Mid-Pacific ICT (MPICT) Center &California CommunityCollege ICT Collaborative

costmarysmileInternet and Web Development

Dec 7, 2013 (3 years and 8 months ago)

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Faculty Development Week



Update 5
-
20
-
13
San Francisco
,
CA, June 1
7
-
21, 2013


Page
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MPIMP

Re
g
is
t
er

a
t
:



http://events.constantcontact.com/register/event?llr=pvd9yudab&oeidk=a07e7cvyy5u8b200b49


M
id
-
P
ac
i
f
ic

ICT

(
M
P
I
C
T
)
C
e
n
ter

&

C
a
l
i
f
o
r
n
ia
C
o
m
mu
n
i
t
y

Co
l
l
e
g
e

I
C
T

C
o
l
l
a
bo
r
a
t
i
v
e


S
u
m
me
r
201
3

F
ac
u
l
t
y

D
eve
l
op
m
e
n
t

W
ee
k


San Francisco
,

CA
J
un
e

17
-

21
, 2013



W
ith

Na
t
io
n
a
l Scie
n
c
e

F
o
u
n
da
ti
o
n

Ad
v
an
c
e
d

T
e
c
h
n
o
lo
g
ical
Edu
c
a
ti
o
n

p
ro
g
r
a
m
g
ra
n
t

f
u
n
d
s,

t
h
e

M
i
d
-
P
a
cific

I
n
f
o
r
m
a
ti
o
n

a
n
d

C
o
mmu
n
ica
t
io
n

T
e
c
h
n
o
lo
g
i
e
s

(
M
PICT.org) Ce
n
t
e
r

mission is
to

c
oo
rdi
n
a
t
e
,

i
m
p
rove

a
n
d

p
rom
o
te

I
C
T
edu
c
a
ti
o
n
,

w
i
th

a
n
e
m
pha
sis

o
n

2
-
y
ea
r col
le
g
e
s,

in

C
a
l
i
f
o
rnia,

Ne
v
a
d
a
,

Haw
a
ii

a
n
d

t
h
e

P
a
cific Ter
r
it
o
r
i
e
s
.


The

Calif
o
rn
i
a

C
o
mm
un
ity

Colle
g
e

I
CT

(C
C
CICT.org)

Colla
bo
rative

is f
u
nd
e
d
t
h
ro
u
g
h

CCC

c
h
a
n
c
e
l
l
o
r

s
o
f
f
ice


to

ad
v
a
n
ce

ICT
e
d
u
c
a
ti
o
n

p
r
o
g
rams
a
t

C
a
l
i
f
o
rnia
c
o
mm
un
ity c
o
l
l
e
g
e
s
a
n
d

to

en
a
b
le

a

d
iverse
s
t
u
d
en
t

p
o
pu
la
t
i
o
n

t
o

s
u
cc
e
e
d

i
n
m
ee
ti
n
g

i
ndu
s
try
a
n
d

b
u
si
n
e
ss
I
CT

w
o
rkforce

n
e
ed
s”

a
t

a
ll

1
1
2

CC
C
s.


I
n
f
o
r
m
a
ti
o
n

a
n
d

Com
mu
n
ica
t
io
n
s
T
e
c
h
n
o
lo
g
i
e
s
(
ICT
) is an

u
m
b
rella t
e
r
m
,

w
id
e
ly
u
s
e
d

ou
tsi
d
e

t
h
e

U
.
S
.

a
n
d

i
n

t
h
e

U.N.,

t
o

e
n
c
o
mp
a
ss
a
l
l ra
p
idly
e
m
e
rgi
n
g
,
e
v
o
lv
i
n
g

an
d

c
on
v
e
rging

c
om
pu
t
e
r,
s
o
f
t
war
e
,

n
e
tw
o
rk
in
g
,

t
e
l
e
c
o
mm
un
ica
t
i
on
s, I
n
t
e
r
n
e
t,

p
ro
g
ram
m
ing

a
n
d

i
n
f
o
r
m
a
ti
o
n

sys
te
m
s
t
e
c
h
n
o
l
og
ies.



This

4
.5

da
y

Su
mm
e
r
2
01
3

Fac
u
lty D
e
v
e
l
op
m
e
n
t

W
ee
k

a
t

City College of San Francisco’s Mission
Campus
in
San Francisco
,

CA

w
i
ll

p
rovid
e
:


Six


Train
th
e

t
rai
n
e
r”

tracks

to

p
r
e
pa
re

f
a
c
u
lty
t
o

t
ea
ch

ne
w
o
r i
m
p
rove

e
xisti
n
g

c
ou
rses

o
r pr
o
g
rams:


1.

Cisco IT
-
Essentials

(Also Available to High School Teachers)

2.

Cisco
CCNA
1 Version 5

(Also Available to High School Teachers)



CLOSED (Enrollment Full)

3.

Accelerated NetApp Certified Storage Associate (NCSA) Boot Camp



CANCELLED

(
Due to Low Enrollment
)

4.

Content Management Systems (CMS) Fundamentals and Security

5.

User Experience and Interaction Design Intensive


6.

Packet Analysis and Intrusion Detection



CLOSED (Enrollment Full)


O
n
e

pe
d
ag
o
g
ical

track

t
o

i
m
pa
rt
n
e
w t
e
a
c
h
i
n
g

a
n
d

l
ea
rning

skil
l
s
:


7.

