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1





Vol. 1 Issue 5













16 August 2000

Edited and Published by Jill Brosig, Motorola University Market Research Department



Schaumburg, IL USA


















2


E
-
WORLD
-

E
-
LEARNING

................................
................................
................................
................................
.............................

6

E
-
LEARNING SERVES CORP
ORATE TRAINING MARKE
T THAT YEARNS TO CUT

COSTS
,

BOOST RESULTS

................................
..
6

S
OOR
'
S
L
AW
-

AND OTHER KEY FACTOR
S
................................
................................
................................
................................
.........
7

E
-
LEARNING IS A
24

X
7

ENDEAVOR

................................
................................
................................
................................
.................
9

FRAGMENTED

E
-
LEARNING

IS

IN

ITS

INFANCY

................................
................................
................................
.............
11

A
UGUST
2000

N
EWS
B
RIEFS
F
ROM
F
RONTLINE
G
ROUP

................................
................................
................................
.............
12

C
OULD E
-
LEARNING BECOME THE
NEW MODEL FOR SCHOOL
ING
?
................................
................................
.............................
13

E
-
LEARNING ALLIANC
ES GAIN MOMENTUM

................................
................................
................................
................................
..
15

E
-
LEARNING

FINDING

ACCEPTANCE

AMONG

MANUFACTURERS
................................
................................
........
16

U
NIVERSITIES
P
URSUE
E
-
L
EARNING
P
ROFITS

................................
................................
................................
..............................
16

A
DVTECH PREDICTS
S
OUTH
A
FRICAN SWING TO ELEC
TRONIC
LEARNING
................................
................................
................
17

E
-
L
EARNING
I
S
F
OR
S
OFT
S
KILLS
,

T
OO
--

PROCTER

&

GAMBLE

SET

TO

ROLL

OUT

ONLINE

PROGRAM

TO

TEACH

EMPLOYEES

NONTECHNICAL

SKILLS

................................
................................
................................
................
18

O
NLINE
T
RAINING
H
ELPS
M
ET
L
IFE
D
EVELOP
,

K
EEP
IT

S
TAFF
--

INSURANCE

COMPANY

WANTS

E
-
BUSINESS
-
SAVVY

WORKERS

TO

IMPLEMENT

CUSTOMER
-
SERVICE

INITIATIVES

................................
..............................
18

E
-
WORLD


E/M
-
COMMERCE
................................
................................
................................
................................
..................

20

P
ENTON
A
NNOUNCES
L
AUNCH OF
I
NTEGRATED
M
EDIA
F
OR
B
OOMING
E
UROPEAN
W
IRELESS
I
N
TERNET
/M
-
C
OMMERCE
M
ARKETPLACE
................................
................................
................................
................................
................................
...................
20

H
ANDICAPPING
M
-
C
OMMERCE

................................
................................
................................
................................
.......................
20

SHOPPING

BY

CELLPHONE

................................
................................
................................
................................
......................
23

MASTERCARD

................................
................................
................................
................................
................................
...............
25

T
ELECOMMUNICATIONS
:

G
OING
M
OBILE

................................
................................
................................
................................
.....
26

T
HE
N
EXT
W
AVE OF
C
ONNECTIVITY
:

M
OBILE
C
OMMERCE
W
ILL
I
MPROVE
S
PEED
,

Q
UALITY OF
D
ECISION
M
AKING IN
B
USINESS

................................
................................
................................
................................
................................
............................
30

M
-
C
OMMERCE
I
NITIATIVE
L
AUNCHED
B
Y
I
NSTANT
S
ERVICE
.
COM AND
M
OBILE
USA.
COM
................................
..................
31

E
-
C
OMMERCE
G
OES
M
OBILE
-

P
ROVIDERS
H
AVE
P
ROOF
................................
................................
................................
...........
32

D
IVERSINET
A
ND
G
EMPLUS
A
NNOUNCE
S
ECURE
S
IM
C
ARD
I
MPLEMENTATION
F
OR
M
-
C
OMMERCE
E
NABLED
D
EVICES
................................
................................
................................
................................
................................
................................
..............
33

S
ECURITY FOR
A
LL
:

M
-
COMMERCE IS C
OMING

................................
................................
................................
............................
34

B
ARNES
&

N
OBLE
.
COM
S
TANDARDIZES ON
N
ET
M
ORF FOR
A
LL
W
IRELESS
C
OMMERCE

................................
.....................
34

E
-
C
OMMERCE
G
OES
M
OBILE
-

P
ROVIDERS
H
AVE
P
ROOF
.

................................
................................
................................
.........
35

P
AYING
T
HE
P
IPER

................................
................................
................................
................................
................................
............
36

M
-
C
OMMERCE
S
URPASSES
E
-
C
OMMERCE

................................
................................
................................
................................
....
37

I
NTERNOVA
A
NNOUNCES
I
NSTAR
M
OBILE
(TM)

I
NTERNOVA
D
ELIVERS THE
F
IRST
M
OBILE
C
OMMERCE
A
PPLICATION
FOR
E
-
B
USINESS

................................
................................
................................
................................
................................
................
38

I
RELAND TO CASH IN ON

MOBILE BOOM

................................
................................
................................
................................
.........
38

WAP

POINTS

WAY

TO

M
-
COMMERCE

SUCCESS

................................
................................
................................
.............
39

Q
UIOS AND
V
IAFONE PARTNER TO DE
VELOP AND MARKET MOB
ILE COMMERCE APPLICA
TIONS

................................
..........
40

C
LEAR
C
OMMERCE
O
FFERS
M
OBILE
C
OMMERCE
S
OLUTI
ON FOR
O
NLINE
M
ERCHANTS

................................
.......................
41

E
RICSSON
C
HOOSES
B
ROAD
V
ISION TO
P
ERSONALIZE
T
HIRD
G
ENERATION
--

G3

--

M
-
C
OMMERCE
I
NFRASTRUCTURE
O
FFERING
................................
................................
................................
................................
................................
............................
41

N
EW
W
ORLD
O
RDER
................................
................................
................................
................................
................................
.........
42

ESPC
ARD
I
NC
.

