Enhancing the Greater Cambridge Biotechnology ... - Insight East

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Dec 3, 2012 (4 years and 10 months ago)

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A Strategic Action Plan for
Enhancing the Greater
Cambridge Biotechnology
Cluster in the East of England





























Summer 2003




2

Contents




1.

Introduction

2.

Background

3.

Why support biotechnology in the region?

4.

ERBI

5.

Locations of grouping
s of biotech companies in the area

6.

The Vision

7.

Drivers and Issues

8.

Six strategic areas for action

9.

The Action Plan


Appendix


1.

ERBI quantitative research

2.

ERBI qualitative research

3.

Consultation process

4.

Infrastructure related issues





3

1. Introduction


The Greate
r Cambridge area within the East of England region is home to the
most developed biotech cluster in Europe. Today there are more than 180
biotech companies, supported by over 250 service providers, with 32
universities/research institutes and 20 internati
onal pharmaceutical
companies in the region alone. ERBI has been active in developing networks
and communications within this community since 1997 and is very keen to
ensure that the community continues to develop and grow.


This strategy document, the fi
rst to be produced for the cluster will assist in
uniting the public and private sectors behind a common vision with clear
actions devised to continue the development of the cluster into the future.





4


2. Background


This strategy and action plan builds on

the quantitative research (see
appendix 1) undertaken by ERBI and the qualitative coherent framework
document research (see appendix 2) which was produced and circulated for
feedback and discussion amongst the public sector and private biotech
community i
n the area (see appendix 3). The actions identified under each
strategic area have been prioritised with suggestions relating to organisations
which may be able to provide the funding. The work on this project has been
co
-
ordinated by ERBI with the assis
tance of Bridgehead Technologies.


The responsibility for implementing this plan lies with a wide range of
predominantly public sector bodies in close co
-
operation with ERBI and
private businesses.


3. Why support biotechnology in the region?


This regio
n has the largest community of biotechnology companies and skilled
service providers in the whole of Europe. It is a real cluster. Over 200 other
regions around the world are using public funds to promote and develop their
region for biotechnology and th
e Greater Cambridge area should not fall
behind for lack of similar support. This region has:




> 180 biotech companies



> 250 specialist service providers with biotech expertise



> 30 research institutes and universities



> 20 multi
-
nationals in pharmaceutic
als, agbio and food



4 leading hospitals involved in research



14 Nobel prize winners in medicine and chemistry since Crick and Watson
(2 in 2002)



Half of the UK’s top 15 LSE quoted biotech companies, 25% of Europe’s
top 50 publicly quoted companies, and 40%

of the US top 10.



29 publicly quoted biotech companies, 17 UK, 8 US, 2 Canadian and 2
European (excluding pharmaceutical companies)



USA quoted biotech companies with a presence in the region include
Amgen, Millennium, Genzyme, and Gilead Sciences



10,000 p
eople employed
directly

related to biotechnology business
together with 3,500 researchers in 350 research groups. 25,000 in total in
relevant academic biotech pharma R&D



The biotech sector breakdown is:



32% develop (bio)pharmaceutical products



23% develop

pharmaceutical services, eg discovery tools, bio
-
informatics, CROs etc



10% supply biotech contract services



8% involved in human healthcare diagnostics



20% involved in other areas





5

4. ERBI


ERBI is an industry led membership organisation started in mid 1
997 after
discussions with a number of individuals from the local biotech community
and government officials. ERBI became a not for profit company limited by
guarantee in April 2000. The company is officially administered by a small
group of directors bu
t a Steering Group representative of the biotech cluster
oversees the direction of the company. This group consists of:




local biotech company Directors, eg Acambis, CAT



international food and pharmaceutical companies, eg GSK, Unilever



research, eg Babrah
am Institute, PBL



professional service providers to the industry, eg Reddie and Grose,
Taylor

Wessing



and other interested organisations such as Invest East of England and
EEDA.


ERBI focuses on the whole of the East of England but the vast majority of the

biotech companies (90%+) fall within the Greater Cambridge Partnership area
and many are located in science and business parks as shown on the map
overleaf.