Teach Your Students to Think for Themselves with
Problem
-
based Learning (and Make Employers Happy)



Eve
nt
r
e
g
i
s
tration

is

free
t
o

q
u
a
l
i
fi
e
d

ICT

e
d
u
c
a
t
o
r
s
,

who

m
a
y

b
e

e
l
i
g
ible

f
o
r

tra
v
e
l

c
ost

r
e
i
mbur
se
m
e
n
t
s
.





Faculty Development Week



Update 5
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,
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Track 1:
Cisco IT
-
Essentials Instructor Class

(Also Available to High School Teachers)


Short Class Description:


The IT
-
Essential Instructor’s Class
prepare
s

community college or high school instructors to teach Cisco N
etworking
Academy IT Essentials.
IT
Essentials is an introduction to computer hardware and software skills needed to help meet
the growing demand for entry
-
level ICT professionals.


This curriculum maps to the popular CompTIA A+ certification.


Class Description:


The Internet is changing l
ife as we know it


bringing new economic and social opportunities to communities
everywhere, and increasing the global demand for information and communication technologies (ICT) skills. Innovations
such as social networking, cloud computing, e
-
commerce,
web conferencing,
mobile devices
and desktop virtualization
are changing the way we live, work, pla
y, and learn. These innovations

are all powered by networks, and
there is a
shortage of qualified ICT candidates to

design, install, and manage these network
s.


IT Essentials: PC Hardware and Software
covers
the fundamentals of computer hardware and software and advanced concepts
such as security, networking, and the responsibilities of an IT professional. Students who complete this course will be able
to
describe the internal components of a computer, assemble a computer system, install an operating system, and troubleshoot usi
ng
system tools and diagnostic software. Students will also be able to connect to the Internet and share resources in a networke
d
e
nvironment. New topics in this version include mobile devices such as tablets and smartphones and client side virtualization.

Expanded topics include the Microsoft Windows 7 operating system, security, networking, and troubleshooti
ng.


Hands
-
on lab activit
ies are an essential element of the course. The Virtual Laptop and Virtual Desktop are standalone tools
designed to supplement classroom learning and provide an interactive "hands
-
on" experience in learning environments with limited
physical equipment.


C
isco Packet Tracer

activities are designed for use with Packet Tracer 5.3. The use of Packet Tracer will support
alignment with the new CompTIA A+ certification objectives.


This course is the first level offering of the Cisco Networking Academy, a global
education program that teaches
students how to design, build, troubleshoot, and secure computer networks for increased access to career and
economic opportunities in communities around the world.

The
Networking Academy provides online courses,
interactiv
e tools, and hands
-
on learning activities to help individuals prepare for ICT and networking careers in virtually
every type of industry. Since 1997, Networking Academy has grown from a small
-
scale program designed to help
schools get the most out of their

networking equipment to Cisco’s largest corporate social responsibility program, with
courses taught at more than 9,000 academies in 165 countries. More than 900,000 students develop ICT skills through
the program each year.




Faculty Development Week



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The curriculum offers the
following features and benefits:




Hands
-
on labs and Virtual Laptop and Virtual Desktop learning tools help students develop critical thinking and
complex problem
-
solving skills



The course emphasizes the practical application of skills and procedures need
ed for hardware and software
installations, upgrades, and troubleshooting systems.



Cisco Packet Tracer simulation
-
based learning activities promote the exploration of networking and network
security concepts and allow students to experiment with network b
ehavior.



Interactive assessments provide immediate feedback to support the evaluation of knowledge and acquired skills


Course outline:


1.

Introduction to the Personal Computer

2.

Safe Lab Procedures and Tool Use

3.

Computer Assembly Step
-
by
-
Step

4.

Basics of Preventive maintenance and Troubleshooting

5.

Fundamental Operating Systems

6.

Fundamental Laptops and Portable Devices

7.

Fundamental Printers and Scanners

8.

Fundamental Networks

9.

Fundamental Security

10.

Communication Skills

11.

Advanced Personal Computers

12.

Advanced Operating Systems

13.

Advanced Lap Top

14.

Advanced Portable Devices

15.

Advanced Printers and Scanners

16.

Advanced Networks

17.

Advanced Security


Who should enroll?




CC
&

High School
Instructors who would like to teach Cisco Academy
IT Essentials Curriculum



CC
&

High School
Instructors
who’
d like to gain fundamental PC hardware and software and networking skills


Prerequisites:


Instructors must be aligned to a preexisting Cisco Academy, but there ar
e no other course prerequisites.

To find out
more about alignment to the Cisco Academy, please contact Karen Stanton at
Karen.Stanton@canyons.edu
.


About the Instructor
:


Sharon Hain


Sharon Hain

has been teaching ITE courses since the late 1990’s. She implemented her high school program with the
help of local businesses and her school district. Her program included soliciting donated computers from businesses
and the community, which were refurbi
shed and donated to schools and non
-
profit organizations. Sharon included
participation in Skills USA, a career and technical student organization, where she achieved much success. Many of
Sharon's students have gone on to successful IT careers, one even t
eaching with her at a community college. Having
taught college and high school courses, Sharon knows many best practices to implement with high school students
.



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T
rack 2
:


Cisco CCNA 1 Version 5



CLOSED (Fully Enrolled)

(Also Available to High School
Teachers)


Short Class Description:


This class

prepare
s

community college or high school instructors to teach
the brand new
Cisco Netw
orking Academy
CCNA
v
5 curriculum:
Introduction to Networks
or

Network Basics

curriculum.

These
two different courses lead the
student to the same outcome. An instructor may choose to teach either.

CCNA1 should be A
-
G approved soon!


