EDUC 5300 - Clayton State University

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Nov 4, 2013 (3 years and 9 months ago)

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M.A.T. Internship Seminar


1





EDUC


Spring 2013

(CRN 24771
)

Meeting Dates:
Mon
.
Jan

9, Feb 20 April
3, April 24

Place: TERR Time: 4:30
-
6:15

5300

M.A.T. Internship
Seminar


Instructor:
Mari Ann Roberts

E
-
Mail:
mariroberts@clayton.edu

Phone:
404/374
-
9154

Office:
G205
-
f

Office Hours:
Tu.&Th. 10
-
12 and 2
-
4






Course Description

Internship Seminar (1
-
0
-
1): This seminar is designed to discuss common
issues, concerns and successes
that candidates will have as teaching interns.
Topics may

include developing curriculum and instruction for diverse
learners, designing and implementing t
hematic units
,

using classroom
management techniques, developing and using data from student
assessments, interpreting standardized testing data, using instructional
technology to facilitate student

learning, and recognizing legal, ethical, and
professiona
l responsibilities. Co
-
requisite: EDUC 5301

Conceptual Framework

The mission of the Teacher Education Unit is to prepare
professional educators who engage in
reflective practice

and who are
competent, caring, committed
,
collaborative,

culturally responsi
ve,
and prepared to teach diverse
learners in an ever
-
changing society. For the complete
CSU Teacher Education Unit Conceptual Framework, follow the link below.

Teacher Education
Policy

The content of this course syllabus correlates to education standards
established by national and state education governing agencies, accrediting
agencies and learned society/ professional education associations.


Please
refer to the course correlation mat
rices located at the following web site:

http://a
-
s.clayton.edu/teachered/Standards%20and%20Outcomes.htm


Materials



Friere, P
. (??
).
Pedogagy of
the Oppressed




hooks, b. (1994
).
Teaching to
Transgress




Noddings, N. (2006).

Critical Lessons: What Our
Schools Should Teach



Palmer, P. (1983).
To Know as
We are Known: Education as A
Spiritual Journey



Web Cam w/ Mic.



Live Text Software

**
Students are required to read all
assigned chapters/articles and be
prepared to discuss such when
prompted.







M.A.T. Internship Seminar


2


Course Evaluations

-

There are six

overarching evaluations in
this class. Please see below for further description.


Due Dates & Details


Peer Coaching ORDR (Observation Reflection Dialogue Reflection)


Attend at least one of your peers’ classes during a time they are solo
teaching. (Set this up with one another). While observing, or immediately
afterward, reflect deeply on their performanc
e and evaluate them by
completing the
CSU Observation Instrument

(be sure to provide valuable
comments in the comments section (
see Appendix A for rubric
)

then,
reverse roles
.

1.

OBSERVER

-

Provide your peer with a copy of the evaluation
and meet with your peer to discuss their performance.

2.

Write a one
-
page reflection about the conversation.

a.

What did your peer teach about?

b.

What was said in your meeting?

c.

What should you have said that yo
u did not?

d.

How do you REALLY feel about your peer’s
performance?

e.

What were/are your feelings about having to
give

peer
feedback?

3.

OBSERVED

-

Meet with your peer to discuss their thoughts.

4.


Write a one
-
page reflection about the conversation.

a.

What was said

in your meeting??

b.

What did you want to say but did not?

c.

How do you REALLY feel about your peer’s evaluation?

d.

What were/are your feelings about having to
receive

peer
feedback?




Jan 30
th


1.

Peer Coaching ORDR Due

2.

S
ubmit a portfolio containing
(in this order)

a.

Your observ
er

reflection.

b.

Your reflection about
being observed

c.

A copy of the observation
form you provided to your
peer when you observed
them.

3.
You MUST start this project
early

in Jan in orde
r to submit it
by
the due date
.


Diversity Self
-
Evaluation
-

Record yourself teaching a solo class. Be sure
to place the recorder in a place where you
can see
yourself

and as many
students as possible. Watch the recording TWICE. The first time just
watch; the second, use the
CSU Diversity Evaluation

Form
(
see Appendix
B for rubric
) to self
-
evalu
ate your demons
tration
of
cultural
responsiveness

during your lesson.


Write a 2
-
4 page reflection about your performance. In your reflection, be
sure to re
spond to the following areas
.

1.

Diversity Outcomes

a.

