Chapter 1 PowerPoint Slides (309.0K)

dargspurNetworking and Communications

Oct 27, 2013 (3 years and 7 months ago)

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1

Chapter Overview



Understanding the Windows 2000 Networking
Architecture


Using Microsoft Management Console


2

Understanding the Windows 2000
Networking Architecture



Networking is one of the primary functions of
Windows 2000.


The four basic building blocks of the Windows
2000 networking architecture are



Clients


Services


Protocols


Network interface adapter drivers


3

Understanding the Windows 2000
Networking Architecture (Cont.)



During installation, Windows 2000 installs a
basic network software configuration
consisting of



Client for Microsoft Networks


File and Printer Sharing for Microsoft Networks
service


Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) protocol module


Network interface adapter driver


4

Windows 2000 Networking
Components and the OSI Model

5

Client for Microsoft Networks

Module


Included with all versions of Windows 2000


Provides the capability to log on to a
Windows domain


Enables applications to view and access
resources shared by other Windows
computers on the network


Primary functions are network file and printer
access


6

Microsoft Clients for Novell NetWare
Modules



These two client modules make it possible to
access Novell NetWare resources:



Client Service for NetWare (CSNW)


Used with Microsoft Windows 2000 Professional


Provides basic NetWare file and printer connectivity


Gateway Services for NetWare (GSNW)


Used with Microsoft Windows 2000 Server


Provides access to NetWare resources and enables other
Windows clients to access NetWare resources through
Windows 2000 Server


7

File and Printer Sharing for Microsoft
Networks Module



Enables a computer running Windows 2000
to share its own resources


Installed by default during Windows 2000
installation


Is a service, which is not an essential
component of the Windows networking stack


8

TCP/IP

Protocol Module


Transmission Control Protocol/Internet
Protocol (TCP/IP) is a suite of protocols that
provide functions ranging from the network
to the application layer.


The computer uses TCP/IP to send large
amounts of data that must be broken into
smaller segments for transmission over a
packet switching network.


9

Protocols in the TCP/IP Suite



The primary protocols in the suite are


Internet Protocol (IP)


Transmission Control Protocol (TCP)


User Datagram Protocol (UDP)



The Windows 2000 TCP/IP protocol module
also includes File Transfer Protocol (FTP) and
Telnet clients, and utilities such as Ping and
Tracert.


10

Local Area Connection Properties
Dialog Box

11

NetBEUI Protocol Module



NetBIOS Extended User Interface
(NetBEUI) is the default protocol of Microsoft
Windows NT 3.1.


NetBEUI is used to support file and printer
sharing on small local area networks (LANs).


It provides good performance, is

self
-
adjusting, and requires no configuration.


NetBEUI is not routable and cannot be used
to access the Internet.


12

IPX Protocol Module



Internetwork Packet Exchange (IPX) is a
proprietary suite of protocols required by
Novell NetWare prior to version 5.


Microsoft's implementation of IPX is NWLink
IPX/SPX/NetBIOS Compatible Transport
Protocol (NWLink).


NWLink is required by CSNW and GSNW.


13

TDI Module



The client and protocol modules are
separated by a boundary layer called the
Transport Driver Interface (TDI).


The TDI enables any client module to use any
protocol that can run on Windows 2000
servers.


The TDI standardizes the software
development process for clients and
protocols.


14

The Windows 2000 Networking
Architecture

15

Network Interface Adapter Drivers



Located below the protocol modules in the
Open Systems Interconnection (OSI) model


Separated from the protocol modules by a
boundary layer called the Network Device
Interface Specification (NDIS)


NDIS makes it possible for any protocol module
installed on the computer to use any installed
network interface adapter.


16

Bindings



Bindings are the connections between the
components that make up the networking
stack.


Windows 2000 automatically binds all of the
installed components together so that


Any client can use any protocol


Any protocol can use any network interface
adapter


You can disable bindings if you need to.


17

Disabling Windows 2000 Bindings

18

Lesson Summary



The Windows 2000 networking architecture
consists of clients, services, protocols, and
network interface adapter drivers.


Windows 2000 clients include Client for
Microsoft Networks, Client Service for
NetWare (CSNW), and Gateway Services for
Netware (GSNW).


Windows 2000 protocols include TCP/IP,
NetBEUI, and NWLink.


Windows 2000 uses two boundary layers, TDI
and NDIS.


19

Using Microsoft Management Console



The Microsoft Management Console (MMC) is
a tool used to administer many Windows
2000 functions, including most networking
services.


The MMC console provides a standardized
user interface for many Windows 2000
administrative tools.


20

The MMC Environment



The MMC console is a shell program; it does
not provide any management functions.


You can use the MMC console to


Open management applications called snap
-
ins


Open multiple snap
-
ins at once and combine them
into a single, multipurpose console


21

Snap
-
Ins



Snap
-
ins are the fundamental units used to
create MMC consoles.


Every MMC console has one or more snap
-
ins
that run within the MMC shell.


There are two types of snap
-
ins:


Stand
-
alone snap
-
ins


Extension snap
-
ins


22

Understanding the MMC Console



A console is a window containing one or more
snap
-
ins, which can be saved as a file with an
.msc extension.


The main console window contains menus
and tool buttons that can be used to open
console files or snap
-
ins.


The child window has two panes: the left
(scope) pane, and the right (details or
results) pane.


23

An Empty MMC Console

24

The Computer Management
Preconfigured MMC Console

25

Preconfigured MMC Consoles



Windows 2000 includes many preconfigured
MMC consoles.


Many preconfigured MMC consoles are
available in the Start menu's Administrative
Tools program group.


You cannot modify a preconfigured MMC
console or add snap
-
ins to it.


26

Preconfigured MMC Consoles (Cont.)



The preconfigured consoles vary, depending
on the version of Windows 2000 and which
components are installed.


The Windows 2000 Server preconfigured
MMC consoles can be installed on a computer
running Windows 2000 Professional.


27

Customized Consoles



You can create customized MMC consoles by
combining MMC snap
-
ins.


You can save customized MMC consoles for
future use.


You can distribute customized MMC consoles
to other administrators.


You can use customized MMC consoles to
perform tasks on the local computer or on
remote computers.


28

MMC Console Modes



There are two console modes: author mode
(the default) and user mode.


By default, all new MMC consoles are saved
in author mode.


When you save an MMC console in author
mode, you enable users to


Add or remove snap
-
ins


Create new windows


View all portions of the console tree


Save MMC consoles


29

MMC Console Modes (Cont.)



Save a customized MMC console in user mode
if others will use the MMC console and you do
not want them to add or remove snap
-
ins or
save the MMC console.


There are three user mode types:


Full Access


Limited Access, Multiple Windows


Limited Access, Single Window


30

Lesson Summary



The MMC console is a shell program that uses
snap
-
ins to perform Windows 2000
administration and management tasks.


MMC consoles contain one or more snap
-
ins,
which may be preconfigured or customized.


Customized MMC consoles can be saved in
author mode or user mode.