Class Description:


The Internet is changing life as we know it


bringing new economic and social opportunities to communities
everywhere, and increasing the global demand for information and communication technologies (ICT) skills. Innovations
such as social networking, clo
ud computing, e
-
commerce, web conferencing, and desktop virtualization are changing
the way we live, work, play, and learn. These capabilities are all powered by networks, and organizations around the
world are experiencing a shortage of qualified candidat
es to design, install, and manage these networks.


This class prepares community college or high school instructor to teach the first of the brand new Cisco Network
Academy CCNA v5 courses. The CCNA 5.0 introductory courses are designed to give instructo
rs a choice between
teaching introductory networking as it relates to students’ everyday experiences or to business applications and
requirements. Upon completion of either introductory course, students will have the necessary knowledge to continue
with th
e next sequence of CCNA courses that their academy offers.


CCNA 5.0 introductory courses introduce the architecture, structure, functions, components, and models of the Internet
and other computer networks. The principles and structure of IP addressing an
d the fundament
als of Ethernet concepts,
media

and operations are introduced to provide a foundation. By the end of either course, students will be able to build
simple LANs, perform basic configurations for routers and switches, and implement IP addressin
g schemes.


Course Structure and Sequences
:


The introductory CCNA 5.0 courses are Introduction to Networks and Network Basics.

The CCNA Introduction to
Networks course is designed for instructors who would like to teach introductory networking as it
relates to students’
everyday experiences. In this course, networking topics are associated with common encounters with networking such
as email, search engines, and wireless adapters, to enhance students’ understanding and assimilation of the content.


Th
e CCNA Network Basics course is designed for instructors who would like to teach introductory networking as it
relates to business applications and requirements. In this course, networking topics are taught by mapping business
applications and requirements

to the OSI and TCP layered models.


Upon completion of either introductory course, students will have acquired the necessary knowledge to continue the
next sequence of CCNA courses. One sequence offers an instructional flow where routing and switching net
working
technologies are taught individually. The other offers an instructional flow where routing and switching are taught
together. While the core concepts and related activities are consistent in the different four
-
course paths, the instructional
flow,
contextual examples, and integrated activities are unique to help you accommodate different student goals.

Faculty Development Week



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Course Outlines
:


Introduction to Networks



Network Basics

Exploring the Network




Exploring the Network

It’s Just an Operating System!



It’s Just

an Operating System!

Network Protocols and Communications


Network Protocols and Communications

Network Access





Application Layer

Ethernet





Transport Layer

Network Layer





Network Layer

Transport Layer





IP Addressing

IP Addressing





Subnetti
ng IP Networks

Subnetting IP Networks




Network Access

Application Layer




Ethernet

It’s a Network





It’s a Network


Instructors who complete Introduction to Networking or Network Basics will be able to teach
students to
:



Understand and describe the de
vices and services used to support communications in data networks and the
Internet



Understand and describe the role of protocol layers in data networks



Understand and describe the importance of addressing and naming schemes at various layers of data
networks
in IPv4 and IPv6 environments



Design, calculate, and apply subnet masks and addresses to fulfill given requirements in IPv4 and IPv6
networks



Explain fundamental Ethernet concepts such as media, services, and operations



Build a simple Ethernet
network using routers and switches



Use Cisco command
-
line interface (CLI) commands to perform basic router and switch configurations



Utilize common network utilities to verify small network operations and analyze data traffic


Who should enroll?



Instructo
rs who would like to teach Cisco Academy
CCN
A Introduction to Networks or
Network Basics
.


Prerequisites:

Instructors must be aligned to a preexisting Cisco Academy, but there ar
e no other course prerequisites. To find out
more about alignment to the Cisco Academy, please contact Karen Stanton at
Karen.Stanton@canyons.edu
.


About the Instructor
:


Richard Grotegut
(BA, MA, San Jose

State, ABD, Alliant University, San Francisco) teaches in the
Computers, Networks, and Emerging Technologies department at Ohlone College in Fremont. He has
been at Ohlone for 15 years, has 25 years of experience in IT training, and has taught networking
and
system administration courses both here and abroad through Ohlone's Cisco Network Academy.


He

began his teaching career teaching at the high school level in the area of math and computers. In the early 90’s he
started the first Novell Network Administration training program for high school students here in California. To this day
,

he continues to
work with high school students and teachers as they learn about ICT careers.


Under Grotegut’s direction, Ohlone College, Irvington High School, and Mission Valley ROP have partnered in the
establishment of a Career Pathway in
ICT
. The ICT Pathway leads h
igh school students through courses that prepare
students to transfer to community college and then on to a university for baccalaureate degrees with a computer science
or engineering focus. The Cisco Academy program plays a large role in this pathway. Ric
hard is leading Ohlone
College’s Cisco Networking Academy training programs. If you have questions about that program, or this particular set
of track offerings,
he can be emailed here
.

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Track 3
:

Acceler
ated
NetApp Certified Storage A
ssociate (NCSA) Boot Camp


Short Description:


Boot camp

goals for the

week are to:




Provide you an in
-
depth introduction and overview of storage and data management concepts, technologies and
industry best practices



Provide you
the opportunity to gain a new, storage industry certification



Provide you the knowledge, resources and options to offer the NCSA as a storage certification at your institution



Provide you the techn
ic
al understanding and foundation


and a set of teaching
materials and resources


to infuse
storage content into your

exis
ting IT courses.


Description:


During this

intensive
, one week NCSA Storage Boot Camp, you will complete most of the course and lab work to prepare
you to sit for NetApp’s new, entry
-
level
certification. There will also be a set of interactive lecture/discussion sessions
covering key topics on storage industry trends that you will be able to take back and integrate into your teaching.

