BUS-MHR 8780 - Introduction to Micro Research Methods in Management

crateleftInternet and Web Development

Dec 4, 2013 (3 years and 8 months ago)

93 views

BUS
-
MHR
8780

-

Introduction to Micro Research Methods in Management

THE OHIO STATE UNIVERSITY

FISHER COLLEGE OF BUSINESS

Spring

20
1
3, Second
Term

Professor:



Howard J. Klein, Ph.D.

Office:




748 Fisher Hall

Office Phone:


292
-
0719

E
-
Mail:



Klein_12@fisher.osu.edu

Office Hours:


Monday 3:00
-
3:30, Tuesdays

4
:
0
0
-
5:0
0
, and by appointment

Class Hours:


Mondays
,
12
:00



3:00

in
700

Fisher


COURSE DESCRIPTION:

This class is designed to familiarize doctoral students with the fundamentals of behavioral
research in the organizational sciences.
To be successful as a researcher
(
and
a
consumer
of
research
)

you need a working understanding of
all phases of the
scientific process
.

T
he scientific process employs both theory and data in an effort to describe, explain, predict
and/or control
a

phenomenon of interest. This process c
onsist
s of four key linkages. Linkage I
involves

moving from theory to hypotheses generation, and entails such
topics as theory building, ascertaining the current state of knowledge and
generating hypotheses. Linkage II
concerns designing a study to provide
data relative to those
hypotheses
,

and deals w
ith the issues associated with
the
reliability

and
validity of measurement, sampling, and research design.
In Linkage III, th
at

data is analyzed in order to draw inferences with respect
to the theory and hypotheses. Finally, the process comes full circle i
n
Linkage IV, where the results are used to support, amend or refute the
theory. Critical topics associated with this linkage include the interpretation,
generalizability
,

and presentation of research results.

This class uses a
seminar format requiring (a)

active, through reading and evaluation of
assigned materials, (b) written assignments, and (c)
rigorous
, engaged group discussions.
T
his class will
not

deal with
technical aspects of using
statistics

(your statistics classes serve
that purpose) nor will it

provide in
-
depth practice in
conducting
research

(research
experiences with
faculty is needed for that).

This course provides the foundation
for you t
o
learn more
from those research experiences
.

CO
URSE OBJECTIVES:

T
his seminar
will
prepare
you

to undertake original programs of
behavioral research.

Y
ou will
learn about the
numerous methodological options available to researchers
,
the strengths and
weaknesses of each
,
and
how
to assess the appropriateness
of each given the
research
questions

of interest.

We will consistently return to the themes of choices, constraints, and
tradeoffs
.
You will also
gain

a
n

understanding of the ethical standards used in the conduct of
research w
ith respect to both the treatment of research participants and the dissemination of
research findings.

After completing this course, you should
be able

to
:
(a) communicate about empirical
research with the community of scholars in your
field,
(b) critical
ly review the methods used in
empirical studies
--

for yourself

in the journal articles

you read
, for peers seeking feedback, or
for journal editors, and

(c) design your
own
research
to maximize the possible knowledge to
be gained from it, while at the
same time recognizing its limitations.

MHR

8780

Spring

20
1
3


2

INSTRUCTIONAL PHILOSOPHY:

This course is designed to lay the foundation for your research endeavors

and
I'm here to
help you
set a solid foundation.

I am committed to
working with you to
creat
e
a

positive
learning
environment but e
ach of us is responsible for the success of this class.
What you get
out of the course is, ultimately
,

up to you.
I expect each
you to take
responsib
ility
for
your
own
learning and
to actively
contribute to the class
.

My goal is to strikes

a balance between my
presentin
g

material and your involvement in discussions and
assignments
.
If things get
boring, tell me
;

i
f you're having trouble,
let me know
. I'm looking forward to an enjoyable,
stimulating course
.

I’l
l do everything I can to make i
t so.

WEEKLY ASSIGNMENTS
:

Required Text:

Kerlinger, F. N., & Lee, H.
B
.

(200
0
).

Foundations of behavioral research
,

(
4
th
Edition).
Cengage Learning
-

Wadsworth.

ISBN# 9780155078970

Readings
. Additional

r
eadings for the course are taken from a variety of
academic journals
and books to provide a comprehensive treatment of the topics covered.

Assigned
readings
will be made available

on Carmen along with discussion questions for each class sessions.