ERBI’s main activities assist with improved communications and networking
to help companies top a
nd bottom line operations. Other activity areas assist
business training and support is provided through research and active
publicity for the Region. ERBI also keeps a watching brief on local planning
issues and improved education and awareness concerni
ng biotechnology.
Specific activities include:


Improved communications and networking



A quarterly
newsletter

for the bio
-
community



A series of 6
network meetings

per year based on business issues.



An annual
conference

for an international audience of ove
r 400
delegates from 250 organisations to assist business partnering,
collaborations and licensing.



Assisting with
partnering

and technology transfer opportunities by
enhancing existing events and activities



Special Interest Groups, such as
purchasing
and

human resources,
designed to give bottom line operating cost savings for participating
companies whilst increasing the quality of service delivery.



Working closely with other Regional organisations, e.g. Invest East of
England (IEE).



Networking with other
national and international biotech organisations,
e.g. Oxford, Massachusetts, San Diego, Munich, Berlin, etc.



Simple signposting, e.g. to existing grant and investor funding.


Supporting research



A
sourcebook and map

of the bio
-
business community.



A
survey

and report

on bio
-
business trends in the region.



A
database

of the bio
-
science research community available on the
website.



Visits

to regional biotech businesses to listen to their needs and
requirements.






6

Publicity



A website,
www.erbi.co.uk



Presentations at conferences and attendance at exhibitions.



Talks and presentations to companies and organisations outside the
Region.



Articles on ERBI, the Region and its companies in the public media.





7

5.

Locations of groupings
of biotech companies in the area


Although biotech companies are located throughout the area, a number of
groupings occur:






Key:


Blue


University sites

Green


Established Science/business parks and incubators

Red


New Busine
ss Parks






8

6. The Vision


ERBI’s aims are to enhance the growth and development of biotechnology in
Cambridge and the East of England, thereby asserting the region as a world
-
renowned centre of excellence. ERBI will achieve this through promoting
local,
national and international networking; supporting successful growth of
new and emerging ventures; and ensuring the future infrastructure of the
region allows seamless growth of the bioscience community. In short this is
the health, wealth and growth of bi
otech companies in the region.


7. Drivers and Issues


Key drivers for the growth of biotech in the region revolve around the
established cluster and the benefits which it offers, ie:


-

People



Fluidity of employment



Quality of staff



Collegiality and netwo
rking opportunities



Availability of appropriate advisors



Availability of entrepreneurial people with a track record


-

Finance



Good links into appropriate sources of finance and entrepreneurial
people with a track record


-

Technology



Access to leading ed
ge technology from a range of academic and
commercial sources


-

Infrastructure



Availability of appropriate accommodation



Good access into Europe via Stansted and to London



Availability of appropriate, ready made facilities/people for certain types
of comp
any e.g. chemistry companies taking redundant chemistry
buildings as big pharma retrench.


-

Other



Availability of potential acquisition targets



Availability of potential customers for service companies in the sector


Nevertheless, there are also constrai
nts or issues described by the
interviewees. These include:


-

Finance



Limited access to sources of funding, despite the good links already
established



Problems with finance generally in the biotechnology sector





9

-

People



Despite the access to good peopl
e this can still be limiting; staff with
commercial management skills and staff with certain technical skills eg,
medicinal chemistry


-

Other



Animal rights activism



Public opinion regarding biotechnology



Losing local companies when they are acquired by ex
ternal
companies; resulting in credibility issues as public companies locate
headquarters elsewhere


-

Infrastructure



Infrastructure issues particularly transport



Planning hurdles



High cost of premises



House prices



Travel time to Heathrow/ range of flight
destinations from Stansted,
especially with the importance of the US market and developing Asian
markets



Lack of low cost, short lease incubator space, a specific problem for
the biotechnology sector



Limited conference facilities


Other more general constr
aints include those based on the general
environment within the biotech industry which cannot be addressed by
regional public spending.





10

8. Six strategic areas for action


In order to assist the drivers and minimise the constraints 6 strategic areas
have
been recommended for actions.


1.

