Smart Manufacturing is - Digital 2013

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Oct 19, 2013 (4 years and 24 days ago)

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TITLE


“Smart” businesses use Smart Manufacturing


DATE


4
th

June 2013






OUR DOCUMENT REFERENCE




20130604/WG/Digital_2013/Smart_Mfr.ppt

PRESENTERS




Dr. Craig Livingstone, Director, AP
Benson Limited



Manufacturing Success

Manufacturing is no longer
important in developed
economies

c.£150bn GVA


80%+ of exports



12% of UK economy, 8.3% of workforce


Overseas manufacturing costs are increasing

Managing extended supply chains is not easy

“Real” manufacturing has
moved off shore to lower cost
-
base centres

Britain & Wales can survive as
innovators and entrepreneurs
and manufacturing can be
outsourced

Overseas centres are developing capable innovation and
design centres

Manufacturing in the West

British manufacturers can compete

British manufacturers
can

compete


Wales has important players in the
aerospace
, the
automotive

and the
optoelectronics sector
supply chains and a well established
process engineering
sector

BUT:

We
cannot

rely on outdated aged plant and machinery...

...and we
cannot

rely on cheap labour and cheap parts...

...and we
do

need to invest in competitiveness with world class manufacturing and
business management systems.

We need to
compete

in a worldwide open and rapidly developing market.


Failure

Success


What is Smart Manufacturing?

A future vision

…the integration of data…



Smart Manufacturing is:





…with process expertise…



…to enable “evidence based” management…



…of manufacturing.


Smart Connections

Your Smart Factory

Business Systems

Customers

Distribution
Centres

Suppliers

The Smart Grid

Other Network Partners

OEM

Demand

Mass customisation

Traceable

Recyclable / remanufactured

Real time information
flows

Reporting on
availability, traceability

& movement of
products

Optimise resource and energy use vs. production

Optimise production and minimise cost

Close links into supply
chain/networks

Optimise production
performance

Create agile networks able to respond to

Rapid demand changes


Higher product availability & lower
inventories

Pedigree


Smart Manufacturing Leadership Coalition


USA
-
based lobbying group



Developed from National Science Foundation grant in 2008


to support US industry competitiveness


to address off
-
shoring


But challenged by ability to apply same techniques globally



However off
-
shoring is a weakening trend due to:


Education & Cost


Equalising (everyone is “lean”)


Logistics


Long supply chains are more risky



Resulting in a
more level but
highly competitive

playing field




Our Assessment


Sold with a certain amount of hype



The promise is big but the message is confusing



Incorporates other IT ideas like “big data”



Timescales up to 2020 in US plans

A lot of future promise but...


...
there are practical steps that can be taken by British businesses today...


...
to ensure we are ready to join in as smart develops.

Operating
Efficiency

Energy Efficiency

+20%

+25%

New Product and
Services Sales

Moves into
“Adjacent”
Industries

+25%

+25%

Costs

Cycle Times

-
30%

-
40%

Safety Incidents

Water Use

-
25%

-
40%


Supply chain wide tracking and traceability of products in production


Increases in skills and job sustainability


Cradle to grave (to cradle) product lifecycle maps


Double SME Capacity

USA Ambition/Goals

Phases

1. Plant and
enterprise wide
integration


2. Development of flexible
manufacturing based on:


analysis of customer demand


factory planning


performance data and options
modelling

3. Process innovation
led by greater
analysis, innovation
& identification of
market disrupting
opportunities

Predicted: the $3000 car and the $300 PC



Barriers:


incorporating and integrating customer intelligence and demand dynamics...


the need for greater
affordability
...


operator usability...


protection of proprietary [company] data...


systems interoperability...


and security.

Enablers:


In
-
house integration of business and manufacturing systems



Smart tooling and factory floor systems (CNC/PLC, AIDC)


Real time reporting and analysis: Business Information Management


Smart resource metering / “the smart grid”


Adding sensors and data gathering points (Raspberry Pi and Gadgeteer etc.)


Dynamic modelling of supply chains/networks, dynamic planning and scheduling
across SME/OEM supply chain networks


Secure data exchange

Barriers and Enablers

Ability to
meet customer data demands
(openness, visibility, traceability)

Ability to
model and optimise processes
in company and across supply chains / networks

(including resource use and energy use management)

Improved use of
automated monitoring

(reduce abnormal and catastrophic events)

Ability to
improve competitiveness
through efficiency, optimisation and agility

Ability to participate in
smart supply chain networks

Manage through dashboard performance tools


real time reporting of key

performance indicators
, dynamic monitoring, dynamic visualization of

critical data, like a car dashboard (including energy & resource management)

Ability to
anticipate and schedule maintenance

(“improved asset management”)

Ability to
improve safety
monitoring and performance

Outcomes

Smart manufacturing: Flavours


“Flavours” of smart for...