Web Casts
.

For several classes, the assignment will include
watch
ing

a
web cast and
download
ing

the
slides

corresponding to those web casts.

The web casts are approximately 1
to 1 and one
-
half hours

and should be viewed prior to the class session for which they are
a
ssigned.

Below are the log in instructions for accessing
the
assigned
web casts and
Power
P
oint slides
as well as
a
ny
other topics

that may interest you
.



Go to
http://carma.wayne.edu/Login.asp

the website fo
r the Center for the Advancement
of Research Methods and Analysis



Enter my e
-
mail address:
klein.12@osu.edu

and
the
password:
MHR911



Click on Video Library

(the last link on the page)



GRADING:

The graded requirements for this course reflect
the things
you

will be expected to
know and
do as
academics
.
S
tudents will receive
a letter grade

f
or
all but one
of these
requirements

(the CITI training)
,
each of which is
described in more detail below
.
The following table
indicates the relative weigh
t
ing of the
graded requirements

in determining final grades.


Research Proposal

50
%

Contribution to Class Discussions

20
%

Faculty
R
esearch
R
eport

15%

Peer Critique

15
%

Complete CITI Training

--

Total:

100%


CITI Training.
Students will be required to complete

the training
requirement for OSU
researchers
involved
in
researching involving
human subjects

if they have not already done
so. This
assignment

is not graded but must be completed as evidenced by submitting a copy
of the completion report. Information abou
t this web
-
based course can be found at
http://orrp.osu.edu/irb/training/citi.cfm
.



MHR

8780

Spring

20
1
3


3

GRADING (continued):

Research Proposal.

Each student will formulate a research proposal
with a
focus

on
the methods section of that proposal
.

The proposal should describe a feasible, original
research project
relating to your area(s) of interest.
I encourage you to choose a topic you are
interesting in pursuing

(i.e., the goal should be to subsequently c
onduct the research you
propose). You may but do not have to further refine an idea used for a previous seminar. You
may c
onsult with
faculty to help develop, evaluate, and

refine your thinking, but the proposal
should be for your own original new research
, not something you have started doing with a
faculty member. See the page
9

of this syllabus for additional details on expected content of
your proposal.

Faculty Research Report.

This assignment requires that you make contact with one of
the faculty
members in your department
,
ask him or her to share a relatively recent article
reporting the results of some type of empirical research
,
and
conduct a brief interview with
that professor
. You are to read th
at

article carefully and to prepare a brief (
5
-
7
minute)
presentation to the class on th
at professor’s views of research, areas of expertise, and the
study you read
.

See the page
10

of this syllabus for additional details on expected content of
your presentation and suggested interview questions.
Student
s are expected to coordinate
their efforts so as to avoid duplication of faculty

(i.e
.
, e
ach student should report on a different
faculty member’s work
)
.
If you have already begun working with a faculty member and are
somewhat familiar with that person’s r
esearch, you
should select

a different faculty member
so that you use this opportunity to make additional connections
.
Since you will be hearing
about my research and views all quarter, I am not an eligible subject for this assignment.

Class Contribution.

Substantive contributions to class
discussion
s

are expected and
critical for learning to occur in a seminar format.
Note that contributing is not the same as
attending or participating (though
the others are prerequisites for

contribut
ing
). Contributing is

defined as providing comments that demonstrate knowledge, application, or integration of
course material, respectful responses to and elaboration on the comments of others,
refraining from overly long monologues or war stories, and actively engaging in in
-
class
activities.

Ask questions and contribute your thoughts and personal experiences whenever
relevant.

You

are expected to have
read

all assigned materials

and prepared answers to the

discussion questions. Review those materials prior to class and to co
me to class with ideas,
concerns, and questions on the material.
You do
not

have to formally write

out

your answers
to the
discussion
questions, but you should bring thorough notes and be prepared to speak
from them, should you be called upon in class (and

you will be!).
The
r
e
is not always a
"correct" answer

to the questions b
ut you are expected to have an opinion and to back up
your opinion.
My teaching style is informal. Feel free to interrupt or ask questions at any time.
The question
s

you ask will like
ly
be of
help
to
other students in class.
Feedback regarding
your
contribution
level is available upon request.


Peer
D
raft
C
ritique and
R
esponse.