Promote the Cambridge brand.
This should be seen as a high priority
for action by both the public and private sectors since a successful
Cambridge brand would help the whole East of England, expanding the
cluster throughout
the region. Integrating all the activities of the various
groups and bodies involved in the promotion of Cambridge brand and
development of Cambridge biotech cluster resources would appear
essential for success.


2.

Provide financial incentives.
This should

also be viewed as a high
priority, since lack of funding is perceived by many as the major issue in
the sector at the moment. It is important that public sector investment is
not perceived as soft money; that the public and private sectors are seen
to wo
rk together to identify the type of funding which would be most
beneficial and to consider how this would be best administered. In
particular discussions identified that financial help needs to be directed at
start up companies (see next action).


3.

Help st
art up biotechnology companies.
Again this should be seen as
a high priority area since many felt that the Cambridge model of working
as the creative innovation engine for biotechnology invention may be the
best one for the region. Many interviewees felt

that you cannot deliver
successful mature biotechnology companies unless you promote the start
up companies going in at the bottom


you have to promote the process.


4.

Facilitate inter company interactions.
Many Cambridge biotechnology
companies have alre
ady benefited from interaction with major
pharmaceutical companies, who themselves see biotech companies as a
source of innovation. Pharmaceutical companies also provide
management expertise as a result of merger and acquisition activity. The
potential f
or more formal networking opportunities to supplement the
informal networking already taking place was highlighted in several
discussions. In addition, there was a feeling
that more mature biotech
companies should be encouraged to partner and provide spac
e to
innovative start
-
ups.


5.

Skills development.
The lack of people with the right managerial and
technical skills is seen as a constraint common to the biotechnology sector
within the UK, rather than a specific regional factor. The greater
Cambridge regi
on is in a better position than other parts of the UK and it is
able to build on the pool of management expertise from big pharma and
the pool of management expertise already within the region.


6.

Influence the public opinion of biotechnology.
If done care
fully, with a
long term objective, this could go a long way toward improving the public
perception of biotechnology and smooth the planning application process.



11

It can also be seen as one of the activities, incorporated into the
development of the Cambrid
ge biotechnology brand.


A healthy and thriving community will always put pressure on the
infrastructure and any development will need significant public sector
investment. Investment in infrastructure is outside the scope of this plan but it
is important

that the biotechnology community supports any moves to improve
the infrastructure in the region. ERBI could act as an effective route to
channelling biotechnology opinion to the relevant bodies in support of such
improvements. Certain areas have been hig
hlighted (see Appendix 4) and
they are seen as key to future expansion and maturation of the cluster. As
such they should receive particular support and, where appropriate,
representations to the relevant planning bodies.


9. The Action Plan


ERBI’s role
is one of facilitation and enabling companies to meet other
organisations (be it industrial or academic) whilst also ensuring the profile of
the region is seen as a leading light within the global biotech sector. ERBI
cannot undertake all of these actions

but it can help to manage, direct and
advise others.


A range of discussions and negotiations will now take place relating to funding
the action plan and involving organisations including ERBI, East of England
Development Agency, Invest East of England, t
he Learning and Skills
Councils and the Local Economic Partnerships.. It is important that
organisations with an intimate relationship with the private biotech sector are
chosen to undertake the recommended actions.






12




Strategic Action 1


Promote the Ca
mbridge biotechnology brand


Project

Timescale
(S/M/L)*

Cost estimate

Lead organisation

Potential source of
funding

Comments


1.

Set up biotech office in Silicon
Valley


2.

Further develop database of
expertise in the region, to include
companies involved in n
on
-
core
biotechnology areas such as
engineering design as well as
service areas


3.

Develop Cambridge Regional
Biotech Cluster brochure


4.

Build and publicise the pool of
expertise available, e.g. clinical
development


5.