A
voucher to take the NCSA certificati
on exam at a
local Pear
son VU T
esting Center (nearest to you)
will be provided to all of
the par
ticipants who are interested in

completing the full NCSA certification for themselves.


Participants will complete approximately 20 hours of training


including 5 web
-
based

courses and 5
-
6 hours of h
ands
-
on
lab exercises delivered

through a hosted virtual environment. Attendees will only need a standard PC with Internet
connection, a browser to access the NCSA materi
als, and a set of head phones (
more detail
ed configur
ation

and technical
specifications will be provided in advance).


With th
e explosion in data volume, velocity

and variety, storage and data management are consistently rated among CIO
and IT managers Top 10 IT issues and considerations. NetApp’s Academic Alli
ances Program has been working with
college and university faculty for the past 2.5 years to enrich individual courses, and began rolling
-
out the new, full
certification curriculum in April of 2013.

The NCSA is designed to either be offered as part of a s
emester long
-
course, or it
can be offered as a supplement to an existing degree program where the student can take it on their own time.


The goal in
both cases is to provide the students with an industry credential documenting the
ir knowledge of NetApp st
orage
and its
basic configurati
on and administration features
.


Additional information and teaching resources on data management trends and technologies will be reviewed and provided
as resources that participants can bring back to their institutions.


These will include several white papers, case studies,
videos, scripted power point presentations/lectures and access to a Virtual Simulator (VSIM) of NetApp’s data
management software that can be deployed and used in teaching labs back at the participant
’s school.



At the end of this week, a faculty member participating in this track
will

be:




Deeply familiar with storage concepts, terminology and technology



Knowledgeable about NetApp products and solutions, particularly the Data ONTAP storage
management suite


which is the #1 storage OS in the world



Well positioned to leverage and utilize NetApp teaching materials and resources such as the web
-
based courses
and a virtual simulator of Data ONTAP with their students



Able to integrate storage con
cepts into a variety of courses to help students understand the connections between
networking, virtualization and storage.

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Proposed Session Flow
for the Week

(
9:30


5:0
0 each day; Friday 9:30


12:00
)




Instructor Bio:


Mark Conway

is the Sr. Program Lead for Academic Alliances at NetApp. In this role he works with faculty and colleges
and universities to enrich their IS
-
related programs, curricula, and student learning opportunities with teaching resources on
storage, data manageme
nt and emerging topics such as virtualization, cloud computing and data center architectures.

Mark has developed and led innovative industry
-
academic partnership programs for several of the leading technology firms,
and he has an extensive track record of

successfully collaborating with faculty worldwide, to enhance their teaching by
infusing new technologies and industry best practic
es content into their courses.


Mark joined NetApp from Oracle in July 2010, where he was a director for BI Product Marketi
ng and worked in the
Enterprise Performance Management Strategy group. Prior to Oracle, Mark led Hyperion Solutions’ Academic Alliances,
where he developed and launched Hyperion’s university
-
partnership program and Hyperion’s collaborations with schools of

business. While at Hyperion, Mark also served on the Teradata Univ
ersity Network’s advisory board

for three years.


Mark launched PeopleSoft’s academic alliance programs, leading the “On Campus” program’s global roll
-
out to some 25+
countries. Mark worke
d at Digital Equipment Corporation for
14

years where he was a founding member of Digital’s Internet
Business Group, and led Digital’s worldwide ISP marketing. He served in several marketing capacities in the Education &
Research Industries group, and wor
ked for five years in DEC’s Corporate Research/External Research Program,
sponsoring university
-
based, research projects.

At DEC, he managed faculty development and science education projects
with the National Science Foundation, the National Academy of S
ciences and several HBCUs.


Mark is a frequent speaker at conferences and
academic institutions. He
has a Masters in Technology, Strategy and Policy
from Boston University, a Masters

in Education from Northeastern University and a BA in Psychology from Merrimack
College. Mark currently serves as the Chairman, Board of Directors, of Teachers 21, a leading teacher development &
advocacy organization in Massachusetts.


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Deborah Roussea
u

is a Technical Content Developer for NetApp University where, as a
technical subject matter expert, Deb designs and develops content for instructor
-
led and web
-
based courses. She has worked for NetApp for thirteen years, first as a technical instructor, t
hen
as one of the lead technical presenters for the Executive Briefing Center (EBC), and now as a
technical courseware developer.


As an instructor, Deborah has trained and certified other instructors on NetApp technology. In her
role at the EBC Deb has
presented NetApp technical vision and solutions to customers and
prospects from around the world. In her current role as a Technical Content Developer, Deb
creates virtual labs to install and explore new software applications and then write the courses t
hat will be delivered to
NetApp employees, customers and partners. Deb holds certifications in Data Management Administration and as a Backup
& Recovery Implementation Engineer. Deb has a wide breadth of technical expertise and interests, has contributed
to
courses on Storage Area Networks (SAN), Virtualization, Storage Virtualization, Disaster Recovery, VMware & Hyper
-
V,
NFS and Clustering and High Availability solutions; and, she is able to bring the combined perspective of course delivery,
student enab
lement, and retention to her work as a courseware developer. Before working for NetApp, Deb has worked in
support roles at PC Medic and HP. Deb attended San Jose State University.





Faculty Development Week



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,
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Track 4
:

Content Management Systems (CMS) Fundamentals and Securit
y




Short Description:


This track will develop instructors’ knowledge and skills with Web Content Management Systems and prepare them to
teach CMS as a course or integrate CMS concepts and activities into existing courses.


