Biology 27 Principles of Microbiology

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Feb 12, 2013 (4 years and 9 months ago)

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Fall 2010






Instructor: Ann Wright, Ph.D.


Biology 27 Principles of Microbiology



Tel: (831) 770
-
6112

Lecture: MER 12 MWF 1:00
-
1:50



Lab: MW 11:00
-
12:25 (sec. 5090)









TTH 9:30
-
10:45 (section 5091)



Office hours:
MW 9:00
-
10:00, TTh11:00
-
12:00, or by appointment

Office hours will be held in MER 29 (open lab) as announced, otherwise in my office.

Web site address:
www.hartnell.edu/faculty/awright

E
-
mail:
AWright@hartnell.edu



Welcome to
Principles of
Microbiology! We will construct our study of the microbial world
around the following themes:



A survey of microbes: bacteria, fungi, protozoans, helminths and viruses. We will
study

examples of

their unique morphologies and distribution in the environment

(including our
own bodies!)
. Very few of them actually cause disease: what is their role in the
environment?



The growth characteristics and metabolism of microbes (with emphasis on bacteria)



Co
ntrol of microbial growth



Essentials

of bacterial genetics

and biotechnology



What is infectious disease; how do microbes cause
disease?



How do we prevent or cure infectious disease?



The immune system and the body’s response to infectious disease



Epidemiol
ogy



“Applied microbiology”: biotechnology, food microbiology and bioremediation



The lectures will be accompanied by Power Point presentations, which are posted on the Web site
indicated above. Be sure you bookmark it! Note that, if you do not have the Po
wer Point program
on your computer, I have included on the Web site instructions for downloading a free Power
Point viewer. Power Point is available on all of the student
-
accessed computers at Hartnell. I will
also place hard copies of the presentations on

reserve at the Learning Center.


Although the PowerPoint slides will be useful to help you follow the lectures and review
concepts, you are also responsible for the material in the assigned reading as well!


Required lecture texts:
Nester, et al
,

Microbi
ology, A Human Perspective

(6
th

Edition) Boston:
McGraw
-
Hill, 200
9

Laboratory text:
Robin Hayes and I have written a lab manual just for Hartnell students! This will
be much less expensive than commercially published lab manuals, and is also customized to
our
procedures, facilities and supplies. You will be “test
-
driving” it as the first group of students to
use it. Any feedback, corrections, etc. are most welcome!


You will also need a lab notebook
-

composition book with tape binding. We will go over this
in
lab, as well as safety requirements.


Study guides and other items of interest (including assignments) will be posted on the Web site.


Grading:

T
hree

midterms are tentatively scheduled for

Sept. 13, Oct. 20, and Nov. 17
. The
midterms are not comprehens
ive, although the topics are so interrelated it may seem that they are.

Quizzes will be given, approximately every other Friday, and are noted on the schedule.
Homework assignments will be announced throughout the course
.

Make
-
up exams are given only at m
y discretion and if you have a compelling and documented
reason for your absence.


The final exam will be held on
Monday, December 13, from 11:30
-
2:30
.


Microbiology laboratory:
This is an essential component of the course
-

you will spend as much
time in l
aboratory as in lecture
!
In microbiology lab you will be evaluated not only for your
understanding of concepts but also for your technical competence and comportment in the lab.
That is, successful completion of the laboratory exercises will require techni
ques such as aseptic
transfer, microscopy, pure culture technique, morphological staining, bi
ochemical analysis, and
so on.
After all, those of you who enter health professions will be required to perform certain
procedures correctly and
consistently.

Furt
hermore, although we use laboratory strains that are
nonpathogenic, you must learn to handle the specimens as if they were. Don’t be afraid to make a
mistake and learn from it, but persistent sloppiness and lack of effort will not be tolerated.


We are goi
ng to organize the lab somewhat differently this year. You will learn the same
techniques as always, but the entire semester will be organized as an inquiry
-
based project. You
will be assigned an organism and spend the semester learning about it. You will
also isolate an
organism and learn about that. You will document your findings in your laboratory notebook and
present your findings to the group at the end of the semester. You will learn all about it in lab.


Tips for success:

I recommend STRONGLY that y
ou work with the supplemental instructor
,

form study groups, and otherwise develop strategies to help you master this material. If group
learning isn’t your style, be sure you give yourself enough time to think about and learn the
material. Take lots of no
tes: You will not learn by hearing once and reading once! If you don’t
understand something, ASK!!