Which domains of the evaluation instrument did you
cover well? Ho
w do you know this?

b.

Which domains do you need to improve? How do you
know this?

2.

Course Literature Transfer

a.

What does the multicultural


Feb 20
th


1.

Diversity Self
-
Eval. Due
.

2.

Be sure to R
espond to the
following areas in your
2
-
4 page
reflection:

a.

Diversity Outcomes

b.

Course Literature Transfer

c.

Effectiveness of CSU
Diversity Instruction

3.

You MUST start this project by
late Jan/Early Feb to submit it by the
due date.






M.A.T. Internship Seminar


3


education/diversity/culturally relevant pedagogy
literature
that we have studied in the past (hint 5100)
say
about
any of

your expressed

pedagogical concerns as
related to diversity

(provide at least one cite)
?

3.

Effectiveness

of CSU Diversity Instruction

a.

Is there something the Teacher Ed Department at CSU
should do or should have done to better prepare you to
meet the
diversi
ty
objectives in the evaluation
instrument? If so what?

Using Data From Student Assessments
-

You will need to determine the
level of
your
students’ growth and achievement during your 6
-
weeks of
full
-
time teaching.
Note that
you have already done many of the tasks this
assignment requires of you
--

in your instructional planning for your
unit
.


This assignment simply asks you to pull together all the
information you've included in your unit plan and use it to inform a
detailed
, focused analysis of the effectiveness
and influence of your
instruction on student learning
.


To do so, you will complete

the following
:

1.

Select a class of students that you are teaching.

2.

Conduct a pre
-
assessment

3.

Select one lesson plan, unit, or activity

and identify its major
learning outcomes.

4.

Delineate indicators of how students will achieve/demonstrate
these outcomes.

5.

Select method(s) of assessment.

6.

D
ecide on a method of collecting data on the impact your
instruction has
had on your students' learni
ng
such as a pre
-

and
post
-
test.



7.

Carry out the assessment procedures.

8.

Analyze the data on three levels:

a.

Class Level

b.

Sub Group Level

c.

Individual Level

9.

Prepare a data report in which you
analyze, interpret, and report
your data

10.

Reflect on your performance
as a teache
r.

See
APPENDIX
C

for rubric and details regarding this assignment
.



March 2oth

1.

Using Data From Student
Assessment
Due.

2.

Be sure to follow the instructions
about this assignment given in
Appendix
C

There are numerous
details to which you must
attend.

3.

You MUST start this project
at
the BEGINNING of one of your
solo lesson plans or units and
conclude it at the end of the LP
or unit.

4.

Collect your data during
student teaching, then
,

put it
away and do
the write up in

March

5.

Your final portfolio should
address

three sections:

a.

Data Analysis

b.

Interpreting

Data

c.

Reflection

6. This is a BIG project. Do NOT
wait until the last minute to do it.
Review
Appendix C

early in the
semester.


Speakers’ Series Attendance


The Teacher Education Unit will have
three speakers on various educational issues throughout the semester.
Pick the one that interests you most/fits your schedule and attend. Have
ANY TE faculty sign your attendance slip (
Appe
ndix E
) and turn it in.



Dates/Times TBA






M.A.T. Internship Seminar


4


Developing Philosophy of Education
-

We teach out of what we believe
--

about students, about the purpose of education, about the value of our
discipline, about our role as teachers.


As you near the end of

your

teacher preparation program, the first stage in your professional journey,
it is time to articulate your

"Transforming Phi
losophy of
Education."


You
have written
a philosophy statement

earlier in this
program. Review that and, although it may have evolve
d by now,
use
that

as a starting point. H
owever,
this
new
one should be informed not
only by the beliefs you brought with you to Clayton State

but also



T
he issues

you've discussed in your classes,




T
he experiences you've had in your field placements, and



Y
our knowledge of the philosophy, psychology, and pedagogy
undergirding your profession.



You've had the opportunity during your internship to test the beliefs and
values you broug
ht to the classroom and
, to strengthen, revise, or deepen
your philosophy.


Your statement should be
no more than two

pages double
-
spaced

and should

include:



Personal reflection



Experiential information



Quotes from
/mention of

educational philosophers who speak to
your beliefs.

o

Information from one or more of the texts assigned f
or this
course should play a large role in your writing
.




April 3
rd


1.

Philosophy of Ed.

Due.

