Haystack: Bringing Good Metadata to Life

coordinatedcapableSoftware and s/w Development

Nov 4, 2013 (4 years and 8 days ago)

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MIT CSAIL/IBM Watson Research

© 2004 IBM Corporation

Haystack:

Bringing Good Metadata to Life

Dennis Quan

dennisq@us.ibm.com

MIT CSAIL/IBM Watson Research

© 2004 IBM Corporation

2

Haystack: Bringing Good Metadata to Life

May 22, 2004

Outline


Exposing the benefits of RDF data integration


Demonstration


Prototyping in the Haystack environment


Hooking in different RDF sources


Designing visualizations


Adenine scripting language


Example: Open Directory browser

MIT CSAIL/IBM Watson Research

© 2004 IBM Corporation

3

Haystack: Bringing Good Metadata to Life

May 22, 2004

Show me the metadata


Common questions regarding Semantic Web applications:


“Is this stuff practical?”


“Are you just overloading me with more information?”


“What can I do with this data today?”


“What is RDF giving me over databases and XML?”


Asked by developers, not just users and observers


Approach: easy prototyping environment for visualizing
connections within and among metadata sources


The “museum” approach versus the “brochure” approach

MIT CSAIL/IBM Watson Research

© 2004 IBM Corporation

4

Haystack: Bringing Good Metadata to Life

May 22, 2004

The Haystack Semantic Web browser


Allows users to create, explore, and organize RDF
information spaces


Web browser
-
style navigation of Semantic Web resources


Metadata can be fetched from a variety of sources


User
-
selectable presentation templates (“views”)


Flexible bookmark management system (“collections”)


Access to Semantic Web Services


Research project originating from MIT CSAIL


Open Source Java project built on top of Eclipse, IBM’s
Open Source rich client platform

MIT CSAIL/IBM Watson Research

© 2004 IBM Corporation

5

Haystack: Bringing Good Metadata to Life

May 22, 2004

Fictitious example: a rock star’s manager


A day in the life of the manager of the famous
-
physicist
-
turned
-
rock
-
star, Johnny Doe


Some of the backend services and data have been mocked
up, but presentation services are real


Point of demonstration is to show what can be seen through
Haystack, which is acting as a front end


Key concepts to watch for:


Views


Lenses


Collections


Semantic Web Services

MIT CSAIL/IBM Watson Research

© 2004 IBM Corporation

6

Haystack: Bringing Good Metadata to Life

May 22, 2004

View Ontology Web Language (VOWL)


RDF Schema, DAML+OIL, and/or OWL used to describe
ontologies to Semantic Web agents


Similarly, VOWL is used to describe presentation knowledge
about ontologies to user agents


Views: different ways of looking at resources


Lenses: sets of properties that make sense being shown
together


Operations: mini Semantic Web Services with type information
that specify what kinds of resources can be used with them


VOWL definitions, like OWL definitions, are encoded in RDF

MIT CSAIL/IBM Watson Research

© 2004 IBM Corporation

7

Haystack: Bringing Good Metadata to Life

May 22, 2004

Process diagram

Metadata

Presentation

recommendations

Ontological

specifications

Applicable service

descriptions

+

Point and

click, hyper
-

linked UI



MIT CSAIL/IBM Watson Research

© 2004 IBM Corporation

8

Haystack: Bringing Good Metadata to Life

May 22, 2004

Incrementality in the user interface


The more Haystack knows about an ontology, the better job it can
do presenting objects to the user


With no knowledge, Haystack shows a property listing


With rdfs:label and dc:title attributes, Haystack shows human
-
readable
names


With rdfs:domain, rdfs:range, daml:UniqueProperty,
daml:ObjectProperty, and daml:DatatypeProperty, specialized forms
can be produced


With lenses, Haystack shows filtered property listings in All
Information and Explore Relationships views


With custom views defined, Haystack can show a completely custom
presentation


These specifications do not have to all come from the same place;
different pieces of presentation knowledge can be fused together

MIT CSAIL/IBM Watson Research

© 2004 IBM Corporation

9

Haystack: Bringing Good Metadata to Life

May 22, 2004

Getting metadata into the system


Metadata can come from:


