Management Information Systems - Chipps

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Nov 20, 2013 (3 years and 10 months ago)

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Management Information
Systems

Last Update 2013.09.09

1.1.0

Copyright Kenneth M. Chipps Ph.D. 2013
www.chipps.com

1

What is MIS


What is a MIS


The

Texas A&M Mays Business School
defines it this way on their web site


MIS
-

Management Information Systems is
the study of people, technology, organizations
and the relationships among them


MIS professionals help firms realize maximum
benefit from investment in personnel,
equipment, and business processes

Copyright Kenneth M. Chipps Ph.D. 2013 www.chipps.com

2

What is MIS


Businesses use information systems at all
levels of operation to collect, process and
store data


Management aggregates and disseminates
this data in the form of information needed to
carry out the daily operations of business


Everyone who works in business, from
someone who pays the bills to the person
who makes employment decisions, uses
information systems

Copyright Kenneth M. Chipps Ph.D. 2013 www.chipps.com

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What is MIS


A car dealership could use a computer
database to keep track of which products sell
best


A retail store might use a computer
-
based
information system to sell products over the
Internet


In fact, most businesses concentrate on the
alignment of MIS with business goals to
achieve competitive advantage over other
businesses

Copyright Kenneth M. Chipps Ph.D. 2013 www.chipps.com

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What is MIS


MIS professionals create information systems
for data management


In addition, they manage various information
systems to meet the needs of managers, staff,
and customers

Copyright Kenneth M. Chipps Ph.D. 2013 www.chipps.com

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What is MIS


By working collaboratively with various
members of their work group, as well as with
their customers and clients, MIS professionals
are able to play a key role in areas such as
information security, integration, and
exchange


You will see these same things in the
textbook we will use for this course as well

as the rest of the material

Copyright Kenneth M. Chipps Ph.D. 2013 www.chipps.com

6

Theme

of the Textbook


Toward

this end the authors of the
textbook we are using state that their
approach to the study of MIS is as follows

Copyright Kenneth M. Chipps Ph.D. 2013 www.chipps.com

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Theme of the Textbook


Perhaps the single most important theme
in the book, reflected in case studies and
exercises, is that managers need to
consider the broader organization and
management dimensions of information
systems to understand current problems
as well as to derive substantial above
-
average returns from their information
technology investments

Copyright Kenneth M. Chipps Ph.D. 2013 www.chipps.com

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Theme of the

Textbook


As you will see throughout the text, firms
that can address these related dimensions
of the IT investment are, on average, richly
rewarded

Copyright Kenneth M. Chipps Ph.D. 2013 www.chipps.com

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Approach of the Textbook


The textbook views MIS as

consisting of
four main actors


The technologist such as suppliers of
hardware and software


Business firms making investments and
seeking to obtain value from the technology


Managers and employees seeking to achieve
business value


The legal, social, and cultural contexts

Copyright Kenneth M. Chipps Ph.D. 2013 www.chipps.com

10

Approach

of the Textbook


This constitutes a sociotechnical approach
to the study of MIS


Where the social aspects are just as
important as the technology

Copyright Kenneth M. Chipps Ph.D. 2013 www.chipps.com

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Aspects of MIS


There are three aspects of MIS that must
be addressed when considering

how to
integrate the information systems that are
used to implement a management
information system into a business or
government entity


Organizations


Management


Technology

Copyright Kenneth M. Chipps Ph.D. 2013 www.chipps.com

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Organizations


Organizations have a structure that is
composed of different levels and
specialties


Their structures reveal a clear
-
cut division
of labor


Authority and responsibility in a business
firm are organized as a hierarchy, or a
pyramid structure

Copyright Kenneth M. Chipps Ph.D. 2013 www.chipps.com

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Organizations


The upper levels of the hierarchy consist
of managerial, professional, and technical
employees, whereas the lower levels
consist of operational personnel


Senior management makes long
-
range
strategic decisions about products and
services as well as ensures the financial
performance of the firm

Copyright Kenneth M. Chipps Ph.D. 2013 www.chipps.com

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Organizations


Middle management carries out the
programs and plans of senior
management and operational
management is responsible for monitoring
the daily activities of the business


Knowledge workers, such as engineers
and scientists, design products thereby
creating new knowledge for the firm

Copyright Kenneth M. Chipps Ph.D. 2013 www.chipps.com

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Organizations


Whereas data workers, such as
secretaries or clerks, assist with
scheduling and communications at all
levels of the firm


Production or service workers actually
produce the product and deliver the
service

Copyright Kenneth M. Chipps Ph.D. 2013 www.chipps.com

16

Management


Management’s job is to make sense out of
the situations faced by organizations,
make decisions, and formulate action
plans to solve organizational problems