2.

This should be a formal essay
. It
will be assessed by the
following criteria: (
see rubric in
Appendix
F
).

3.

Suggested things to address in
your philosophy are
:

a.

How
does learning take
place?

b.

What is the purpose of
education?

c.

What

should the role of the
school and the teacher be?

d.

What are the skills you
expect your students to
develop?

e.

What do you want your
students to gain from being
in your classroom?

f.

What ed. philos
ophies do
you find value in?

Oral Portfolio and A. R. Presentation


Throughout the cou
rse of this
semester, you will upload relevant portfolio items
from this class
to your
Livetext account.

1.

Philosophy of Education

2.

Diversity Self
-
Eval and Reflection

3.

Final AR Paper

4.

Content Items (as specified by content area faculty)


Although you will have individual grades on these assignments, you will
also
receive a grade when you present

the

entire portfolio

at a final
defense
(details discussed in AR class and
with Content Area fac
ulty
).


Any interested graduate faculty member may attend this defense and
will evaluate your performance.




April 22nd


1.
All portfolio items uploaded to
Livetext.


April 26
th


1.
Oral Portfolio Defense

2.
See
Appendix
D

for rubri
c.

3. Graduate faculty aggregated

scores will determine your

final
presentation grade.







M.A.T. Internship Seminar


5


Course Grading


Total Points

ORDR Portfolio



200
pts

Diversity Self
-
Evaluation Portfolio


200pts

Using Data From Student Assessments
-

Portfolio


200pts

Speakers’ Series Attendance


100pts

Developing Philosophy of Ed.


100pts

Final AR Paper, Brochure, & Defense


200pts

1000
-
920 = A 919
-
830 = B 829
-
750 = C 749
-
690


D

Below 690 = F

***Please note that the grading scale is set for graduate
student work
and may be higher than the standard scale with which you may be
accustomed.


10
00 total possible points

Grades and Feedback:

Grades relating to your AR paper will be discussed between us as I
review your drafts. If you are wondering how your
final
paper will be
graded, please refer to the rubric in
Appendix B
. Grades

relating to
smaller items, meeting logs, F2F’s, et ct., will be posted as you complete
them. You have the right to make an appointment with me to review
your grade at any time.


M
id
-
term Progress Report:

The mid
-
term grade in

this course will be calculated

on
Feb 25
th
. Based
on this grade, students may choose to withdraw from the course and
receive a grade of “W.” Students pursuing this option must fill out an
official withdrawal f
orm, available in the Office of the Registrar, by mid
-
term, which occurs on
March
1
st

The

last day to withdraw without
academic accountability is
March
1
st
,

2012.
Instructions for
withdrawing
are provided at this link.


Graduation Due Dates:

G
raduate Degree Requirements
Completion Deadline
Friday,
April 5









M.A.T. Internship Seminar


6


Class Schedule

Topic, Activities
, &

Readings

Dates

What’s Due

Why Are We Here and What are We Doing?

DURING
CLASS
:



Discuss
assignments



Select peer(s) for ORDR



Co
-
construct schedule/parameters for text chats



Invite your CT



BREIF lecture: Managing the Workload



Guest Speaker


Shaneeka Favors
: Managing the
Workload

Jan
7th


ORDR Partner



Select ORDR
partner and schedule
visits.
Be sure to let your CT know!

Ed Philosophy Text One
& Two
Chat

BEFORE
CLASS
:



Read ____________________



Do _________________________

DURING CLASS
:



Discuss Diversity Self
-
Eval Portfolio



Due Feb 20
th




Discuss Student Assessment

Portfolio



Due March 20
th




Do _______________________ with ed. philosophy text

Feb 18
th


Have Philosophy Text One
and Two
Read



Be prepared

for whatever we will do with
them
.

Ed Philosophy Text Three & Four Chat

BEFORE
CLASS
:



Read ____________________



Do
_________________________

DURING CLASS
:



Discuss Evolving Philosophy of Ed.


Due April 3
rd
.



Do _______________________ with ed. philosophy text.

April 1

Have Philosophy Text Three
and Four Read



Be prepared
for whatever we will do with
them.


Portfolio
Questions & Certification Paperwork

BEFORE
CLASS
:



Read portfolio guidelines for both content area and ed
area

DURING CLASS
:



Discuss Portfolio
or P. Presentation
Questions



Upload all relevant docs to Livetext



ID next year’s speaker.