Develop an expertise
-
based task
force to a
ssist with inward
investment, comprising people with
in depth knowledge of specific
areas within biotechnology, who
are empowered to sell Cambridge
as an area for investment



S


see
comment


S







M



M




M



See comment



£10,000 plus
graduate






£
20,000



£15,000




£25,000


Invest East of
England/EEDA/ERBI


ERBI/Business School







ERBI



ERBI/Private Sector




Invest East of England


See comment



GCP







ERBI/GCP/EEDA/DTI



EEDA/GCP




Invest East of
England/EEDA


Investigate if could be lin
ked or
part of existing office


Investigate potential for mapping
exercise using business school
graduates





Potential to be part of ‘Harnessing
Genomics’


Linked to all of above




Discussions to be undertaken with
Invest East of England



* S = short,

typically less than 1 year


M = Medium, typically up to 2 years


L = Long, typically over 2 years




13



Strategic Action 2


Develop the provision of financial incentives


Project

Timescale
(S/M/L)

Cost estimate

Lead organisation

Potential source of
fundi
ng

Comments


1.

Improve communication regarding
access to public and private sector
funding which is already available


2.

Provide funds in competition, e.g.
business plan competitions for
start ups and for more mature
companies









3.

Develop regionally based

“pre
-
seed/seed/proof of principle
funding” valued at around £200k


£300k


4.

Develop public sector funded VC
style fund aimed specifically at
biotechnology companies


5.

Provide tax breaks and other
incentives to encourage mature
biotech companies to set up an
d/or
grow activities in the region


6.

Extend schemes such as research
and development tax credits
(national)


S




S/M












M





M/L




M/L





M/L





£10,000




£500k
-
£1million












£200,000
-

£300,000




£1
-
£2 million




-





-


ERBI




ERBI
/Private companies












EEDA/ERBI/Private
companies




EEDA/Private companies




EEDA/ERBI/Chamber of
Commerce/GCP




EEDA/ERBI/Chamber of
Commerce/GCP


EEDA/DTI/GCP




EEDA/DTI/Smart












EEDA/DTI





EEDA/Local VCs




-





-


Part of Harness
ing Genomics




Needs further discussions with EEDA
and managers of regional SMART
awards to be developed in conjunction
with Harnessing Genomics funding.
The cost of this activity will be totally
dependent on the size of the prizes
from the competition.

Closely linked
with other activities highlighted as
Harnessing Genomics. Also ensure
this links with Cambridge University
Entrepreneur scheme and Babraham’s
Bioconcept hub

Totally linked to above and funding
would be an expected annual amount.




Could b
e part of current EEDA fund
(capital being raised)



Lobbying of central and local
government




Lobbying of central government






14



Strategic Action 3


Provide help for start up biotechnology companies


Project

Timescale
(S/M/L)

Cost estimate

Lead organ
isation

Potential source of
funding

Comments


1.

Provide incubator space to the
south of the region to serve spin
outs from London, in
collaboration with London
academic institutes


2.

Create links with other parts of
the UK


virtual clusters


3.

Encourage and im
prove
Mentoring/Networking, especially
for very early stage ideas
developed by virtual linking of
business angels, serial
entrepreneurs and people with
very early stage ideas. Such
networking and information
transfer could be carried out via a
website


4.

Pr
ovide better assistance and
information on approaching
potential collaborator companies
e.g. big pharma


5.

Provide wet lab incubator space


i.e. low cost, short lease





6.

Develop a major integrated
centre, e.g. based on Karolinska
Novum Centre model


S






S



S/M











M





M/L






M/L


Unknown






£10,000



£500k











£20,000





Unknown






Unknown




EEDA /Private companies/ERBI






ERBI



ERBI











ERBI





EEDA






Universities/Institutes/Wellcome
Trust


Public/Private






EEDA



EEDA/DTI











ERBI/EEDA





EEDA






Public/Private


Discuss key sites with
Developers e.g. Churchmanor
Estates at Chesterford Park.
Now could also discuss with
Millennium and Granta Park





Use of Harnessing genomics


totally linked to 2.1
-
2.3 on

previous table









Will enhance activities which
have already been initiated




Undertake feasibility study of
potential sites within Greater
Cambridge area (e.g. at
Chatteris


also see point 1
above)


Consider developments at the
University of Cambr
idge,
Babraham and Wellcome Trust
campuses





15



Strategic Action 4

Facilitate inter
-
company interactions


Project

Timescale
(S/M/L)

Cost estimate

Lead organisation

Potential source of
funding

Comments


1.

