting this into practice….

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Using WebSphere MQ as

the
JMS provider












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WMQ Connection Factories


Specify how an application connects
to a WMQ queue manager



Typically requires:


Queue manager name


Hostname and port


Channel name


Other parameters such as:


Transport type (client or bindings)


Use of SSL



WAS V7 allows the identification of a
WMQ
client channel definition table

(CCDT) URL


This removes the need for most of the above
configuration


Prior to V7, a CCDT can be specified through
custom properties



WAS V7 added the option to try


bindings, then client’

as a transport
type

Resources > JMS > Connection factories > [New]

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WMQ Destinations


Defines references to the resources in WMQ that a JMS application will use


The WMQ resources must be created using WMQ administration



Queues


Identifies the actual queue

in WMQ


Can be used to set properties

such as persistence,

priority, etc.



Topics


Defines the WMQ

publish/subscribe properties


Can include details of a

durable subscription


Requires knowledge of WMQ

pubsub broker configuration

Resources > JMS > Queues / Topics > [New]

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WMQ Activation Specifications


Message
-
driven beans

(
MDBs
) are a special
class of EJB, they enable JEE applications to
asynchronously process messages, with WAS
managing the transactionality and concurrency
of the application.



Activation specs are the standardised way of
defining and activating an MDB



The WebSphere MQ messaging provider in
WAS V7

adds support for activation specs



Activation specs combine the configuration of
connectivity, the JMS destination to be
processed and the runtime characteristics of
the MDB itself



Activation specs can be defined at all WAS
configuration scopes, as can be done for
ConnectionFactories and Destinations.







Resources > JMS > Activation Specifications > [New]

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Listener

Ports


Prior to V7, activation specifications are not available when using WMQ. Instead,
MDBs are enabled by an application server’s
message listener service

and its
associated
listener ports



Just like an activation spec, a
listener port

is bound to the JMS destination that an
MDB wishes to receive messages from


It also identifies a ConnectionFactory to use

for connecting to WMQ



Listener ports can only be defined at


server scope.



WAS V7 provides a wizard to migrate

listener ports to activation specs



Servers > Server Types > WebSphere application servers >
serverName
> Message listener service > Listener ports > [New]

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Using connectivity with

WMQ via the SIBus









































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Using
asynchronous

connectivity with

WMQ via the SIBus

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Asynchronous connectivity to WMQ


The point where WMQ and SIBus configuration

and runtime come together is within the SIBus’

WebSphere MQ link


Prior to V7, two separate pieces of configuration

are required


One
foreign bus



defined on a bus


One
WebSphere MQ link



defined on a messaging engine


V7 brings these together under the umbrella of a
foreign bus connection
, and
adds a wizard to take you through its complete configuration



A WebSphere MQ Link can be further subdivided into an
WMQ link sender

and
an
WMQ link receiver

(surprisingly similar to WMQ sender and receiver
channels!),

which require:


Channel names


Queue manager location (TCP/IP address and port)


Security settings


The link runs in a
single messaging engine


The link has access to all resources in the bus for incoming messages, and
all members of the bus have access to the link for outgoing messages





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Configuring a foreign bus connection in WAS V7

1. Decide which messaging engine

will own the link



2. Provide the WMQ specific details


enter the details including the send/receiver channel details

Service integration > Buses >
BusName

> Foreign bus connections > [New]

3. (or 0) Configuring the equivalent sender and receiver
channels on the WMQ queue manager

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Asynchronous connectivity to WMQ


Just as a WMQ receiver channel requires an active channel listener on the
queue manager to enable it, an SIBus WMQ link receiver requires an
enabled inbound
transport chain

on the application servers that the link may
run on


The
InboundBasicMQLink

and
InboundSecureMQLink

transport chains are
automatically enabled on such servers


Inbound transport chains are

associated with a port, the WMQ

sender channel should point to

that port



Secure inbound and outbound

transport chains may be used to

secure the channels using SSL


Servers > Server Types > WebSphere application servers >
serverName
> Transport Chain

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Asynchronous connectivity to WMQ


WMQ stores messages on an XMITQ prior to sending them down a sender
channel. Similarly, SIBus stores messages on a
Sender channel transmitter


WAS V7

added direct administration of these transmitters, allowing viewing and
management of messages currently awaiting transmission on the transmitter


System integration > buses >
BusName
> Foreign bus connection >
name

> WebSphere MQ Links

The current number of messages
waiting to be transmitted

The overall state of the link

The messages can be
viewed, deleted or moved to
an exception destination

Indoubt batches of messages can
be detected and resolved

The link can be started and
stopped

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Asynchronous connectivity to WMQ

Translation guide

Below is an approximate mapping between things that do
similar

jobs in SIBus and WMQ
when connecting an SIBus to a WMQ queue manager network


There is actually considerable overlap between certain objects, for example a WAS inbound transport
chain and a WMQ channel listener both listen for incoming traffic on a TCP/IP port, but the transport chain
can also contain the SSL configuration for a link, where as that would be configured on a channel in
WMQ.