April 22

Portfolio



bring electronic
copies of all docs to be
uploaded into LT.

Oral Portfolio and A. R. Presentation


April 2
6

Defense



bring handouts,
send presentation via mail
and bring presentation on a
flash drive. Dress
professionally!!







M.A.T. Internship Seminar


7


Class
Policy

Discipulus
Caveo:

I reserve the right to change or amend any policies, provisions, or schedules in this syllabus as needed.

Expectations
:

COMMUNICATION
-

I will be communicating with you regularly and sending you class readings through e
-
mail. Check
your e
-
mail DAILY

and open all attachments. “I didn’t get the e
-
mail” will not be accepted as an excuse for


well


anything.
Please be sure to open all attachments that come with the e
-
mail as there are times when my e
-
mails just arrive as
attachments. Not sure why.

Abo
ve all, remain in communication with your writing group and myself.
Do NOT let

yourself get
lost in the weeds
. You will be solely responsible for scheduling/rescheduling meetings, due dates and other activities. In fact,
you may have to remind me!

CLASSWOR
K AND HOMEWORK

-

Assignments will be given to complete in
-

and outside of class. Unless otherwise
instructed all assignments are to be typed, double spaced in Times New Roman 12
-
point font, and completed in APA format.
If you are unfamiliar with this style
, please reference your text and my webpage for further instructions
http://a
-
s.clayton.edu/mroberts/Class_Info.html

Written assignments will be graded for correct grammar and punctuation as well as
accuracy of contents.

Things You Should Pay REALLY Close Attention to or They
Will

Bite You Later On
:

COURSE ATTENDANCE POLICY
-

There will only be four physical course m
eetings on the following dates
Jan 7th, Feb
18th, April 1st
, and April
22nd
.

Other weeks you may

have individual meetings with me, with your writi
ng group, or
through the
Desire to Learn

online course delivery system.

**Please note
there are times when yo
u will be asked to come by to drop off or pick up hard copy assignments
.

Timely and consistent arrival to class is important to me and essential to your grade in this course. You are expected to
attend
all

class sessions and be punctual.
Students who miss
1 or more of the in
-
class meeting sessions due to
unexcused

absences will receive a WF (Withdraw Failing) grade
.

This policy will be applied uniformly to all students regardless of
course average. Excessive tardy arrivals to class (four or more) will resul
t in a reduction of one letter grade.

LATE ASSIGNMENTS


It is imperative that you keep up with the due date schedule in this course. It is carefully balanced
against your other obligations. Unless there is an earthquake, or bloodshed on your part,

the work is due when it is due

and
will

not be accepted late
.


TURNING IN YOUR WORK IN PERSON


ANYTHING you turn in to me physically, should be
stapled, typed, and double
-
spaced using an appropriate font

style, size, and margins (you are always
safe with

1 inch margins, size 12, in Times New Roman style font) unless otherwise instructed.
When in
doubt, type
.



“I couldn’t get to a printer” is not a sufficient excuse for late work.



You are expected to purchase and keep with you in class a mini stapler. They

are relatively inexpensive and can be
purchased almost anywhere. I suggest this one, which may be purchased at
Office Depot

for $3.77. Thus, “I couldn’t
find a stapler” is also not an acceptable excuse.



Written assignments will be graded for correct grammar and punctuation as well as acc
uracy of contents. Number
your pages.




M.A.T. Internship Seminar


8




Submitting Your Work

-

Use a Clear Cover Presentation Folder Including 3 Tangs For Inserting 3 Hole Drilled
Papers, and a Clear Poly Front With A Durable Coated, Weather Resistant Paper Back. Punch holes in your work a
nd
put it in the folder. See
http://www.amazon.com/Mead
-
Cover
-
Folder
-
34120
-
Binder/dp/B000BO6XYC

for an example.

FOLLOW THE COURSE OUTLINE STRICTLY

or you will fall behind and
jeopardize your ability to graduate
.


ACADEMIC INTEGRITY
-

Academic integrity is of paramount importance in this class. Cheating
,
particularly plagiarism,
will not be necessary or tolerated. Students are expected to abide by th
e
Student Code of Conduct as outlined in the
Clayton State University Student Handbook

and the
Basic Undergraduate Student Responsibilities
. All instances of academic dishonesty will be
reported to the Office of Student Life/Judicial Affairs. Judicial procedures are described at
http://adminservices.clayton.edu/studentlife/judicial_affairs.htm
.