Partnering event/conference and
other formal network
ing where
relevant biotech companies and
academies are encouraged to
interact effectively with the right
people within big pharma


2.

Develop a group which can rapidly
deliver the relevant information to
companies looking to acquire or
merge with companies in

the
region


the rapid reaction force


3.

Encourage mature companies to
partner with and provide space for
start
-
ups


4.

Operate a pilot scheme for testing
mechanisms for accessing new
approaches/technologies globally


5.

Hold larger conferences
encouraging big ph
arma and the
medical community to come to the
Greater Cambridge area and to
network



S







S/M






M




M/L




M/L



£15,000







Unknown






Unknown/low




£30,000




Unknown


ERBI







ERBI






ERBI




ERBI




EEDA/GCP/ERBI


EEDA/ERBI/CE/CMI







-






-




EEDA/DTI




EEDA/Private



Work with Cambridge Enterprise
to link in to academics (and
CGKP to also access research
clinicians)




Could also link to strategic action
1, project 4 and 5





Enhance current activity and link
to action 3, proje
ct 3







Need for a larger facility, eg of a
standard as at Hinxton Wellcome
Trust but at least twice the
capacity. Facility would need to
be justified as required by other
market sectors and industries






16



Strategic Action 5


Encourage skills develop
ment


Project

Timescale
(S/M/L)

Cost estimate

Lead organisation

Potential source of
funding

Comments


1.

Develop technical skills e.g.
technical courses such as those
run at West Suffolk College


2.

Develop management training, e.g.
encourage links between
aca
demia and biotechnology
companies. One example might
be a scheme encouraging
placement within companies in the
region of MBA students


3.

Develop training courses
specifically aimed at the needs of
the local biotechnology community



S




S/M








S/M


N/a




Negotiable








£10,000
-
£20,000
per course


LSC/BL




ERBI/Judge
Institute/Cranfield







ERBI


LSC/ESF




DTI/CMI/EEDA








LSC//ESF/EEDA


Currently being developed by
ESF/BL project



Investigate opportunities with
Judge Institute, Cambridge Min
ds
projects, Cranfield etc






Enhance activity currently
undertaken by ERBI






17



Strategic Action 6


Influence the public opinion of biotechnology


Project

Timescale
(S/M/L)

Cost estimate

Lead organisation

Potential source of
funding

Comments


1.

Hold pu
blic meetings in Greater
Cambridge



2.

Fit
-
out a biotech road bus for
school and other public visits



3.

Foster high scientific literacy in
local schools


4.

Explore the possibility of building a
biotechnology museum in
Cambridge and building a
biotechnology ele
ment into existing
and planned museum displays in
Greater Cambridge



M




M




M



M/L


£20,000
-
£30,000




£1.5 million




Unknown



Unknown


ERBI




ERBI




LSC



GCP/ERBI


EEDA




EU/
DfE/DTI/EEDA/private



LSC/DFE



GCP/Private Sector


Significant wor
k to develop
content and to pay for the right
people to speak.


Expect 50% to be funded privately
and this cost would cover a 3 year
timescale


Need to work closely with industry
to ensure correct content


A potential element of this has
been an interestin
g suggestion;
eg the construction an extremely
large ‘helix’ structure/sculpture at
the junction of the M11 and A11
with a logo stating


you are now
entering gene country







18

Appendix 1


ERBI quantitative research


Independent of this report, ERBI has un
dertaken a number of questionnaires
with the businesses in the biotech cluster. This information has been used in
the creation of this Action Plan.


