List of Interoperability Initiatives

darkfryingpanMobile - Wireless

Dec 10, 2013 (3 years and 8 days ago)

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1

List of Interoperability Initiatives

1. Multi
-
platform service delivery

Define strategy for

multi
-
platform service delivery

2. Streaming

multimedia

Develop guidelines

for
services to

exploit streaming

m
ultimedia

3. Use of consumer

s existing

d
evices

Develop

guidelines for services to work with c
onsumer’s
existing devices

4. Shared calendar and messaging

Define

strategy for service to use shared calendar and
messaging services

5. Multi
-
sourcing of telecare and telehealth
equipment

Extend choice and

competition for telecare and telehealth
equipment

6. Telehealth integration with GP systems

Define strategy for integration of telehealth with GP systems

7. Identity and consent

Develop guidelines

for use of diverse identity services

and a model for consent

8. Data security and information governance

Define strategy and standards for data security and
governance

9. PHR
i
nteroperability with statutory systems

Define strategy for PHR interoperability with NHS and Social

Services

2

1. Multi
-
platform service delivery

This work area is focussed around how best to solve the problem of delivering
dallas applications and
content
from disparate
delivery platforms to the range
of client
devices used by consumers,
from
TV and cable network operators
(Sky, Virgin,
Freesat
, BT Vision,
YouView

STBs, Freeview & Freeview HD TVs, various brands of Connected TV, …) to computers (Windows,
Mac, Linux) to smartphones and tablets (
iOS
, Android, Blackberry, Windows Phone, …).


Maximum reach of audience


Efficient
and effective delivery of applications
and
content
from multiple delivery platforms to multiple form factors


Allowing applications
/ content to make best use of the capabilities of the client devices and conform to the user interface
norms of those
devices


Make
it easy for users to
participate


Make it feel like a single
experience across devices and
channels


Broad appeal to application vendors and content
providers to plug
-
in and provide services


Multiplicity of apps, using same data platform



Scenarios


Users can access services across device types


Users can access services across TV service providers


Users can tie together
and personalize a
collection of
services into a seamless whole
.


Challenges


User may prefer not to sign up for yet another account


Ability to influence the interoperability and standards
of existing
platforms


Translation to address proprietary standards

3

This work area is focussed around the use of streamed multimedia content within applications.
This could be simultaneous
two
-
way multimedia streaming, as used for a video call, or it could be one
-
way on
-
demand or broadcast multimedia used for
education /
coaching.
Different
qualities of service and levels of security
could be
required for different applications.
For
example, a consumer
-
grade video calling service might be adequate for informal care networks, but a high
-
fidelity, higher
-
security service might be required if a consultation with a health professional is needed.


A single common set of interoperable streaming media standards that can be used across multiple platforms, and with
appropriate levels of security. Alternatively, the conclusion may be reached that, from a practical perspective, a small numb
er
of different solutions should be recognised as meeting certain needs.

2. Streaming multimedia


Drive service transformation across consumer and
statutory sectors


Encourage application vendors to include streaming
multimedia


Improve quality of interaction across care networks



Scenarios


Users can video connect with members of their care
network, including health professionals


Easy for users to request a video conference call with
members of a care network


GPs and clinicians can schedule and participate in one
-
to
-
one and group video calls

Challenges


Federation of
communication
systems across
agencies
and sectors


Cultural reluctance from statutory agencies

4

With the intent of deploying
consumer oriented health
and well
-
being services, and the financial constraints on statutory
service provision, it is
important
that
dallas applications and
and

services are accessible from

existing
consumer devices
(TVs,
computers, smart phones, tablets,
…).

Minimize barrier to entry for app/device vendors

Maximise ability of citizens to make a start

Capability to
run health and well
-
being related applications on devices that are inherently open.

3. Use of existing consumer devices


Connecting
with target users


Making
it easy for users to
participate


Acceptance of consumer devices


Regulatory compliance where appropriate


Encourage innovation for apps on devices with
connection to backend services



Scenarios


Users can access services using their current devices,
e.g. download app to existing phone


Users can access services from their current TV
/network provider


Users can purchase self
-
care and
tele
-
care devices
online and on the high street that work with existing
PCs, TVs
etc

Challenges


Vendor imposed content
standards


Vendor controlled app stores


Applicability of Medical Devices Directive

5

This project will address how shared services such as calendars and messaging could be provided and consumed by multiple
services. A key part of care planning is scheduling what will happen, who will do it, and collaborating over messaging to
ensure successful outcomes. The calendar and messaging functions need to be accessible by the members of a care network
and the supporting applications.



Re
-
use of calendar and messaging capabilities by services and communities


Improved access to information on care plans


Common approach for reminders, alerts and messages

4. Shared calendar and messaging


Patient centric care plans


Helping people to form community and ways of looking
after oneself and others


Encouraging independence and wellbeing


Facilitate social interaction for hobbies, games and
interests



Scenarios


Patients can manage and share their calendar


Carers can monitor and manage care plans


Carers can drive care plans on behalf of less abled
users and patients


Patients and carers receive reminders, notifications and
alerts


Challenges


Multiplicity of control of calendars

6

This work area is focussed around the development of a suitable interoperability framework that would open
-
up the market
for
t
elehealth
and t
elecare equipment.