University

Policy

Disability Services/Academic Support Services:

For information about Disability Services
or to obtain this document in an alternative format, contact: The Director of
Disability Services (Office of Disability Services, Student Center) at 678
-
466
-
5449.

For information about Academic Support
Services, use the following link:

http://adminservices.clayton.edu/cas/campus_services_guide_final.doc

University Attendance Policy
:

Instructors establish specific policies relating to absences in their courses and communicat
e these policies to the students
through the course syllabi. Individual instructors, based upon the nature of the course, determine what effect excused and
unexcused absences have in determining grades and upon students’ ability to remain enrolled in their

courses. The
university reserves the right to determine that excessive absences, whether justified or not, are sufficient cause for
institutional withdrawals or failing grades.

Disruption Of The Learning Environment
:

Behavior, which disrupts the teaching

learning process during class activities, will not be tolerated.

While a variety of
behaviors can be disruptive in a classroom setting, more serious examples include belligerent, abusive, profane, and/or
threatening b
ehavior.

A student who fails to respond to reasonable faculty direction regarding classroom behavior and/or
behavior while participating in classroom activities may be dismissed from class.


A student who is dismissed is entitled to
due process and will b
e afforded such rights as soon as possible following dismissal. If found in violation, a student may be
administratively withdrawn and may receive a grade of WF. A more detailed description of examples of disruptive behavior
and appeal procedures is provid
ed at:


http://a
-
s.clayton.edu/DisruptiveClassroomBehavior.htm

Course
Computer Skill Prerequisites:



Able to use Windows opera
ting system



Able to use GA View



Able to send and receive e
-
mail using Outlook or Outlook Express



Able to attach and retrieve attached files via e
-
mail



Able to use Web browser for research purposes



Able to create a Power Point presentation




M.A.T. Internship Seminar


9




Familiar with Web

2.0 trends such as blogs



Able to use Microsoft Word



Able to use Skype


In
-
class Use of Student Notebook Computer or Computerized Devices
:

Student notebook computers will be used in class. Please bring your computer to each of our in
-
class meetings. Cell p
hones
are not

to be used during class.

Required Software
:

1.

Needed to access files/documents: Go to:
http://www.adobe.com/
. Select and download free
Adobe Reader
.

2.

May be needed to view video clips: Go to:
http://www.adobe.com/
. Select

and download the free
Flash Player
.

3.

May be needed to view video clips: Go to
http://www.apple.com/quicktime/download/

Select and download the
free
Quicktime Player

4.

Needed to have online teacher
-
student conferences: Go to
http://www.skype.com/intl/en
-
us/get
-
skype/

Select and
download free
Skype
. Find me by my e
-
mail address
mariroberts@clayton.edu

and add me to your call list.


Troubleshooting Suggestions
:

Unable to access file:



Download Adobe Reader at
www.adobe.com

to access files



Download Flash Player at
www.adobe.com

to access the movie clips.



If you are unable to upload a page, you may need to turn off your pop
-
up blockers (this is common with
learning modules and online lectures).

Trouble with Attachments:



Download the most recent vers
ion of Java at http:
\
\
java.com. After you install java, reboot your computer
and try again.

Other Problems:



Email the instructor with a detailed description of the problem. An attachment of the screen shot of your computer
would be extremely helpful. (
Select Control and Prnt Scrn, then copy and paste into a blank Word document)



Contact The HUB in person, via email (
TheHub@clayton.edu
) or on the phone 678 466
-
HELP. You will need to
provide the date and time of the problem, your GeorgiaView username, the name of the course that you're
attempting to access, and the instructor's name.







M.A.T. Internship Seminar


10


Appendix A

ORDR Rubric

You will be evaluated
based on depth/revelatory nature of reflections, completeness of evaluation instrument, understanding of observation
objectives.


200 pts


12.5 and below

42

50

Reflection demonstrates indicates
analytical thinking, including depth

and complexity, on the
nature and
content of this project and it’s relation
to your teaching.

Boo.

Not Bad. Not perfect, but not
bad.

Ideal

Observation instrument completed
with detail and attention. It should
really be helpful to your peer.

Boo Hiss.

Not Bad. Not perfect, but

not
bad.

