Disaster Site Worker Safety

concretecakeUrban and Civil

Nov 29, 2013 (3 years and 6 months ago)

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1

Disaster Site Worker Safety

Module

11


Safe

Work

Practices
:


Material

Handling





Heavy

Equipment





Confined

Space





Demolition

2

Objectives


Describe

precautions

to

take

when

moving

materials

manually

and

mechanically
.


Identify

PPE

that

may

be

used

for

personal

protection

when

moving

materials
.


List

safety

considerations

when

physically

lifting

materials
.


List

indicators

of

unstable

structure

integrity
.


Describe

how

implementation

of

an

Incident

Command

System

can

assist

in

minimizing

exposure

to

structural

collapse

hazards
.


List

some

confined

spaces

that

may

be

created

by

a

disaster

incident
.

3

Introduction


Handling

and

storing

materials

involve

diverse

operations

such

as
:


Hoisting

tons

of

steel

with

a

crane
.


Driving

a

truck

loaded

with

concrete

blocks
.


Carrying

bags

or

materials

manually
.


Stacking

palletized

bricks

or

other

materials

such

as
:


Drums


Barrels


Kegs


Lumber


4

Standing

Orders


Distributed

to

everyone


Posted

at

Command

Post


Posted

at

access

points


Reviewed


5

Example of Standing Orders


Eating,

smoking,

and

drinking

prohibited

within

the

work

zone
.


Lighters

and

matches

are

not

allowed

in

the

work

zone
.


Check

in

at

the

access

entry

point

before

entering

the

work

zone
.


Always

work

with

your

buddy
.

6

Moving, Handling, and Storing Materials


Employees

should

know

and

understand

the

potential

hazards

associated

with

the

task
.


Employees

should

be

aware

of

accidents

that

may

result

from

the

unsafe

or

improper

handling

of

equipment
.


Employers

and

employees

should

examine

their

workplaces

to

detect

any

unsafe

or

unhealthful
:


Conditions
.


Practices
.


Equipment
.


7

Moving, Handling, and Storing Materials


Workers

frequently

cite

the

weight

and

bulkiness

of

objects

that

they

lift

as

major

contributing

factors

to

their

injuries
.


450
,
000

workplace

accidents

result

in

back

injuries,

on

the

average,

annually
.

8

Potential Hazards for Workers


Falling

objects


Improperly

stacked

materials


Various

types

of

equipment


Strains

and

sprains

from

lifting

loads


Fractures

and

bruises

caused

by

being

struck

by

materials

or

by

being

caught

in

pinch

points


Cuts

and

bruises

caused

by

falling

materials

9

Precautions to Take Moving Materials
Manually


Workers

should

attach

handles

or

holders

to

loads


Workers

should

always

wear

appropriate

personal

protective

equipment



Use

proper

lifting

techniques


10

PPE


Hand

and

forearm

protection,

such

as

gloves,

for

loads

with

sharp

or

rough

edges


Eye

protection


Steel
-
toed

safety

shoes

or

boots


Metal,

fiber,

or

plastic

metatarsal

guards

to

protect

the

instep

area

from

impact

or

compression

11

Precautions to Take When Moving Materials
Mechanically


Avoid

overloading

equipment
.



Let

the

weight,

size,

and

shape

of

the

material

being

moved

dictate

the

type

of

equipment

used
.


Make

sure

equipment

is

rated

for

the

weight

of

the

load

being

moved
.

12

Precautions to Take to Avoid Storage
Hazards


Keep

storage

areas

free

from

accumulated

materials
.



Place

stored

materials

(inside

buildings

that

are

under

construction)

at

least

6

feet

from

hoist

ways,

or

inside

floor

openings

and

at

least

10

feet

away

from

exterior

walls
.


Separate non
-
compatible
materials.

13

Safety Measures for Cranes


Equip

all

cranes

that

have

adjustable

booms

with

boom

angle

indicators
.


Provide

cranes

with

telescoping

booms

with

some

means

to

determine

boom

lengths
.