You

will be asked to critically review a classmate’s
draft
research proposal
. In doing so, you will provide constructive, written feedback to your
classmate (and to me). You likewise will receive a peer critique of your own draft proposal.
Use that critique to improve your proposal. When you submit your proposal, you will need to
also provide a letter to the “editor” (me!) explaining what was changed in the final paper
(or
the rationale for not making changes)
to
address
the “reviewer” comments. The
10
% of your
final grade for
this assignment breaks down to 6
% for the peer critique

you provide to your
classmate
and
4
% for y
our letter responding to the critique

you receive
.




MHR

8780

Spring

20
1
3


4

COURSE POLICIES:



Anyone needing special accommodation because of a disability or other unique
circumstances should notify me as early as possible. Students with special needs are
responsible for making me aware of their situation.



I expect you to honor the academic honest
y standards
outlined in OSU’s

Code of Student
Conduct
(
Section 3335
-
23
-
04)
.
Any suspicion of academic misconduct will be acted upon in
accordance with university policy.
The ideas and work on the assignments for this class
must be your own
--

they

are
not

group

projects
.

I also reserve the right to use
Turnitin

or
similar products to detect plagiarism or excessive undocumented material.

CLASS SCHEDULE:


DAY

(DATE)

TOPIC

MONDAY

(
3
/
4)

Introduction to Course

& Connections to Prior Coursework

MONDAY

(
3
/
11
)


No Class


Spring Break

MONDAY (3/18)

Choosing Variables &
Measure
s I

MONDAY

(
3
/
25
)

Choosing Measures II & Samples

MON
DAY

(
4
/
1
)

Research Ethics

&
Cultur
al Considerations


CITI
&
Faculty Research Report
s
Due

MONDAY

(
4
/
8
)

Choosing
Data Collection Sources and Methods;

MONDAY

(
4
/
15
)


Choosing Designs

Draft Research Proposal Due

MONDAY

(
4
/
22
)

Choosing Conclusions

Peer Critique Due

MONDAY
(
4
/
29
)

Research
Proposal due


RESEARCH METHODS RESOURCES
:

B
elow is a list of
valuable
research methods
resources
of which
you
shoul
d

be aware:

Research Methods Division of the Academy of Management Website
http://division.aomonline.org/rm/joomla


Cohen, J., Cohen, P., West, S.G., and
Aiken, L.S. (2003).

Applied multiple
regression/correlation analysis for the behavioral sciences
.

Lawrence Erlbaum and
Association:

Hillsdale, NJ.

Corbin, J.
,

&

Strauss, A.
(2008)
. Basics of qualitative Research
(3
rd

ed).
Newbury Park:

Sage.


Dillman
,

D
.

A.
,

Smyth
J. D., &
Christian
, L. M. (2008).

I
nternet, mail, and mixed
-
mode
surveys:
T
he tailored design method

(3rd ed.)
.
New York: Wiley.

Drasgow, F. & Schmitt, N. (2002).
Measuring and analyzing behavior in organizations
. San
Francisco: Jossey Bass.


Go
ldacre
, B. (2010).
Bad Science: Quacks, Hacks, and Big Pharma Flacks
. London,
Faber &
Faber
.

Hunter, J. E. & Schmidt, F. L. (2004).
Methods of meta
-
analysis

(2
nd

ed.). Thousand Oaks,
CA: Sage.

MHR

8780

Spring

20
1
3


5

RESOURCES (continued)
:

Klein, K.J. & Kozlowski, S.W.J. (2000).
Multilevel theory, research, and methods in
organizations
.

San Francisco: Jossey
-
Bass.

McGrath, J.E., Martin, J., & Kulka, R.A. 1982.
Judgment calls in research
. Beverly Hills, CA:
Sage.

Nunnally, J.C., & Bernstein, I.H. (1994).
Psychometric
t
heory
. (3rd
Edition). NY: McGraw
-
Hill.

Pedhazur, E. J., & Schmelkin, L. P. (1991).
Measurement, design, and analysis: An integrated
approach
. Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum. (P&S)

Rogelberg, S. G. (2002).
Handbook of research methods in Industrial and Organizational
Psychology
. Oxford, UK: Blackwell.

Rubin, H. J. & Rubin, I. S.

2005.

Qualitative interviewing: The art of hearing data. 2nd Ed.
Thousand Oaks: Sage


Shadish, W. R., Cook, T. D., & Campbell, D. T. (2002).
Experimental and quasi
-
experimental
Designs for gene
ralized causal inference
. Boston, MA: Houghton Mifflin.