File system


Web servers


LSID servers


Jena stores


Joseki servers


Annotea servers


Web Services


In a number of formats:


RDF/XML


Notation3


Adenine


RSS and other XML
formats (via XSLT)

MIT CSAIL/IBM Watson Research

© 2004 IBM Corporation

10

Haystack: Bringing Good Metadata to Life

May 22, 2004

Life Science Identifiers (LSID)


Hyperlinking metaphor and URLs on billboards depends on
there being a metadata retrieval mechanism


Life Sciences community coming together around LSID


urn:lsid:[server name]:[db
-
specific identifier]


Retrieval protocol based on SOAP and RDF


Undergoing standardization by OMG and I3C


Open Source client/server libraries provided by IBM


Many public data sources accessible via LSID today

beginnings of a Biological Semantic Web


Not specific to Life Sciences


Support built into Haystack

MIT CSAIL/IBM Watson Research

© 2004 IBM Corporation

11

Haystack: Bringing Good Metadata to Life

May 22, 2004

Adenine


Adenine is Haystack’s RDF scripting language


Syntactically, a cross between Notation3 and Python


Both a data definition language (RDF) and an imperative
scripting language


Native support for RDF manipulation


Access to Java classes and methods


Haystack system built like a Lisp machine


Everything is accessible from the “Adenine console”


Leveraging the Eclipse platform


Powerful Adenine text editor with outline and syntax
highlighting

MIT CSAIL/IBM Watson Research

© 2004 IBM Corporation

12

Haystack: Bringing Good Metadata to Life

May 22, 2004

Example: an Open Directory browser


MIT CSAIL/IBM Watson Research

© 2004 IBM Corporation

13

Haystack: Bringing Good Metadata to Life

May 22, 2004

Current status of prototype


Open Source, Java/Eclipse
-
based implementation


Runs on Windows, Linux, and Mac OS X


Easy to hook in new data sources


Stable, but still some usability issues


Provides stable platform for extensions (Eclipse plug
-
ins)

Guru

Grandma

Power user

Goal

We are here

MIT CSAIL/IBM Watson Research

© 2004 IBM Corporation

14

Haystack: Bringing Good Metadata to Life

May 22, 2004

Packaging


VOWL specifications can be:


Made available for download from a Web site


Packaged with instance metadata coming from the server


Put into an Eclipse plug
-
in


Distributing your own custom Haystack is easy


Documentation describes process to create a stripped
-
down, specialized version of your own Semantic Web
browser


Can integrate custom RDF metadata, ontologies, VOWL
specifications, and even Java and Eclipse components

MIT CSAIL/IBM Watson Research

© 2004 IBM Corporation

15

Haystack: Bringing Good Metadata to Life

May 22, 2004

Real life Haystack application: myGrid provenance

Courtesy of Professor Carole Goble, University of Manchester

MIT CSAIL/IBM Watson Research

© 2004 IBM Corporation

16

Haystack: Bringing Good Metadata to Life

May 22, 2004

Key ideas


Demonstrating the value of RDF is easiest when the user can
experience the benefits for him or herself


Haystack is an extensible Semantic Web browser:


Connects to a variety of RDF sources


Exposes an intuitive, Web browser
-
like interface


Incrementally improves experience as more ontological and
presentation knowledge is provided


Built on Eclipse, providing a solid basis for extensions


Scriptable using Adenine


Haystack addresses important HCI concerns, e.g.,
personalization and organization, that must be supported in
information applications but are often taken for granted

MIT CSAIL/IBM Watson Research

© 2004 IBM Corporation

17

Haystack: Bringing Good Metadata to Life

May 22, 2004

Thank you for your attention


Dennis Quan, dennisq@us.ibm.com



Haystack project home page (new download coming May 24)


http://haystack.lcs.mit.edu/


Documentation!


http://haystack.lcs.mit.edu/developers/


IBM LSID home page


http://www.ibm.com/developerworks/oss/lsid/


Eclipse home page


http://www.eclipse.org/


myGrid home page


http://www.mygrid.org.uk/