D
ELIVERS
M
OBILE
C
OMMERCE
S
OLUTIONS
V
IA
C
USTOMIZED
,

P
ATENT
-
PENDING
M
-
S
ERVER
I
NFRASTRUCTURE

................................
................................
................................
................................
................................
..............
44

J
UST WHEN CONSUMERS G
OT COMFORTABLE WITH
E
-
COMMERCE
,

NOW COMES M
-
COMMERCE
.
................................
..........
44

Q
UIOS AND
V
IA
F
ONE
P
ARTNE
R TO
D
EVELOP AND
M
ARKET
M
OBILE
C
OMMERCE
A
PPLICATIONS
................................
......
46

D
ATALINK
.
NET AND
C
ERTICOM TO
P
ROVIDE
H
IGH
P
ERFORMANCE
W
IRELESS
S
ECURITY
................................
....................
46

V
IZTEL AND
P
IVOTA
.
COM IN M
-
COMMERCE ALLIANCES

................................
................................
................................
.............
47

D
IVERSINET
A
ND
P
RESIDEO
J
OIN
F
ORCES
T
O
S
ECURE
H
EALTHCARE
W
IRELESS
I
NTERNET
E
XCHANGES
..........................
47

E
-
COMMERCE SEEN EVOLVI
NG TOWARD MOBILE COM
MERCE
................................
................................
................................
....
48

MAKING

THE

MOVE

FROM

E
-
REVOLUTION

TO

M
-
COMM
ERCE

MEANS

NEW

CHALLENGES
.....................
49

H
ANDICAPPING
M
-
C
OMMERCE

................................
................................
................................
................................
.......................
50



3

H
EXAWARE
T
ECHNOLOGIES

................................
................................
................................
................................
............................
50

B
ELLS
A
RE
R
INGING
F
OR
'M
-
C
OMMERCE
'

................................
................................
................................
................................
....
51

N
EXT
C
ARD
T
EAMS WI
TH
S
KY
G
O IN
F
IRST M
-
C
OMMERCE AND
W
IRELESS
I
NTERACTIVE
M
ARKETING
C
ONSUMER
T
RIAL
IN THE
U.S.

................................
................................
................................
................................
................................
.........................
52

F
ROST
&

S
ULLIVAN
P
REDICTS
E
XPLOSIVE
G
ROWTH IN
M
-
C
OMMERCE
M
ARKETS

................................
................................
52

G
OYADA SECURES
E
UROS
13
M IN
N
OMURA
-
LED FINANCING ROUND
;

L
EADING
S
WEDISH
M
-
C
OMMERCE COMPANY
PLANS RAPID
E
UROPEAN EXPANSION

................................
................................
................................
................................
.............
53

T
HE NEW WIRELESS
:

L
OCATION
,

LOCATION
,

LOCATION
................................
................................
................................
..............
54

T
ANTAU ANNOUNCES PART
NER PROGRAMME TO PRO
VIDE COMPREHEN
SIVE SOLUTIONS FOR W
IRELESS
I
NTERNET
SOFTWARE DEPLOYMENT

................................
................................
................................
................................
................................
.
56

M
OBILE
C
OMMERCE AT E
B
USINESS
C
ONFERENCE AND
E
XPO
T
O
D
EBUT IN
N
EW
Y
ORK IN
D
ECEMBER

............................
56

S
OUTH
A
FRICAN ELECTRONIC AN
D MOBILE COMMERCE MA
KES
QUANTUM LEAP
................................
................................
...
57

DCTI'
S
I
NTERNET
P
AYMENT
S
OFTWARE TO
P
OWER
W
IRELESS
T
RANSACTION
S
ERVICE
F
OR
B
ANCO
B
ILBAO AND
T
ELEFONICA

................................
................................
................................
................................
................................
.......................
58

T
ELCORDIA
T
ECHNOLOGIES AND
S
IGNAL
S
OFT TO PROVIDE ENHAN
CED WIRELESS SOLUTIO
NS FOR NETWORK
OPERATORS

................................
................................
................................
................................
................................
.........................
59

C
ELLMANIA AND
B
ROAD
V
ISION
P
ARTNER TO
D
ELIVER
P
ERSONALIZED
W
IRELESS
S
OLUTIONS
................................
.........
60

I
N
R
ESPONSE TO
WAP

AND M
-
COMMERCE
B
OOM IN
E
UROPE
,

Z
ENTROPY
P
ARTNERS
O
PENS
O
FFICES IN
D
EN
MARK AND
S
WITZERLAND

................................
................................
................................
................................
................................
....................
60

TICKET

TO

RIDE
................................
................................
................................
................................
................................
............
61

S
COOT
.
COM PLC
P
ARTNERSHIP
A
GREEMENT
W
ITH
T
HE
C
ARPHONE
W
AREHOUSE
G
ROUP
PLC

................................
.........
62

SCM

M
ICROSYSTEMS AND
E
RICSSON TO
C
REATE
B
LUETOO
TH
(TM)

M
-
C
OMMERCE
P
RODUCTS

................................
.......
63

C
IVISTA LAUNCH ENABLE
S BUSINESSES TO TAIL
OR M
-
COMMERCE
,

INTERACTIVE SERVICES

AND INFORMATION FOR
THEIR MOBILE COMMUNI
TY

................................
................................
................................
................................
.............................
63

I
3

M
OBILE
O
PENS
N
EW
C
ENTER FOR
D
EVELOPMENT
OF
A
DVANCED
W
IRELESS
S
ERVICES

................................
.................
64

I
NTELLI
Q
UEST
R
ESEARCH
I
DENTIFIES
K
EY
C
ONCERNS
A
BOUT
M
OBILE E
C
OMMERCE
................................
.........................
65

M
ASTER
C
ARD AND
V
ISA IN SINGLE M
-
COMMERCE FORUM

................................
................................
................................
........
66

I
NFOSYS
A
NN
OUNCES
S
TRATEGIC
I
NVESTMENT IN
M
-
C
OMMERCE
V
ENTURES
P
TE
L
TD

................................
......................
67

M
OBILE E
-
C
OMMERCE TO
R
EACH
74

M
ILLION
W
IRELESS
U
SERS BY
2004

................................
................................
.............
67

I
NFINITE
S
PACE
.
COM
I
NCORPORATES
W
IRELESS
T
ECHNOLOGY
I
NTO
P
RODUCT
O
FFERI
NG

................................
..................
68

W
IRELESS TO BECOME A
KEY CHANNEL
................................
................................
................................
................................
.........
68

I
3

M
OBILE
A
NNOUNCES
S
ECOND
Q
UARTER
R
ESULTS
................................
................................
................................
.................
70

E
-
WORLD


E
-
CITIZENSHIP

................................
................................
................................
................................
.....................

71

S
ABA AND
E
-
G
OV
2000

T
EAM
P
RESENT
A
WARDS FOR
E
-
L
EARNING
L
EADERSHIP AND
E
XCELLENCE

...............................
71

S
EARCHING FOR THE PER
FECT
...

SCORM?

G
OVERNMENT
A
CTIVITY
................................
................................
......................
71

COMPANY ENHANCEMENTS
/STRATEGIC DIRECTION
S

................................
................................
..........................

