Biometric security devices can be described as those being placed in movies to enact visions of the future. That is they are those devices which can use a variety of biological techniques for authorization such as thumb print scanners, iris or retinal scanners, voice print analyzers, and facial geometry scanning devices that obtain a fairly small number of facial feature size/distance measures for future matching. For example, a person using a thumb print scanner would place their thumb onto an infrared scanner which would identify them individually and grant access to the level in which they are authorized. This can be predetermined by programming into a database

connectionviewAI and Robotics

Nov 17, 2013 (3 years and 9 months ago)

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What are the privacy implications in regards to biometric security devices, face
recognition, voice recognition, and matching databases, which compare biological data
to actual people? Do the benefits outweigh the individual privacy issues?

Biometric security devices can be described as those being placed in movies to
enact visions of the future. That is they are those devices which can use a variety of
biological techniques for authorization such as thumb print scanners, iris or retinal
scan
ners, voice print analyzers, and facial geometry scanning devices that obtain a
fairly small number of facial feature size/distance measures for future matching. For
example, a person using a thumb print scanner would place their thumb onto an
infrared sca
nner which would identify them individually and grant access to the level in
which they are authorized. This can be predetermined by programming into a database
a copy of the thumb print and granting secured access on a privacy network, for
example, to cer
tain files or folders.



The topic that arises with the advancing in the field of biometrics is the concept
of individual privacy. The question becomes then that if a corporation, for example,
places a thumb print or iris scan of an individual on file, ar
e they violating that
individuals right to privacy? An easy way to say you have a fix to this problem is to
require the employer to promise not to release personal files or information. But as we
all very well know, nothing can be that secure when you are
dealing with the digital age
and having these files stored on computerized databases. There is always an underlying
threat. Although, in my personal opinion and I will continue with this for the rest of the
solution, I would contend that biometrics could i
n fact be one of the best ways to
adhere to security policies. One cannot just simply exchange key cards or passwords to
allow access. A thumb print is something that is unique to each individual and it would
all the system administrators and security tech
s to keep an iron fist when dealing with
problems or security issues. For example, say you keep important documents of high
sensitivity and those documents contain personal information that cannot be released to
the general public and should only be access
ible by those of high ranking. Those high
ranking individuals can be added to a database containing fingerprint images, iris scans,
facial features, and so on. You then place an iris scanner as the lock on the door to that
room. If anyone that is not autho
rized to access that room tries to, you will be notified
immediately and they will not be granted access. On the opposite side of this, those
that have clearance can walk up and use the iris scanner and have the door unlocked.
You can then log the time the
y spend in that particular room and monitor activity.



In my personal opinion, biometrics is quickly becoming the new wave in security.
In fact, on a much smaller scale, my personal keyboard to my computer has a
fingerprint scanner built in. I can use my

fingerprint to access certain web pages, such
as angel, with the touch of a finger my password and user name appear and I am
automatically logged into the system. This is also a technique that is used by certain
corporations that are granted military acce
ss. Information truly is secure on an
individual basis. So to answer the question, yes I feel that the benefits of biometrics do
outweigh those of individual privacy concerns.



In researching further into the concept of biometrics, I found that the Unite
d
States government is taking a giant step forward in this field. In fact, they have even
created a Federal Program under the Department of Defense called the Biometrics Task
Force. Looking further into this, I found that the Department of Homeland Securit
y,
Department of the State, and the Department of Commerce have also adopted
programs into the use and research of biometric equipment. In particular i looked into a
program the Department of Homeland Security has created called Real ID. This states
that e
ach state should adopt new standards for drivers' license issuing. The program is
expected to have a deadline of May 2008. It would program each license with a
machine readable strip that would allow certain agencies or companies to pull an entire
file on
an individual with the swipe of a drivers' license. In fact, they are talking about
requiring a Real ID to board any federally
-
inspected commercial airline(steps to prevent
occurrences such as 9/11). It would also require a digital photo and possible other

encryptions. To find more information, you can visit
http://www.biometrics.gov

From
this web page, you can explore several different programs that are currently being
researched and put into u
se.