Ideal

Your complete understanding of
CSU’s observation objectives is
evident in your reflection and
evaluation form responses.

Boo Hiss Yuck

Not Bad. Not perfect, but not
bad.

Ideal

You were accountable to your partner
and your work includes fe
w errors.

Arrghhh.

Not Bad. Not perfect, but not
bad.

Ideal



Appendix B

Diversity Self
-
Eval. Rubric

You will be evaluated based on depth/revelatory nature of reflection, completeness of evaluation instrument, understanding of

observation
objectives.


200 pts


12.5 and below

42

50

Reflection indicates analytical
thinking, including depth and
complexity, on the nature and content
of this project and it’s relation to your
teaching.

Boo.

Not Bad. Not perfect, but not
bad.

Ideal

Observation instrument
completed
with detail and attention. You really
thought about your performance and
made an effort to critique it
appropriately.

Boo Hiss.

Not Bad. Not perfect, but not
bad.

Ideal

Your complete understanding of
CSU’s diversity observation objectives
is evi
dent in your reflection and
evaluation form responses.

Boo Hiss Yuck

Not Bad. Not perfect, but not
bad.

Ideal

You were accountable in submitting
your work in the correct manner and
your work includes few errors.

Arrghhh.

Not Bad. Not perfect, but not
bad.

Ideal

* If needed, you may borrow a video camera for a 48
-
hour period from Media Services. Find them at the
following link
http://adminservices.clayton.edu/media/services.htm



M.A.T. Internship Seminar


1


Appendix C

Student Learning Analysis


Y
ou have already done many of the tasks this assignment requires of you
--

in your School Context
Analysis, in your Intern
Agenda journal responses, and in your unit plan.


This assignment simply asks you to pull together all the information
you've included in these other assignments and use it to inform a detailed, focused analysis of the effectivenes
s of your
instruction and the impact it has on your students' learning.

(This assignment is adapted, with permission, from Mercer University's "Analysis of Student Learning Example," and it is
modeled after
The Renaissance Partnership for Improving Teacher

Quality Project
.)

Method



Select a class of students that you are teaching.



Conduct a pre
-
assessment to determine your students' prior knowledge
--

for best results, do this early enough so
that what you learn from the pre
-
assessment can actually inform yo
ur decisions as you design your instruction.



Select one lesson plan, unit, or activity.



Identify major learning outcomes.



Delineate indicators of how students will achieve/demonstrate these outcomes.



Select method(s) of assessment and include examples
that are appropriate (e.g., teacher
-
made checklist, rubric,
anecdotal records, students' samples). Decide on a method of collecting data on the impact your instruction has had
on your students' learning, using an assessment that will generate data suitable

for analysis, such as a pre
-

and post
-
test.


The assessment/performance task you use should be aligned with your major learning outcomes.



Carry out the assessment procedures.


Your Portfolio should consist of three sections with the following information
:

DATA ANALYSIS

-

Analyze the data on three levels:

1.

Class Level

a.

Compile the data as a whole class by using simple descriptive

techniques (you should include score range,
mean, median, mode).


If you did a pre
-

and post
-
assessment, compare the results.

b.

Review and describe collected class data related to students' learning.

c.

Use code names to ensure confidentiality.

d.

Group students according to learning patterns
--

common misconceptions, strengths, gaps in knowledge,
interests or learning styles.




2.
Sub
-
Group Level

a.

Compile the data into two groups for comparison, based on at least one of the following factors: ethnicity, race,
sex, language, exceptionalities. Don't choose these sub
-
groups in a vacuum: look for patterns that suggest
themselves

in the whole class data and analyze further on those contextual factors that appear to be relevant.

b.

Review and describe collected sub
-
group data related to students' learning.

c.

Compare and contrast the sub
-
group data.

d.

Be sure to include specific example
s for each sub
-
group.

e.

Use code name(s) to ensure confidentiality if using example of individual students.




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f.

Select the learning outcome where performance of both sub
-
groups was comparable.



3.
Individual Level

a.

Select

two students who represent diffe
rent levels of performance and examine their assessment data.

b.

Review and describe collected data related to the

two individual students' learning.

c.

Use code names to ensure confidentiality.

d.

Describe the performance of each student in relation to the perf
ormance of the whole class on the given learning
experience.

e.

Explain special circumstances or special needs that might have affected the performance of an individual
student.