73

CLICK
2
LEARN
.
COM
L
AUNCHES
N
EW
L
EARNING
C
ENTER TO
H
ELP
C
USTOMERS
U
NDERSTAND E
-
L
EARNING

...................
73

K
NOWLEDGE
N
ET
S
ETS
I
NDUSTRY
M
ILESTONE FOR
Q
UALITY
E
-
L
EARNING

................................
................................
...........
73

L
GUIDE
.
COM
L
AUNCHES
N
EW E
-
L
EARNING
S
ERVICES

................................
................................
................................
...............
74

S
KILL
S
OFT E
-
L
EARNING
U
SERS
T
OP
O
NE
M
ILLION

................................
................................
................................
....................
75

B
LACKBOARD
L
AUNCHES
P
OWERFUL
N
EW
M
ULTI
-
C
HANNEL E
-
L
EARNING
W
EB
S
ITE AT WWW
.
BLACKBOARD
.
COM
.....
76

U
NIVERSITY
A
CCESS
H
ARNES
SES
E
SSENCE OF
L
EARNING
W
ITH
C
HANGE TO
Q
UISIC
,

F
OCUS ON
C
ORPORATE
,

H
IGH
-
E
ND
G
RADUATE
T
RAINING

................................
................................
................................
................................
..............................
76

L
OGIC
B
AY
C
OMPLETES
$17

M
ILLION
P
RIVATE
F
INANCING

................................
................................
................................
......
77

L
EARNFRAME
(TM)

A
NNOUNCES
N
EW
PLM

4.11

I
S
AICC

C
OMPLIANT

................................
................................
.................
78

S
KILL
S
OFT
C
ORP
.

A
NNOUNCES
C
OURSE
C
USTOMIZATION
T
OOLKIT

................................
................................
.......................
78

WEB

VARSITY

FOR

TRAINERS

LAUNCHED

................................
................................
................................
......................
79

T
RAINERS
S
AY
T
HEY
C
OMPLY
W
ITH
N
EW
M
ICROSOFT
E
-
L
EARNING
S
PEC
................................
................................
............
79

C
ORPEDIA
LLC

A
NNOUNCES THE
R
ELEASE OF
D
R
.

P
ETER
F.

D
RUCKER
'
S
S
ECOND
S
UITE OF
E
-
L
EARNING
C
OURSES
.....
80

G
LOBAL
K
NOWLEDGE
I
NTRODUCES
F
RAME
R
ELAY
S
ELF
-
PACED
E
-
L
EARNING

................................
................................
.....
81

$60

M
ILLION TO
J
ONES
K
NOWLEDGE
.
COM TO
F
URTHER E
-
L
EARNING
................................
................................
......................
81

T
CERT
'
S
E
DAPT
A
DAPTS TO E
-
L
EARNING

................................
................................
................................
................................
......
82

L
EARNABILITY
,

I
NC
.

S
ELECTS
H
EAR
M
E
'
S
V
O
IP

S
OLUTION TO
E
NHANCE

................................
................................
...............
82



4

G
LO
BAL
K
NOWLEDGE
L
AUNCHES
N
EW
S
ELF
-
P
ACED
E
-
L
EARNING
T
ITLES ON
E
SSENTIALS OF
C
OMPUTER
N
ETWORKS
................................
................................
................................
................................
................................
................................
..............
83

W
EB
CT

A
NNOUNCES
C
ANADIAN
C
OLLEGES AND
U
NIVERSITIES IN
N
EW
I
NSTITUTE
P
ROGRAM
................................
.........
83

PARTNERSHIPS
................................
................................
................................
................................
................................
...............

85

A
FRICA
-
AT
-
L
ARGE
;

S
MART
F
ORCE
,

M
ICROSOFT ADOPT E
-
LEARNING OBJECT STRA
TEGY

................................
.....................
85

S
MART
F
ORCE
T
EAMS
W
ITH
W
EB
E
X TO
D
ELIVER
I
NTERACTIVE E
-
L
EARNING
S
ERVICES

................................
.....................
85

P
ENSARE
F
ORMS
E
-
L
EARNING

P
ARTNERSHIP
W
ITH
C
AP
G
EMINI
E
RNST
&

Y
OUNG
................................
..............................
86

E
-
L
EARNING
P
ROVIDER
P
ARTNERS
W
ITH
EDS

--

DIGITALTHINK

AND

SYSTEMS

INTEGRATOR

WILL

DEVELOP

BUSINESS

E
-
LEARNING

PORTALS

................................
................................
................................
...................
86

D
ELL
A
NNOUNCES
A
LLIANCE
W
ITH
B
LACKBOARD
I
NC
.

TO
H
ELP
L
EARNING
I
NSTITUTIONS
H
ARNESS THE
W
EB

...........
87

W
EB
CT

A
NNOUNCES
S
TRATEGIC
A
LLIANCE
W
ITH
C
OURSE
T
ECHNOLOGY

................................
................................
...........
88

L
OGIC
B
AY
A
ND
S
ABA TO
O
FFER
H
OSTED E
-
L
EARNING
S
OLUTION
................................
................................
..........................
88

P
ATHLORE
L
EARNING
M
ANAGEMENT
S
YSTEM FILLS
'
SKILLS GAPS
'

THROUGH STRATEGIC PA
RTNERSHIP WITH
S
KILL
S
CAPE
................................
................................
................................
................................
................................
........................
88

P
ATHLORE IN STRATEGIC

PARTNERSHIP WITH
S
KILL
S
CAPE

................................
................................
................................
.......
90

UWLI,

B
ERBEE
P
ARTNERS
HIP
T
APS
S
OARING
D
EMAND FOR
E
-
LEARNING
S
OLUTIONS

................................
........................
90

ABA

L
AUNCHES
P
ARTNERSHIP
W
ITH
E
-
L
EARNING
P
IONEER
D
IGITAL
T
HINK TO
T
RAIN
B
ANKING
I
NDUSTRY
.................
91

E
M
IND
.
COM
A
NNOUNCES
P
ARTNERSHIP WITH
AIG

TO
P
ROVIDE
E
-
L
EARNING

................................
................................
......
91

L
EARN
C
OM
,

I
NC
.

&

S
YSTRAN
,

I
NC
.

C
REATE
P
ARTNERSHIP FOR
M
ARKETING E
-
L
EARNING
C
OURSEWARE

.......................
92

M
EDIMORPHUS
.
COM AND
H
EALTHSTREAM
A
NNOUNCE
P
ARTNERSHIP
................................
................................
....................
92

M
ENTERG
Y
P
ARTNERS
W
ITH
V
OYANT
T
ECHNOLOGIES TO
P
ROVIDE
I
NTEGRATED
V
OICE
C
ONFERENCING
O
VER
T
ELEPHONE
N
ETWORKS FOR
L
IVE
I
NTERNET E
-
L
EARNING

................................
................................
................................
........
92

ITC

L
EARNING
J
OINS WITH
L
EARNFRAME TO
D
ISTRIBUTE
P
INNACLE
L
EARNING
M
ANAGER

................................
..............
93

W
EB
CT

AND EDU
.
COM
A
NNOUNCE
S
TRATEGIC
A
LLIANCE

................................
................................
................................
.......
93

L
EARNFRAME
(TM)

P
ARTNERS
W
ITH
C
ONVENE
.
COM

................................
................................
................................
.................
93

T
RAINING
S
ERVER
A
DDS
N
EW
C
ONTENT
P
ARTNERS TO
B2B

L
EARNING
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ETWORK
................................
..............................
94

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ARKETS
............................
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ORM
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OR
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NTERNET
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................................
.................
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ISE ENTERS
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................................
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....
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OTUS AND
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................................
................................
................................
........................
95

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NTRA
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IEW
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IRST
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SSESSMENT

................................
................................
................................
................................
................................
.........
96

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ARTNERSHIP

................................
................................
.......................
96

CDI

AND
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SOPIA FORM PARTNERSH
IP

................................
................................
................................
................................
.............
97

ACQUISITIONS

................................
................................
................................
................................
................................
................