Post

load

rating

charts

in

the

cab

of

cab
-
operated

cranes
.

14

Safety Measures for Cranes


Check

the

load

chart

in

the

cab


Frequently

inspect


Ensure

area

of

travel

is

clear


Never

lift

people

15

Heavy Equipment Safety


Traffic

patterns


Right
-
of
-
way


Equipment

signals



Blind

spots

around

operating

heavy

equipment

16

Heavy Equipment No
-
Zones

Man lift

Mobile hydraulic crane

Rubber tire backhoe

Bulldozer

Front
-
end loader

Bobcat/Skidsteer

High Reach RT forklift

3 Ton forklift

10 Ton forklift

17 Ton forklift

Semi
-
truck and trailer

Refuse truck

HiVac truck

Dump truck

School bus

Street sweeper

Straddle lift truck

Cushman

EL
-
PAR

Check overhead power lines

18

Rigging Equipment Slings


Types

of

slings

covered

are

those

made

from

alloy

steel

chain,

metal

mesh,

natural

or

synthetic

fiber

rope,

and

synthetic

web

Chains

Metal mesh

Synthetics

19

Safe Use of Slings


Remove immediately damaged or defective slings
from service


Do

not

shorten

slings

with

knots

or

bolts

or

other

makeshift

devices


Do

not

kink

sling

legs

Crushing

Kinking

Bird Caging

20

Powered Industrial Trucks


35
,
000

Related

Injuries

a

Year


Inattention


Distraction


Excessive

speed


Poor

driving

habits


Lack

of

training

21

Circumstances of Injury


How

Most

Injuries

Occur


Overloading

causing

turnover


Load

instability

causing

turnover


Obstructions

in

the

path

of

travel

or

lift


Using

forklift

outside

of

design

limitations


Striking

a

pedestrian

22

Safety Issues for All Equipment


Visibility
;

stay

in

line
-
of
-
sight

of

equipment

operators
.


Understand

and

use

correct

hand

signals
.


Identify

area

of

work

operations
.


Know

path

of

equipment

operation
.


Use

hearing

protection

appropriate

to

the

task

around

operating

equipment
.


Use

appropriate

PPE

around

operating

equipment
.


Avoid

being

under

a

boom

when

a

load

is

being

hoisted
.


Be

aware

of

the

swing

radius

of

operating

equipment
.


23

Structure Collapse

24

Introduction


Workers

at

all

stages

of

operation

must

be

familiar

with

the

safety

hazards
.



Effective

operations

at

a

structural

collapse

can

only

be

possible

if

disaster

site

workers

aware

of
:


Hazards

involved
.


Methods

necessary

to

mitigate

the

hazards
.


25

Optimum Level of Safety


The types of risk and hazards to
which they will be exposed


Building construction types and
characteristics


The manner of building collapse


Indicators of compromised
structure integrity


Types of voids and areas of
survivability


Personal protective safety
equipment


Safety hazards that may be
present at disaster sites that
involve CBRNE agents


Safe zones and escape
routes

26

Building Instability


The

risks

include
:


Falling

material

and

flying

objects


Secondary

collapse

of

unstable

structures


Fire

and

explosion


Fall

or

tripping

hazards

from

uneven

surfaces


Exposure

to

smoke,

dust,

and

particulates


Excessive

noise

27

Electrical Hazards


Downed

power

lines


Energized

power

grids


Damaged

connection

boxes


Displaced

power

transformers

and

controls

28

Hazardous Material Exposure


Direct

exposure

from

an

area

that

is

contaminated

during

a

collapse


Indirect

exposure

from

moving

water

or

a

cloud/vapor

plume

moving

through

or

beyond

the

collapsed

area


29

Performing Work While at Risk


Some

of

the

most

dangerous

work

you

will

encounter

is

work

performed

in

a

collapsed

or

unstable

structure
.


You

may

be

exposed

to

hazards

for

which

you

may

have

little

or

no

training
.


Lack

of

experience

will

make

it

impossible

to

recognize

all

of

the

safety

hazards

or

to

know

what

actions

to

take

to

eliminate

the

hazards
.