...Batch...


...Continuous...


...Discrete...



...manufacturing processes



Priority Actions in Smart

Understanding business processes and opportunities for optimisation at the

supply chain / network level (better tools needed?)

Integration of human factors and decisions into models

Integrate energy/resource efficiency decision tools

Community

platforms



integrate supply

chains and create

agile “virtual

plants” able to

respond to

changes in

customer

demand

Develop,

improve and

implement

software and

computing

architectures

for manufacturing

decision
-
making

Integrate human

factors and

decision points

Extend

integrated

business

management

systems to

manage energy

and resource

use/costs

Action 1:Modelling and simulation

Develop supply chain connections

(protocols and interfaces, communications standards)


Develop robust data collection frameworks

(sensors/fusion, machine and user interfaces,

data recording and reporting and analysis tools)


Action 2: Affordable collection and
management systems

Action 4: Education and training


Optimisation through reporting and response (dashboard reports, metrics,

common data architecture and language)

Develop methods to integrate SMEs and OEMs

Integrate partner process models

(
Business Systems, Manufacturing Plants, and Suppliers
)

Enhance education and training to build workforces
Fit for Smart

Action 3: Enterprise
-
wide Integration


Practical Steps Towards Smart

Step 1

Integrate information

technology, sensors,

motors/actuators,

computerized controls,

production management

/ ERP

Work towards an

integrated business

management system

Process, cost, efficiency


visibility


real time

reporting

Develop towards

“manufacturing

intelligence”


Do this first within your own company


Be ready to do it across your supply chain


network



Lower cost options are becoming more available


Step 2




BE ABLE TO:



Put together, analyse and present business and manufacturing


performance data in real time


Change plans to optimise production and resource use


Respond to changes in demand


Model business processes and supply chains to assist in


optimisation




BE READY TO:


Connect with supply chain


partners and potential new


partners

WORK TO OPTIMISE:


Costs, efficiencies, energy


conservation etc.

Step 3

Some processes have more opportunity for flexibility / optimisation

than others


high tech manufacturing vs. every day process engineering

manufacturing.

Consider integration with emerging cost management options


scheduling

vs. the “smart grid”


make things when energy costs less

(USA DoE Project)

Manage for process

efficiency

Manage product

mass
-
customisation

Improve product

tracking and

traceability

Benefits


Integration of systems and data:


...leads to more profound analysis...


...and the elimination of wastes...


...promotion of flexible and efficient processes...


...and to innovative and “disruptive” products



Plant wide integration / Integrated business systems



Demand Driven supply Chains



Sustainable Production



Ability to participate in smart supply chains



Development of a smart workforce



Case Studies

Moving in the Right Direction












Integrating manufacturing management systems

and ERP






Invertek











Integrating high end machine tools,

manufacturing planning

and ERP





FSG Tool and Die











Supply chain integration and traceability





Texturing Technology and TATA


Service and professional services businesses


E.g. HCD and Contract Services






Relevance to non
-
manufacturers


Next Steps


Key goal: lowering cost of entry

“Community Sourcing”

Development of:

“Smart” pilots and demonstration sites

National centres of excellence

Develop, improve and implement real time visualisation and simulation

tools (real time planning, tracking / traceability


materials and products)



Collaborative Development

Develop
consortia

to develop integrated supply chains / networks
-

Goals:

Test and develop methods for efficient flexible manufacturing

Develop smaller, incremental projects
-

Each stage should develop something that delivers

ROI and practical benefits in return for a small incremental project

Develop a road map

made up of small projects


Maybe a multi
-
year programme but delivered in increments

with in
-
year benefits

Map proposed actions to practical benefits for participants

The roadmap needs to accommodate the ability of participants to devote time to projects

Practical projects involving consortia of industry players are preferable to academic or

government led projects, but academia and government may have roles

Open to participants at equitable investment levels (inc. SMEs)

Work out how IPR will be owned

Sources of Knowledge

Welsh

Government

E
-
Business

Programme

Private

sector

suppliers

and

consultants

WRAP


Cymru



Resource

Efficiency

support

Events,

Industry

Associations,

Universities

Business

colleagues

and partners

The High Value Manufacturing Catapult


Advanced Manufacturing Research Centre (University of Sheffield), Sheffield


Nuclear Advanced Manufacturing Research Centre (Universities of Manchester and Sheffield)


Manufacturing Technology Centre, Coventry


Advanced Forming Research Centre (University of Strathclyde), Glasgow


National Composites Centre (University of Bristol), Bristol


Centre for Process Innovation, Wilton and Sedgefield


Warwick Manufacturing Group (University of Warwick), Coventry

Publications (including online):


SMLC: “Implementing 21st Century Smart Manufacturing” June 24,2011


US Academic/Industrial forum


focus: lobbying


Thank you!


Questions / Discussion