Van de ven, A. H. (2007).
Engaged scholarship: A guide for organizational and social
research
. Oxford University Press.


READING ASSIGNMENTS:

I. THEORY


HYPO呈ESES

WEEK 1


Introduction to Course


Kerlinger
& Lee

(
2000
)
C
hapter
s

1
-
2
,
&
pages 455
-
463

(Research Design as Variance Control).

Campion, M. A. (1993). Article review checklist: A criterion checklist for reviewing research articles
in applied psychology.
Personnel Psychology,

46
(3), 705
-
718.

Robison, S. J. 1990. Top 10 things you should know about doing research in an organization.
The
Industrial
-
Organizational Psychologist
,
27
(3)
,

79
-
81.


Hodgkinson, G. P., & Rousseau, D. M. (2009). Bridging the rigor relevance gap in management
research: It
is already happening!
Journal of Management Studies, 46
, 534
-
546.

Recommended but not required
:


Sackett, P. R., & Larson, J. R., Jr. (1990). Research strategies and tactics in industrial and
organizational psychology. In M. D. Dunnette &

L. M. Hough (Eds.),
Handbook of
industrial and organizational psychology

(pp. 419
-
489). Palo Alto, CA: Consulting
Psychologists Press. [a great overview of everything we’ll be covering in this class]

McGuire
,

W
.

J.

(1997).

Creative hypothesis

g
enerating
in psychology:

Some useful heuristics
.
Annual Review of Psychology
, 48, 1
-
30
.


II.

HYPOTHESIS


DATA

WEEK
2

Choosing
Variables & Measures I

Webcast

-

#22
Issues with Group Measurement; Dr. Katherine Klein

Kerlinger
& Lee

(
2000
)
C
hapter
s

3 &
27
.

Becker, T. (2005). Potential problems in the statistical control of variables in organizational
research: A qualitative
analysis with recommendations.

Organizational Research
Methods, 8
,

274
-
289.

Hackman, J.R. (2003). Learning more by crossing levels: Evidence from airplanes, hospitals,
and orchestras.
Journal of Organizational Behavior, 24,

905
-
922.

MHR

8780

Spring

20
1
3


6

Harnish
, K.A., Hulin,
C. L., & Roznowski, M.

(1998)
.

The importance of individuals' repertoires

of
behaviors: the scienti
fi
c appropriateness

of studying multiple behaviors and

general
attitudes
.
Journal of Organizational Behavior
,
19
,

463
-
480

Bagozzi, R. P., &

Edwards, J. R. (1998). A general approach for representing constructs in
organizational research.
Organizational Research Methods, 1,

45
-
87.

Johnson, R. E., Rosen, C. C., Chang C. H., Djurdjevic, E., & Taing M. U.
(2012).
Recommendations for improving the

construct clarity of higher
-
order multidimensional
constructs
.
Human Resource Management Revie
w, 22
(2),

62
-
72
.

Cortina, J. M. (1993). What is coefficient alpha? An examination of theory and applications.
Journal
of Applied Psychology, 78
(1), 98
-
104.

Dalton, D. R. (1986). The practical applicability of test
-
retest reliability on a decision making
algorithm: Exhaustive Alternatives.
Journal of Irreproducible Results, 3
, 278.

Recommended but not required
:


Kerlinger
& Lee

(
2000
) chapter
26
.

LeBrenton, J.

M., & Senter, J. L. (2008). Answers to 20 questions about interrater reliability
and interrater agreement.
Organizational Research Methods, 11
(4), 815
-
852.


WEEK
3

Choosing Measures II & Samples

Webcast
s

-

Watch at least one or both of the following:

#20
Non
-
responses to Organizational Surveys;

Dr. Steven Rogelberg



#15
Contributing to Applied Psychology with Laboratory Research; Dr. John Hollenbeck

Kerlinger
& Lee

(2000)
C
hapters
8 & 28
.

Schwab, D.

P. (1980).

Construct validity in organizational behavior.
Research in Organizational
Behavior, 2
, 3
-
43.

MacKenzie, S. B., Podsakoff, P. M., & Podsakoff, N. P.
(2011).
Construct measurement and
validation procedures

In
MIS

and behavioral research:
I
ntegrating

New and
existing
techniques
.