98

G
ILAT

C
OMMUNICATIONS
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TS
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NTO
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S
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PERATIONS

................................
................................
................................
................................
................................
..
98

L
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UYS
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DMIN
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ILLION
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AINING
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ORPORATE
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A
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....................
98

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INDS
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ARKETPLACE

................................
....................
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NOWLEDGE
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ORTAL
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ASED
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OMPANY

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................................
................................
................................
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...........................
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PA

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TAGE
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IGITAL
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................................
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.....
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INE TO
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................................
......................
100

COMPANY CONTRACTS
................................
................................
................................
................................
...........................
101

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IGITAL
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ET
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E TO
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................................
................
101

S
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AMBLE IN
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................................
.................
101

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ITH
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LARICA

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................................
..................
101

I
NTERNATIONAL
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NSTITUTE FOR
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ORPORATION TO
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AUNCH E
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..........
102

T
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OM ENTERS INTO A
$10

MILLION JOINT VENTUR
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OHN
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RYCE
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RAINING
................................
.........................
102

I
NNOVATIA SIGNS E
-
LEARN
ING AGREEMENT WITH
N
ORTEL
N
ETWORKS
--
FORECASTS FIVE
-
YEAR REVENUES OF
$175

MILLION
CDN

................................
................................
................................
................................
................................
..................
103



5

W
EB
CT

A
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W
ITH THE
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SSOCIATION OF
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OLLEGES AND
U
NIVERSITIES

..........................
104

E
-
LEARNING CONFEREN
CES

................................
................................
................................
................................
................
105

W
IDE RANGING
WOLCE
................................
................................
................................
................................
................................
105

FINANCIALS AND QUART
ERLY EARNINGS REPORT
S

................................
................................
............................
107

CLICK
2
LEARN
.
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R
EPORTS
R
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Q2

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EVENUE

................................
................................
................................
................
107

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IRST
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INANCIAL
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...........
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S
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EVENUES
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................................
................................
................................
................................
............
109

F
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AJOR
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EALS

................................
................................
................................
................................
................................
......
110

S
MARTER
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IDS
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L
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NLINE
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DUCATION
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TORE
,

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NCREASES
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2000

N
ET
S
ALES
422%

O
VER
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1999
................................
................................
................................
................................
................................
................................
............
110

VSI

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OLDINGS
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................................
..........
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................................
............
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................................
................................
...............................
113

S
MART
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................................
................................
.......
113

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..........
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................................
................................
...........................
116

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................................
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..........
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.......
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LATIN AMERICA

................................
................................
................................
.......................
121

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................................
................................
.............................
121




6


e
-
World
-

e
-
Learning

Milwaukee Journal Sentinel August 13, 2000

E
-
learning serves corporate training market that yearns to cut costs, boost results

Famous Footwear found that handing new employees a bulky three
-
ring binder of a
training manual was
a poor way to help its clerks learn to sell shoes. Many found the material hard to slog through. Others barely
cracked the notebook cover to try. Frustration mounted, both for store managers and for the sales force.

Technology offered
a solution. The Madison
-
based company, working with a Wisconsin organization
that specializes in online training, transformed the paper manuals into a computerized version heavily spiced
with music, video and other features appealing to the target audience

of 17
-

to 22
-
year
-
old clerks.

University of Wisconsin Learning Innovations, which worked with Famous Footwear, is among a
handful of new or expanding organizations in the state that hope to find a niche in the ballooning e
-

learning
industry.

Corporate
use of classroom training and face
-
to
-
face workshops is by no means going away. It is,
however, losing its dominant position. E
-
learning soon will account for half of all instruction. And, for
companies such as Glendale
-
based Manpower Inc., it will be the

method used for as much as 80% of all
training.

Rockwell International Corp. has found e
-
learning to be a natural method for employees to master word
processing, spreadsheet and other computer programs such as Microsoft's PowerPoint. Employees of the
elec
tronics conglomerate also can take some 50 courses in the professional development arena
--

learning,
for example, to read financial reports, to conduct employee performance appraisals or to coach employees on
problem
-
solving skills.

In addition to the com
puter courses, Rockwell has used satellite systems to broadcast presentations by
nationally known business consultants and motivational speakers.

Since it started offering e
-
learning courses in 1998, the Milwaukee
-
based company has found them to be
an effe
ctive way of reaching 40, 000 workers among its global operations.

Convenience has been coupled with some bottom
-
line benefits. The experience of one of the
corporation's business units is telling. Training budget costs at Rockwell Collins were reduced ov
er three
years by 40%, or $14 million, thanks to lowered expenses for air fares, hotel costs and employee work time
lost to off
-
site training.

Manpower, the employment company, gradually started adopting e
-
learning methods about three years
ago. E
-
learning

has become the most prevalent method used to train the firm's permanent staff, temporary
contract staff and employees of some clients.

In addition to computer skills training, Manpower's program offers college
-
equivalent courses covering
such subjects as
finance, accounting, business law, marketing and human resources management.

The program, which Manpower calls its global learning center, is considered an important benefit by the
company's temporary and contract employees, said Pam Brown, director of pro
duct program development
for Manpower.

Brown said she likes the e
-

learning courses' flexibility, which makes them relatively easy to squeeze
into her hectic schedule.

Web Solutions Inc. in Waukesha started out with a service it called "PC coaching," in wh
ich trainers
would teach students at their desks. The company has evolved and now makes custom e
-
learning programs.



7

One client, a local bank, uses a program to train participants in its high school and college cooperative
program, said Tim Hagen, president

of Web Solutions.

One of the distinct advantages of more sophisticated e
-
learning programs is a feature that automatically
tracks which employees take which courses and how they perform.

Analyzing test results can help an employer identify specific skills

lacking in a large number of
employees, or pieces of the program that need extra attention. Then the company can design special training.

University of Wisconsin Learning Innovations, an arm of the University of Wisconsin System, helps
provide distance
-
le
arning courses for the state's public universities. It also has an entrepreneurial mission to
sell products and services to businesses, said Doug Bradley, marketing manager.

It is focusing on serving businesses with $50 million to $1 billion a year in reve
nue.