Role

SIBus

WMQ

Addressing resources in another
messaging system directly

Foreign bus

Remote queue manager

Addressing specific queues in another
messaging system

Alias destination

Remote queue

Configuration and status for sending
messages to another system

WMQ link sender


+ runtime

Sender channel


+ channel status

Configuration and status for receiving
messages from another system

WMQ link receiver


+ runtime

Receiver channel


+ channel status

Place for storing messages prior to
transmission

Sender channel transmitters

XMITQ

Listening on a TCP/IP port for incoming
communication from another system

Inbound transport chain

Channel listener

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Failover of a WMQ Link


If the messaging engine is made
highly available

across a WAS cluster the
link will also be made highly available on the WAS side


The ME, along with the link, is able to run on different application servers (with
different TCP/IP addresses)


WMQ requires an additional support pack,
MR01
, to enable this function



AppServer

ME

SIBus network

WMQ network

AppServer

ME

Cluster

Queue

Manager

AppServer

ME

SIBus network

WMQ network

AppServer

ME

Cluster

Queue

Manager

Link fails over
along with the ME

Server running the
ME terminates

Channels reconnect to
the alternative location
using MR01

MR01

MR01

MR01 configured for
multiple ME locations

Cluster bus member
configured to allow MEs to
failover to alternative servers

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Using
synchronous

connectivity with

WMQ via the SIBus

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Configuring synchronous connectivity with WMQ through SIBus is a
three stage process



First, a
WebSphere MQ Server

is required


This defines which queue manager or queue sharing group (QSG) is to be connected to and

how to achieve it


E.g. identify the WMQ server connection channel of the queue manager


Servers > Server Types > WebSphere MQ servers > [New]



Second, that WebSphere MQ Server is made a
member of the SIBus


Service integration > Buses >
busName
> Bus members > [Add]




Third, An SIBus
queue destination

is created which identifies a WMQ queue on the
configured queue manager or QSG bus member.


This does not create a queue in WMQ, it simply references an existing queue from the SIBus


This enables producing or consuming applications connected to the SIBus to use the queue


Service integration > Buses >
busName
> Destinations > [New]






Synchronous connectivity to WMQ

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Summary


Why were we here


What options are available


Choosing between then


How to do it


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Further Information


WAS product information


http://www
-
306.ibm.com/software/webservers/appserv/was/


WAS Info Center


http://publib.boulder.ibm.com/infocenter/wasinfo/v6r0/index.jsp


http://publib.boulder.ibm.com/infocenter/wasinfo/v6r1/index.jsp


http://publib.boulder.ibm.com/infocenter/wasinfo/v7r0/index.jsp


Using WebSphere MQ Java Interfaces in J2EE/JEE Environments


http://www
-
01.ibm.com/support/docview.wss?rs=171&context=SSFKSJ&dc=DB520&uid=swg21266535&loc=en_US&cs=UTF
-
8&lang=en&rss=ct171websphere


IBM RedBooks


http://www.redbooks.ibm.com


WebSphere Application Server V7: Messaging Administration Guide SG24
-
7770
-
00


WebSphere Application Server V7: Concepts, Planning and Design, SG24
-
7708
-
00


WebSphere Application Server V7: Technical Overview, REDP
-
4482
-
00


WebSphere Application Server V6.1: JMS Problem Determination, REDP
-
4330
-
00


WebSphere Application Server V6.1: System Management & Configuration, SG24
-
7304
-
00


WebSphere Application Server V6 Scalability and Performance Handbook, SG24
-
6392
-
00


WebSphere Application Server V6.1 Security Handbook, SG24
-
6316
-
01



WebSphere Application Server V6.1: Technical Overview, REDP
-
4191
-
00


WebSphere Application Server V6.1: Planning and Design, SG24
-
7305
-
00


WebSphere Application Server V6.1: Installation Problem Determination, REDP
-
4305
-
00


IBM developerWorks


http://www.ibm.com/developerworks


(Searching on “Service Integration Bus” returns a number of interesting articles)


http://www.ibm.com/developerworks/websphere/techjournal/0901_leming/0901_leming.html

-

WASV7


http://www.ibm.com/developerworks/websphere/techjournal/0601_ratnasinghe/0601_ratnasinghe.html

-

Security


http://www.ibm.com/developerworks/websphere/techjournal/0601_smithson/0601_smithson.html

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Security