Description:


A Content Management System (CMS) is a computer application
used to create, store, publish, edit and manage content

for the Web
. That content can include text, graphics, photos, audio, video, links and code. A well
-
designed web
experience using a CMS is
easier to deploy and manage over time, especially with dynamic content, than standalone,
static coded sites. For that reason, they are increasingly used by website owners, developers, managers, consultants and
other professionals. They provide centralized

management and
maintenance tool
s, tools for cataloging and indexing
content and custom capabilities for content delivery to specific users
.

A growing number of Web professionals use

a

CMS
to

enable their customers to manage, maintain and dynamically upda
te websites as fresh content becomes available.



There are plenty of CMS options available when it comes to
the
selection process for choosing the best resource for a Web
development project or client.

Depending on how advanced you need the CMS resource

to be, what language it’s built in,
and who is going to be using it, it can be a daunting task for Web professional
s
, their clients, customers and stakeholders
when trying to find the perfect fit for a project or website.


The Content Management Systems
(CMS) Fundamentals and Security Course explores the use of open source Content
Management Systems such as Wordpress, Drupal, Joomla, and others to create dynamic, flexible, secure and accessible
websites that are mobile friendly.


Participants will be able

to explore the fundamentals and the multitude of CMS
environments available today.



The Content Management Systems (CMS) Fundamentals and Security Summer 2013 Web Educator Conference Series
takes place at a number of select locations throughout the natio
n. The

goal of the summer series week
-
long workshops is
to help facilitate teacher access to cutting edge Web design and development training and curriculum materials. The
summer workshop series helps teachers stay current by engaging them in projects desi
gned to showcase skills that are in
the highest demand by those that employ Web professionals.





Faculty Development Week



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In this four and a half day workshop
,

specifically designed for the community college educator and those that teach Web
professional topics, we’ll cut through the jargon and clutter to explore the current tool sets, trends, processes and real
-
world case studies for how CMS systems are evolvin
g and improving services for the practitioner and those that they
serve.

Learn teaching methodologies with an overview of selected lesson plans and projects.

Attendees will receive a
complementary one
-
year access to Webprofessionals.org
School of Web

online resources, including:




Web design



Web development and Web business resources including educational content



custom curriculum and training resources covering advanced techniques, and the most up
-
to
-
date best pra
ctices
and methods



Lesson plans for those that teach



How
-
to guides to establish a Web professional program at your school or college



Web professional directories



Web professional job boards



Web professional career guides.



Specifically you will learn/rece
ive:





CMS fundamentals



Overview of the market consisting of commercial, open
-
source and hosted applications



Who needs a CMS case studies and in depth analysis of the most commonly used CMS



Best practices for defining the scope, vision, needs, and
features of a possible content management system for
Web professionals



Content Management Systems for the Enterprise



A CMS "Starter
-
Kit" for teachers and students that includes, a how to guide to prepare content for CMS and how to
prepare stakeholders and
a ROI calculator



A
deep dive into the inner workings of the most commonly used CMS
solutions



CMS Glossary of terms



CMS Security concerns and solutions


Instructor Biographical Information:



Mark DuBois

serves as the Director of Education for WOW and has been teaching at Illinois
Central College

for over a decade. He also teaches classes for fellow faculty members every year
within the state of Illinois (in May). Prior to 1999, he worked in various rol
es in Information
Technology. He has been working with HTML since 1992. Mark developed his first commercial
web site in 1995. He established the first accredited degree in web systems in the U.S. He also
established the first accredited degree in rich
Internet application development (a full year before
the term AJAX was coined). Mark has spoken at various conferences. For example, he gave a
full day pre
-
conference seminar at the 17th International WWW Conference in Beijing in 2008.
Mark runs a local

chapter of WOW and a local Adobe User Group. He is an Adobe Education
Leader and received the Adobe AEL Impact Award in
2011
.


Blog:
http://www.markdubois.info/weblog/contact/

Campus web site:
http://www.icc.edu/faculty/facdetail.asp?id=336



Faculty Development Week



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Track 5:
User Experience and Interaction Design Intensive


Short Description

This hands
-
on workshop introduces participants to the core
principles and foundations of interaction design, information design, and
user experience design. We will interleave discussions of user interface design principles with hands
-
on design exercises crafted to
clarify, illustrate, and elucidate the principle
s. We will explore how to apply the design principles for the web, tablets, smartphones, and
other devices (e.g., watches, televisions, and kiosks). This seminar also introduces the basics of Responsive Web Design (RW
D), an
important technique for design
ing digital experiences that span all screens regardless of size. Participants will be able to utilize these
design principles and exercises to create their own curricula and engage their students in active learning through hands
-
on, practical
experience.

Description of Activities

During the hands
-
on labs, participants will form project teams and collaborate as well as work independently to apply design principles
to selected user interface and user design problems. Teams will collaborate to identify and d
efine possible solutions, then individuals
will design and describe their selected direction.

Some of the practical techniques employed for the hands
-
on exercises may include:



Sketching (pen & paper and/or digital, depending on your preference)



Brainstormi
ng



Design presentation methods



Design critique (constructive criticism)



Personas and/or scenarios



Site or application structural diagrams (e.g., site maps)



Flow diagrams



Wireframes



Storyboards



Simple prototypes



Functional annotations (or functional specifi
cations)



Faculty Development Week



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Topics to Be
Covered



Information Architecture



Information & Interaction Design Principles

o

Perceivability

o

Predictability

o

Feedback

o

Learnability

o

Consistency



Designing for User Experience

o

Motivation

o

Behavior

o

Emotion

o

Cognition

o

Creativity & Generativity



Design Patterns



Experience Context



Mobile Web vs. Mobile App

o

Mobile First



Designing for Touch



Human Interface Guidelines (HIG)



Responsive Web Design (RWD)

o

Content First



Prototyping



Usability Testing



Heuristics Reviews



Accessibility


Course Objectives


At the completion of this workshop participants will be able to:



Understand the unique design challenges for web, mobile, touch, and other devices.