INTERPRETING, AND REPORTING OF DATA

Wherever statistical techniques, charts, o
r other representations are used, describe them adequately in the narrative.

You
should attach spreadsheets and/or include data tables in this section.


This section provides you an opportunity to show you
can use assessment data to communicate student pro
gress knowledgeably and responsibly, by the clarity and accuracy of
your data presentation.


Use the following to guide your analysis:

1.

What do you see in the students’ work?

2.

What does the work tell you about your students’ accomplishment of the learning
goal(s) and the understanding of
the particular information presented?

3.

What does the work tell you about how the students learn?


What characteristics of the student might be influencing
the work (e.g. development, interests, prior performance/experience,
culture, attitudes)?

4.

What factors in or outside the classroom may have influenced the students’ performances (e.g., illness, playground
conflict, family issues, time of day)?

5.

Identify the learning objective where your students were most successful.

6.

Identif
y the learning objective where your students needed more opportunity to grow.

7.

In each case, provide two or more possible reasons for these outcomes.


Consider your objectives, instruction, and
assessment, along with student characteristics and other contex
tual factors that you can influence to continue to have
a positive impact on student learning.

8.

What specific evidence can you provide for your assessment of what the students understand or can do (e.g.
misconceptions, gaps in their knowledge base)?

9.

One las
t bit of advice: try to identify
patterns

in your data.


Were there assessment items that more students had
trouble with than others?


If so, are they addressing common concepts?


What, if anything, do the students who
performed well have in common?


What,

if anything, do the students who performed poorly have in
common?


What
concepts

are students struggling with most?


REFLECTION

This section provides you an opportunity to demonstrate that you can reflect on your performance as a teacher, draw
conclusions

about the effectiveness of your instructional and assessment decisions, use what you’ve learned to improve your
practice in the future, and set related professional development goals for yourself.


The Reflection section should address the
following:




M.A.T. Internship Seminar


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1.

Ins
ights on Effective Instruction and Assessment:

Identify successful and unsuccessful activities and provide
plausible reasons for their success or lack thereof.

2.

What does your students’ work tell you about the success of your teaching approach?



a.

Consider t
he
individual items
on your assessment and their effectiveness in measuring student learning.


On
which items were your students most successful?


Least successful?


Reflect on reasons for the levels of
performance on those items, including student prerequ
isite knowledge, student motivation, instructional
strategies, and item design.

b.

Did your assessment match your learning objectives?


Did you actually end up assessing what you said you
were intending to teach?

c.

What role, if any, did your pre
-
assessment pl
ay in the process?


Did you actually use it to inform your
instructional decisions?


If not, reflecting back on it, what might it have told you and how might it have been
used more effectively?

d.

Reflect on the relationship between teaching strategies and pe
rformance on related objectives.

e.

Reflect on the appropriateness of the assessments and on the relationships between the feedback you got
from those assessments and performance on related objectives.

3.

Implications for Future Teaching:


Provide ideas for rede
signing learning goals, instruction, and assessment and
explain why these changes would improve student learning.

a.

Describe the teaching actions you might try next.


What are some of the teaching actions (e.g., teacher
feedback, peer instruction, clearer m
odeling of expected work) you think are likely to help the student(s)
achieve the learning outcome, and why do you think each would work?

b.

What additional information, if any, do you need before you can decide which action to take?


Where would
you get the
additional information?

c.

Based on the results you obtained and analyzed, discuss the implications for instruction and what should be
changed or given different or greater emphasis if the unit/lesson were to be taught again.



Be specific about
the implicati
ons for a teaching method, assignments/activities that students might complete to minimize
knowledge gaps or increase understanding.


Identify any changes you would make in preparation,
procedures, and data collection if you were able to administer the ass
essment(s) again.



4.

Implications for Professional Development:


Present at least two professional learning goals that clearly emerged
from your insights and experiences with this assignment.


Identify two specific steps you will immediately take to
improve

your performance in the critical area(s) you identified.






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Student Assessment Data Rubric

You will be evaluated on: Presentation of data (look), clarity of data (did you do it right?), revelatory nature of reflectio
n (do you truly understand/know
whether

your students “got it”?). 200


21 and below

32

4
0

Data are explicated and presented
clearly. Charts look professional are
labeled, have titles and legends
when necessary,

Boo.

Not Bad. Not perfect, but not
bad.