This may be your first extensive exposure to detailed metabolic pathways, morphologic
comparisons, regulatory mechanisms, and so on. Some of the nomenclatur
e may be unfamiliar
and difficult to learn. You will not learn this without a considerable investment of time and effort,
and remember: these are fundamental concepts upon which you will build as you continue your
training in the health care field. The mor
e you get involved in the learning process
-

through
lecture and discussion, laboratory activities, reading, and interaction with your classmates
-

not
only is it more likely it is that you will be successful, but the process will be much more
enjoyable!


Ou
r supplemental instructor is Pyeongsug Kim
-

by popular demand! She has been an outstanding
instructor (and former student) for several semesters. She will provide details about the program
and work out a schedule with you early in the semester. Details wil
l be provided in class.


The Hartnell seminar series will also continue into the fall semester. I will announce the schedule
when it is finalized.


The experience will also be more
rewarding

if you treat your classmates and your instructor with
courtesy
and respect, i.e.:



come to class regularly
, be on time, and be prepared. N
ote: according to Hartnell policy
you may be dropped from class if you have unexcused absences from more than six
lectures.
It is your responsibility, however, to drop the class shou
ld that become
necessary
-

do not assume that I will take the initiative
.



turn off your cell phone during lecture and lab

(no texting either, please!)



refrain from casual conversation during lecture



observe all safety rules and regulations in lab.


Cheatin
g will not be tolerated and will result in a failing grade.


Homework assignments and due dates
will

be announced.

Assignments will be posted on the
class web site.


Grading (lecture):


3

midterms


3
00 points total


5

quizzes


125

points total

(total may v
ary)


1 comprehensive final

150 points total


Homework



50

points

minimum


Lab grading guidelines will be discussed in lab. Criteria include

completed assignments,
your lab
notebook, your presentation,
two exams and general proficiency in lab. Your lab gr
ade will
comprise 40% of the total grade, so be prepared to work hard! Be forewarned that technique and
professional attitude in the lab
,
and adherence to safety rules
,

are a significant part of your
grade.

.




Biology 27








Fall 2010

Lecture schedule

(tentative)


Week


Topic








Reading


Week 1 (
8/16
)

Introduction to the microbial world




Ch. 1



(and a little microbial ecology)



Basic chemistry for microbiologists




Ch. 2


Week 2 (
8/23)

Studying the microbial world





Ch. 3













Week 3
(
8/30
)

Characteristics of microbial growth




Ch. 4

QUIZ 1 Friday, Sept. 3






Week 4 (
9/6
)

Control
of microbial growth





Ch.
5

NO LECTURE Monday, Sept. 6


Week 5 (
9/13
)

MIDTERM 1 Monday,
Sept. 13



Survey of microbes: prokaryotes




Ch. 10, 11


Week 6

(
9/20
)

Eukaryotes







Ch. 1
2



Viruses








Ch. 13, 14

QUIZ 2 Friday, Sept. 24





Week 7 (
9/27
)

continued







Ch. 10
-
14



Features of microbial metabolism




Ch. 6


Week 8

(
10/4
)

Antimicrobial activity






Ch. 21



What you need to know about gene
tics




Ch. 8

QUIZ 3 Friday, Oct. 8


Week 9

(
10/11
)

Basic biotechnology






Ch. 9










Week 10

(
10/18) Review;
MIDTERM
2
Wednesday,
October 20






Introduction to immunology





Ch.
15, 16



Week 11
(
10/25
)

Continued

(parts of Ch. 17 and 18)
;







W
eek 12
(
11/1
)

Host
-
micro
be interactions; epidemiology



Ch. 19, 20

QUIZ 4 Friday, Nov. 5





Week 13

(
11/8)
continued; selected topics in infectious disease



Ch. 22
-
28

No lecture Friday, November 12













Week 14 (
11/15
)

Infectious disease

continued





Ch. 22
-
28

MIDTERM 3
Wednesday
, November 1
7



Week 15 (
11/22) Infectious disease continued

No lecture Friday, November 26




Week 16 (
11/29)
Environmental microbiology applications



Ch. 31



Food microbiology






Ch. 32

QUIZ 5 Friday, Dec. 3


Week 17
(
12/6
)
continued; review



FINAL EXAM Monday, December 13, 11:30
-
2:30