Bradley said his organization's e
-
learning courses stand out from many others that involve little more
than scrolling through screen after screen of text.

The courses use chat rooms that give students the opportunity to post questions for a teacher. S
ome are
designed to allow three or four students to collaborate on a project by writing different sections of a research
report that is posted online.

UW Learning Innovations arranged a recent partnership with Berbee, which is providing computer
technology

such as hosting and high
-
speed, reliable connections. It also is providing around
-
the
-
clock help
-
desk support.

Login & Learn Inc. already has designed 10 courses and plans to have as many as 50 to 100 by the end
of the year. The Waukesha company's strateg
y is to market its products through employer associations across
the country, such as MRA
-

The Management Association Inc. in Waukesha.

This relationship gives Login & Learn a key advantage in what is becoming an increasingly crowded e
-
learning industry, s
aid Pat Foy, chief executive officer.

Each association has at least hundreds of members and oftentimes more. MRA has more than 2,000
member companies that turn to the association for advice and training on human resources issues and other
business matters.


INSIDE MULTIMEDIA August 14, 2000

Soor's Law
-

and other key factors




The only way we have of judging the future is by the past
-

which, in the neo
-
nascent world of
e
-
learning,
can be of doubtful value. However, one early theory of technology
-
ba
sed training can be used to
explain an interesting phenomenon currently affecting
e
-
learning.


The theory
-

proposed as long ago as September 1998 by Kulvinder Soor, speaking at a TACT (now
e
-
Learning
Network) meeting
-

runs something like this:

It
is always the delivery of video that prompts technological advances. All those years ago, Soor
explained: "First came the delivery of training
-

initially via a PC. Then came technology issues
-

the
delivery of audio and video
-

and this gave rise, at fir
st, to the development of interactive video (IV). Then
along came the multimedia PC (MPC). There were issues about the delivery of audio and video and this
produced AVI. Then came the third generation MPC, more issues about the delivery of audio and video
and
the solution was MPEG.


"Then came networks; more issues about the delivery of audio and video and the solution was a
dedicated environment of specialised solutions using proprietary software. Now we have the Internet,
intranets and so on; more i
ssues about audio and video delivery and the current solution is streaming
technologies."



8


Once again, the demand for video has prompted another leap in technology
-

with the advent of DVD
and its derivatives
-

and there are still peripheral issues a
bout standards, compatibility, established user bases
and so on.


Just as writing on parchment gave way to printing on paper in the 16th century
-

because the technology
enabled more things to be written and distributed to a wider audience
-

so 'sp
inning silver disc' technology is

enabling more things to be distributed to infinitely more people. This is often via video images rather than
text, which is more to human beings' taste as far as communication is concerned.


There are no prizes for

guessing that the limiting factor is bandwidth. Developers of e
-
learning programs
are having to come up with ways of packaging that bandwidth and delivering it locally in order to meet
demand.


Some are investigating local delivery via DVD. Some, s
uch as Learning Resources International with its

'Development Zone', have followed 'Soor's Law' and created a proprietary delivery system with enough
bandwidth to cope with whatever audio and video demands a range of generic e
-
learning courseware may
make
.


The Scottish Learning Network (SLN)
-

established by Scottish Enterprise and the proposed forerunner
of the Scottish University for Industry
-

aims to provide some 500 learning centres and learning access points

throughout most of Scotland. Thes
e are being sited in a variety of locations including village halls and even
football clubs in an attempt to make learning materials widely accessible to everyone in a community. With
help from the English multimedia specialists Bridge Multimedia, the SLN
is initially opting for stand
-
alone
CD
-
Rom based programmes (although by the end of the project some of the courseware may be delivered
over a network).


Still other e
-
learning solutions providers, such as blueU, are steering clear of including audio

and video
in their programmes. Instead, they are offering primarily text
-
based courses and playing up the feature of
learners having round
-
the
-
clock access to online tutors.


Developers of e
-
learning materials acknowledge the audio/video bandwidth b
ottleneck and may see it as
a necessary spur to technological advances. They are more concerned, however, that trainers need to embrace
their changing role in the light of the development of e
-
learning. They realise that, if 'traditional', classroom
-
based
trainers fear that e
-
learning will rob them of their jobs, the technology is doomed to sabotage and
failure.


As blueU's managing director, Ian Clague, explained: "Until moveable type printing was invented in
Gutenberg in the 16th century, the skill
of scholarship had focused on learning a text sequentially. The
advent of moveable type encountered strong opposition from some scholars who argued that, in future, a

text could just be read and would not have to be learnt.


"Today, it is unthinkabl
e to equate 'scholarship' with 'learning by rote'. Yet those who are now in charge
of the education system have achieved their status by being successful in a 'classroom
-
based' learning
culture. As the scholars of the 16th century were forced to acknowledg
e that moveable type made 'learning'
available to a wider audience to the benefit of society generally, today's leading educationalists need to
welcome the benefits of a similarly alien technology: e
-
learning.


"Trainers can fear for their jobs on th
e introduction of e
-
learning and so be less than wholehearted in
their support of this delivery mechanism," he continued. "Yet all but the briefest of e
-
learning programmes
can be made more effective by human intervention
-

from a tutor."


Traditiona
lly, trainers gave knowledge to a group of people. But, when working with e
-
learning
materials, trainers become 'tutors' and have to embrace the skills of a facilitator, counsellor and mentor.


The challenge involved in online learning is not simply

teaching in a different way. Rather, it means re
-
thinking the whole nature of the learning/teaching process and the role of the teacher within that process. "An
effective tutor can make the online learning experience so much richer," Clague continued. "Af
ter all, Web
-
based learning content can be richer than that delivered via other media. It can be viewed from different
perspectives and the way the content is presented can be changed to suit learners' needs."


One of the key objectives of the SLN pr
oject is to train some 1,000 online tutors to provide remote,
online support for SLN learners. The project's director, Bruce Armitage, of Scottish Enterprise, explained:


9

"Scotland is a country where conventional communication can be difficult
-

especially
in winter. So the
provision of technology based learning materials in a large number of strategic sites around the country, with
learners having round the clock access to online tutors via telephone and e
-
mail, could be a key resource for
helping people to

develop new and important skills.


"These skills will not only be important to the Scottish economy as it develops in the 21st century but
they will also be important in helping individuals to increase their personal skills portfolio, making
themsel
ves increasingly marketable and so increase their earning potential."


Bridge Multimedia's Andy Stevenson added: "The future of online learning
-

not just in Scotland
-

depends on the quality of support that online learners receive. That support is v
ital in terms of monitoring
learners' progress, providing them with feedback and encouraging them to continue their studies.


"You can't just deliver an online course and expect the learner to be fully trained. There must be an
element of support as
well as of course validation and student assessment
-

which is where a learning
management system and competent online tutors can prove invaluable."


