ALVIN COMMUNITY COLLEGE

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Oct 28, 2013 (3 years and 7 months ago)

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ALVIN COMMUNITY COLLEGE

SYLLABUS FOR

PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS I

ECON 2301 (MACROECONOMICS)

SPRING 2
01
3

A DUAL CREDIT COURSE FROM

ALVIN COMMUNITY COLLEGE AND

GLENDA DAWSON

HIGH SCHOOL


Class

Meets
:


9:01
-
9:53 AM
Daily, M
-
F

Location
:
Classroom
1408

Professor:

Dr. Frank Jacobson
, DBA


Dawson High School Instructor:
Mr. Daniel Stuckey

Office Hours:

See me during class and I will be happy to arrange to meet with you at a time
mutually convenient.

E
-
Mail:

2
jacobsons@prodigy.net


Required Material:


Text:
Ma
croeconomics
,
3
rd

Edition,
Paul Krugman and Robin Wells
,
Worth Publishers (2013
).
Class discussions, Lectures, homework and tests will all be centered around

the text. Therefore,
in order to pass the course you must have this edition of the text.


Academic Integrity
:


Scholastic dishonesty will not be tolerated and
you
will be p
enalized

to the
fullest extent. You are expected to
know

and underst
and

policies

r
eg
arding student
responsibilities
, and the intellectual property policy
, in addition to the s
chools

policy
for
o
n
-
campus behavior.


Calculator:

Although most of the calculations in this class can be made without using a
calculator it probably will make yo
ur life easier for class exercises and tests to have one.


Other Materials:

I will be referencing and using examples from: Economics Made Easy however this is not a
required text. I will also be using handouts to reinforce the text.


C
atalog

Description:

(3 Units)

An introduction to the macro
-
economics of a modern industrial society.
This course is
an analysis of economic aggregates: inflation, unemployment, economic growth, and
the distribution of income (including current policies and problems)
. The

course
presents problems of fiscal and monetary policy and places primary emphasis on
critical understanding of the economy

s ability to meet the needs of its people
participating as workers, consumers, and citizens.


Prerequisites
:


none



Learning Objec
tives:

This course will provide students with a fundamental understanding of
Macroeconomics. Learning objectives include an understanding of and the factors affecting:
GDP and GNP, Consumer Price Index, the monetary system, economic expansion, inflation

and
unemployment.


GENERAL OBJECTIVES:

1.

The fundamental goals of this course are as follows:


a.

Understand the basic theories, concepts, and ideas used by all economists to discuss
and explain economic phenomenon.


b.

Understand the methods and
techniques used to analyze data and events.


c.

Understand the development of economic analysis by comparing past schools of
thought to dominant economics models used today.


d.

Understand the use and purpose of fiscal and monetary policies.


e.

Understand

problems associated with inflation and unemployment, the goal and
objective of economic growth, and the related current issues in macroeconomics.


Specific Learning Objectives:

1.

Understand how outputs (production) of countries are measured.

2.

Understand how
price indexes are established.

3.

How the government influences the market structure.

4.

Develop an understanding of the multiplier effect.

5.

Develop an understanding of the monetary system and the role of taxes.

6.

Understand the structure and influence of the Feder
al Reserve.

7.

Understand the role of monetary and fiscal policy and the impact of the national
debt.

8.

Conduct research and do a presentation on a major topic of Macroeconomics.

9.

Understand the logic of the basic theories and concepts use to explain economic
e
vents.

10.

Analyze government policies designed to achieve certain goals and deal with specific
problems.

11.

Read and understand current economic conditions as they relate to past and present
circumstances.


Late assignments/Quizzes
:


Late assignments will not be

accepted.


Students are urged to keep
up with the calendar and assignments module to make sure they are keeping up.


Pop quizzes
and “quick writes” will not be made
-
up (that is why they are called "pop quizzes"). Also,
participation points are available i
n class on some class days.





Attendance:

Attendance will be taken each class period.



Exam Make
-
up
:


If you will miss an exam, please contact the instructor
PRIOR TO THE EXAM

to
arrange a make
-
up date.


Exam make
-
ups will not be allowed if you do not

contact the
instructor prior to the exam.


Make
-
ups will not be allowed on take
-
home exams.



Grading
:


This semester I

will be giving several tests
, including a comprehensive final
exam.


A
l
s
o
, unannounced
“Quick Write”
10 point days will be
given
.



Quizzes (both announced
and
unannounced) will also be given.

Attendance will not be
directly used in grading except for
the “pop” quizzes and “Quick writes” which if missed will affect the student’s grade.
Attendance

may
be used

in borderline situatio
ns

to determine
a student’s final
grade.