The responses include:



Figure
1

Assessment of services within the Cambridge reg
ion


% of Companies rating each service as "Good"
0
10
20
30
40
50
60
70
k) Export services
n) Rail/public transport
h) Business training for staff
g) Technical training for staff
m) Road transport
b) Support in Man. Dev.
o) Tech transfer / grant/fund advice
p) Information Services
e) Property agents
l) General business advice
f) Recruitment agents
j) IT services
d) IPR advice
i) Design & marketing services
a) Financial advice
c) Legal advice




19


Figure
2

Base data for assessment of services

0
10
20
30
40
50
60
70
80
90
100
Design and marketing services
Information Services
Rail/public transport
Legal advice
IT services
IPR advice
Management development
General business advice
Technology transfer/funding advice
Financial advice
Recruitment agents
Property agents
Technical training for staff
Business training for staff
Road transport
Poor
Excellent



Responses


Poor

Excellent

Design and marketing services

18

64

Information Services

0

60

Rail/public transport

41

59

Legal advice

5

48

IT ser
vices

31

46

IPR advice

18

45

Management development

14

43

General business advice

14

43

Technology transfer/funding advice

14

43

Financial advice

16

42

Recruitment agents

30

26

Property agents

24

24

Technical training for staff

86

14

Business trai
ning for staff

89

11

Road transport

38

8






20

Figure
3

Assessment of constraints on development of the cluster




Note figures on bottom is '3 and 4 responses' expressed as a percentage

3 and 4 responses
represent assessment of this factor as an important/critical
constraint



0
5
10
15
20
25
30
35
40
45
50
Poor training available
Cost of training available
Complex local reg. & planning proceedures
Lack of networking opportunities
Poor quality grads/scientists
Difficulty in recruiting lab technicians
Inadequate avail. of labs/special prem
Poor public transport
Difficulty in recruiting senior execs
Poor road infrastructure
High Rent
Difficulty in recruiting grads/scientists
Regulatory delays in prod/tech dev. for market
Competition
Limited access to sources of funding




21

Figure
4

Base data for assessment of constraints

0
10
20
30
40
50
60
70
Difficult grad recruitment
Limited funding
Difficult exec recruitment
Product regulatory delays
Competition
High lab rental costs
Bad road structure
Poor public transport
Poor graduates
Lab availability
Difficult technician recruitment
Training costs
Lack of networking opportunities
Limited training available
Complex regulatory procedures
Unimportant
Important/Critical



Responses


Unimportant

Important/Critical

Difficult grad recruitment

31

56

Limited funding

36

46

Di
fficult exec recruitment

27

42

Product regulatory delays

36

42

Competition

29

40

High lab rental costs

47

34

Bad road structure

43

29

Poor public transport

39

28

Poor graduates

41

26

Lab availability

48

24

Difficult technician recruitment

65

23

Tr
aining costs

50

16

Lack of networking opportunities

47

16

Limited training available

53

13

Complex regulatory procedures

64

12






22

Appendix 2


ERBI qualitative research


With funding from EEDA/GCP ERBI produced “Enhancing the Greater
Cambridge biotechno
logy in the East of England” framework document. This
is a quantitative study of the views, ideas and aspirations of biotech
businesses, support organisations and public sector bodies. The report is
available from ERBI and on the ERBI website
www.erbi.co.uk


The information from this framework document and the consultation process
(see appendix 3) has been used in the creation of this Action Plan.





23

Appendix 3


Consultation Process


Following the publication of the f
ramework document (see appendix 3) a wide
ranging consultation programme was undertaken, incorporating a specific
launch event and presentations to or discussions with:




DTi



EEDA



ERBI Board



ERBI Steering Group



ERBI International Conference



ERBI Members



Gre
ater Cambridge Partnership Operating and Partnership Boards



Local Government Chief Executives’



MPs’



Technopole Group


Consultation remains an ongoing process and we are keen to hear your views
in the future.






24

Appendix 4


Infrastructure Related Issues



A

healthy and thriving community will always put pressure on the
infrastructure and any development will need significant public sector
investment. It is important that the biotechnology community supports any
moves to improve the infrastructure in the reg
ion. ERBI could act as an
effective route to channelling biotechnology opinion to the relevant bodies in
support of such improvements. Certain areas, highlighted below are seen as
key to future expansion and maturation of the cluster and as such should
re
ceive particular support and, where appropriate, representations to the
relevant planning bodies.


It is clear that in the UK, Cambridge is one of a number of sites where you
don’t have to pay people to go; they actually want to go. If this means that
Cam
bridge is designated as a place where there has to be more houses and
roads, in order to sustain economic growth, then this should influence local
planning decisions.