30

Demolition


Demolition

is

a

highly

specialized

field

requiring

a

wide

range

of

technical

and

engineering

expertise
.


Engineered

demolition

plans

are

required

for

every

project
.



Engineered

shoring

and

bracing

plans

are

required
.


The

complete

demolition

of

buildings

and

other

structures

requires

continuous

inspections
.

31

Demolition/Collapse Differences


Unstable,

partially

collapsed,

or

totally

collapsed

structures


A

different,

extended,

or

unusual

chain

of

command


An

extended

pre
-
job,

or

pre
-
task

orientation

period


Unexpected,

unknown,

undocumented

hazardous

material

32

Demolition/Collapse Differences


Higher

than

normal

PPE

requirements


Blocked

or

unsafe

access

to

work

areas


Unexpected/unknown

holes

or

voids


Debris

created

non
-
standard

confined

spaces

33

Demolition/Collapse Differences


Much

more

frequent

occurrences/conditions

that

create

slip,

trip,

and

fall

hazards


Higher

levels

of

decontamination

generally

required


Environmental/weather

considerations

not

normally

present


Special

considerations

necessary

for

biological

needs

(sanitation,

eating,

drinking,

etc
.
)

34

Demolition/Collapse Differences


Higher

than

normal

levels

of

stress

and

psychological

pressures


Higher

levels

of

urgency

(leading

to

inadvertent/unnoticed

lessening

of

safety/PPE

considerations)


The

need

for

emergency,

or

contingency

plans

for

rescue

of

workers

injured

or

trapped

while

working

post
-
disaster

35

Types of Structure Collapse


V
-
Shaped


Pancake


Lean
-
to


Cantilever


36

V
-
shaped Collapse

37

Pancake Collapse

38

Lean
-
to Collapse

39

Cantilever Collapse

40

Walking

and

Working

Surfaces


Openings


Stairs


Ladders


Scaffolds

41

Overhead and Underground Utilities


Underground


Law

in

most

states

requires

call

before

digging


Overhead


Power

lines

are

the

greatest

above
-
ground

utility

hazard

42

Electrical Accident Prevention


Call

before

you

dig


No

conductive

jewelry


Allow

minimum

clearances

when

working

with

overhead

lines


Qualified



Unqualified

43

Tools


Proper

maintenance


Regular

inspection


Safe

work

practices

44

Energy

Sources


Lockout/Tagout

45

Work Practice Controls


Proper

work

techniques


Employee

training

and

conditioning



Regular

monitoring


Feedback


Adjustment


Modification


Maintenance

46

Lifting Techniques


Size

up

the

load

before

trying

to

lift

it
.


Bend

the

knees
.


Lift

with

your

legs

and

not

your

back
.



Do

not

twist

or

turn

you

body

once

you

have

made

the

lift
.



Make

sure

you

can

carry

the

load

to

where

you

need

to

go

before

attempting

to

move

it
.



Set

the

load

down

properly
.



Always

push,

not

pull,

objects

when

possible


47

Special

Case

Problems


Vacuum

trucks


Elevated

tanks


Compressed

gas

cylinders


Ponds

and

lagoons


Tanks

and

vaults

48

Drum Hazards


Look

for
:


Labels


Drum

type



Deterioration


Bulging


Pressurized


49

Confined Space


Contains

or

has

the

potential

to

contain

a

hazardous

atmosphere


Contains

a

material

that

has

the

potential

for

engulfing

an

entrant


Has

an

internal

configuration

that

might

cause

an

entrant

to

be

trapped


Contains

any

other

recognized

serious

safety

or

health

hazards

50

Confined Space Emergencies


The

employer

must

ensure

that

rescue

service

personnel

are

available

and

trained

in

the

proper

use

of

personal

protective

equipment,

rescue

equipment,

and

trained

to

perform

assigned

rescue

duties
.


Other Disaster Site Considerations

Thank you!


Credits

Chicago

Safety

Institute


HMTRI


NIEHS


The

End

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