Intervention and Mechanical Engineering (EIME) Project

cuckootrainMechanics

Oct 31, 2013 (3 years and 11 months ago)

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Providing Real
-
World Mechanism
Design Experience through the Early
Intervention and Mechanical
Engineering (EIME) Project

Stephen L. Canfield, Andrew Bryant

Dept. of Mechanical Engineering


Lindsay Smith

Dept. of Civil Engineering

Tennessee Technological University


ASME IDETC
-
CIE 2010

Montreal CA.

August 15
-
18

Outline of presentation




Description of project


Elements of education


Pedagogical basis


Stakeholders


Expectations and outcomes per stakeholders


Project Examples

Pedagogical basis


Over arching idea; learn by doing in a relevant, guided and
motivational environment


Problem
-
Based learning (Duch, 2001)


Using problems to engage students and initiate learning on the subject
matter


Contextualized learning (McKeachie and Hofer, 2002)


Students seek meaning in context and process new information in a
way that makes sense to their own frames of reference


Service learning (Oakes et al., 2002)


Integrates community service with instruction and reflection to enrich
the learning experience



This paper offers an example for contextual learning in
mechanism design for undergraduates


TTU’s EIME Project


EIME is my approach for creating a context for
learning in ME3610

“Kinematics and Dynamics of Machinery


Design of
Machinery”


How?


All students in ME3610 engage in/join the EIME
project


EIME is a team
-
based, multi
-
disciplinary design
experience created around developing assistive
technology for children


Student teams are matched with children/families
with needs


Student teams are provided resources associated
with such a project


Student teams are responsible to deliver a solution
(Design, product*)


Consider how we create context for
learning


“The Syllabus”

Course
Outcomes:

How a syllabus creates context

Course
Outcomes:


Its major objective is to provide
students with proficiency and
experience in the basic skills of
analyzing motion of machines and to
perform synthesis of mechanisms
based on task specification.

How Service could create a context
for learning:

Course
Outcomes:


Your company thinks that Jon’s
quality of life might be enhanced with
a machine


You are assigned to use your
mechanism design skills to help Jon


Successful outcomes might look like

What a successful outcome might
look like



Background & current status


Began at TTU in 1999


Employed in ME 3610


1 section out of 2 per semester


Approximately 60 students/year


Classic mechanisms class


Analysis/synthesis of linkages,


Cam and gear systems


Basic force analysis

Project Objectives


To demonstrate real
-
world application
of mechanism design


Provide compelling and immediate
purpose for learning mechanism
theory


To provide experience working with
customers


Create opportunity to see design in
practice


Details of the EIME Project


Impact of project on:

1.
Instructor

2.
Students

3.
Course


General approach

1.
Collect project needs

2.
Present them to the students

3.
Provide feedback to the students during the design
process

4.
Provide resources for fabricating / testing the
product

5.
Reflect

How EIME Works

Collect assistive
technology needs

Form Student Design
teams

(Engineering, Education)

Match Child
needs with
Student teams

Form Final
project team

background research,
integrate course material,
create design

Family

Service coord.

Therapists /

Medical prof.

Deliver Final
product to
child/family

Within context of a course

Disseminate
Results

Community

Curriculum

Fabrication, testing,
evaluation and final
preparation

What the project implies


Project requirements for:


Students


Instructor


Course

Project requirements for Instructor


Collect project needs



Projects selected around theme:


Assistive technology for children with disabilities


Focus on needs with motion
-
control or mechanism
-
based solutions


Mobility, access, inclusion


Early intervention service coordinators, special education,
school system


TEIS located on Universities in TN


Letter soliciting
nees


Established relationship with service providers


Understand course objectives


What needs are best suited to the project


Successful outcomes not guaranteed (~70%)


Support student team interaction with families


Support logistical issues while instructor can focus on technical
feedback to the groups


Present to the students / initiate
projects


Students form teams


Teams select projects from list


Topic thoroughly covered in literature

Support design process



Similar to feedback students receive in
typical assignment


Difference here: 5
-
7 different projects,
more open
-
ended design


To facilitate, two technical reviews are
scheduled


One with preliminary design


One with final design


Present and receive feedback in 20
-
30 min.
review session


Local engineers volunteer to help support these
reviews

Provide resources for
fabricating/testing products


Support consists of two parts:


Location, technical support for fabrication


Typical shop support at engineering universities


Financial support


Annual grant support from the TN dept. of
special education


Other issues


Liability


Students engage in the project as a formal class
assignment


They fall under a classification of persons performing duty
for state


Liability is born through the state


A project release


Any faculty engaging in this type of project should get
legal clarification through their OSP


Time associated with managing the project


20 hours to organize project details


28 hours (2 hours per week) to provide technical support
and feedback


100 hours per semester required by supporting student


(latter supported through state grant)


Project requirements for Students


Form teams, create a short, written teaming agreement


Meet with the family and service coordinator to identify
need/project specs.