Greater
competition, driving innovation and reducing cost of
ownership.


Plug and play of devices


Overcome lock
-
in and limited interoperability of today’s services

5. Multi
-
sourcing of
t
elecare and
t
elehealth
equipment


Encouraging adoption of t/c and t/h services


Encourage use of more consumer devices


More meaningful connection of users and their data with
care networks


PHR as repository for device data


Call centre integration to improve provisioning, support
and administration of services




Scenarios


Commissioning bodies can switch device provider or
backend service provider without impact on end users
and referring users (GPs)


New device provider can innovate and enter market


End users can plug and play from different device
providers


Challenges


Breaking down silos of backend services


Use of PHR as repository for all device data

7

One of the perceived obstacles to the widespread deployment of
t
elehealth

systems is the lack of integration between the
telehealth

system and the clinical information system used by GPs (and hospital consultants).

This work area is focussed around removing or minimising any such obstacle, be it real or perceived.

Improve the adoption of telehealth services across target audiences

Improve the
clinical value of
telehealth services


6. Telehealth integration with GP systems



Sharing of readings with trusted individuals such as
GPs and clinicians


Assist
with the transformation
of services for people
with
LTCs


Help promotion of healthier lifestyles


Open up existing
telehealth

providers to interoperate
with PHRs


Scenarios


GPs can request a telehealth service for a patient as
easily as a blood test or other procedure


GPs can review the outputs from T/H services as easily
as blood test results from a lab


Patients have the option to receive output from T/H
services in their PHR


Patients have control of data feeds into their PHR, and
who can see this data

Challenges


GPs may want to
manage the configuration of alert and
early warning services associated with T/H services to
best suit the needs of the GP or
practice


The need for patients to consent for T/H services to feed
data into PHRs


8

This work area is focussed on
enabling citizens to use digital identities so that they can create care networks consisting of
friends, family and professionals. It will also address the
related
issue of a common model for citizens to determine who they
trust and a common model for consent so citizens control the permissions used by care network members to access services
and various
data
sets.


Re
-
use of consumer identities to reduce barriers to engagement with services


Exploiting different sources of identity attributes


Alignment with cultural norms on forming social networks and giving consent


Improving trust and confidence via user centric approach to security and privacy


7. Identity and consent


Use of existing identity services to ease adoption


Consistent privacy and consent models


Putting control in the hands of individuals


Alignment
with Cabinet Office Identity Assurance
program


Federated governance model, e.g. Cloud4Health




Scenarios


An individual can create a care network from friends,
family and professionals using existing digital identities


An primary carer can easily grant/revoke permission
for an app or member of a care network to access
services such as a care plan, PHR
etc



People feel in control of the info about themselves

Challenges


Establishing trust frameworks across communities
regarding what entities are trusted to provide what
attributes about an identity



9

With increased emphasis being placed on self
-
management of health and well
-
being, it is important that a patient can import
data from his/her statutory health record into his/her personal health record, and also for him/her to be able to share this
dat
a
with health professionals if he/she so
desires. This
work area will focus on addressing the barriers to this interfacing between
PHRs and statutory systems.

Improved visibility and completeness of
personal health records

Improved collaboration across care networks, by informal carers and professionals

Better access to health information

8. PHR interoperability with statutory systems

Themes


Telemonitoring services can share readings with trusted
individuals and professionals


Opening up channels for informal care networks


Facilitation of service re
-
design, and step
-
up and step
-
down across T/H, T/C and self
-
care


Interoperation with multiple PHRs


Alignment with dallas wide consent model


Statutory sector can trust data feeds from PHRs



Scenarios


Patient and/or their
carers

can elect to link their PHR
to statutory systems


Care networks receive alerts and notifications based on
data from statutory systems


Easier hand
-
off of patient to care network upon
discharge

Challenges


Connectivity to statutory infrastructure


Scale
-
out of interface implementations by incumbents


Changing cultural norms and behaviours

10

This work area is focussed on the data security and information governance issues that are necessary and/or appropriate
given the increased use of electronic health records, both within the statutory sector and the consumer space.


Easy for suppliers to adopt security standards to drive scale
-
out


Policies that enable communities to make information available to
dallas

services


Standards for protection of information


Governance framework for business executives to follow

9. Data
s
ecurity and information governance


Compliance with data protection/NHS regulations


Visible governance model


Inclusion of expert groups


Common models for data security





Scenarios


Individuals have consistent experience of consent and
protection models as they cross between services and
communities


Individuals gain confidence and trust in services


Security
managers can codify
access rules
from policies


Buyers can comply with dallas policies

Challenges


Tooling for security managers


Adoption of common models and standards across
communities