Identify, describe, and define user interface and workflow problems for the web and mobile devices.



Identify and apply design patterns or generate new designs to solve user
interface and workflow problems.



Create design documents to illustrate the proposed solution.



Document and convey the interactivity, flow, and logic of the proposed solution.



Apply foundational design principles in the proposed solutions.



Present design so
lutions using a narrative method.



Explain the rationale behind interface design decisions.



Offer constructive criticism and feedback on design solutions proposed by team members.



Create task lists, scenarios, and simple prototypes to evaluate the efficacy
or proposed design solutions.


Pre
-
Requisites

and Materials Requirements


No prior web design experience is required. Familiarity will common dig
ital design tools is preferred. Bring
Pen and paper (for
sketching)
, a
USB drive (if you would like to take y
our project files with you)
, a s
martphone and/or tablet device to view existing
web sites or apps or to preview project design documents or prototypes


Instructor's Bio


David M. Hogue, Ph.D.

is an applied psychologist and UX (User Experience) design and s
trategy consultant. He holds an
adjunct faculty position at San Francisco State University where he has been teaching Information & Interaction Design course
s
in the Multimedia Studies Program since 2003. He was the Vice President of Experience Design at

Fluid in San Francisco
(2000
-
2013), and prior to joining Fluid he was an Assistant Professor of Psychology at Xavier University of Louisiana in New
Orleans.


He consults with digital agencies, start
-
ups, and corporations to build in
-
house UX teams; he pro
vides professional training and
development services to existing UX teams; and he speaks frequently at conferences and seminars about UX Design,
Interaction Design, and Psychology. He is a member of the Information Architecture Institute (IAI), BayCHI, In
teraction Design
Association (IxDA), Sigma Xi, and is an Adobe Community Professional.




Track 6
:

Packet Analysis and Intrusion Detection

-

CLOSED (Fully Enrolled)


Course Overv
iew


This course will utilize the
“Wireshark 101”
course materials created by
Laura Chappell, Founder of Wireshark
University and Chappell University.
Students will receive six months of online access to additional materials that will
help to prepare them for the
Wireshark Certified Network Analyst (WCNA
) certification.



This course provides an ideal starting point
,

whether students are interested in analyzing traffic to learn how an
application works, troubleshoot slow network performance, or determine whether a machine is infected with malware.


In thi
s track y
ou'll learn how to properly read and interpret packets and packet headers including IP, TCP, ICMP, and
UDP.

You will learn how to distinguish between normal, abnormal, and malicious traffic.

You will also create and
respond to attacks such as Sm
urf, Tribe Flood Network, Stacheldracht, and Targa
,

among others.

You will see how
man
-
in
-
the
-
middle attacks are perpetrated, and how to prevent them.

You will see how hackers bring down routers
and switches, and will learn how to protect network infrast
ructures as well as properly setup and maintain an Intrusion
Detection System.


Who Should Take This Class?


Anyone in an information technology related field. New information security personnel, IT security officers,
information security professionals, s
ecurity auditors, network engineers, network administrators, troubleshooters and
technicians.

Appropriate for anyone interested in network security and the forensic value of performing packet
analysis
-

technical CEOs and law enforcement as well.


What Ar
e Some Applications Of Packet Analysis?


1.

Gleaning clear
-
text usernames and passwords from network traffic. Used by hackers for unauthorized
access. Used by IT professionals to test security of network traffic.

2.

Performance and fault analysis to discover ne
twork bottlenecks and communication problems.

3.

Differentiating normal from abnormal and malicious traffic.

4.

Authenticating and analyzing what Intrusion Detection Systems and Firewalls are recording as attacks.

5.

Making certain that the information captured in

network traffic logs is reliable, and will withstand scrutiny
when used in a legal or administrative proceeding.


Prerequisites


Students should have at least one network certification such as Network+ or CCNA, or equivalent work experience.


Schedule


Day One




IP Theory



TCP Theory



ICMP Theory



Mapping Networks



Packet Fragmentation



The Domain Name System



Routing



Packet Capture Exercises


Day Two




Using TCPdump



Using Ethereal



Normal and Malicious
Activity



Traffic Analysis using TCPdump



Traffic Analysis using Ethereal



Insertion and Evasion Attacks



Examining Embedded Protocol Header
Fields



Trojan Scans



Worm Scans



Man
-
in
-
the
-
middle Attacks


Day Three




Operating System
Fingerprinting



Creating TCPdump Filters



Creating Ethereal Filters



Intrusion Detection



Introduction to Snort



Creating Snort Rules



Formatting Rule Options



The Mitnick Attack



TFN Attacks



Smurf Attacks


Day
Four




Attack Countermeasures



Calculating Attack Severity



IDS Sensor Placement



Host/Network Based IDS



Security Models



Defining Risk



Honeypots


Day Five




Common Exploits and Their Signatures


Exercises



Packet Analysis
-

Exercises



Incident Response Procedures
-

Exercises


Instructor Biographical Information:



Steve Hailey is a 30
-
year

IT
veteran, with
23
years of experience developing and
delivering technical training. Steve has
27
years of data recovery experience, and has
been conducting digital forensic analysis professionally for
16
years. He is a highly
skilled expert witness and dynamic instructor, bringing to bear his combined skills in
information security and digital forensi
c analysis.