Managers are supposed to


Perceive business challenges in the
environment


Set the organizational strategy for responding
to those challenges

Copyright Kenneth M. Chipps Ph.D. 2013 www.chipps.com

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Management


Allocate the human and financial resources to
coordinate the work and achieve success


Throughout, they must exercise
responsible leadership


The business information systems
described in this book reflect the hopes,
dreams, and realities of real
-
world
managers

Copyright Kenneth M. Chipps Ph.D. 2013 www.chipps.com

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Technology


Information technology is just a tool for
managers to use


Examples of information technology
include


Computer hardware


Computer software


Network

infrastructure


The web

Copyright Kenneth M. Chipps Ph.D. 2013 www.chipps.com

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Trends in MIS


In the view of the authors there

are three
areas driving change in MIS


These are


Mobile

devices


Software as a Service


Cloud Computing

Copyright Kenneth M. Chipps Ph.D. 2013 www.chipps.com

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Trends in MIS


This table from Laudon and Laudon details

these trends

Copyright Kenneth M. Chipps Ph.D. 2013 www.chipps.com

21

Trends in MIS


Copyright Kenneth M. Chipps Ph.D. 2013 www.chipps.com

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The

Digital Firm


A digital firm can be defined along several
dimensions


A digital firm is one in which nearly all of
the organization’s significant business
relationships with customers, suppliers,
and employees are digitally enabled and
mediated

Copyright Kenneth M. Chipps Ph.D. 2013 www.chipps.com

23

The Digital Firm


Core business processes are
accomplished through digital networks
spanning the entire organization or linking
multiple organizations

Copyright Kenneth M. Chipps Ph.D. 2013 www.chipps.com

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The Digital Firm


Business processes refer to the set of
logically related tasks and behaviors that
organizations develop over time to
produce specific business results and the
unique manner in which these activities
are organized and coordinated

Copyright Kenneth M. Chipps Ph.D. 2013 www.chipps.com

25

The Digital Firm


Developing a new product, generating and
fulfilling an order, creating a marketing
plan, and hiring an employee are
examples of business processes, and the
ways organizations accomplish their
business processes can be a source of
competitive strength

Copyright Kenneth M. Chipps Ph.D. 2013 www.chipps.com

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The Digital Firm


Key corporate assets such as intellectual
property, core competencies, and financial
and human assets are managed through
digital means


In a digital firm, any piece of information
required to support key business decisions
is available at any time and anywhere in
the firm

Copyright Kenneth M. Chipps Ph.D. 2013 www.chipps.com

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The Digital Firm


Time shifting refers to business being
conducted continuously, 24/7, rather than
in narrow work day time bands of 9 A.M. to
5 P.M


Space shifting means that work takes
place in a global workshop, as well as
within national boundaries


Work is accomplished physically wherever
in the world it is best accomplished

Copyright Kenneth M. Chipps Ph.D. 2013 www.chipps.com

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Use of Information Systems


Specifically, business firms invest heavily
in information systems to achieve six
strategic business objectives


Operational excellence


New

product development


Customer and supplier contact


Improved decision making


Competitive advantage


Mere survival

Copyright Kenneth M. Chipps Ph.D. 2013 www.chipps.com

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Operational Excellence


Businesses continuously seek to improve
the efficiency of their operations in order to
achieve higher profitability


Information systems are some of the most
important tools managers us to

achieve
higher levels of efficiency and productivity
in business operations, especially when
coupled with changes in business
practices and management behavior

Copyright Kenneth M. Chipps Ph.D. 2013 www.chipps.com

30

New Product

Development


An example of a new product development
that fundamentally changes the way
business

is done is the move from
physical song delivery to electronic
transfers

Copyright Kenneth M. Chipps Ph.D. 2013 www.chipps.com

31

Contact


Contact refers to understanding and
keeping in touch with

customers

Copyright Kenneth M. Chipps Ph.D. 2013 www.chipps.com

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Decision Making


Decision making requires accurate and
current information on which to base these
decisions

Copyright Kenneth M. Chipps Ph.D. 2013 www.chipps.com

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Competitive Advantage


Doing things better than your competitors,
charging less for superior products, and
responding to customers and suppliers in
real time all add up to higher sales and
higher profits that your competitors cannot
match this

providing a firm with a
competitive advantage

Copyright Kenneth M. Chipps Ph.D. 2013 www.chipps.com

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Survival


Business firms also invest in information
systems and technologies because they
are necessities of doing business


For example,

if Bank of America had not
introduced mobile check deposit I would
have changed banks

Copyright Kenneth M. Chipps Ph.D. 2013 www.chipps.com

35

Sources


Most

of this is copied from


Management Information Systems


12th Edition


Ken Laudon and Jane Laudon

Copyright Kenneth M. Chipps Ph.D. 2013 www.chipps.com

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