Michael Morgan, former Chief Executive, The Wellcome Trust Genome
Campus, Hinxton


Millen
nium came to Cambridge as a result of acquisition of Cambridge
Discovery Chemistry, which began in Cambridge because of strong links with
the Chemistry and Biochemistry departments at the University. All the
company’s European R&D will be based at Granta P
ark for the next few
years. It is likely that more commercial and clinical activities will eventually be
centred around London or the M4 corridor, mainly owing to availability of
people with those types of experience. There are other arguments for
wantin
g to co
-
locate commercial and R&D in Cambridge. If Stansted operated
transatlantic flights this could shift the balance towards Cambridge.

Laurence Reid, Millennium

Transport

The Greater Cambridge region can act as an even more effective community
by impr
oving access and communications internationally, nationally and
regionally between the university, the centre of Cambridge, Addenbrookes
and the various science parks and incubators. Suggested activities could
include:




Provision of support for widening o
f the A14 and M11



Provision of improved public transport



Development of a Cambridge ring road (eg M11, A14, A11)



Development of Stansted to service business needs with flights to
more European, North American and Far East business destinations



Development
of an out of town parkway station with rapid rail link to
London



Provision of specific rail car park at Stansted at non
-
airport rates


You almost have the ideal ring road around Cambridge in the form of the
triangle created by the M11, the A11 and the A14,

all of which are minimum




25

dual carriageway. But it doesn’t operate as a ring road


you can’t join the
A14 (Westbound) from the A11 (Northbound) for instance. This could be such
an easy solution to a number of transport problems, diverting a significant
amount of traffic off the A14, for a relatively small investment.

Nigel Pitchford, 3i

Housing

To solve the problem of technical staff moving here from regions with lower
housing costs and also of partners perhaps in lower paid professions such as
nursing o
r teaching not being able to afford to move to the area, provision of
affordable housing, perhaps low interest loans was suggested. This would
need to include provision for key lower paid workers in the biotechnology
sector

Development of large conference

centre/hotel facility

Several discussions identified building a large conference centre as offering
the potential to further attract the medical community/large pharma to the
region. It would provide facilities for larger medical and big pharma
conferenc
es and improve the facilities of the region which are not seen as
adequate for some of the larger companies. The location of such a centre
would need careful consideration due to the infrastructure requirements which
it would present. There is a need for

market research to assess the demand
and to investigate the potential lead organisations for developing this
conference centre

Encourage manufacturing in the region

This was an area of disagreement with the public sector tending to feel that
manufacturing

in the region would promote further development within the
cluster. In contrast the private sector felt that biotechnology manufacturing
per se was not appropriate for the region. Manufacturing will tend to be
outsourced initially to the most appropriat
e company with the relevant
technology and, as the biotech industry matures, to the lowest cost producer.
Decisions regarding manufacturing are very much driven by cost and as
space costs are relatively high in close proximity to Cambridge, there is a
nee
d to promote lower cost areas in the wider sub region, thus extending the
cluster outwards into the East of England region.


There was some support for consideration of a small scale GMP (Good
Manufacturing Practice) production facility for development of
clinical trial
material, locating such a facility in the wider East of England region rather
than Cambridge itself.


There is a real need, however, and a clear business opportunity, for a small
scale GMP production facility for the manufacture of clinical
trial material, to
support companies in the Cambridge region. This could be realised as either
a stand alone business or through a consortium. The region needs this
resource, together with expertise in down
-
stream processing.

Enda Gribbon, Celltech






26

Promo
te the wider East of England

Promoting the development of the biotechnology cluster in association with
local economic partnerships and along corridors such as the Oxford
Cambridge Arc and the Cambridge Ipswich high tech corridor would require
investment i
n infrastructure to optimise communications between various
parts of the cluster.





27




This project has been has been undertaken and part funded by ERBI Ltd with
the support of Bridgehead Technologies who undertook the interviews and
analysis.


The project
has been sponsored by the GCP (Greater Cambridge
Partnership) and EEDA (East of England Development Agency).


The work reported herein was carried out with the financial assistance of
EEDA and the GCP. Any views expressed are not necessarily those of EEDA

or the GCP.