Steve has performed work and
conducted training in the fields of computer networking, information security, and
digital forensics for two Fortune 100 companies, several law firms, the federal
government, various law enforcement agencies, and se
veral colleges throughout the Pacific Northwest. He is
actively involved with developing and delivering training in digital forensics to members of city, state, and federal
law enforcement agencies, and has trained military personnel that performed handhel
d and computer forensics in
the Mideast.

For
more
, please see:
http://www.cybersecurityacademy.com/instructors.html
.




Track 7: Teach Your Students to Think for Themselves with
Problem
-
based Learning (and M
ake
Employers H
appy)


Short Class Description:


Employers seek technicians who can communicate well, work in teams, learn independently, think creatively, identify and
solve problems, and have the needed content expertise for
the job.

Colleges want students to be engaged in learning and
motivated to persist to graduation. In this workshop you will create your own problem
-
based learning scenario and tasks th
at
give your students these 21st
Century skills and achieve your student

learning outcomes as well. You will acquire the skills
needed to implement your scenario and identify resources to support your efforts. Your new scenario will be ready for use in
your classroom by Fall 2013.


Class Description:


One of the most
consistent messages the Mid
-
Pacific ICT Center receives in its many interactions with employers of ICT
technicians is that employability or s
oft skills are very important.
As part of MPICT’s recent
Foundational Competency
Employment Demand in California

study of 782 California employers, 76.3% either agree or very much agree:
“Non
-
technical (soft, workplace or employability) skills are at least as important as technical skills in what we

look for in our ICT
Workforce.”


Employees need to be able to communicate efficiently and effectively and identify and solve a variety of structu
red and
unstructured problems.
They must be able to identify and acquire relevant in
formation to get the job

done.
They need to
show pride in their work and conscientiousness and take responsibility for their own

continued learning and growth.

They
must demonstrate motivation and work well in
teams
.


Behind many employer comments like these is a desire for stude
nts with real world experiences. It is a great challenge to
pedagogy just how we as educators can help students get real world or real
-
world
-
like experiences. Experiential learning
techniques include: internships, mentoring, service learning, job shadow
ing, site visits, industry guest lectures and
apprenticeships.


A key, accessible strategy for integrating experiential learning experiences into ICT classroom teaching and learning is
Problem
-
b
ase
d Learning (PBL.)
In PBL, we bring real world problems into

the classroom and put stud
ent teams to work
solving them.


This track
is designed to help you prepare, teach and assess
problem
-
based learning
with

your students, to help them
acquire and develop soft or employability skills that

are so important to emplo
yers.

In this workshop
,

you will develop and
implement a problem
-
based scenario of your own that addresses your student learning outcomes.

You will explore existing
problem
-
based scenarios, develop new problem
-
based scenarios and tasks, develop an assessment plan and assessment
items to track student progress and deliverables, and prepare to implement your new tasks in your own classroom.



I
CT industry professionals will visit the workshop to ensure that our new scenarios are authentic representations of what
students might encounter on the job.


Over the course of the week we will also discuss obstacles inherent in changing the way you teac
h, ways to elicit support and
input from industry, and techniques for project and team management.


Selected tasks completed in the workshop will be added to the National PBL Library at
http://lear
npbl.com/scenario
-
based
-
tasks/
.


The scenario development process we will be following is detailed at:

https://sites.google.com/site/pblscenariotaskforce2013/


PREREQUISITES:


Please
bring your laptop and the Student Learning Outcomes for your class. Also
,

try to think of a possible scenario you
wo
uld like to develop; t
his includes a fictional company, position and project that your students will be working within.

For
examples of succ
essful scenarios, visit:

https://sites.google.com/site/pblscenariotaskforce2013/orientation/sample
-
scenarios


Destination: Problem
-
Based Learning (DPBL)
:


T
he
Destination: Problem
-
Based Learning (DPBL)

project at the Experiential Learning Center at Truckee Meadows
Community College advocates for and supports problem
-
based learning in STEM classrooms nationally.

We
develop tools
for faculty creating and assessing PBL scenarios and tasks for their classrooms and sponsor a Library of Scenarios and
Tasks.


About the Instructors:


Elaine Haight

earned her bachelor's degree from the University of California at Berkeley
in math
and computer science in 1982. After working in the real world of software development and
teaching at Santa Monica College, she earned her masters degree from Stanford in engineering in
1988.


She currently teaches Java and C++ at Foothill College

in Los Altos Hill, CA.

In addition to
her teaching responsibilities, Elaine has taught numerous college teachers across the country how
to organize their courses around real
-
word projects. Transitioning to this teaching methodology,
called "Problem
-
base
d learning" is strongly supported and funded by the National Science
Foundation. For more information on Problem
-
based Learning, see
http://learnpbl.com/



Charlotte Cox

earned her Masters

degree in organizational training and development from the
University of Nevada, Reno in 1985.

Her first job, coordinating and training tutors at

Truckee
Meadows Community College, was

basic training

in getting the student to own the learning.


Next,
she

taught teachers and professors in her area how to teach to different learning styles in the
classroom.


In 2009, Charlotte earned a degree in reading and starting teaching full time.


In a
continuing effort to

shift the ownership of

learning to the studen
t, Charlotte followed other
faculty

using problem
-
based learning at her college and created one scenario
-
based
problem.