MIS Quarterly
,

35
(2), 293
-
334.

Molloy
,

J
.

C.
, &

Ployhart
,

R
.

E.
(
2012
).
Construct Clarity: Multidisciplinary Considerations and an
Illustration Using Human Capital
.
Human Resource Management Review
, 22
, 152
-
156.

Highhouse, S., &
Gillespie, J.Z. (2009). Do samples really matter that much? In C.E. Lance &

R.J. Vandenberg (Eds.),
Statistical and methodological myths and urban legends:

Doctrine, verity and fable in the organizational and social sciences
(pp. 249
-
268). New

York: Routle
dge.

Murphy, K. (2002).

Using power analysis to evaluate and improve research (pp. 119
-
138).

In
S.G. Rogelberg (ed.),
Handbook of research methods in industrial and organizational
psychology.

Malden, MA:

Blackwell.


Mook, D.G. (1983).

In defense of
external invalidity.
American Psychologist, 38
, 1379
-
1387.

Highhouse, S. (
2009
). Designing experiments that generalize.
Organizational Research
Methods
,

12

(3
),
554
-
566
.


WEEK
4

Research Ethics & Cultural Considerations

Webcast
s

-

Watch at least one or
both of the following:


#21
Methodological issues in Cross
-
Cultural Research;

Dr. Michele Gelfand

#
65

Cross Cultural Research Methods
;

Dr. Mark Peterson

Kerlinger
& Lee

(2000) chapter
17
.

MHR

8780

Spring

20
1
3


7

Schaffer, B. S., & Riordan, C. M. (2003).

A Review of Cross
-
Cultural Methodologies for
Organizational Research: A Best
-

Practices Approach.

Organizational Research Methods
,
6
(2), 169
-
215.

Rousseau
, D. M., &

Fried
, Y.

(2001)
.

Location, location, location:

C
ontextualizing organizational
r
esearc
h.
J
ournal of Organizational Behavior
,

22
,

1
-
13
.

Academy of Management.
(
2005
)
. The Academy of Management code of ethics.

Rosenthal
, R. (1994). S
cience and ethics in

conducting, analyzing,

and reporting

psychological
research
.
Psychological Science
,

5

(3
)
.

127
-
133.

Stroebe, W., Postmes, T., & Spears, R.
(2012).
Scientific Misconduct and the Myth of

Self
-
Correction in Science.
Perspectives on Psychological Science, 7
(6) 670
-
688
.

Simmons, J. P., Nelson, L. D., & Simonsohn, U. (2011). False
-
Positive Psycholog
y:
Undisclosed Flexibility in Data Collection and Analysis Allows Presenting Anything as
Significant.
Psychological Science, 22(11), 1359
-
1366.

Kacmar, K. M
. (2009). An ethical quiz.
Academy of Management

Journal
,

52

(
3
)
, 432

434.


WEEK
5

Choosing Data
Collection Sources and Methods

Webcast
s

-

Watch one or
more

of the following:

# 40
Measurement

of Affect and Episodic Events; Dr. Howard Weiss

# 41
Question and Context Effects in Organizational Survey Data
;


Dr. Adam Meade

#

70
Practical Issues in
Developing a Measure; Dr. Fred Oswald

Hinkin, T. R.
(
1998
)
. A brief tutorial on the development of measures for use in survey
questionnaires.
Organizational Research Methods,

1
,

104
-
121.


Schriesheim, Powers, Scandura, Gardiner, & Lankau.
(
1993
)
. Improving construct
measurement in management research: comments and a quantitative approach for
assessing the theoretical content adequacy of pencil

and
-
paper survey
-
type
instruments.
Journal of Management
,
19
, 385
-
417.

Whitley, B. E. (2002). Chapter 11: Survey research. In
Principles of research in behavioral science
(2
nd

ed.)
.

Burr Ridge, IL:

McGraw
-
Hill.
pp. 343
-
371.

Schwartz, N.
(1999)
Self
-
reports: How the questions shape the answers.
American Psychologist,
54
(2)
,
93
-
105.

Podsakoff, P.M., MacKenzie, S.M., Lee, J., & Podsakoff, N.P. (2003). Common method
variance in behavioral research: A critical review of the literature and recommended
remedies.
Journal of Applied Psychology
, 88, 879
-
903.