Submit a preliminary design report


Problem statement with design requirements


Conceptual solutions


Comparison/evaluations


Submit a written final design report


Description of design


Kinematic model


Analysis of 3 components in the design


CAD model,
dwgs

for all
fab
. Components


Fabricate, test design and demonstrate results


*Deliver a functional, safe working model of the design to the
family


Optional


Incentive

Project requirements for Course


20% of class grade


Represents 8 class meetings


In practice, four class meetings assigned to project,
remaining 38 to class projects


Project introduction, forming teams, project assignments


Preliminary design technical review


Final design technical review


Final project review


Project assigned at the beginning of course




+


Open
-
ended nature of projects project


=> Students may need access to course information in
an order different that that presented by the lecture
schedule

Project Outcomes (on student
learning)


Course surveys


Indicate positive outcomes in meeting course objectives


Relative to other sections on formal, in
-
place measures


Exams, follow
-
on courses, FE exams


No significant deviation between sections


Heuristic measures


Student evaluations,


Senior exit interviews


500+ students engaged in the project


100+ products delivered


Many students respond after graduating


What EIME projects look like



Modified Bike for Brendon

TTU engineering students help make holidays
happy for child with muscular dystrophy


COOKEVILLE, Tenn. (Dec. 13, 2006)


A group of
Tennessee Tech University engineering
students are helping make the holidays happy
for a 7
-
year
-
old boy with muscular dystrophy.

The team designed and built a motorized bicycle
that will accommodate his special needs, giving
him the once impossible opportunity to ride
alongside the bikes of his two older brothers.

Team spokesman Nick Seegraves spoke for the
entire group when he said, “It’s really made my
Christmas knowing we’ve been able to do
something to make Brendon happy.”

“I want the light on the front to shine,” he said,
when team members finally got him to stop
riding long enough to get his reaction to his
new set of wheels


but even a working
headlight wasn’t enough of a priority for
Brendon to want to give up his new prized
possession.


“Sit and Spin”

Goal: Specified sensory
stimulation

Primary Challenges:


Multi
-
dof


Speed limited


Focus on a single
sensory input

Delivered: Novel Sit and
spin device for family,
design solution and
details

Sports Example:


Modified Tee
-
ball
stand and swing
device


Used by Structured
Athletics for
Challenged Children

Playground Equipment

Mobility: Tricycles, Bikes


New
Tricycle/Modified
Tricycle designs


Needs include
Dwarfism, Spina
-
Bifida

Top Benefits

1.
Provides students with a “relatable”
framework in which to organize new
knowledge content

2.
Catalyst for self
-
directed learning

3.
Emphasizes important skills not easily
incorporated into traditional activities

4.
Targets ABET learning objectives that
are more difficult to achieve in
traditional classroom experience


Top Challenges (potholes)

1.
To work, the experience must be
meaningful => Faculty time, organization

2.
Self
-
directed learning => Need to
accommodate asynchronous knowledge
transfer

3.
Skills often require implementation =>
Cost (budget per team)

4.
Learning objectives are much more difficult
to measure => Assessment

Conclusions:



Students have interest to engage in
service
-
learning activities


Project offers opportunity to engage
technical and project management
skills


Multi
-
disciplinary team work



Success and sustainability of project
depends on partnership


Assessment based on TTU Service
-
learning survey

#

Question

1

I

learn

more

when

courses

contain

hands
-
on

activities

2

Courses

in

school

make

me

think

about

real
-
world

situations

in

new

ways
.

3

When

I

am

put

in

charge

of

a

project,

I

sometimes

wonder

whether

I

can

succeed

at

it
.

4

I

learn

course

content

best

when

connections

to

real
-
world

situations

are

made
.

5

The

community

participation

that

I

did

through

this

course

helped

me

to

see

how

the

subject

matter

I

learned

can

be

used

in

everyday

life
.

6

The

work

I

accomplished

in

the

course

has

made

me

more

marketable

in

my

chosen

profession
.

7

The

work

I

preformed

helped

me

learn

how

to

plan

and

complete

a

project
.

8

Participating

in

the

community

helped

me

to

enhance

my

leadership

skills
.

9

The

work

I

preformed

in

the

community

enhanced

my

ability

to

communicate

my

ideas

in

a

real
-
world

context
.


Figure 1: Student response (1 = strongly disagree, 5 = strongly agree)