Today,

problem
-
based learning is

the main course of her

teaching, and she trains
others

to let students

take ownership of the learning
through PBL
.






STIPENDS AND EXPENSE REIMBURSEMENTS




We know travel budgets and permissions are tight in this difficult economic climate.


To help
local

faculty attend, benefit from and share the benefits of these excellent faculty development
opportuni
ties, the Mid
-
Pacific ICT Center
or the California Community College ICT collaborative
will pay you a
$250 stipend

if your employer community college is
within 50 miles of
San Francisco
, CA
.


To be fair to faculty
elsewhere in California or
the Mid
-
Pacific ICT Center region who would have to travel further
and spend more money to attend, and to incent attendance by faculty further away,
we

will
reimburse
up to
$1,500 of the
reasonable air, mileage (@ $0.565
/mile), train and/or hotel travel ex
penses

of qualified faculty
whose employer community college is
> 50 miles from
San Francisco
. GSA li
mits the hotel room rate to

$15
5

per night (excluding taxes)

in San Francisco and
$111

in San Mateo county, near the airport
. Breakfast and lunch
are provided all days.
We do

not provide or reimburse dinner.


To be qualified for a stipend or expense reimbursement, you must be a faculty member in good standing at an
ICT
-
related department at a
California Community C
ollege
or other college
in the Mid
-
Pacific ICT Center region
:






California,



Nevada,




Hawaii or



the Pacific Territories.




To
receive your stipend or expense reimbursement, you must:




apply and be accepted to attend Faculty Development Week training,



attend and sign in for all days of your Faculty Development Week track,



complete any required contract documents, and



submit qualif
ied receipts
-

for reimbursements.


Stipends and expense reimbursements are offered in good faith, on a first
-
accepted
-
to
-
attend/first
-
received
-
by
-
attendee basis.


Anyone who applies and gets a
ccepted to the MPICT Summer 2013

Faculty Development Week, does

not
attend and does not formally cancel attendance by May
31st

agrees to pay the regular event
cancellation
fee of $500
.


If you have any questions about stipends or expense reimbursements, please call (415) 239
-
3600 or email
info@mpict.org
.





APPLY TO ATTEND




To apply to attend the Mi
d
-
Pacific ICT Center Summer 2013

Faculty
Development Week, please complete and sub
mit the application form at

http://events.constantcontact.com/register/event?llr=pvd9yudab&oeidk=a07e7cvyy5u8b200b49
.



You should receive an email communication back from us within

2
4

hours
. If
not, please call (415) 239
-
3600 or email
info@mpict.org
.


Registration is for qualified community college faculty in ICT related
programs in the MPICT region, on a first
-
come/first
-
served, space
available basis. Non
-
qualified registrations will be wait
-
listed and are
not eligible for stipend or expense reimbursement

but may be accepted
at no fee on a space available basis
.




OVERNIGHT ACCOMMODATIONS



For lodging,
there are

t
wo options:



1.

MPICT has reserved 25 rooms at the Hotel Whitcomb at 1231 Market St, San Francisco, CA 94110. The entrance
to the Civic Center Bart train station is right at the front door. Qualified registrations at that hotel will have their
stay paid by M
PICT through a master bill. To reserve your room please call 415
-
626
-
8000 and use the group
code MPICI.

Please note that reservations
were

only be accepted until May 26
th.


2.

The other option is to choose another hotel and submit receipts for reimbursement (
up to a maximum rate of
$155/night before tax
).


MAPS AND DIRECTIONS


From the
AIRPORT
:

By car, (not recommended



parking is difficult and expensive
)

By taxi ($30) or by Shuttle Van
s ($16)

By Public Transportation (BART):


Take the free air train to Garage G/BART Station.

Take a (Bay Area Rapid Transit)
BART

Train to San Francisco.

BART information and train schedules are available at
www.bart.g
ov
. (Trains run frequently)




MAPS AND DIRECTIONS

City College of San Francisco
,

Mission Campus

1125 Valencia Street, San Francisco, CA 94110
,
(415) 920
-
6000




DIRECTIONS TO THE
CITY COLLEGE OF SAN FRANCISCO MISSION CAMPUS
:



1125 Valencia St • San Francisco, CA 94110

415.920
-
6000

www.ccsf.edu/mission

(Opened February 2008 in ceremony featuring

Then
U.S. Speaker of the House, Nancy
Pelosi)



By BART:



Take
BART

to the
24
th

Street/Mission Street station



Walk 1 block north on Mission Street to 23
rd

Street



Walk left 2 blocks west on 23
rd

Street to Valencia Street



Walk right ½ block
north on Valencia Street to the Mission Campus



Take in the Central and South American culture along the way


Bus #14

or #49

Mission Bartlett Garage


By
Bus
:



#14
or #49

to Mission/22nd Streets


By Car:



From
Highway 101

North or South



Take the
Cesar Chavez

exit
west

for about 12 blocks



Cross S.
Van Ness and Mission Streets



Turn
Right on Valencia Street



Turn
Right

after 6 blocks on
21
st

Street



The
Mission Bartlett Garage

is immediately on the right at 3255 21
st

Street (415) 821
-
6715



Walk ½ block south on Valencia Street to the campus




For
i
nformation on San Francisco
, start with
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/San_Francisco
.

For
information on San Francisco’s Mission District
, start with
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mission_District
.


Weather:

Please bring a variety of clothing.

The
weather could be anything from 85 and sunny to raining and 6
0.

(We’re working on 7
5 and sunny

)