Ideal

Testing and analysis were done
cor
rectly.

Boo Hiss.

Not Bad. Not perfect, but not
bad.

Ideal

A thorough understanding of your
students’ attainment (or lack thereof)
of the stated objectives for your unit
is evident in your reflection and the
reflection indicates analytical
thinking,
depth
,
and complexity
.

Boo Hiss Yuck

Not Bad. Not perfect, but not
bad.

Ideal

You were accountable in submitting
your work in the correct manner and
time.

Arrghhh.

Not Bad. Not perfect, but not
bad.

Ideal

Your work includes few (if any)
errors and includes al
l required parts
of portfolio.

Why must I be
subjected to
such drivel??

Not Bad. Not perfect, but not
bad.

Ideal








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Appendix D

AR Presentation Rubric


Criteria

Insufficient

Poor

Mediocre

Appropriate


Exceptional

Quality of Content

Rationale



Presentation provides an
introduction and a compelling
rationale for the study

1

6

7

8

10

Literature



Seems to be relevant and
current to the field. Evidently
considered in the design of the
research project. Summarized in a
concise fashion.

1

9

11

13

1
5

Question



Thoughtful and creative,
breaks new ground, or contributes to
knowledge in a meaningful way.

1

2

3

4

5

Methodology



Appropriate to inform
the stated research questions. Clearly
explained.

1

9

11

13

1
5

Data Analysis



Process clearly
explained. Choice of process
appropriate for extent data and
desired outcomes.

1

6

7

8

10

Findings/Discussion



Student
carefully analyzed the information
collected and drew appropriate
conclusions supported by evidence.

1

9

11

13

1
5

Action Plan



A change to educational
praxis will/can result from this
research and will address the needs of
student, classroom, or school.


1

2

3

4

5





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Mechanics

Technical Issues


Power point runs perfectly with no
technical problems or error messages.

1

2

3

4

5

Presentation Skills



Student was dressed
appropriately, did not read power point slides, spoke
at an appropriate rate and volume, and kept eye
contact with audience.

1

2

3

4

5

Grammar



PPP honors all rules of spelling and or
grammar and no errors in mechanics are evident.

1

2

3

4

5

Design

-

All graphics, video, audio etc.

are used
effectively (if used). Slides are visually pleasing and
not crowded.

1

2

3

4

5

Citing Resources



All sources are properly cited
within the body of the PPP according to APA style.

1

2

3

4

5

Comments:










TOTAL

__________X2
_____
_

EXCEPTIONAL


2
00

APPROPRIATE


170

MEDIOCRE


150

POOR


130

INSUFFICIENT


Below
130








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Appendix E

Speakers’ Series Attendance


I attest to the fact that I am a member of the teacher education faculty, this student was present for the entire
event, and he/she/other seemed engaged in the subject matter.


Print Name ____________________________
___________



Sign Name _______________________________________


I attest to the fact that I was present to hear _____________________
______

(name of presenter) speak about
_________________________________________________ (
main
subject of presentation)
. I

was on time, did
not leave early, and will tell you one thing I learned from this presenter below:







Student Print Name ____________________________________


Student Sign Name ____________________________________






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Appendix F

Philosophy of Education
Rubric


Exceeds Standard

(25

pts)

Target

(20

pts)


Adequate

(16

pt)


Unsatisfactory


(16 & below)

Completeness

Essay addresses
required components

and adds components
that are not required to
really heighten the
experience
.

Essay addresses
required
components.

Essay addresses most
of the required
components.

Essay does not
address required
components.


Philosophical
Support

Philosophical
underpinnings are
clearly articulated

and
well
-
selected to bolster
philosophy in a
particularly strong
fashion
.

Philosophical
underpinnings are
clearly articulated.

Underpinning
s of
philosophy are

articulated
, but need
some clarity
.

Philosophi
cal
underpinnings are
poorly

or not

articulated.

Quality of Writing

Writing is elegant and
contains no mechanical
errors.

W
riting is clear and
contains few mechanical
errors.

Writing is clear but may
contain some mechanical
errors.

Writing may be unclear
and contains many
mechanical errors.

Quality of
Reflection

Essay demonstrates
particularly thoughtful
or insightful
reflection
and insights.

Essay demonstrates
appropriate

reflection
and insights.

Essay demonstrates
limited reflection and
insights.

Essay does not
demonstrate reflection
or insights.