And, speaking of learning management systems, Pathlore Software
-

makers of the Pathlore Learning
Ma
nagement System (LMS)
-

concluded a strategic partnership deal with SkillScape Skills Management
Services Ltd a couple of weeks ago. The partnership enables Pathlore to offer an embedded skills dictionary
-

the SkillScape Starter Skills Dictionary
-

in its

LMS, containing thousands of pre
-
defined skill definitions
and over 150 skill profiles.


Customers can build career paths based upon the profiles and can link skills to specific learning
opportunities. SkillScape has already completed skill links (
vendor training maps) to courseware offered by
SmartForce and DigitalThink. With the integration of the Pathlore LMS and SkillScape Competence

Manager, employees can now go to their online corporate e
-
learning page, assess their skills, discover their
'sk
ills gaps' and go directly to prescribed e
-
learning materials that will help them to fill those gaps.


According to US
-
based online learning analyst, Brandon Hall: "Leading enterprises are looking to add
more value to their e
-
learning initiatives by
incorporating skills and competency management processes.
Pathlore's ability to give employees and management access to individual and organisation
-
wide skills
profiles from an integrated, enterprise
-
wide viewpoint is a compelling proposition."


Electronic

Engineering Times July 31, 2000

E
-
learning is a 24 x 7 endeavor

The potential of anytime, anywhere access to education
-
oriented content, programming and services is
capturing the attention of entrepreneurs, who are putting ubiquitous computing, distrib
uted networks and
broadband access to good use. These pioneers envision a future where individuals and employees will have
access to continuous learning in their homes, in their workplaces and on the road. They are creating
e
-
learning
Web sites, communitie
s, services, courses and Web portals where people can access educational
material, mentors, professors, scientists and fellow students to enhance their education experiences.

This kind of access to learning is critical for the so
-
called new economy, in wh
ich companies must
compete in fast
-
changing markets, turn out products in record time and keep employees trained in a learning
-
on
-
demand fashion. In the same way, other
e
-
learning
companies are focusing on elementary
-

education
programs in science to start

building the basic foundation for a knowledgeable next
-
generation work force.

Today, much of e
-
learning is dedicated to training for information technology, an area where the demand
for skilled professionals is high and the supply is low. Having educ
ational programs that can be accessed at
any time from a desktop PC or Macintosh enables the IT industry to train its work force in a just
-
in
-

time
manner. While most e
-
learning companies today offer e
-
reading courses rather than true virtual classrooms,
s
eamless broadband access is expected to make possible much more realistic, interactive educational
programs.



10

Broadband access will allow employees to take anything from a five
-
minute refresher course on how
software works that they can access on their PDA
s, to sessions lasting several weeks on say, a new
programming language, for which they will need a PC.

Microsoft Corp. co
-
founder Paul Allen is one of the visionaries who recognized the need for continuous
learning and acted on the idea that converging t
echnologies will create tremendous opportunities for
education anytime and anywhere.

Allen's company, click2learn.com, has been developing online learning programs since 1984. In recent
years, click2learn. com has emerged as a leading provider of online p
rogram
-
authoring tools and an Internet
distribution platform for online learning. Click2learn.com provides products and services that let
corporations design, manage, catalogue and track their own online educational material. In addition, the
company's new

e
-
Learning Network allows corporations to instantly establish virtual university Web sites on
company intranets that are custom designed for their employees' training needs.

Click2learn.com is one of many companies chasing the emerging corporate e
-

learn
ing market, which
analysts estimate at about $66 billion to $100 billion in 2000, with a compound annual growth rate of 100
percent each year for the next three years.

More corporations are expected to turn to e
-
learning to train employees on new products
, new
management techniques and new business skills. And e
-
learning companies like Click2learn.com are looking
ahead to how they can improve online training in the future. The company's position is that many
opportunities exist to enrich the education expe
rience by making content available in forms other than text.
Those other forms include video, synchronous events, live broadcasts and business simulations and
interactions.

Click2learn.com is working with customers to explore the use of handheld and non
-
P
C devices to deliver
access to small bites of learning content, rather than full
-
length courses. The company believes there is an
opportunity to deliver learning content in smaller pieces and that the future is bright for wireless access, but
most of toda
y's educational content is not optimized for this yet.

Other companies see opportunities in e
-
learning as well. Ninth House Network, a San Francisco
company launched in 1997, is focusing on providing a broadband learning network for Fortune 1000
corporati
ons. Tony Mitchell, Ninth House Network's e
-
learning evangelist, envisions a world where students
have "unlimited access to the best teachers, scholars and students via a multipoint network that can be
reached from anywhere at any time."


The program cont
ent is based on material licensed from best
-
selling authors and instructors like Tom
Peters ("In Search of Excellence") and Ken Blanchard ("One
-
Minute Manager") and designed by in
-
house
PhDs. Ninth House Network offers what it calls "thin content" in the

form of online mentors and
conversational programs that can be accessed over a 56
-
K modem connection to the Internet. For higher
bandwidth content, Ninth House Network places a media server inside a company's firewall so users can tap
their desktop PCs t
o access video files on the server via a corporate LAN.

The Jason Foundation for Education (Needham Heights, Mass.) is one of the few e
-
learning companies
that goes beyond corporate learning to provide children with interactive educational programs online

built
around real science expeditions. Dr. Robert Ballard, the oceanographer who discovered the remains of the
legendary RMS Titanic, founded the company in 1989 to help bring science to life for children. The Jason
Foundation integrates a yearlong scie
nce expedition, a school curriculum endorsed by the National Science
Teachers Association, supplemental video programming, a Web site and educational broadcast technologies
to bring to students the excitement of science and exploration.

Inabeth Miller, pr
esident of the Jason Foundation, said the organization wants all schools to eventually
receive the programming "so that everyone can watch the places we go in streaming video in classrooms and
in their own homes."



11

Currently the program reaches between 1 m
illion and 2 million students each year and is the largest
science project of its kind in this country.

Today, the organization conducts yearlong science expeditions with scientists and researchers who work
with educators to create a curriculum built arou
nd the expedition. A gated Web site enables yearlong
interactivity between the schools and the scientists, and between and among schools. In the second semester
of the school year, the foundation conducts 55 hours of live broadcasts from the expedition sit
e hosted by Dr.
Ballard. These can be viewed by streaming video or by satellite, cable or public television broadcasts,
depending on the region. This summer the expedition will take place in the Black Sea in the Mediterranean.

But all of this is just the
beginning. Miller said future plans include redoing the public Web site so that
anyone can access information about the expeditions and chat with scientists and have links to National
Geographic and Earth Watch expeditions as well.

Currently the foundatio
n is working with HandSpring Inc., the University of Michigan, the Concord
Consortium (Concord, Mass.) and other organizations to experiment with wireless technology and sensor
devices that can immediately input information onto the Internet. One experimen
t involves children making
low
-
cost sensor devices that they can use in the field to measure temperature, light and heat, and then send
the information to the Web.