Spector, P. E. (2006). Me
thod variance in organizational research: Truth or urban legend?
Organizational Research Methods, 9,

221
-
232.

Recommended but not required
:

Kerlinger
& Lee

(2000) chapters

25, 29
-
31
.


WEEK
6

Choosing Designs

Webcast
s
-

Watch at least one or both of the
following:

#24 Longitudinal Data Analysis; Dr. Robert Ployhart

#
64

Quasi
-
Experimental Research
,
Dr. Adam Grant

Kerlinger
& Lee

(2000) chapters
18
-
24
.

Shadish, W. R., Cook, T. D., & Campbell, D. T. (2002).

Experimental and quasi
-
experimental
Designs for
generalized causal inference
. Boston, MA: Houghton Mifflin. Pages 53
-
61;
156
-
160; 247
-
257.

MHR

8780

Spring

20
1
3


8

Kelly, J.

R., & McGrath, J.

E.
(
1988
)
. Time and the logic of method. In
On time and method
, (pp.
9
-
28). Newbury Park, CA: Sage.

Edmonson
, A. C.,

& McManus
, S. E.

(2007)
.
Methodological fit in management

field research
.
Academy of Management Review
,

32(
4) 1155
-
1179.

Mitchell, T.

R.
(
1985
)
. An evaluation of the validity of correlational research conducted in
organizations.
Academy of Management Review,

10,

192
-
205.


Scandura, T. A., & Williams, E. A. (2000). Research methodology in management: Current
practices, trends, and implications for future research.
Academy of Management Journal,
43
, 1248
-
1264.

Recommended but not required
:


Stone
-
Romero, E. (2002). The rela
tive validity and usefulness of various empirical
research designs (pp. 77
-
98). In S.G. Rogelberg (ed.),
Handbook of research
methods in industrial and organizational psychology.

Malden, MA:

Blackwell.


III

& IV
.

DATA


IN䙅RENCE


呈EORY

WEEK
7

Choosing Conclusions

Webcast
s

-

Watch one or more of the following:

#

56 Missing Data: Problems and Prospects; Dr. Daniel Newman

#

48 Computer
-
Aided Text Analysis: Tips and Techniques; Dr. Jeremy Short

#
82

C
rafting Qualitative Organizational Research
;

Dr. Ann Cunliffe

Jick, T.D.
(
1979
)
. Mixing qualitative and quantitative methods: Triangulation in action.
Administrative Science Quarterly,

24
,

602
-
611.


Corbin, J.,

& Strauss, A. (2008).
Chapters 1 and 2 from
Basics of qualitative
r
esearch

(3
rd

ed).

Newbury Park:

Sage.


Cunliffe, A. L. (2011). Crafting Qualitative Research: Morgan and Smircich 30 years on.
Organizational Research Methods, 14
(4), 647
-
673.

Smith, P. C., Budzeika, K. A., Edwards, N. A., Johnson, S. M., Bearse, L. N.
(
1986
)
. Guidelines
for clean data: Detection of common mistakes.
Journal of Applied Psychology,

71
,

457
-
460.


Asimov, I
.

(1988). Chapter
17
: The relativity of wrong.
The relativity of wrong
. NY: Doubleday.
pp.
213

225.

Anderson
, C. (2008).
The End of Theory: The

Data Deluge Makes the Scientific Method
Obsolete
.
Wired Magazine: 16.07.
http://www.wired.com/science/discoveries/magazine/16
-
07/pb_theory


Recommended but not required
:


Switzer, F. S., & Roth, P. L. (2002). Coping with missing data. In S. G. Rogelberg (Ed.),
Handbook of research methods in Industrial and Organizational Psychology
.
(pp.
310
-
323). Oxford, UK: Blackwell.




MHR

8780

Spring

20
1
3


9

Research Proposal
Guidelines

[with approximate page

budgets]


Proposals should conform
with
the predominate
format
style
in your field (e.g., Academy of
Management Journal Guidelines, APA Guidelines)

and are not to exceed 2
5

pages
(
double
-
spaced in a 12
-
point font with 1” margins on all sides
)
.

Introduction

-

Because the focus of this assignment is on the
on the methods

section, the
introduction
section
should
be abbreviated from what you would typically see in a journal article
submission
. However, it
must contain sufficient detail to
(a)
demons
trate the “value added” to
the literature and
(b)
evaluate the appropriateness of the proposed methodology.