Tests:

Periodic Tests will be scheduled throughout the semester.

These tests may be on individual
chapters or multiple chapters depending on the chapter topic and pace of the class. Material
contained in the text

(even if not discussed in class) and in the lectures may be used on the
tests. Only the final exam will be comprehensive.
Most tests will be multiple choice.

Pop Quizzes:

Pop quizzes will be unannounced and may consist of essay, true/false, open ended or

any other
type of question. These quizzes will relate to the topics currently under discussion, therefore it
benefits the student to read ahead or stay current with the readings and discussions as well as
being in class as there is
NO MAKEUPS

of Pop quiz
zes.





Quick Writes:

Quick writes are simply a written memory dump by students on a topic in order to simulate
thought and discussion of a specific topic chosen by the instructor. The grades for the quick
write are either 10 or 0 points. If you partic
ipate (both written and verbally) you will receive 10
points if not 0. Persons absent will not be allowed to make up the quick write unless the
absence is authorized in advance by the instructor. i.e. participating in a sporting event,
surgery.


Homew
ork/
Presentations:


Homework may be periodically assigned at the d
i
scretion of the in
s
tructor
. Because 20
12

was

an election year
and the economy was a central theme,
it is anticipated that topics may arise
that may require additional student involvement
in the form of homework or research. Any
additional homework assignments will be given with minimum of one week’s notice.


Student presentations will consist of two parts. The first part will consist of giving a 10
-
15
minute (may be adjusted depending up
on the number of students in the class) individual
PowerPoint presentation on a major topic of Macroeconomics. These topics will be
determined
by the instructor
. This is an individual project and not a group project, therefore students are
expected to com
plete this work on their own.
The student will also be required to submit a
written essay on the subject of 5
-
8 printed pages.

The second part will consist of being involved
in a group debate concerning that topic (either pro or con). For Example one top
ic will be the
Federal Reserve Board. Students may be asked to give the makeup or charter of the Federal
Reserve Board. Other students will present on either the positive or negative aspects of the
Federal Reserve Board. The group debate may consist of
answering a question such as this:
The head of the Federal Reserve Board has been called the second most powerful man in the
world. Do you think this should be an elected position and why? Students will be assigned to
one side of the debate or the other
. Presentations and debates will be scheduled at
appropriate times during the semester. Presentations are due on the date scheduled and
CANNOT

be made up.


T
he following general guidelines will be used for grading, but the instructor will assign final
gr
ades based upon a flexible curve taking into account attendance, participation, improvement
during the term, and completion of homework as well as points.



















P
ercentage



Grading
Scale



Tests

30%



94
-
100%

90
-
93

A

A
-

Comprehensive
Final

30%



87
-
89
%

84
-
86

80
-
83

B+

B

B
-

Quizzes/
Quick Write

Participation

20%



77
-
79
%

74
-
76

70
-
73

C+

C

C
-

Presentations/
Essay

20%



67
-
69
%

64
-
66

60
-
63

D
+

D

D
-

Total

100%



<
6
0%

F





Course Schedule
:


Life will be easier if you read the assigned chapters
ahead of the relevant
lecture and come to class prepared (note: do not cover appendices unless instructed).

Topics
listed below will follow the schedule listed below unless I inform you differently.

The week in
which a chapter may be covered will probabl
y vary due to presentations, tests and
unanticipated events.

I also will in some instances deviate from the text, however students are
responsible for the material covered in the text even though not discussed in class, as well the
materials and subjects
covered in the lectures.



























Chapter
























Topics































































Week 1, 2









1

































First Principles

Week
3













2

































Economic Models: Trade
-
offs and Trade

Week
4













3




Supply and Demand


Week 5

4



Price Controls and Quotas: Meddling with Markets


Week 6

5



International Trade


Week 7

6




Macroeconomics: The Big Picture


Week 8

7



GDP and the CPI: Tracking the Macroeconomy


Week 9

8



Unemployment and Inflation


Week
9

9



Long
-
Run Economic Growth


Week 1
0

10



Savings, Investment Spending, and the Financial System


Week 1
0

11



Income and Expenditure


Week 1
1

12



Aggregate Demand and Aggregate Supply


Week 1
1


13



Fiscal Policy


Week 1
2

14



Money, Banking, and the Federal Reserve System


Week 1
2

15





Monetary Policy


Week 1
3

16



Inflation, Disinflation, and Deflation


Week 1
3

17



Crises and Consequences


Week 1
4

18



Macroeconomics: Events and Ideas


Week 1
5

19



Open
-
Economy Macroeconomics