While there are other companies focused on online learning, Miller believes the Jason Found
ation for
Education is unique.

"No one is doing what we're doing, taking live expeditions and broadcasting them and offering
interactions between researchers and children," Miller said. The Jason Foundation is not just offering
scanned textbooks and stre
amed lectures, but communication between children and real scientists. That
offers excitement no flat screen can match.


Sun
-
Sentinel (Fort Lauderdale, FL) July 23, 2000

FRAGMENTED E
-
LEARNING IS IN ITS INFANCY

The national shortage of skilled workers
is helping spur the market for Web
-
based corporate training.
Last year, corporations spent $ 870 million on e
-
learning, according to International Data Corp. By 2003,
IDC predicts that e
-
learning will capture 80 percent of the training market.

Yet the mar
ketplace for training online and offline is highly fragmented. Today, there are more than
10,000 training providers, vying for an estimated 54 million students, according to Thinq Leaning Solutions
(www.thinq.com). In the e
-
learning marketplace, no company

has more than 3 percent market share.

In addition to e
-
learning firms, many companies have created their own universities, such as General
Electric Corp.'s Crotonville, a 52
-
acre campus nestled in the Hudson Valley of New York.

Overall, the number of co
rporate universities has jumped from 400 to about 2,000, and the number of
students enrolled is increasing 30 percent a year. GE alone says it spends $ 500 million a year on training and
education.

Hewlett
-
Packard Co. has also staked its claim in the mark
et with its new E
-
Learning On Tap through
which the company provides an interactive online learning environment for corporate clients.

International Business Machines Corp. has more than 135,000 employees enrolled in e
-
learning courses.
The company estima
tes it saved $ 200 million by moving just one
-
fifth of its training to e
-
learning.

The success of its e
-
learning ventures led IBM to spin off a division to provide training and distance
learning to other companies. In May, IBM created IBM Mindspan Solutio
ns, which focuses on providing
customers with the capability to plan for, create and deploy e
-
learning solutions.



12

Not only does learning new skills help improve a company's productivity and bottom line, but it also
helps retain and recruit employees, said

Greg Long, founder and chief learning architect of Mentoring
Technologies.

The Annapolis, Md.
-
based company provides network engineers access to Cisco equipment via the
Internet to practice and achieve their certification.

Learning new skills was ranked

third by employees who were asked what non
-
compensation rewards
would retain them
--

right after opportunities for advancement and job redesign
--

according to a recent
Watson Wyatt survey.

"The bottom line is the learning path where you learn at your ow
n pace is at least as good as instructor
-
based learning," Long said.

Offering training online to employees saves time and money, according to companies. That's because
Web
-
based corporate training can be done anywhere, anytime, via the Internet, a company
's intranet or CD
-
ROM. The flexibility for both employers and employees is what is helping e
-
learning become a very big
business.

For example, Thinq offers access to 1,200 training providers, for a total of almost half a million courses.
Information techn
ology employees take courses in Linux, object
-
oriented programming, C++ and Java.

Just about every week, another e
-
learning company is launched, said Adam Newman, analyst with
Eduventures.com, a Boston
-
based education
-
industry research firm. Nearly $ 1 bi
llion worth of venture
capital has gone into financing e
-
learning ventures so far this year, compared with $ 2.6 billion in 1999. And
Eduventures.com estimates an additional $ 3 billion is expected before year's end.

Corporate training companies attracted

the bulk of the funds
--

$ 610 million during the fourth quarter,
before dropping to $ 216 million in the first quarter of this year, according to Eduventures.com.

Industry observers predict a shakeout will occur in the e
-
learning marketplace, as it is i
n other online
industries.


Business Wire August 1, 2000

August 2000 News Briefs From Frontline Group

At a recent Merrill Lynch Growth Conference presentation, Frontline CEO Marguerite Sallee
experienced increased interest in the training industry among

investors, analysts and bankers. She attributes
the interest primarily to the huge potential
e
-
learning
has in helping corporations continually educate and
retrain their workforces.

The global corporate and government learning market today is more than
$300 billion and growing. The
CAGR (combined annual growth rate) for online learning between now and 2003 is expected to be almost 80
percent a year, while traditional classroom instruction is expected to decrease from 71 percent of all training
today to 5
1 percent in 2003.

According to Brian Ruttenbur, an e
-
learning analyst with Morgan Keegan & Co., e
-
learning companies
received $2.6 billion in private equity investments last year. Frontline Group's $100 million in financing
comes from GTCR Golder Rauner,
LLC, a leading private equity investment firm with over $4 billion in
capital under management.

Although technology is revolutionizing the training industry, Sheila Paxton, Frontline's executive vice
president for instructional design, technology and deplo
yment and president of the Frontline Technology
Center, warns that poor e
-
learning is poor training disguised by technology. Paxton is leading Frontline's
efforts to develop e
-
learning programs that are integrated into a "blended learning" philosophy.



13

Blen
ded learning takes full advantage of the power of technology to deliver training "just in time",
anyplace, anywhere and anytime. However, in blended learning, e
-
learning is not used as an isolated tool, but
as a key part of a comprehensive workplace perfor
mance solution.

Call center training is one example of the effectiveness of blended learning. An operator at a call center
might use an e
-
learning course on her desktop to learn how to introduce new products to customers. Later in
the more traditional clas
sroom environment this operator and an instructor would practice actual customer
scenarios to reinforce e
-
learning content. Back at her place of work, the operator has immediate access to
prompts and tips on this cross
-
selling activity.


The Post and Couri
er (Charleston, SC) July 23, 2000

Could e
-
learning become the new model for schooling?

Click. Welcome to the world of
e
-
learning.

Time and space fall to the wayside and a boundless educational universe opens, free from the limits of
classrooms and sche
dules.

At any time, from anywhere, you can take a class, get your notes, interpret data, solve problems. You can
get your homework, talk with your teacher, chat with your classmates.

Gone the yellow school buses.

Gone the romantic images of children fl
ocking to the school yard in the early morning sun.

Could it be?

Yes, believes renowned learning theorist Roger Schank, director of the Institute for the Learning
Sciences at Northwestern University and chief technology guru of a new company that creates

online
courses.

The former chair of the Yale University computer science department sees cyberlearning as the only
bearer of change in an educational world stifled by the politics of textbook industries, testing companies and
union pressures.

"There are

too many political forces to keep schools the way they are," Schank said. "Now, you have
everyone teaching to the test. No one even cares about interesting intellectual questions if they are not on a
test. You have a situation that is insane.

"This gives

you the possibility of designing something new. I see it as the only hope for schools."

In the face of daunting and hugely expensive reform, Paul Schwarz, leadership program developer for
the Center for Educational Outreach and Innovation at Columbia Uni
versity's Teacher College, agrees.