1.

Identify the specific
problem
, purpose of the study,

and corresponding
research
question
(s)
.

E
xplain h
ow this study will make an
important
contribution
from
both
theoretical and applied perspectives. [2
-
3

pages]

2.

Briefly review the relevant literature on this topic

and u
se th
at

literature to develop specific,
testable hypotheses.

In doing so, be sure to provide c
onceptual
definitions of all
constructs that will be measured in the study.

[
4
-
6

pages]

Method

-

This section should
reflect what would be found in
a journal submission but
should
contain

even more detail and
be
worded in future rather than past tense. The methods should
be spelled out so clearly that another graduate student could pick up your proposal and know
exactly how to
conduct

the
research.

3.

Describe the sample you would use, explain why

that sample is appr
opriate
, and identify
how
participants
would

be
recruited

and selected
. Note
how participants will be assigned
to conditions (if applicable), and

any incentives offered for participation
. [1 page]

4.

Describe the setting and procedures to be followed
.

Include

the instructions to be
presented to participants and what

the participants will do and when and how they will
do it. Also describe any
experimental tasks
,

manipulations
, and/or
apparatus or

materials that will be used.

[1
-
3 pages, depending on complexity]

5.

Describe the specific
type research study and research design
you will use
and

justify

those choices
.

[1
-
2

page
s
]

6.

Describe

all

constructs that will be
measure
d

and
/or
manipulated. Provide
operational
definitions of all variables

in the methods section
.
Indicate what types of data collection

methods will be used

(i.e.,
how will
data
be
assess
ed

and from where/whom
?).

P
rovide
evidence regarding the reliability and validity of each
established
measure

and describe
how you would
go about establishing

the
rel
iability and validity

of any new measures
.

[2
-
4 pages]

7.

Discuss the analytical approach that you would use to test your hypotheses

and the
specific statistical information use
d
to determine support for

each hypothesis
. [1 page]

Discussion

-

This section
should
also be abbreviated from what you would typically see in a
journal article submission but
should

include the following:

8.

Outline the implications of the study (assuming that the study was conducted as described
and the hypotheses were supported) for
both theory/research and practice.
[
1
-
2

pages]

9.

Provide a thorough treatment of the study’s strengths and limitations
. [2
-
4

pages]

10.

Identify suggestions for
future research
that would follow from the expected findings in this
study
. [
1
-
2 pages]

Appendices

-

Include a complete list of r
eferences
,

any figures

or
tables,

and
your point by
point response to the peer review you received with your proposal submission.

The
se materials
do not count against the page limit.


MHR

8780

Spring

20
1
3


10

Faculty Research Report

Contact the
professor you would like to use for your report, explain the assignment, request an
article and make an appointment to meet with and interview that faculty member.

Obtain and
read the article prior to meeting with the faculty member. Below are
some possibl
e
interview
questions
(you
should
ask some of these and some of your own)
and an outline for preparing
your presentation to the class.

In addition to giving an oral report, have a handout to distribute to
the class (2 pages maximum) that summarizes what yo
u learned about conducting research
and research methods from this assignment.


Faculty Interview guide


General questions

What kinds of
things do you study and how do you go about studying them? (topics,
methods, samples,
target
audience
/
outlets)

Is
there a particular methodology you use most frequently? Why?

What aspects of the research process do you find most enjoyable and rewarding?

Most
difficult and frustrating?

How many research projects do you typically have going at any one time?

How often do

you work with co
-
authors? Why? If you do, how is the work usually
distributed?

How do you make time for research?

In your opinion, what makes for a great research article?

What do you see as the biggest obstacles to being a successful researcher?


Questions relating to the article

What can you tell me about this study that is not in the article?

What was the most challenging aspect of conducting this study?

If you had the chance to do this study over again, what would you have changed?

Identify what you perceive to be a trade
-
off made in the design of the study and inquire
as to why the decision was made to go in the direction that was taken.

How does this article fit within your broader research interests?


Have you or are you planning

to conduct any research that follows
-
up on the results of
this study?


Report and presentation outline

What did you learn about the kind of research this faculty member

conducts
?

What did you learn about this faculty member’s approach to research
?


What did you learn about this faculty member’s thoughts about
the
research

process
?


Summarize the example of this person’s research


Purpose, findings, importance


Methods
-

setting, sample, type of design; strengths and weaknesses