"The technology is going to blow the walls off the schools," he said. "Why would you go to a big old
stodgy high school where we do things the way we did 150 years ago and where half the kids are acting out
when you can
go to an Internet garage school ... created by 20
-
year
-
olds with their toys, giggling with each
other and changing the world?

"We are not going to be able to compete with the quality of the information and the experiences that kids
very soon are going to
be able to get on the Internet."

At this point, cyberspace learning is mostly an enhancement to classroom work. A growing number of
Web sites offer online materials, games and strategies to help enrich school curricula, particularly in math
and science.

Revitalizing Science Teaching using Remote Sensing Technology
-

rst2
-

uses live satellite
meteorological imagery and data about hurricanes, floods and blizzards to teach students to make weather


14

forecasts and weather policy. Students help governments deci
de school closings for snowstorms or
evacuations for hurricanes. In the process they learn science and math.

"Kids see an image at the same time as the teacher and instead of giving facts and information, the
teacher becomes a facilitator," said Tony Vouv
alides, co
-
author of the program. "This is a connection
between real life and learning."

At Quest.classroom.com, another e
-
learning site, children become explorers and historians through
multi
-
disciplinary classrooms that merge history, geography, art and

philosophy.

But e
-
learning is quickly expanding to more comprehensive educational programs for primary and
secondary schools.

The Virtual High School is a comprehensive, online cooperative school sponsored by the U.S.
Department of Education that offers

as many as 160 courses from high schools around the country and the
world. The Florida (Online) High School offers all core courses required by the state of Florida as well as a
wide range of busi
-

ness and computer technology electives.

About 60 percent

of Florida High School's students use the program to supplement their school
curriculum, overcome scheduling conflicts or accelerate, said principal Julie Young. The popularity of her
school is booming, and at least one school district has promised to hel
p it begin granting diplomas.

Educators at Virtual and Florida High schools say they don't intend to replace brick
-
and
-
mortar schools.

"This is one more way of meeting the needs of kids," Young said. "I think we are losing kids in
traditional schools bec
ause we have one format and not everyone fits into that format. But to replace that
format with another format is to cut off your nose to spite your face."

But they may not be able to stop the tide.

"I think there is very little that cannot be done onlin
e, at all levels of education," said Morten Sohlberg,
CEO of New York
-
based Sessions.edu, an online school of design and new media, the first of its kind to
provide a campus and faculty entirely on the Internet.

He and Schank argue that teams of people an
d millions of dollars are being invested in the creation of e
-
learning courses and curricula. Compared to mediocre teachers and limited resources, Sohlberg said, "The
quality jump is going to be very large."

Full access to computers will make e
-
learning m
ore accessible and cheaper than education is in many
rural and impoverished areas of the world, Sohlberg said.

E
-
learning is not without pitfalls.

Tom Layton, founder of Oregon
-
based CyberSchool, the first company to offer for
-
credit high school
courses,

mainly for students of small rural high schools, fears potential unfairness if districts don't properly
tailor technology for students who cannot read and write well.

Young, meanwhile, worries about inequities for students who lack the needed motivation
to work online.

"To replace a brick
-
and
-
mortar school completely you have to compensate for the children whose
parents don't come home and all the other scenarios," she said.

Not everyone learns well online, Young said. Data on how computers affect stude
nt performance are
inconclusive. Some students say they miss having a teacher to talk with them, or miss sitting next to their
classmates.

"I really think teachers still have to be up there to guide the inquiry," said Vouvalides. "We can all think
back to

a teacher who made a connection because we felt they understood us. Sitting in front of a computer
does not give you that smile or that pat on the back."



15

"There is socialization and good citizenry that comes from the interactive environment where you are

face to face," said Liz Pape, administrator of the Virtual High School.

But e
-
learning advocates say those issues can be addressed by making schools into social centers and
teachers into facilitators.

Students could go to school buildings once or twice
a week, cutting costs and overcrowding just as the
nation faces an unprecedented school building crunch, Layton said.

Already, cyberlearning sites offer chatrooms and ways for students to stay in touch with teachers and
classmates. Young said parents at h
er online high school are involved in their children's e
-
learning
experience. She said students socialize outside of cyberschool and go on field trips together.

"The relationships that have developed ... really mirror the 21st century workplace," Young sa
id. "You
can have colleagues who do wonderful work together and never meet. Kids are going to be moving into that
kind of a workplace, so that is good."

Cyberlearning's immediacy and its access to experts and primary source material are improving the
qual
ity of brick
-
and
-
mortar schools, with their outdated textbooks and limited resources, Pape said.

Schank and Layton believe e
-
learning will democratize education, making high
-
quality curriculum
available to everyone. Layton also predicts it will make schoo
ls smaller.

"The reason you have a 3,000
-

student school is that you can have six foreign languages," he said.
"When it is no longer necessary to have gigantic high schools where kids are shooting each other, schools are
going to get smaller and more loca
l. That is very positive."

E
-
learning also offers an unprecedented opportunity to revisit what children really should learn.

"Maybe we don't need to teach physics," said Schank, whose company, Cognitive Arts, builds course
software for college courses fo
r high school seniors. "People are bored to death with school, and you can
chain them and handcuff them there and if you don't make them interested, they will not remember a damned
thing. Children learn to do their job by doing their job ... and a computer

is a learning
-
by
-

doing device."

The bottom line, he said, is that effective schooling has to be an emotional experience, and brick
-
and
-
mortar schools cannot compete with the cyberworld.

"The question is, can a computer provide children a set of experie
nces that they could not otherwise get,"
he said. "The answer is yes, absolutely."


eWeek July 17, 2000

E
-
learning alliances gain momentum


IT managers, driven by corporate need to train far
-
flung employees without breaking the budget, are in
prime pos
ition to take advantage of new advanced
e
-
learning
solutions. Two agreements announced last
week point to an increasingly crowded
e
-

learning
space. The largest of the new partnerships: a $ 150
million strategic alliance between Electronic Data Systems Co
rp., of Plano, Texas, and
e
-
learning
provider
DigitalThink Inc., of San Francisco, under which EDS promises to deliver $ 100 million in revenue to
DigitalThink over the next five years.


Separately, Docent Inc. and London
-
based FT Knowledge Ltd., a divis
ion of Pearson plc., also teamed
up. The British company will develop, market and implement financial management and business
management courses for Docent, a Mountain View, Calif., provider of e
-
learning technology.


The deals follow the creation of Mind
span Solutions by IBM and Lotus Development Corp. in May,
lending mainstream credence to a sector once thought of as being strictly for academics. The timing couldn't
be better for IT managers looking for ways their companies can increase productivity whil
e saving money
and time training employees.



16


EDS and DigitalThink plan to mold client
-
specific "Web Universities" that will give customers access to
DigitalThink's catalog of courses as well as provide original content developed for each customer.


The D
igitalThink platform, like Docent's, is entirely Web
-
based. All of the courses are designed from
the ground up to address each company's specific business needs.